Vol. 50, No.

8 The Council of State Governments September 2007
statenews
Also
States Warm Up
to Climate Change
Tol Felows 2007
Boot Camp for Leaders
2 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
9 CSG’s Annual State Trends and
Leadership Forum—
Oklahoma City, OK
General information and registration for CSG’s
Annual Meeting coming up Nov. 11–14, 2007
14 Boot Camp for Leaders—
2007 Toll Fellowship Program
Biographies and fun facts for this year’s Toll Fellows
29 Not Too Hot to Handle
States Warm Up to Actions on Climate Change
3v Looz |ve·s
29
32 Lessons Taken to Heart
Utah Legislator Credits Healthy States Policy
Meeting for Lifestyle Changes
3v T|¬ \e|ooo

34 Research Fuels Economy
EPSCoR Helps Stir Economic Development
In Nebraska
3v |. |·eo C|oob|oe| aoo |ete |ots|ooo|os
statenews
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Executive Committee
President
Cov. 3·ao ¬eo·v. C'|a|o¬a
President-Elect
Cov. |. |oo| |e||. Coooect|cot
Vice President
Cov. |oe |aoc||o. |||. \est V|·z|o|a
Chair
|eo. Lebo·a| ¬oosoo. Le|a.a·e

Chair-Elect
|eo. ||¬ |oooe|¬ao. |o·t| La'ota

Vice Chair
Seo. 3a·t Lav|s. |oa|o
2007 executive committee
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STATE NEWS, 1549-3628, September 2007, Vol. 50, No.
8— Published monthly with combined issues in June/July
and Nov. /Dec. by The Council of State Governments,
2760 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511-8410.
Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily
refect the policies of The Council of State Governments
nor the views of the editorial staff. Readers’ comments are
welcome. Subscription rates— In the U.S., $55 per year.
Single issues are available at $6 per copy. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to State News, Sales Department,
P.O. Box 11910, Lexington, KY 40578-1910.
Advertising—Black and white, two-color and full-color ad-
vertising available. For complete circulation and advertising
information, contact the advertising department at (800)
800-1910. Mailing lists are available for rent upon approval
of a sample mailing.
Copyright 2007 by The Council of State Governments.
Periodicals postage paid at Lexington, Ky., and at additional
mailing offces.
Sharing capitol ideas.
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¬ea|t|v States |o|t|at|ve /oo·esses C|||o|ooo Cbes|tv
CSC. |·bao |ost|tote Stoov Cove·o¬eot |e·¦o·¬aoce
7 State Sources
|a|se· |eoo·t |ev|e.s |eo|ca|o |otez·|tv |·oz·a¬
States |oact +¯0 |¬¬|z·at|oo-|e|ateo 3|||s
8 State Snapshots
State 3v State So¬¬a·v o¦ /c||eve¬eot S|oce 2002
36 CSG Spotlight
¬|z|||z|ts o¦ act|v|t|es aoo eveots bv CSC. |ts a¦¦||ates
aoo ot|e· assoc|at|oos
38 Conference Calendar
|eet|ozs aoo coo¦e·eoce act|v|t|es o¦ CSC. |ts a¦¦||ates
aoo ot|e· assoc|at|oos
39 Timeline
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t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z S
This Month in the NEWS

Legislator Policy Briefs
TheHealthyStatesInitiativesoonwillbepublishingnewLeg-
islatorPolicyBriefsandTalkingPoints.Thebriefsandtalking
pointsfocusonadolescentimmunizations,agingissues,asthma,
HIVtestingandtoothdecay.
PastbriefshavecoveredissuessuchasChlamydia,stroke,vac-
cination exemptions and smoking. View all the briefs through
www.csg.org.
In Memoriam
Lois M. Murphy, a longtime employee of The Council of
StateGovernments,diedlastmonthinLexington,Ky.
MurphyworkedasanassistantsecretarytotheCSGexecutive
director,thenasexecutiveassistanttotheexecutivedirector,for
32years,fromMarch1,1957toFeb.28,1989.
“Lois was a pillar of knowledge, professionalism and conti-
nuity for CSG for many years,” said Daniel M. Sprague, CSG
executivedirector.“ShetouchedthelivesofscoresofCSGgov-
ernorpresidentsandlegislativechairs.Wearedeeplyindebted
toherformanyyearsofdistinguishedservicetoCSG.”
As executive assistant, Murphy was responsible for the day-
to-day operations of the executive director’s offce, was a liaison
for all departments in headquarters as well as the branch offces
inthefourCSGregions,andassistedinarrangingmeetingsof
theexecutivecommitteeandboardofdirectors,aswellasthe
conferencesforgovernorsandstatelegislators.
PriortojoiningCSG,MurphyworkedatContainerCorpora-
tionofAmericainChicago.MurphywasalsoavolunteeratSt.
JosephHospitalinLexingtonformorethan15years.
ShegraduatedfromMarygroveCollegeinDetroitwithaBA
inSpanishandEducation.
CSG-WEST
The Council of State Governments-WEST will be meeting in
JacksonHole,Wyo.,Sept.16–19.Theconferencewillcovertop-
ics from energy to water, from health to education. You can fnd
outwhathappensatthemeetingbyvisitingCapitolComments.
Past Meetings
The Council of State Governments Eastern Regional Confer-
ence held its 47th Annual Meeting and Regional Policy Forum
Aug.12–15.The62ndAnnualMeetingoftheMidwesternLeg-
islative Conference was Aug. 26–29 in Traverse City, Mich. If
youmissedthosemeetings,orwanttolearnmoreabouttheCSG
SpringCommitteeandTaskForceMeetingsinPuertoRicoorthe
Southern Legislative Conference meeting in Williamsburg, Va.,
checkoutthemeetingslinkonCapitolComments.
What Do You Think?
State Newsisheretoserveyou,ourmembership.Doyouhave
issuesyou’dliketoseeuscover?Issomethinggoingoninyour
statethatmightbehelpfultootherstatesinsimilarsituations?Let
usknow.VisittheCSGWebsite,www.csg.org,andclickonthe
CapitolCommentslink.ClickontheTalkBacklinkintheblog
andgiveusyourinput.
Talk Back
What would you like to see covered in Capitol Comments?
ClickontheTalkBackcategorylinkontheCSGblogandgiveus
someideasofthetypeofinformationyouseek.
csg
BLOG
Question:
What two states were part of Virginia until they were admitted as states? Which of the states was admitted frst?
capitol trivia
To fnd the answer, log onto CSG’s Web site at www.csg.org!
capitolcomments
6 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
toolbox
Two featured speakers at the policy academy—Dr. Margo
Wootan,directorofnutritionpolicyattheCenterforScience
inthePublicInterest, andRobert Earl, senior directorofnu-
trition policy for the Grocery Manufacturers/Food Products
Association—discussedbothmandatoryandvoluntaryguide-
linesregulatinghowfoodismarketedtothecountry’syoung-
estconsumers.
To view their presentations, and those of other experts and
legislators who presented, visit: www.healthystates.csg.org/
Events+and+Conferences/Healthy+States+Policy+Academy.htm.
Presentationsfromtheotherconferencesandworkshopsare
availableontheHealthyStatesWebsite.Theseinclude:
TheMayHealthyStatesPolicyDevelopmentWorkshop,an
invitation-onlyeventattheCentersforDiseaseControland
Prevention in Atlanta. The event was forlegislators work-
ingintheareasofaging,healthdisparitiesorcommunity
approachestowellness.
The June Healthy States Public Health Roundtable with
theCDC,wherelegislatorslearnedhowtobecomemore
effective public health champions and how the CDC can
helpthem.
Speakers’presentationsfrombothconferencesareavailableat:
www.healthystates.csg.org/Events+and+Conferences/.
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¬ea|t|v States |o|t|at|ve /oo·esses C|||o|ooo Cbes|tv
CSC. |·bao |ost|tote Stoov Cove·o¬eot |e·¦o·¬aoce
Trackingwhatresidentsaregettingfortheirmoneyhasbe-
come a major task for government agencies, including state
governments. Citizens and government offcials want to know
if their dollars are being used in the most effcient, effective
manner possible when providing services. Residents increas-
ingly care about the quality of services provided to them by
theirstategovernment.
Obtainingsoundinformationonprogressinachievinggovern-
ment missions is an important tool for achieving accountability
and for pointing agencies to continuing improvement efforts in
the delivery of services to the public. State comparative data
would provide the public and elected offcials, as well as execu-
tivebranchmanagers,withasolidbasisonwhichtoassesstheir
stateagenciesandencourageimprovedpracticesandoutcomes.
CSG and UI will develop, test and implement an ongoing
processwherebydataonimportantstateserviceoutcomeswill
becollected,analyzedandreportedannuallytothestatesand
residents.
The work will be done under the guidance of a steering
committeeandserviceworkinggroupsconsistingofstategov-
ernment representatives and the public. The frst steering com-
mitteemeetingwillbeheldinOctober.
To learn more about this project or to participate, contact
JenniferBurnettatjburnett@csg.org.
TheCouncilofStateGovernments’HealthyStatesInitiative
has had a busy summer, conducting four conferences across
thecountryonavarietyofpressingpublichealthtopics.
The Initiative sponsored the Healthy States Policy Acad-
emyonthePreventionofChildhoodObesityinHiltonHead,
S.C., July 10–12. Thirty-seven state legislators attended the
meeting,whichfeaturedsessionsabouthowpolicymakersare
tryingtomakeanimpactonchildhoodobesitythroughcoordi-
natedschoolhealthprograms,schoolwellnesspolicies,physi-
caleducationandevencommunitydesign.
Howwellisyourstateservingitsresidents?
The Council of State Governments, in partnership with
the Urban Institute, will be working to answer that question
throughaprojectfundedbytheAlfredP.SloanFoundation.
Theprojectwilllookatperformancemeasuresacrossstates
to provide residents and elected offcials with a solid basis on
which to assess their state agencies and encourage improved
practicesandoutcomes.
statesources
|a|se· |eoo·t |ev|e.s |eo|ca|o |otez·|tv |·oz·a¬
AnewreportbyTheKaiserCommissiononMedicaidandthe
UninsuredhasfoundthefederalMedicaidIntegrityProgramhas
broughtsubstantialnewresourcestoensureprogramintegrityin
Medicaid, which covers health and long-term care services to
morethan50millionlow-incomechildren,parents,seniorsand
peoplewithdisabilities.
Thereport,releasedinJune,reviewedtheprogramthatCon-
gresscreatedin2006withintheCentersforMedicareandMed-
icaid Services (CMS). The creation of the program offers an
opportunityforthefederalgovernmenttoincreaseitscommit-
ment to promoting the effciency, effectiveness and integrity of
Medicaid.
Other fndings in the report include:
Program integrity is central to program management and
ensuring a program’s effectiveness and effciency.
The program integrity challenges facing Medicaid mirror
thosefacingthehealthinsurancesystemnationwide.
Responsibilityforensuring Medicaidprogramintegrityis
sharedbetweenthefederalgovernmentandthestates.
Quality of care is a signifcant program integrity issue.
Targeting high-risk areas would help employ limited re-
sourcesmosteffectively.
Tolearnmore,ortoreadthefullreport,visithttp://www.kff.
org/medicaid/upload/7650.pdf.
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States |oact +¯0 |¬¬|z·at|oo-|e|ateo 3|||s
Statelegislatorsin41statesthisyearenacted170immigra-
tion-relatedbills,morethandoublethenumberofnewlawsin
2006,accordingtoanewreportfromtheNationalConference
ofStateLegislatures.
Legislatures in all 50 states considered a combined 1,404
bills as of July, as immigration-related introductions jumped
more than 240 percent over last year. The legislation encom-
passed a wide range of policy areas, including education,
employment, human traffcking, law enforcement and public
benefts.
Amongthenewlaws:
Arizonapassedlegislationprohibitingemployersfromhir-
ingundocumentedworkers.Itrequiresallemployerstouse
theBasicPilotProgram,andbusinessesthatdon’tcomply
facesuspensionorrevocationoftheirbusinesslicenses.
Illinoispassedlegislationthatprohibitsemployersfromen-
rolling in the Employment Eligibility Verifcation System
untilthesystemmeetscertainaccuracycriteria.Thatbillis
pendinggubernatorialapproval.
An Arkansas resolution requests the federal government
todevelopaguestworkertaxationsystemtoprovidebasic
healthcaretoguestworkers.
Oregonpassedalawmakingitillegaltoperformanyim-
migrationconsultationwithoutactivestatusintheOregon
Bar.
To read the report, visit http://www.ncsl.org/programs/
immig/2007immigrationupdate.htm.
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t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z ¯
8 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
statesnapshots
State 3v State So¬¬a·v o¦ /c||eve¬eot S|oce 2002
Table reads: In Connecticut, the percentage of students scoring at the
profcient level or above on state reading tests has decreased slightly
since 2002 at the elementary grade analyzed for this report. When mea-
sured in terms of effect size, achievement in elementary-level reading
has also decreased during that period, confrming the percentage pro-
fcient trend. In high school reading, however, percentages profcient
increased slightly but effect sizes declined, contradicting the percent-
age profcient trend.
Source: The Center on Education Policy released June 5 the frst report
to analyze state tests and fnd that reading and math scores have im-
proved since the enactment of No Child Left Behind in 2002. This table
is part of that report, titled “Answering the Question That Matters Most:
Has Student Achievement Increased Since No Child Left Behind?” The
report used testing data from all 50 states and addresses two key ques-
tions in the debate surrounding NCLB: Has student achievement in-
creased and have achievement gaps narrowed since NCLB was enacted
in 2002? The full report is available at www.cep-dc.org.
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z `
Photos courtesy OKC Convention & Visitors Bureau
Please Join Us in ...
+0 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
ß
GENERAL
INFORMATION
Important ContaCt InformatIon
CSG MEETINGS
Phone: (800) 800-1910
Fax: (859) 244-8117
E-mail: registration@csg.org
Web: www.csg.org
ConferenCe regIstratIon
Registering
You can register for the conference by visiting the “Meetings” area of the CSG Web site
(www.csg.org) and completing the online registration form. If you prefer to fax in your
registration, you can download forms from the CSG Web site. Please fax registrations
to (859) 244-8117. If you have any questions regarding registration, please contact
CSG at (800) 800-1910 or e-mail registration@csg.org.
Rates
Registration rates for the Annual 2007 meeting are below. If you have questions
regarding your rate, please contact CSG at (800) 800-1910 or registration@csg.org.
Please note that rates increase closer to the meeting, so register as early as possible to
receive the lowest rate. If you register via mail, note that your rate will be based upon
the date your form is postmarked.
Early Regular Onsite
(beforeSept.10) (Sept.10) (Nov.11)
State Government Ofcials & Staf $350 $450 $550
Other Government/Nonproft/Academic $375 $475 $575
CSG Associates (one per company) FREE FREE FREE
CSG Associates $550 $650 $750
Private Sector (non-associate member) $750 $850 $950
Guest/Spouse $150 $225 $300
Media & Children under 18 FREE FREE FREE
Cancellations
All cancellations must be received in writing and a cancellation penalty may apply.
Please visit www.csg.org for complete cancellation policies and fees. Notices of can-
cellation can be e-mailed to registration@csg.org or faxed to (859) 244-8117. Cancel-
lations are also accepted via postal mail—National Meeting Registration, CSG, 2760
Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511.
Hotel reservatIons
Location
CSG will be hosting the 2007 Annual State Trends and Leadership Forum at the Cox
Convention Center located in downtown Oklahoma City. In order to accommodate
meeting participants, CSG has secured room blocks at the Renaissance Hotel Oklaho-
ma City and the Sheraton Hotel Oklahoma City for November 11–14. Both properties
are located directly across the street from the convention center.
Reservations/Room Block/Rates/Cancellations
Space at both the Renaissance and the Sheraton is limited and will be reserved on a
frst come, frst serve basis. Attendees will be responsible for making their own hotel
accommodations by contacting the hotels directly at the numbers listed on the foll-
lowing page. All room cancellations or changes to arrival/departure dates must be
made directly with the hotel.
+0 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
ß
Conference Hotels
TheRenaissanceOklahomaCityConventionCenterHotel
10 North Broadway, Oklahoma City, OK, 73102
Marriott Rewards Category: 4
Rate: $189.00+ 13.88% room tax = $215.23
Check-In: 3:00 PM—Check-Out: 12:00 PM
Experience the Renaissance of Oklahoma City, the premier luxury Oklahoma City ho-
tel in the heart of downtown. Conveniently located near Bricktown Canal and Enter-
tainment District, Bricktown Ballpark, OKC National Memorial, Cox Business Service
Convention Center and Ford Center Arena. The only four-diamond downtown OKC
hotel, it is a place of style and class, and boasts a uniquely upscale ambiance. Services
include a full spa, cofee shop ofering Starbucks, 24 hour room service, and a world-
class executive chef. Experience the Renaissance of Oklahoma City.
ForReservationsCall: (800) 859-6877*
*Creditcardinformationwillberequiredinordertoguaranteereservations.
NameofRoomBlock:2007 CSG Annual Meeting
Hotel Cut of Date: Oct. 12, 2007**
**All reservations must be made prior to Oct. 12, 2007. After this date, CSG can no
longer guarantee availability. Cancellation: Room cancellations must be made 48
hours prior to arrival date in order to avoid one night’s room charge plus tax.
TheSheratonOklahomaCity
10 North Broadway, Oklahoma City, OK, 73102
Starwood Preferred Guest Category: 3
Rate: $159.00+ 13.875% room tax = $181.06
Check-In: 3:00 PM—Check-Out: 12:00 PM
At the Sheraton Oklahoma City, you will be connected and comfortable. Because of
this, take time to relax, enjoy and unwind in one of the 395 newly renovated Bricktown
hotel guest rooms. The Sheraton in Oklahoma City provides guests with unsurpassed
service and amenities not ofered by any other Oklahoma City hotel. The Sheraton
in Oklahoma City puts you in the heart of this exciting city and provides you with
all necessary facilities for an amazing trip. Unlike most other Oklahoma City hotels,
the Sheraton in Oklahoma City ofers newly enhanced guest rooms and suites that
feature modern conveniences and the comforts of home. Guests can enjoy the best
night’s sleep in Sheraton Sweet Sleeper beds, and you’ll be within walking distance to
most of the city’s major attractions!
ForReservationsCall: (800) 325-3535*
*Creditcardinformationwillberequiredwhencallingintomakereservations.
NameofRoomBlock:2007 CSG Annual Meeting
Hotel Cut of Date: Oct. 12, 2007**
**All reservations must be made prior to Oct. 12, 2007. After this date, CSG can no
longer guarantee availability. Cancellation: Room cancellations must be made fve
days prior to arrival date in order to avoid one night’s room charge plus tax.
attIre
The average high for November is 60° - the average low is 38°. The dress for all meetings
is business casual.
tHIngs to Do
For a complete list of local attractions, visit the Oklahoma City Convention & Visitors
Bureau at www.okccvb.org.
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z ++
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Sunday, November 11, 2007
10 a.m.–6:30 p.m. Registration
3–4 p.m. Dues Subcommittee
3–5 p.m. Technology Working Group (membersonly)
3–5 p.m. Alzheimer’s Issues Workshop
4–5 p.m. Associates Advisory Committee
4–5:30 p.m. Finance Committee
5–6 p.m. Newcomers’ Reception
6–8 p.m. Governor’s Welcome Reception (OklahomaHistoryMuseum)
(Shuttletourstothecapitolwillbeavailable)
Monday, November 12, 2007
7 a.m.–6 p.m. Registration
7–8:15 a.m. Bufet Breakfast
8:30–10:30 a.m. CSG Expo Hall Open
8:30–10:30 a.m. Health Policy Task Force: Business Meeting and Roundtable Discussions
8:30–10:30 a.m. Public Safety and Justice Task Force: Business Meeting and Roundtable Discussions
8:30–10:30 a.m. Education Policy Task Force: Business Meeting and Roundtable Discussions
8:30–10:30 a.m. Workshop: Solar Energy
10:30 a.m.– Noon Opening Plenary (VeteransDayRecognition)
Noon–3:30 p.m. Strategic Planning Committee
Noon–1 p.m. CSG Expo Hall Opening Luncheon
1–1:30 p.m. Dessert (servedinExpoHall)
1–5 p.m. CSG Expo Hall Open
2–3:30 p.m. Workshop: Centers for Disease Control
2–3:30 p.m. Energy & Environment Policy Task Force: Business Meeting and Roundtable Discussions
2–3:30 p.m. Workshop: Education Policy Topic TBD
2:30–5:30 p.m. Committee on Suggested State Legislation (SSL): Part I
3:30–5:30 p.m. Annual Meeting Committee
5:30–6:30 p.m. Toll Fellows Alumni Reception (byinvitationonly)
5:30–6:30 p.m. National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators (NHCSL) Reception
6:30–10 p.m. Oklahoma Host State Reception(SkirvinHotel)
Tuesday, November 13, 2007
7 a.m.–6 p.m. Registration
7–8:15 a.m. Bufet Breakfast
8:00–10:30 a.m. CSG Expo Hall Open
8:30–10:30 a.m. Energy & Environment Policy Topic TBD
8:30–10:30 a.m. Health Policy Task Force Policy Topic TBD
8:30–10:30 a.m. Public Safety & Justice Task Force Policy Topic TBD
10:30–11:30 a.m. Plenary II (Speaker - TBD)
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Appetizers Sponsored by the Expo Hall
12:30–2 p.m. Awards Luncheon
2–4 p.m. CSG Expo Hall Open
2–4 p.m. Workshop: Health Information Technology
2–4 p.m. Workshop: Energy Topic TBD
2–5 p.m. Committee on Suggested State Legislation (SSL): Part II
2–4:30 a.m. Intergovernmental Afairs Committee
3:30–5:30 p.m. Midwestern Legislative Conference (MLC) Executive Committee Meeting
5:30–6:30 p.m. Eastern Regional Conference (ERC) Reception
5:30–6:30 p.m. Midwestern Legislative Conference (MLC) Reception
Honoring Kim Koppelman, North Dakota 2008NationalCSGChair
5:30–6:30 p.m. CSG-WEST Reception
5:30–6:30 p.m. Southern Legislative Conference (SLC) Reception
9 p.m.–Midnight 2008 Omaha Reception
Wednesday, November 14, 2007
7 a.m.–3 p.m. Registration
7–8:30 a.m. Bufet Breakfast
9–11:30 a.m. International Committee
9–11:30 a.m. Workshop: Topic TBD
SponsoredbyFinancialServicesWorkingGroup
9–11:30 a.m. Workshop: Topic TBD
InterbranchWorkingGroup
9–11:30 a.m. 21st Century Foundation (members only)
Noon–1:30 p.m. Closing Plenary & Luncheon (Speaker - TBD)
2–4:30 p.m. Governing Board/Executive Committee
2:30–5:30 p.m. Field Studies and Technical Tours
6:30–9:30 p.m. Oklahoma Host State Closing Dinner
NationalCowboyandWesternHeritageMuseum
PRELIMINARY
AGENDA
(as of 7/26/07)
+2 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
By Beverly Bell
Fax form to CSG at (859) 244-8117. Or mail to CSG, 2760 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511
¬ote| ·ese·vat|oos ¬av be ¬aoe oo||oe at www.csg.org. |ovo|c|oz ¦o· ¬eet|oz ·ez|st·at|oos .||| bez|o oo t|e oate o¦ ·ez|st·at|oo. /|| caoce||at|oos ¬ost be ·ece|veo |o .·|t|oz aoo a
caoce||at|oo oeoa|tv ¬av aoo|v. |o· co¬o|ete |o¦o·¬at|oo ·eza·o|oz o·oz·a¬¬|oz. acco¬¬ooat|oos. ·ez|st·at|oo caoce||at|oos. o· soec|a| ass|staoce oeeos. o|ease v|s|t www.csg.org
o· ca|| (800) 800-+`+0.
Please print. Duplicate this form for multiple registrations.
Name ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Title (as it is to appear on your badge) ____________________________________________________________________________________________
Organization _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
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o Please check if this is the frst time you have attended a CSG Spring or Annual meeting.
Payment Enclosed $ ___________________
Charge to: o American Express o Visa o MasterCard Card No. _______________________________ Exp. Date _________
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Signature ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Attendee Categories and Fees
(Please check the appropriate box. Payment must accompany registration.)
Attendee Payment Information
Spouse/Guest Payment Information
2007 Annual State Trends
& Leadership Forum
Oklahoma City ß November 11–14, 2007
Early Regular Onsite
(before Sept. 10) (Sept. 10) (Nov. 11)
o State Government Offcials & Staff ................................................................$350 $450 $550
o Other Government/Nonproft/Academic ....................................................$375 $475 $575
o CSG Associates (One desired member) .............................................................................................FREE FREE FREE
o CSG Associates ..................................................................................................$550 $650 $750
o Private Sector (non-associate) .............................................................................$750 $850 $950
o Guest/Spouse ......................................................................................................$150 $225 $300
o Media & children under 18 ..............................................................................FREE FREE FREE
++ state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
++ state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯


Bot Camp
The Henry Toll Fellowship helped me identify my
own leadership strengths, work more effectively
with my colleagues and strengthen my relationship
with the media.
—U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff of California—1997 Toll
for Leaders
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aoo t·eoos s|ao|oz zove·oaoce oo t|e state |eve|. |·ev|oos too|cs o|s-
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|o t|e coo·se o¦ eve·voav oob||c se·v|ce.
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ship development programs, aoo t|e oo|v ooe ooeo to o¦¦c|a|s
¦·o¬ a|| t|·ee b·aoc|es o¦ state zove·o¬eot.
|ac| vea· +0 o¦ t|e most impressive state leaders—+0 ¦·o¬ eac|
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Sen. Philip Bartlett Maine

BuildingconsensusandsharingresponsibilityhavebecomevitaltoolsofthetradeforMainestateSen.PhilipBartlett.
During his frst term in offce, Bartlett faced a diffcult budget issue which required a small group of his colleagues to
developaplantocutnearly$125millioninspendingtoremoveacontroversialborrowingproposalfromthebudget.
“I quickly learned there is no limit to what you can accomplish if you are willing to let others take the credit,”
hesaid.“Bylettingothercolleaguesinbothpartiesdominatethepublicdiscourse,wewereabletobuildconsensus
aroundourproposal.”
LessonslikethesehavehelpedBartlettinhispositionaschairoftheUtilitiesandEnergyCommittee.
“Byworkingtowardcompromisebutalsobuildingsupporttomovelegislationforwardevenifconsensusprovedun-
achievable,Ihavebeenabletokeeppartiesatthetable,”hesaid,“andstrengthenthecommitteeprocessbyensuringthatit
cannotbedriventoahaltbyafewdivisivemembers.”
BartlettwasmotivatedtoreturntoMaineafterlawschool,butfoundthestateofferedfewjobopportunitiesandlow
salaries.
“Thismotivatedmetopaymoreattentiontopoliticsandtosearchforwaystoenablemoreofthepeoplewhosolovethe
statetolive,workandraisetheirfamilieshere,”hesaid.
FAST FACTS
Cum laude graduate of Harvard Law School ß Former volunteer at Mission Possible Teen Center ß Married with three
dogs: Joe Pete, Miss Otis and Milton
Eas
Mark Brainard Delaware

Public-privatepartnershipsareofparticularinteresttoMarkBrainard,chiefofstafftoDelawareGov.RuthAnn
Minner.
Asthefederalgovernmentcontinuestoshiftcoststostateandlocalgovernments,Brainardsaid,leadersmustdetermine
howtodomorewithless.
“Leadersatthestatelevelwillbeforcedtoidentifynewandcreativewaystoprovideservices,developpartnershipswith
other public entities or the private sector and fnd effciencies in current programs to meet the growing need to provide core
services,”hesaid.“Innovation,creativityandthecompetitivedrivethathaveservedtheprivatesectorsoeffectivelywillbe
necessarytokeepstategovernmentseffectivelyresponsivetotheircitizens.”
Brainardhasworkedinboththeexecutiveandlegislativebranchesofgovernment.Hesaidhisdecisiontoenterthis
feld was infuenced by the personal and professional satisfaction he derives from serving the public through government
service.
“Workingonbehalfofthepublicgood,particularlythosesegmentsofthepopulationthattypicallyarenotempoweredto
work on their own behalf because of economic or social status not only benefts the disenfranchised,” he said, “but equally
important,buildsstrongercommunities.”
FAST FACTS
Graduate of the frst class of CSG’s Eastern Legislative Academy ß Began his working life as a sales associate for Sears
and Roebuck ß Obtained his Juris Doctorate from Widener University School of Law in 1994
Rep. Michael Brunelle New Hampshire

FreshmanRep.MichaelBrunellewasselectedbyhisHousecolleaguesfromManchestertoserveaschairoftheMan-
chesterdelegation.Heisexecutivedirectorofhislocalpoliticalpartyanddeputypoliticaldirectorforthestateparty.
Andhe’sonly22yearsold.
BrunelleattributeshissuccessatsuchayoungagetoteachersandelectedleadersinManchester.
“Their guidance and dedication to a troubled, misguided young man who had great potential is what drives me
todaytogivebacktothecommunitythathasprovidedmewiththeopportunitytoonceagainthriveandsuccessfully
achieveanythingIundertake,”Brunellesaid.
Outsidestatepolicytrends,BrunelleisespeciallyinterestedinUnitedStatesworldtradepolicy.
“Theworld’seconomiesarebeatingAmericatothepunch,”hesaid,“andtheresulthasbeenthatourcountryhas
becomeheavilyinvestedinanddependentonglobalmarketswhilesimultaneouslyfallingbehindintermsofinnova-
tionandtheproductionofgoodsandservices.”
Thisself-proclaimedhighschoolunderachievergraduatedfromtheUniversityofNewHampshirewitha3.8GPA
andwaselectedtwiceasstudentbodypresidentatUNH-Manchester.
FAST FACTS
Eucharistic minister at the Parish of the Transfguration since January 2005 ß Led a current events topic discussion
at Hillcrest Terrace Retirement Home ß Made the New Hampshire Union Leader/Ocean National Bank Top “Forty
leaders under 40” list for New Hampshire leaders
+6 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
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t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z +¯
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Secretary of State Lorraine Cortes-Vazquez New York

Lorraine Cortes-Vazquez is the frst Latina to hold the position of secretary of state in New York—but, as a colleague
said,“heraccomplishmentsextendfarbeyondtheboundariesofanyparticularcommunity.”
Cortes-VazquezsaidshetriestoupholdMahatmaGhandi’sphilosophythatoneshould“bethechangeyouwanttosee
intheworld,”andthisledhertopublicservice.
“Earlyinmyprofessionalcareer,asacommunityadvocate,Irecognizedthattochangesystemsandpolicies,youhad
tohaveaccesstothesystemsthatneededtochange,”shesaid.“Fortunately,Iwasrecruitedearlyinmycareertoservein
MayorKoch’snewadministration.IthasbeenmygoalsincetoensurethatgovernmentalsystemsareaccessibletoallNew
Yorkers.”
Beforeshewasnominatedassecretaryofstate,Cortes-Vazquezwasvice-presidentofgovernmentandpublicaffairsat
CablevisionSystemsCorporation,oneofthelargestcableandentertainmentcompaniesintheUnitedStates.From1998-
2004sheservedaspresidentoftheHispanicFederation,andin2001,shewasappointedtotheNewYorkBoardofRegents,
apositionshehelduntilthisyear.
FAST FACTS
Married to Louis M. Vazquez, mother of Michael and grandmother of Michael and Mark ß Held positions working with
children, young people and senior citizens in East Harlem ß Past executive director at ASPIRA, the oldest and largest
nonproft group dedicated to education and leadership development in young Latinos
Rep. John Keenan Massachusetts

MassachusettsstateRep.JohnKeenanhasspent13yearsofhislifeinpublicservice—twoyearsasassistantdis-
trictattorney,eightascitysolicitorandthepastthreeasastaterepresentativeontheJudiciary,TourismandEnergy
committees.
“Asastaterepresentative,Ihavebecomearecognizedstateleaderontourismissuesandhavebeenonthefront
linesdealingwithcriminaljusticepolicyinourstate,”hesaid,“includinglegislationondrunkdriving,sexoffenders
andcapitalpunishment.”
OfparticularinteresttoKeenaniscriminalre-entry,thejudicialsystemandsexoffendermanagement,especially
relatedtotheInternet.
“TheInternetisaparticularchallenge,”hesaid.“Althoughitisawonderfultoolforinnovativeeconomicgrowth,
ithasalso,unfortunately,becomeatoolforsexualpredators.”
Keenansaidoneofthemostinterestingpartsofhisjobislearningsomethingneweveryday.
“Whetheratechnicaldebateonstemcellresearchandscienceormoraldeliberationsonthedeathpenalty,every
issueisachanceformetolearnandgrowasalegislator,apublicservantandaperson,”hesaid.“Throughthateduca-
tionIhavebecomeabetterrepresentativeformyconstituents.”
FAST FACTS
Harvard graduate and member of the Harvard football team ß Consistent participant in the Pan Mass Challenge, an
annual 192-mile bike ride to raise money for the Dana Farber Cancer Institute ß Cum laude graduate of Suffolk Uni-
versity Law School
Jennifer Davis Delaware
Jennifer“J.J.”Daviscanmanagemoney.
Davis, who works as director of the Delaware Offce of Management and Budget, is responsible for the overall coordina-
tionanddevelopmentofthegovernor’sannual$3.2billionoperatingbudgetandmorethan$500millioncapitalbudget.
AsaformerdeputysecretaryofeducationinDelaware—andamother—Davissaidshehasdevelopeda“keeninterest
inimprovingpubliceducation.”
“Theoldwayofteachingisnolongerrelevant,”Davissaid.“Theclassroomofthefuturewillneedtobemoreglobal
andtechnologicallyadvancedsowecancontinuetobuildonthefoundationofourfuture:ourchildren.”
Davissaidherfather,acareercivilservantwhoworkedasalegalcounselforthefederalgovernment,instilledinher
thedesiretoworkinthepublicsector.
“HeconsistentlyremindedmeasIgrewuptheimportanceofgivingbacktothecommunityandmakingadifference
inpeople’slives,”shesaid.“Hetrulybelievedoneofthebestwaystodemonstrateyourcommitmenttootherswasto
work for the government. He also strongly valued hard work, dedication and a commitment to quality work through
objectiveandcriticalanalysis.”
FAST FACTS
Participated in a dual degree program at Penn State which allowed her to receive a masters’ of science in policy analysis
and a bachelor of arts in political science ß Led and managed the eventual creation of the Offce of Management and
Budget ß Colleagues say she possesses contagious energy and is infectious with enthusiasm
New York Sen. Ruth Hassell-Thompson is,
aboveall,trustworthy.
“By leading through example on controversial
issuesorunpopularstances,Ihaveshownmycon-
ference and my constituency that I am true to my
word,”shesaid.“Alackoftoleranceforproviding
informationthatiswantedratherthanwhatisreal
hasprovedtomycolleaguesandcommunitythatI
canbetrusted.”
Hassell-Thompson’s policy interests include
campaign fnance reform. New York state’s limit
oncampaigncontributionsisthehighestinthena-
tion—morethan10timesthefederallimit.
“More than 99 percent of the public does not
contributetocampaigns,”shesaid.“Wemustwork
diligently to take away the pernicious effect that
wealthy patrons have on state offcials.”
Economic stratifcation and political marginal-
ization motivate Hassell-Thompson to participate
in public service. One major factor that infuenced
herdecisiontoenterpoliticsistheopportunityto
bea“voiceforthosewithinmycommunitywhose
voicescannotbeheardoverthescreamsofwealthy
corporations,privilege,greed,andracialandclass
bias,”shesaid.
According to Hassell-Thompson, government
has big shoes to fll, especially with today’s chang-
ingparadigms.
“Government can adopt policies that create af-
fordableunitsratherthaninstitutionalizinghome-
lessness,andmakestridesontheissuesofhunger,
obesity,diabetesanddomesticviolence,”shesaid.
FAST FACTS
Represents part of the Bronx and Westchester
counties ß Recipient of the Sojourner Truth Racial
Justice Award ß Married mother of two and ador-
ing grandmother
Third-term Vermont Rep. Helen Head is very
awareofgenerationalissuesfacingherstate.She
lost her uncle and mother-in-law to Alzheimer’s
disease in the past three years and also is the
motheroftwoteenagers.
“Our rapidly growing older population is al-
ready creating challenges and opportunities in
oureducationalandtransportationsystems,work-
places and in leisure activities,” she said. “The
populationalsoneedsspecialattentioninhousing
developmentandexpansionofendoflifecare.”
Head is the chair of the General, Housing and
Military Affairs Committee. Under her leader-
ship, the committee has passed legislation to se-
cure job retention and has increased benefts for
Vermont National Guard members, added con-
sumer protections for mobile home owners and
supportedVermont’sentrepreneurialventures.
“Myworkloadhasincreasedexponentiallywith
theneedtoplancommitteetimeandstayontopof
the committee’s issues—before, during and after
theyleaveourroom,”saidHead.
But,accordingtoHead,thechallengesarepart
ofbeingagoodpublicservant.
“My paternal grandfather, John W. Head, was
aKentuckystatelegislatorinthe1960s,”shesaid.
“Theimportanceofgoodcitizenshipandtheim-
portance of community service were messages I
receivedthroughchildhood.”
FAST FACTS
Co-founder of the New Hampshire Coalition
Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault ß
Currently a nonproft planning and development
consultant ß Motivated by the need to give back
to her community through public service
Sen.TerrenceNelson’sdistrictwillfaceunique
challenges, compared to some members of this
year’sTollsclass.
“IaminterestedinthemovementsoftheWorld
TradeOrganizationandthestatusoftheVirginIs-
landsasanunincorporatedterritory,”Nelsonsaid.
Thefreetradestatusagreementsarewiththein-
corporatedUnitedStatesofAmerica,Nelsonsaid,
andthatwouldnotincludetheVirginIslands.
“Due to our unincorporated status, we will be
prohibitedfromtradingdirectlywithourCaribbe-
anneighborsandpayhighercostsforcommodities
becauseofadditionaltransportationcosts,”Nelson
said. “Federal policies are restricting use of our
natural resources such as fshing waters and use of
localbeaches.”
Nelson’s history in public service dates back to
histeachingcareer,whenhewaselectedninetimes
asTeacheroftheYearandwasatwo-timenominee
forWho’sWhoAmongAmericanTeachers.
“Asateacherfornineyears,Ihelpedshapethe
minds and behaviors of many students,” he said.
“Asanactivist,Ihaveorganizednumerousprotests
anddemonstrationstodemandresponsibleandac-
countablegovernanceandpublicservice.”
Nelson said a public offcial’s responsibilities are
weighty.
“Government’s primary responsibility is to
provide the infrastructure and services to enable
public,private,corporateandindividualcitizensto
existcomfortablyinasociety.”
FAST FACTS
Proud father of four children ß First Rastafar-
ian chosen as a representative by the people of St.
Croix ß Motto: “Positive is how I live”
Giving a voice to members of disenfranchised
groups—likepeoplewithdisabilities,thosewhoare
homelessandthosewhostrugglewithHIV/AIDS—
areamongthewaysChelseaTurner,thepolicyand
legislativeaffairsliaisonforConnecticutGov.Jodi
Rell,contributestoherstate’sgovernment.
By working as a lobbyist for a frm that repre-
sents nonproft organizations, Turner said she has
beenableto“penetratebarriersbetweenpolitical
parties and various branches of government and
atthesametime,facilitatecompromiseandbuild
consensus.”
Building consensus and sharing ideas among
states is critically important to Turner, who has
developedlong-standingrelationshipswithCon-
necticutlegislatorsonbothsidesoftheaisle.
“Whileeachstatehasitsownindividualsetof
laws,manyoftheoverarchingpolicyconcernswe
arefacingarethesame,”shesaid.“Withthenet-
workofcolleaguesIhopetodevelopthroughthe
TollFellowshipprogram,Iwillhavetheopportu-
nitytodiscussanddebateissuesaswellasgovern-
mentpolicyandadministrativeprocedures.”
Currently, Turner covers the Judiciary, Gen-
eral Law, Veterans’ Affairs, and Public Health
andAgingcommitteesforRellandisresponsible
for helping develop and advance the governor’s
legislativeagenda.
FAST FACTS
Participated in the Presidential Classroom pro-
gram in D.C. as a high school junior ß Has
worked as a lobbyist and campaign manager, and
as a legislative fellow for the Connecticut Offce
of Legislative Research
Sen. Ruth Hassell-Thompson New York
Rep. Helen Head Vermont
Sen. Terrence Nelson Virgin Islands
Chelsea Turner Connecticut
Midwes
+8 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z +`
Rep. Brenda Clack Michigan

Third-termMichiganRep.BrendaClackhasonemajorgoalinthelegislature:ImpactthelivesofMichigan’sresidents.
Herserviceonfourmajorcommittees—HealthPolicy,Education,FamiliesandChildren’sServices(forwhichsheis
chairman),andNewEconomyandQualityofLife—helpshertoachievethatgoal.
“Ifeelcompelledeachdaytoimpactlivesbyapprovinggoodlegislationandintroducinglegislationtonotonlyimpact
mydistrict,butthestate,”Clacksaid.
Butsheknowstherewillbechallenges.
Onegoalistoimprovethelivesofchildreninfostercareandthoseintransition,aswellasprovidingbetterhealthcare
forallMichiganresidents.
“Band-aidinghealthcareisunconscionabletoday,”shesaid.“Ihaveintroducedproactivelegislationtoaddresstheissues
ofhigherhealthcosts.”
A former teacher, Clack has always been interested in government. She’s also active in many civic and service
organizations.
“Volunteeringwasalsoacomponentforpreparingmyselfforthepoliticalarena,”saidClack.
SheorganizedtheAnti-ViolenceTaskForcecomprisedofcommunity,businessandreligiousleaders.Thegrouphas
gainedcitywideattentionasitstrivestoincreaseneighborhoodawareness.
FAST FACTS
Is a life member of the NAACP ß Co-chaired the Michigan Legislative Black Caucus’ commemoration of the
Brown vs. Board of Education’s 50th anniversary celebration ß Received the Crime Victim Advocate of the Year
by Flint’s prosecutor, David Leyton, and the Service Educator Award from Connect Michigan Alliance
Sen. Tarryl Clark Minnesota

LessthanayearaftershewaselectedtotheMinnesotaSenate,TarrylClark’scolleaguesinthemajoritycaucus
selectedherasassistantmajorityleader.
Hergoal,alongwithMajorityLeaderLawrenceJ.Pogemiller,is“toreturntheSenatetoamoreproductiveand
bipartisaninstitution.”
Clark said she and Pogemiller have made great strides toward that goal through a number of actions, including
workingwellwiththeminoritycaucusandsettingapublictoneofproductivityandpolicyoverpolitics.
That’simportantasMinnesotafacesmanychallenges.
“Leadership from elected offcials will be needed to keep our communities working together and moving forward,
ratherthantearingthemselvesapart,”saidClark.
The desire to help strengthen communities was one factor in her decision to enter public offce after years as an
advocateforfamilies,seniorsandveterans.
“Obviously, this larger goal is infuenced by numerous smaller goals,” said Clark. “One of the most important is to
stem the growing tide of polarization in our communities, our institutions and our elected offcials.”
She hopes to work as an elected offcial toward solutions, “instead of attempting to harvest confict.”
FAST FACTS
Was a member of the 2006 Bowhay Institute for Legislative Leadership Development ß Was executive director of the
Minnesota Community Action Partnership ß Was chief author of legislation to expand early childhood education
Sen. Timothy Grendell Ohio
First-term Ohio Sen. Timothy J. Grendell had a close role model to motivate him to run for public offce: his wife,
Diane.
GrendellwaselectedanOhiostaterepresentativein2000,succeedinghiswife,whohadservedforeightyears.
“Duringthattime,Isawherhelpindividualconstituentswithstate-relatedissuesandmakemajorpolicychangesfor
thegoodofallOhioans,”Grendellsaid.“Herpublicserviceinspiredmetoenterpublicservice,andithasbeenextremely
rewarding.”
GrendellwaselectedtotheOhioSenatein2004.Hesuccessfullyledtheefforttoeliminateaproposed$5usefeeat
state parks and has led the fght against E-check, an emissions testing program.
Apracticingattorney,Grendellhasalsospearheadedpassageoflegislationdealingwithcomplexissuessuchastort
reform,eminentdomain,medicalmalpracticeandstatetaxreform.He’salsohelpedleadeffortstoreininstatespending
andtheburgeoningstatebureaucracy,andconsiderseducationapriority.
“School districts face a squeeze, plus the prospect for fnancial catastrophe—if the state doesn’t act to address the
projectedmassiveshortfallinthenextdecade,”Grendellsaid.
FAST FACTS
Serves on the Judiciary-Criminal Justice, State and Local Government and Veterans Affairs (SLGVA), and Energy and
Natural Resources committees ß Worked as a baseball and softball umpire while in college ß Is a former Judge Advo-
cate General and served as a military prosecutor for one year at Fort Hood, Texas
Midwes
20 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
AmajorreasonSen.MattieHunterenteredpublic
servicewasherdesiretoimprovethequalityoflife
forindividualsandfamilies.
“Irecognizethevastdisparitiesthatstillexistbe-
tweenupper-andlower-classindividualsandprimar-
ilyminorityandmajoritycommunities,”saidHunter.
“I am passionate about reducing those inequalities
throughthelegislativeprocess.”
Hunter, who represents Illinois’ third district, is
interested in issues that illustrate that desire. She
sponsoredbillsinthe94thGeneralAssemblytoim-
prove access to health care, and plans to work with
colleagues during the 95th session to support new
healthcareandeducationalinitiatives.
Shealsohasaninterestineconomicdevelopment.
“I want to continue the entrepreneurial spirit of
BlackChicago,”shesaid.
African-Americanbusinessownershipisatanall-
timehighintheU.S.today,accordingtoHunter.
“I am interested in continuing to bring grocery
stores,specialtyshops,residentialbuildingsandho-
telstomycommunity,”shesaid.“Bringingjobsand
minority-owned small businesses into a community
willdeliveraneconomicboosttothelocalcommu-
nity and will help to close the wealth gap between
African-AmericansandCaucasiansinChicago.”
FAST FACTS
Has been involved in international activities, such as
a China Tour-Trade Mission in 2003 ß Developed
and managed a shelter for battered women and chil-
dren, and trained drug and alcohol counselors ß Is a
former administrator for the city of Chicago
MinnesotaDistrictCourtJudgeDavidL.Knut-
sononlyhadtolooktohisfatherforinspirationto
enterpublicservice.
“It was clearly his example of serving people
andmakingapositiveimpactinthelivesofothers
that compelled me to enter the same professions
and to serve as a district court judge,” Knutson
saidofhisfather,whowasalsoalawyerandstate
senator.“Hisfocuswasonservingindividualsand
nothimself.”
Knutson represented Minnesota’s District 37
from1993to2004.Hewasappointedtothedistrict
courtbenchbyGov.TimPawlentyin2005.
“Asjudges,wewillfacechallengesinthecom-
ingyearsofhavingtodomorewithlessbyprocess-
ing an ever-increasing caseload without signifcant
newresourcesornewemployees,”saidKnutson.
That relates to a public policy issue that draws
Knutson’s concerns—maintaining public conf-
dence in government and elected offcials.
“The courts are specifcally challenged to main-
tainthe perceptionandrealityoffairness and im-
partiality in the face of increasing involvement of
special interest and big money in contested elec-
tions,”Knutsonsaid.“Therehasalwaysbeencyni-
cismandapathytowardgovernment,butaswesee
increasing divisiveness in society and less agree-
ment on public goals and priorities, cynicism and
apathycontinuetogrow.”
FAST FACTS
Was a Bowhay Institute for Legislative Leader-
ship Development fellow in 1999 ß Received the
YMCA Distinguished Volunteer Award in 1999 ß
Selected as Legislator of the Biennium by the Min-
nesota Retailers Association in 2002
JohnLeschwearstwohatsinMinnesota.
As a state representative, he is actively in-
volved in developing policies for the state. He’s
alsoanassistantcityattorneyinSt.Paul,withhis
primaryfocusbeingtheprosecutionofdomestic
assaultcases.
“Inthisrole,Iamabletoseetheimpactofstate
policywhere‘therubberhitstheroad’ofitsacute
implementation,”hesaid.
Thatgiveshimauniqueperspective,andhehas
usedittoexplainthereallifeimpactsofpolicies
tocolleaguesonlegislativecommittees.
“With a foot in both worlds, I seek to breathe
newlifeintomiredpolicies,”hesaid.Ithashelped
himintheareasofcriminaljustice,re-entrypro-
gramsandsafeneighborhoods.
Lesch knows Minnesota will be facing chal-
lenges in the coming years as tax changes have
saddled the state with structural defcit. He knows
it’ll take consensus from both parties to resolve
thoseproblems.
“Thecommonvisionandvalueswhichonceal-
lowedustoagree,relativelyeasily,onaconsensus
astoMinnesota’sillsandtheresourceswewould
directtowardthem,havegonethewayofsomuch
intractablypartisanhogwash,”Leschsaid.
FAST FACTS
Was instrumental in forming a committee for
victims’ rights, and was appointed the frst chair
ß Elected to a third term with 78 percent of the
popular vote ß Is president and general manager
of Triumvirate Development
IowaRep.DonovanOlsonhasalwayshadapas-
siontoservehiscommunity.
He began frst by attending public meetings
on downtown revitalization in his community of
BooneCounty,Iowa.
“Itwasmybeliefthatacitizenmustbeinvolved
tobeheard,”Olsonsaid.
He became involved in the process to create
a comprehensive plan and zoning ordinance for
Boone County. When offcials failed to vote on the
recommendations,OlsondecidedtorunforBoone
County Board of Supervisors. After two years of
publichearings,Olsonwasinstrumentalingetting
theplanapproved.
HewaselectedtotheIowaHouseofRepresenta-
tivesin2003.
Among his goals are to push for more spend-
ingoneducationandtoaddressIowa’sneedforan
energyplan.
“Expansion of renewable energy in an environ-
mentallyfriendlywayisthegreatestchallengeIowa
willfaceinthecomingyears,”Olsonsaid.
Olson helped draft the Iowa Energy Indepen-
denceAct,abilltoexpandtheproductionofrenew-
able energy, energy effciency and conservation,
andresearchanddevelopment.
Asforeducation,Olsonwaspartoftheeffortto
passapackageofeducationreformsandfundingin
thelastlegislativesession.
FAST FACTS
Serves as a distance education coordinator at
Iowa State University ß Helped draft the Iowa
Values Fund, a 10-year comprehensive economic
development strategy ß Conducted a case study
of Main Street Iowa’s Rural Main Street program
for his master’s thesis, “Evaluation of Main Street
Iowa’s Rural Main Street Program”
Sen. Mattie Hunter Illinois
District Court Judge David L. Knutson Minnesota
Rep. John Lesch Minnesota
Rep. Donovan Olson Iowa
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z 2+
Sen. Vicki Schmidt Kansas

As a registered pharmacist, frst-term Sen. Vicki Schmidt brings a wealth of practical experience to the Kansas
legislature.
As the costs of health care continue to rise, the topic has dominated many issues in state government, according to
Schmidt.
“Kansasfacesmanychallengeswithregardtohealthcare,nottheleastofwhichistheincreasedmoneyneededforour
Medicaidbudget,”Schmidtsaid.
Healthcaretechnologyisanotherareathelegislatureisprobing,andSchmidtsaidthestatemustmovetowardmore
technologywithregardtohealthcareinformationande-prescribing.Herbackgroundhasbeenhelpfulindealingwiththe
healthcareissues.
Schmidtservedasvice-chairofacommitteethatdevelopedtheplantoconsolidatethefunctionsofmanyagenciesthat
dealwithhealthcareintotheKansasHealthPolicyAuthority.
“Whilethetimelinewasaggressivewhenthelegislationpassed,theAuthorityhasexceededmyexpectationsandhas
putKansasontheleadingedgeofmanyissueswithregardtoMedicaid,healthylifestylesandaddressingouruninsured
population,”shesaid.
SheisthevicechairoftheSenatePublicHealthandWelfareCommitteeandhasalsoservedontheWaysandMeans
CommitteeandtheinterimJudiciaryCommittee.
FAST FACTS
Received the American Pharmacists Association Hubert H. Humphrey Award in 2007 ß Served previously as director
of the Kansas Medicaid Drug Utilization Review Program, Drug Rebate Program ß Was appointed to the Kansas State
Board of Pharmacy, where she served as president for two years
Assemblyman Ron R. Schuler Manitoba

Manitoba Legislative Assembly member Ron R. Schuler grew up knowing that serving as an elected offcial was an
honorablewaytolivelife.
But it wasn’t until he and wife Tanya had their frst child that Schuler ran for public offce, frst as a school trustee.
“Byworkingontheinsideoftheschoolsystem,Icouldensureher(hisdaughter’s)educationwouldbethebestit
couldbe,”Schulersaid.
He was frst elected a member of the Manitoba legislature in 1999, and is responsible for formulating his party’s response
tolegislationdealingwithLabor&Immigration,Energy,Science&Technology,theKyotoAccord,CivilServiceCommis-
sionandLotteries&Gaming.
A businessman, Schuler is a graduate of BILLD (Bowhay Institute for Legislative Leadership Development), CSG-
Midwest’sleadershipprogram.SchulerbelievestheTollFellowsprogramwillhelphimbeabetterleaderandpositively
infuence his provincial government’s future legislation.
“With only 1.4 million people and a continual out-migration of young people, we may have to face the fact that diffcult
choicesaregoingtohavetobemadeinordertoserviceourdebtload,”saidSchuler.“Manitobaisgoingtohavetocallupon
individualsthatwillleadinthisarea.”
FAST FACTS
Is president of Gingerbread World Inc., an importer of European confectionary goods to Canada and the U.S. ß Has
been active in community organizations, including Big Brothers, Manitoba Inter-Cultural Council and German Canadian
Heritage Foundation ß Is the father of three children, Brigitta, Stefan and Corina
Rep. Pat Strachota Wisconsin
PatStrachotaisaleader.
Sheisonlyinhersecondtermasastaterepresentative,buthercolleaguesinWisconsinhavealreadyselectedher
toserveintheleadershippositionofcaucusvice-chair.She’sattendedtheBowhayInstituteforLegislativeLeadership
Development(BILLD)andtheDardenEmergingPoliticalLeadersPrograminherbrieftenureasalegislator.
“Fundamentally, effective leadership, political or otherwise, is clearly defning your goals and implementing a plan
toachievethem,”saidStrachota.“Effectiveleadersdothisbymakingthemembersofthegroupwanttohelptoachieve
thosegoalsaswell,allowingeveryonetoachievesomeownershipoftheprojectandresults.”
Throughherworkoncommitteesandindraftinglegislation,Strachotahasactedasamediatortobringtwoopposing
sidestogethertocompromisesoalegislativeinitiativecouldmoveforward.
She hopes to use that skill in working on Wisconsin’s budget defcit.
“Mygoalistostrikeabalancebetweenthehighlevelsofservicesourcitizenshavecometoexpect,withoutstrangling
oureconomyduetooverburdensomelevelsoftaxation,”shesaid.
Sheisalsointerestedinworkingonhealthcareissues,particularlywithregardtocontrollingcosts.
FAST FACTS
Is a 30-year resident of Wisconsin’s 58th Assembly District, though she was born in Gates Mills, Ohio ß Served as
chairperson of the Washington County Samaritan Health Center Committee, overseeing a long-term care nursing
home ß Is an employee of the Washington County Human Resources Department


The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience,
but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.
—Martin Luther King Jr.
South
Jerry Boden Maryland

LoyaltyisimportanttoJerryBoden.
It was something he learned during his years as a U.S. Army offcer. It was that sense of loyalty that drew Boden away
fromthecorporateworldtoserveaschiefofstafftoMarylandLt.Gov.AnthonyBrown.
“Igrewupwiththelieutenantgovernorandhavebeenhisclosestfriendforover30years,”saidBoden.“Whenheasked
metocomeonboardashischiefofstaff,Ihadatoughdecisiontomake.Iacceptedthejobprimarilyoutofloyaltytomy
friend,butwithabitoftrepidation.”
Aschiefofstaff,Bodenhasbeentaskedwithheadinguptwooftheadministration’stoppriorities—anewstatehealth
carepolicyandgrowingthestateworkforce.
Theadministrationhassetanambitiousgoalofcreating60,000newjobsby2011.Bodenhastakentheleadinthisinitia-
tiveworkingwithstatebusinessleadersandagenciesinhispositionaschairoftheBRACsubcabinet.Boden’scorporate
experiencehasprovidedtheskillsandcommunicationabilitiestobringthenecessaryplayerstothetableforthisproject.
Boden’s experience makes him an even more perfect ft for the challenge of overhauling the state’s health care system.
With several years of management experience in the health care feld, Boden is well positioned to make the needed changes
toachieveadministrationgoals.
FAST FACTS
1985 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point ß Received an MBA from Georgetown University ß Received
the General Douglas MacArthur Leadership Award while serving in the U.S. Army
Rep. Paul DeMarco Alabama

Whilehealthcareisanissueattheforefrontformanyleaders,Rep.PaulDeMarco’sinterestindrivingchangein
Alabama’shealthcaresystemgoesbeyondthebroadneedforbetterserviceandinsurancecoverage.
DeMarco,inspiredbyhisownmother’sbattlewithbreastcancer,hastakenaninterestinhowAlabamacaresfor
thosewithcancer.
“Mymother’sdeathfromcancerprovokedmetomovefromsimplybeingabystandertobeingavolunteerandthen
into the public arena,” said DeMarco. “Cancer strikes all segments of society and it infuenced me to take a leadership
roletohelpmystatehelpresidentssufferingfromcancer.”
Alabamaisrankednearthetopinthenationforcancerdeathspercapita.DeMarcowantstochangethat.Heis
workingwithacoalitionofgroupsandmedicalproviderstocreatenewpartnerships—publicandprivate—thatcan
helppreventmorecancerdeathswhileprovidingbettercaretothosealreadydiagnosedwiththedisease.
CancercaremaybetheissueclosesttoDeMarco’sheart,butitisnottheonlyexampleofhiseffortstobuildcon-
sensus and cooperation to address pressing concerns. As a member of the Judiciary and Boards and Commissions
committees,DeMarcoistakinganactiveroleinconfrontingincreasingMedicaidcostsandanincreasingandaging
prisonpopulation.
FAST FACTS
Graduated from Auburn University with a degree in journalism ß Chosen as one of the Top 40 under 40 by the Bir-
mingham Business Journal ß Achieved the level of Eagle Scout
Sen. Diane Black Tennessee

While she never considered running for offce until a friend who was retiring from the legislature encouraged her
todoso,TennesseeSen.DianeBlackhasdedicatedherlifetohelpingothersasaregisterednurse.
Once she decided to seek elected offce, Black used her new position to forward issues addressing public health and
safety.
Inherfreshmanyearinthelegislature,then-Rep.Blackpushedanefforttomakethelegislativeplazasmokefree.
Whileherinitialeffortendedinacompromisethatleftdesignatedsmokingareas,theattentiondrawntotheissue
undoubtedlyplayedaroleinthemovementthatrecentlyendedwithallstatebuildingsbeingdesignatedsmokefree.
Inadditiontopublicsmoking,Blackhassponsoredlegislationtoremovejunkfoodfromschoolvendingmachines,
torequirechildrentowearhelmetswhenbicyclingandtorequireinsurancecompaniestooffercoverageforcolonos-
copyscreening.
Black’sinterestshavenotbeenlimitedtohealthcareissues.Shehasalsotakenaroleinotherimportantchallenges
facingthestate,includingeducationandtransportation.
TennesseeranksnearthebottominhighschoolgraduationratesandK-12testscores.Blackrecognizesthatsome-
times conventional fxes won’t suffce.
“Iwanttobeapartoflookingoutsidetheboxatalternativesthatotherstateshaveusedtobringaboutsuccessin
education,”saidBlack.
FAST FACTS
Named American Cancer Society Legislator of the Year in 2003 ß Served as associate professor at Volunteer State
Community College ß Mother of three: Steve, Jill and Katie
22 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
South
Rep. Kenny Jones Missouri

Rep.KennyJonesisonlyinhissecondtermintheMissouriHouseofRepresentatives,buthisentirecareerhas
beendevotedtopublicservice.
Jonesserved11yearsasaMissouristatetrooper,and20yearsasMoniteauCountysheriffbeforebeingelectedto
theMissouriHousein2005.
“I was deeply infuenced by my parents who taught me to always help others,” Jones said.
Hehastakenthatadvicetoheart.Asastatetrooper,Jonessuggestedcost-savingmeasurestoimprovepublicsafe-
ty. As sheriff, he implemented programs to improve employee morale and provide better and more effcient services
toconstituents.
Jones’experienceinlawenforcementhashelpedhiminpublicpolicyareasoutsidethepublicsafetyrealm.
“Ihavecometorealizethateducationandcrimeratesarerelated,”hesaid.“Thefailingschoolsinoururbanareas
have flled our state prisons with individuals who have dropped out and feel they must resort to crime as a way of liv-
ingbecausetheycannotread,writeorhavetheabilitytoobtainadecentpayingjob.”
JonessaidhealthcarewillbeamajorissueforMissouri,especiallyasthestaterevampsitsMedicaidsystem.
FAST FACTS
Vice president of the Missouri Sheriff’s Retirement Board ß Father of four children ß Enjoys fshing, canoeing, skiing
and camping
Secretary of State Mark Hammond South Carolina
Adesiretoserve,togivebackisoftenanidealinstilledfromyouth.SuchisthecasewithSouthCarolinaSecretary
ofStateMarkHammond.
Thesecretarycreditstheexamplessetbyhisparentsforhisdecisiontoenterpublicservice.Hisfatherwasadedi-
catedstatetrooper,andhismotherservedasacountypersonneldirector.
“I have nothing but the utmost respect for my parents’ selfess service,” said Hammond, “and I am proud to follow
intheirfootsteps.”
As secretary of state, Hammond has faced many of the most diffcult issues challenging elected offcials across
thecountry.TheworldisincreasinglyrunelectronicallyandHammond,recognizingthis,hashelpedSouthCarolina
reviseitscorporatecodeswhilemakingelectronictransactionseasier.
Hammond would also like to see increased access to technology beneft the state’s children as part of a broader
efforttoimproveSouthCarolina’seducationsystem.
“Unfortunately, surveys rank South Carolina 49th and 50th in the nation in high school graduation rates,” said
Hammond.“Thisisunacceptable…Wemustlookatinventivewaystoteachourchildreninordertopreparethem
fortheglobaleconomy.”
HammonduseshiseffortsatimprovingthequalityoflifeinSouthCarolinatofollowinhisparents’footstepsby
servingthosewhoelectedhim.
FAST FACTS
Father of three children: Matthew, Ross and Grace ß Completed special basic training at the South Carolina Criminal
Justice Academy ß Served as chairman of the International Relations Committee for the National Association of Sec-
retaries of State
Janie Huddleston Arkansas
For30years,JanieHuddlestonhasdedicatedhercareertoimprovingthelivesofchildren.
From the chalkboard in a frst grade classroom, Huddleston has traveled a long way to the halls of government where
shenowservesasdeputydirectoroftheArkansasDepartmentofHealthandHumanServices.Inhercurrentcapacity,she
continuesservingchildrenassheadministersseveralofDHHS’syouth-orienteddivisions,includingtheDivisionofChild
CareandEarlyChildhoodEducation.
Huddleston’sdutiesatDHHSarenowadministrativeasopposedtothehands-onnatureofthebeginningofhercareer,
butherworkcontinuestohavealargeimpactonthelivesofArkansaschildren.
“WhileservinginleadershiproleswithintheDepartmentofHealthandHumanServices,Iledthedevelopmentof
keyinitiatives,”saidHuddleston.“Thisyearwewillfullyfundqualitypre-Kforat-riskchildren,aninitiativeIhelped
beginin1998.”
FundingqualityandmuchneededchilddevelopmentandeducationprogramsisachallengeHuddlestonfacesheadon.
“Whilewehavedevelopedapolicyunitthatworksonissuessuchaschildren’smentalhealth,”saidHuddleston,“we
founder when we try to develop non-Medicaid sources of funding to support children in the system. We must better coor-
dinateourfundingstreamstosupporttheneedsofchildrenandfamilies.”
FAST FACTS
Served as principal at three different elementary schools ß Started her own cloth diaper service—Diaper Depot Inc.
ß Received the Child Welfare League’s National Award for Advocacy in 2002
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z 23
Family relationships play a large role in shaping
Maryland Sen. Alex Mooney’s legislative acts and
interests.
ThesonofaCubanimmigrant,Mooneyisproudto
bringauniquepointofviewtothelegislaturewhere
heistheonlysenatorofHispanicdescent.Growing
up learning of life under a Communist government
leftMooneywithaprofoundappreciationforthecivil
libertiesandfreedomsoftentakenforgranted.
In addition to a unique childhood experience,
Mooney benefts from a close relationship with his
wife, a doctor, as he attempts to tackle defciencies in
Maryland’sandthecountry’shealthcaresystems.
“Mywifeisaneurosurgeon,andmyconversations
withherandhercolleagueshaveincreasedmyinter-
est in health care policy,” said Mooney. “Given the
great technology in the United States and the very
qualifed and capable pool of doctors and nurses, we
shouldhaveabetterhealthcaresystem.”
Mooneyhasshowninterestnotonlyinthenation-
ally diffcult issue of health care, he has also tackled
decreased tax revenues with advocacy of increased
fscal responsibility. It is such action on behalf of so
manyissuesimportanttohiscitizenrythathashelped
Mooneyserveeffectivelyintohisthirdterm.
FAST FACTS
Was the youngest member of the Maryland Senate
when elected in 1998 ß Enjoys playing rugby ß Has
two children, Lucas and Camille
Competingintheshrinkingglobaleconomyisa
concernforallstatesandthenationasawhole.To
thisend,SecretaryofFinanceJodyWagnercallson
abackgroundincorporateandbankinglawtohelp
Virginiastayonsolidgroundeconomically.
InadditiontohelpingVirginiaretainitsAAA
bondrating,Wagnerhasdedicatedyearsofservice
to strengthening the commonwealth’s fnancial
footingbothinhercurrentroleandwhileserving
astreasurerfrom2002–2006.
InordertokeepVirginiacompetitive,thesec-
retary recognizes the need to build on a base of
diverse industry and business interests that will
offeropportunitiestoabroadworkforce.
“Virginiahassuccessfullyattractedknowledge-
basedindustries,butnotallofourworkforcecan
succeed in those industries,” said Wagner. “We
havenotattractedacarmanufacturingplantinthe
past20years.”
Wagner hopes to explore a number of options
includingre-examiningwhatrolegovernmentcan
andshouldplayineconomicdevelopment.
Wagnerhasdedicatedhercareertoservingthe
residents of Virginia and has no regrets because
she is confdent her efforts have had an impact.
“Basedonmyexperience,Iamconvincedthat
state service is an effective way to make a signif-
cantdifference,”saidWagner.
FAST FACTS
University of Virginia Sorensen Institute for Politi-
cal Leadership board member ß Mother of four:
Rachael, Jason, Elizabeth and Maxwell ß Gradu-
ate of Northwestern University, Washington Uni-
versity School of Law and Vanderbilt University
School of Law
The daughter of a career public servant, Tonya
Williamsalwaysknewshewouldfollowhermoth-
er’sexample.
Her mother was a social worker, but Williams
wantedsomethingdifferent.Tothatendthecurrent
generalcounseltothepresidentprotemporeofthe
NorthCarolinaSenatestudiedpoliticalscienceand
earnedalegaldegree.
“WhenIwasincollege,Idecided,thatlikemy
mother, I, too, wanted to work in public service,”
said Williams. “However, I wanted to work at a
level of government where I could help shape and
directpolicy.”
Whileservingthegovernmentand7millionres-
idents of North Carolina, Williams has addressed
many of the most challenging issues including
educationreform.Buttheissuesshehasdedicated
the most time to thus far are campaign fnance and
ethicsreform.Hereffortstohelpmembersofthe
HouseandSenatedraftmeaningfullegislationhas
led to increased transparency and what Williams
hopes will be greater public confdence in the po-
liticalprocess.
Williamswouldliketofollowthisrecentlegis-
lative victory by playing a similar role in drafting
legislationthatwillhelpprotecttheenvironmentby
combating global warming and ensuring nature’s
sustainability. Environmental issues are of per-
sonal interest to Williams, who recognizes that
solutionsinthispolicyareaarehardtocomebyin
today’spoliticalenvironment,butsheisupforthe
challenge.
FAST FACTS
Fellow, North Carolina Institute of Political Leader-
ship ß Clerked for Judge Joseph John Sr. and Judge
Loretta C. Briggs, North Carolina Court of Ap-
peals ß Has traveled extensively including South-
east Asia, Australia, New Zealand and Europe
Many who claim a lifelong desire to serve the
publicfollowtraditionaleducationalcoursessuch
as law or medical school. Marquett Youngblood
knew he wanted to help others as a result of his
childhood experiences growing up in a lower in-
come family fghting to make ends meet.
“Theopportunitytoserveothersinneedbyim-
provingtheircapacitytofunctionindependentof
publicassistancewastheprimaryreasonIentered
public service,” said Youngblood. “Although my
family never received public assistance, we got
veryclosetotheedgeinspiteofmyfather’smul-
tiplejobsandmanyhoursofhardwork.”
Butitwasn’tacareerinsocialworkoreduca-
tionthatdrewOklahoma’sDepartmentofHuman
Services chief operating offcer. It was the feld of
informationtechnology.
“Accessingtheopportunityfortechnologyedu-
cation,Iwasdeterminedtomovefrombeingclose
toneedingassistancetoaplacewhereIcouldaid
others,”saidYoungblood.
After completing an associate, bachelor’s and
fnally a master’s degree, Youngblood has used his
educationtoworkuptheranksintheDepartment
of Human Services, transforming the effciency
andaccessibilityofthedepartment.
Among his accomplishments, Youngblood has
led efforts to improve the agency’s Web site and
othertechnologies.TodaytheagencyWebsitehas
progressed to allow those who owe or are owed
childsupporttologontoaccesstheirbalanceand
payonline,amongotherservices.
FAST FACTS
Certifed Public Manager ß Chairperson IT Solu-
tions Management Association ß Graduated from
Rose State, Southern Nazarene University and the
University of Oklahoma
Sen. Alex Mooney Maryland
Jody Wagner Virginia
Tonya Williams North Carolina
Marquett Youngblood Oklahoma
2+ state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
Rep. Savali Talavou Ale American Samoa
HouseSpeakerSavaliTalavouAlehasservedintheAmericanSamoalegislaturefor26years.
OptionsforyoungpeopleinAmericanSamoaarelimited,saidAle.
“Theonlyotheralternative,exceptcatchingaplaneandmovingtotheUnitedStates,istoworkforthecanneries,”
hesaid.
Soin1980,heranfortheHouseofRepresentativesandhasbeentheresince.
AleviewstheTollFellowshipprogramasanopportunitytoexchangeideaswithothergovernmentleadersaboutthe
challengesoftheglobaleconomy.
“AmericanSamoaisnolongerisolatedfromtherestoftheworld,”hesaid.“Tosurviveitmustkeepupwiththeworldin
theevergrowingareaofbusinessdynamicsandcriticalthinking.”
ThechallengeforAmericanSamoaiscomplicatedbyitspoliticalstatus.ResidentsarenotcitizensoftheUnitedStates
but are designated as nationals. This classifcation protects the communal land ownership system, said Ale, even though it
frustrateseconomicdevelopment.Thefear,hesaid,isthatifAmericanSamoalosesthelandtenuresystemthatcurrently
exists,itwillleadtothedemiseofitsculturalsystem.
“Leaders of American Samoa,” said Ale, “must have the capacity to process new ideas and concepts quickly to stay
competitive.”
FAST FACTS
Previously taught business administration at the Leone High School ß Is the longest-serving member of the American
Samoan House of Representatives
Rep. Rosie Berger Wyoming

Volunteering for community projects infuenced state Rep. Rosie Berger’s involvement in public service.
“Volunteeringinspiredmetobelievewecanallenhanceourcommunitiesbytakinganactiveroleintheprocess
ofgovernment,”saidtheWyominglegislator.
Bergerisaconsensusbuilder.
“Shestandsoutamongherfellowlegislatorsforherabilitytotirelesslybringtogetherpeoplefromdifferingpoints
ofviewtoreachconclusionsthatwork,”saidGov.DaveFreudenthal.
Oneexample,saidFreudenthal,wasBerger’sabilitytobringopposingsidestogethertoagreeonaqualitychild
careproposal.
“Her determination and skill in hammering out agreements,” he said, “made a signifcant difference in the fate of
themeasurethatwassignedintolawonMarch1,2007.”
As a member of the House Appropriations Committee, Berger believes major challenges will come from state
budget fuctuations because Wyoming’s economy is based on natural resources.
“Weanticipatemajorrevenuedownturnsfromtimetotime,”shesaid.“Asapolicymaker,Ineedtodowisebudget-
ingandanalysisofcurrentandfutureneedsandbeabletoeffectivelycommunicatedecisionstomyconstituents.”
FAST FACTS
Has been involved in location management projects for the flm industry in Wyoming. Among the flms she has
worked on are Flicka, Rollerball, The Horse Whisperer and Starship Troopers ß Serves as chair of the Legislative
Technology Committee
Janice Doggett Montana
JaniceFrankinoDoggettgrewupinanIrishItalianCatholicfamilythatvaluededucationandpublicservice.
AplaqueinthefamilylivingroomdisplayedaquotefromPopePaulVI:“Ifyouwantpeace,workforjustice.”That
concepthasbeenthecorebeliefthathasguidedDoggettinherprivateandpubliclife.
AschieflegalcounselforMontanaSecretaryofStateBradJohnson,a2006TollFellow,Doggettwasinstrumen-
tal in designing the state’s Elector Identity Verifcation Process, which expanded the requirements under the Help
AmericaVoteAct.Theprogramwasconsideredsosuccessful,itwasawardedaCSGInnovationsAwardin2005.
Doggettbelievesittakesmorethanlawstostreamlinetheelectionprocess;italsotakeseducationandtraining.
“OneofthechallengesIhavefacedandwillfacetoagreaterdegreeinthefuturewillbetokeepthemechanicsof
ourelectionprocessfreeofpartisanpolitics,”shesaid.“Wecanbegintomeetthischallengebyeducatingthepolitical
parties.”
Doggett was the frst female president of the Montana High School Association Board of Control; served on the Mon-
tanaSupremeCourtGenderFairnessTaskForce;andispastpresidentoftheWomen’sLawSectionoftheStateBar.
FAST FACTS
Was crowned Miss Montana in 1976 ß Rented a facility and taught gymnastics to hundreds of children to put herself
through college and law school

Wes
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z 2S
Alaska state Rep. Carl Gatto learned early the
value of serving people’s needs and making them
happy.
“IlearnedinelementaryschoolthatIcouldmake
money delivering groceries to tenement houses in
NewYorkCity.Itwasacalling,”saidGatto.“Relying
extensively on tips I soon recognized that working
one-on-one satisfying customers’ needs was a place
whereIfeltcomfortableandprosperous.”
He continued serving people as an adult frst as a
school teacher for fve years, then 26 years as an An-
chorage frefghter and paramedic. After he retired,
hewaselectedtotheschoolboardbeforeenteringthe
stateHouse.
AschairoftheHouseEducationCommittee,Gat-
to has been instrumental in increasing K-12 school
fundingforfourconsecutiveyears.
ServinghisthirdtermintheHouse,Gattohasalso
championed public safety issues, such as the state’s
frst DUI/ignition interlock legislation in response to
agrowingdrunkendrivingprobleminAlaska.
He is chair of the House Resources Committee
and,withotherstateleaders,ispromotingthebuild-
ing of a 1,600-mile natural gas pipeline to Alberta
andthelower48states.
“Ilovemyworkandknowthatmycareerchoices
werethebestIcouldhavemade,”saidGatto.
FAST FACTS
Served as volunteer mentor for children in out-
reach programs ß Interests include fying, mara-
thons and triathlons
Rep. Carl Gatto Alaska
MaryHerrerahasonlybeenNewMexico’ssec-
retary of state since January, but she has already
made her mark on the offce.
During her frst three months on the job, Herrera
initiated the passage of two bills that will stream-
linetheelectionprocessforNewMexicovotersand
make it more effcient. One bill deletes Social Se-
curity numbers as identifers, providing voters with
uniqueIDnumbers.Thesecondprovidesforanau-
tomaticrecountprocedure,somethingNewMexico
didn’tpreviouslyhaveinplace.
Herrera’sinterestinpublicservicestartedearly.
“Asapublicservantforover33years,Iworked
myselfuptheranksatacountylevelfromclerk
typist in 1974 to assistant comptroller in 1989,”
shesaid.
ShewaselectedBernalilloCountyClerkin2000
andre-electedin2004.BernalilloisNewMexico’s
largestcounty.
Herreraalsohaspublicpolicyconcernsoutside
her role as secretary of state, including children’s
issuesandelderlycare.
“AsaboardmemberoftheNationalAssociation
of Latino Elected Offcials, I requested during last
year’sconferencefortheorganizationtoincludefor
itsmembersasessiononhowtoeffectivelymanage
parentaging,illnessandcarewhilekeepingupwith
busyworkschedules,”shesaid.
FAST FACTS
Active in the community working with the Make
A Wish Foundation, Toys for Tots and United
Way ß Has raised funds for the New Mexico
Music Association and the New Mexico Hispano
Entertainers Association
Secretary of State Mary Herrera New Mexico
For state Sen. John McGee of Idaho, public
serviceisawayoflife.
“It hasn’t been an acquired skill I’ve had to
learn,”hesaid.
McGee’sfatherisaVietnamveteranwhocon-
tinues service to his county as a member of the
183rdAttackBattalion.
“Myfather’sexampletogiveofoneselfunself-
ishlyhasbeenacharacterfoundationandwayof
lifeinmyfamily,”McGeesaid.
Although he is the youngest member of the
IdahoSenate,McGeehasarecordofaccomplish-
ment. He was co-author and helped negotiate a
10-year strategy to improve fre-prone ecosystem
health in the West. This was a collaborative ef-
fortwiththeWesternGovernorsAssociation,the
ForestServiceandtheDepartmentofInterior.
He was principal author and coordinator of a
report that identifed potential pilot projects in
Idahothatwouldtestlandmanagementpractices
usedbyfederalagencies.
McGee is chairman of the Senate Transpor-
tation Committee, a member of the Health and
WelfareCommitteeandtheAgriculturalAffairs
Committee.
McGee sees Idaho’s growing population as a
challengeforstateleaders.
“Issuessuchasfundingforhigh-growthareas
suchaseducation,healthandwelfare,andtrans-
portation will have to be examined if the state
ofIdahoistokeepupwiththerapidgrowth,”he
said.
FAST FACTS
Is a board member of the 2009 International Spe-
cial Olympics ß Serves his alma mater, Albertson
College, as a member of the Board of Trustees ß
Is the recipient of national distinguished service
awards from the National Association of Agricul-
ture Educators and the National Association of
State Foresters
Sen. John McGee Idaho
Sen.SheldonKillpackwastedlittletimeinget-
tinginvolvedwithchallengingissueswhenhewas
appointedtotheUtahSenatein2003.
HewasSenatechairofthelegislativecommit-
teeappointedtosettlelitigationonanew14-mile
highwayinNorthernUtahthatcutsthroughapor-
tionofwetlandsalongtheGreatSaltLake.
Environmental groups had fled lawsuits that
stoppedconstructionandcostthestatemorethan
$200million.
“We not only needed to fnd common ground
with the plaintiffs,” said Killpack, “but also per-
suade our colleagues in the legislature to pass a
billduringaspecialsession.Weweresuccessful,
andtheroadwillopennextyear.”
OnepersonimpressedbyKillpack’sleadership
during those negotiations was Utah Gov. Jon M.
Huntsman.
“Throughout the negotiations Sheldon stood
out as a leader and demonstrated rationality and
effectiveness on a very emotional issue,” Hunts-
mansaid.
Killpack said Utah’s rapid growth presents
challengesforeducation.
“The fact that the federal government owns
wellover60percentofthelandinthestate,which
resultsinlesspropertytaxrevenue,combinedwith
much larger than average family sizes and you
quickly see that the fnancial forecast is not rosy,”
hesaid.
FAST FACTS
Assistant Majority Whip of the Utah Senate ß
The youngest of nine children ß Vice president
of Academica West, charter school management
and consultants
Sen. Sheldon Killpack Utah
26 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
Robert O. Lampert Wyoming

AsdirectoroftheWyomingDepartmentofCorrections,RobertO.Lampertbelievesinaholisticapproachtocor-
rections,fosteringperson-centric,crossagencysolutionstotheindividualsandfamiliesoftheprisonpopulation.
“Ihadacousinwhowenttoprisonwheretherewasnoattemptathelpinghimaddressthebehaviorthatlandedhim
there,”Lampertsaid.“Hiscriminalityincreasedasaresultofhisincarceration.Publicpolicyatthattimeseemedto
suggestthatlockingpeopleawayaspunishmentfortheircrimesandexpectingtimeandmaturitytochangethemwas
anacceptableapproach.IdecidedtoseeifIcouldmakeadifferencebychangingthesystemfromwithin.”
Lampertbelievesagenciesshouldshareclientinformation.Heviewsthatasanopportunitytoprovidelegislators
withthecriminaljusticedatatheyneedtomakesoundpolicydecisionsinsentencingpoliciesthathelpreduceincar-
cerationrates.
“The people who suffer the most as a result of agency-specifc, program-centered silo approaches are our children
andfamilies,”hesaid.
Lampert,alawyer,previouslyservedincorrectionsmanagementpostsinTexasandOregon.
FAST FACTS
Previously an animal trainer and showman, training bottle-nosed dolphins, sea lions, dogs and horses ß Began public
service career as a corrections offcer with the Texas Department of Corrections
Sen. Michael Machado California

StateSen.MichaelMachado’sbackgroundpreparedhimforhisroleaschairoftheCaliforniaSenateCommitteeon
RevenueandTaxation.
HegraduatedwithadegreeineconomicsfromStanfordUniversity,earnedhismaster’sdegreeinagriculturaleconomics
fromtheUniversityofCaliforniaatDavis,and,in1988,attendedtheHarvardAgribusinessSchoolinLondon,England.
Beforeenteringthestatelegislaturein1994,whenhewaselectedtotheCaliforniaAssembly,Machadoworkedforthe
AgencyforInternationalDevelopmentinEasternEuropeandRussia,assistingfarmerswiththetransitionfromaclosedto
anopenmarketeconomy.
Machado was the author of Proposition 13, the Safe Drinking Water, Clean Water, Watershed Protection and Flood
ProtectionBondAct.HealsoassistedinthepassageofProposition50,theWaterSecurity,CleanDrinkingWater,Coastal
andBeachProtectionActof2002.
“It’simportanttoadvanceCalifornia’swaterpolicytosupportthestate’seconomyandgrowingpopulation,”Machado
said.“Iwillcontinuetoworkwithurbanandrural,environmental,agriculturalandmanufacturingintereststoensuregood
qualitywaterisavailabletomeettheirneeds.”
FAST FACTS
Owns and operates a family farm that has been in the family three generations ß Was infuenced to run for public
offce by his grandmother, an immigrant who believed it was important to help make other people’s lives better
Rod Tanonaka Hawaii
RodS.TanonakabelieveshiscontributionstoHawaii’sstategovernmenthavebeenbehind-the-scenesinnature.
However,thatdoesn’tmeanhebelievesgovernmentbusinessshouldbeconductedbehindcloseddoors.
“Inrecentyears,therehavebeenincreasedcallsfortransparencyindecision-making,”hesaid.“Asthechiefclerk
oftheSenate’sCommitteeonWaysandMeans,Inotonlyembracedsuchachange,butadvocatedforasmuchpublic
disclosureaspossible.”
Transparency,hesaid,hasforceddecision-makersaswellasstafftodothorough,thoughtfulanddetailedresearch
onissues.
TanonakaisnowchiefofstaffforHawaiiSenatePresidentColleenHanubusa,whowasamemberofthe2000Toll
class.
“Inmycurrentrole,”saidTanonaka,“thechallengeforpublicpolicymakingcomesinadvocatingthatwhilepublic
resourcesmustbesharedbyall,withthosemostinneedgettingpriority,italsocomeswiththeexpectationthatev-
eryone must sacrifce for the greater good.”
Ittakescourage,hesaid,tosupportwhatpromotesfairnesstoall,yetprovide’sgrowthtoindustryandeconomy.
“Doingwhatisrightinthelongtermoverwhatispoliticallyexpedientwillbemybiggestchallenge.”
FAST FACTS
Has served in the private sector as a registered lobbyist for the Hawaiian Electric Company and the Hawaii Govern-
ment Employees Association ß Began his public service career as a budget analyst for the House Committee on
Finance


“The experience rejuvenated me and reminded me why I originally wanted to serve in the legislature.”
—Colorado Senate President Joan Fitz-Gerald—2001 Toll
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z 2¯
28 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
Toll Fellowship
and the Essence of Leadership
By Russell Copeman, 2006 Toll Class Representative
28 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
|’¬ oot a b|z ¦ao o¦ ¬aoaze¬eot zo·os. so | .as esoec|a||v st·oc' bv a ooote ¦·o¬ |ete· |. L·oc'e· t|at | |ea·o
at |ast vea·’s ¬eo·v To|| |e||o.s||o |·oz·a¬. “|aoaze¬eot |s aboot oo|oz t||ozs ·|z|t. |eaoe·s||o |s oo|oz t|e
·|z|t t||ozs.”
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et||cs o¦ oo|oz .|at’s ·|z|t. |eaoe·s||o |s aboot t|e ¬eaos as .e|| as t|e eoos.
T|e·e a·e a|.avs a oo¬be· o¦ s|zo|¦caot ¬o¬eots |o oo· ||ves. ||oo|oz a ||¦e oa·toe·. t|e b|·t| o¦ a c|||o. as-
so¬|oz ¦o· t|e ¦·st t|¬e a oos|t|oo o¦ oob||c t·ost. |o· ¬e. be|oz a ¬eo·v To|| |e||o. ·ao's. ·at|e· ooe×oecteo|v.
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oa·t|c|oaots to e×a¬|oe aoo coo¦·oot oo· o.o s|o·tco¬|ozs aoo. ¬ost |¬oo·taot|v. a||o.s os to |ea·o ¦·o¬ ooe
aoot|e·. St·ooz booos a·e ¦o·zeo .|t| oeoo|e o¦ ve·v o|¦¦e·eot bac'z·oooos aoo e×oe·|eoces aoo eve·vooe
co¬es oot t|e bette· ¦o· |t.
| o·ze t|e ¦o·tooate c|ass o¦ 200¯ to t|·o. voo·se|ves |oto t|e To|| e×oe·|eoce as co¬o|ete|v as voo cao.
Sob¬e·ze voo·se|ves |o t|e ca¬a·aoe·|e aoo voo cao’t |e|o bot |ea·o t||ozs aoo beco¬e “oe. aoo |¬o·oveo.” |
'oo. voo .||| e¬e·ze bette· |eaoe·s. T·v to ·e¬e¬be· t|at. t|ooz| |eaoe·s cao be ¬o|oeo. t·oe |eaoe·s a|.avs
st·|ve to oo t|e ·|z|t t||ozs.
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z 2`
States Warm Up to Actions on
Climate Change
States are beginning to recognize
the impacts—both environmental
and economic—of global climate
change. Several states have begun
to take action.
By Doug Myers
The debate over global warming—more specifcally, global
climatechange—hasbeensettled.Scientists,thepublic,and
evencompanieslikeShellOil,nolongerdisputethereality
of climate change, that human activity is the primary con-
tributororthatsomethingneedstobedoneaboutit.
As detailed in CSG’s most recent report, Trends in Ameri-
ca: 10 Forces of Change States Can’t Ignore,federalactionon
globalwarmingismiredindebate,thoughitisslowlygaining
momentum in Congress, and weaker than many states would
prefer. States, however, recognize the need to push for action
andmanyalreadyhavetakenstepstocounterglobalwarming.
States face many challenges, but some are confronting
global warming through various programs. Other states are
consideringhowtomitigatetheimpactofclimatechange.
A Threat on Many Fronts
States face economic, environmental and public health
threatsfromglobalwarming.Asweatherbecomesmorese-
vere,suchasprolongeddroughtsandheatwaves,stateswill
beexposedtomyriadrisks.
Heatwavesarepotentiallydeadlyforthepoorandelderly.
According to the Illinois State Climatologist Offce, “the heat
waveinJuly1995inChicagowasoneoftheworstweather-
related disasters in Illinois history, with approximately 525
deaths over a fve-day period.”
An unexpected or prolonged heat wave can seriously
strain a state’s ability to meet the public health emergency
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z 2`
30 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
causedbysevereheat.Itstrainsresources
and results in an increased use of am-
bulances, hospitals and doctors, as well
as increased costs of associated medical
care. In addition, warmer temperatures
alsomaybringthespreadofmosquitoes
to formerly cooler climates and thus in-
creasetheriskofmalaria.
A state’s economy also can face seri-
ous damage due to global warming. As
mentioned in the Trends report, hurri-
canes Katrina and Rita, whose intensity
most likely was increased by higher than
averageoceantemperaturesduetoglobal
warming,wreckedtheeconomiesofNew
OrleansandtownsaroundtheGulfCoast,
not to mention countless lives. They re-
sultedinestimateddamagesofmorethan
$200 billion. Global warming has other
economic impacts, such as those caused
by massive fooding due to a rise in the
sea level along coastal towns and cities;
thelossofrevenuetoskiresortsasaresult
of less snowfall; and diminished income
to farmers and price hikes for consumers
and dependent industries, such as cattle
producers,fromalossofcrops.
Otherissuesincludesaltwaterintrusion
intoaquifersandreducedsnow-pack—re-
sulting in reduced water availability—
andanincreasednumberandintensityof
forest fres, destroying homes and dam-
aging businesses. As climate effects are
regional, these impacts will be felt most
atthestateandlocallevels.IntheWest,
drought will continue to be a problem;
while along the Southeast, hurricanes
willposeanever-increasingrisk.
As the frst responders to events and
thoseindirectcontactwiththeeffectsof
a public emergency, state and local off-
cialswillbearthebruntofglobalwarm-
ing induced disasters. For this reason,
stateshaveseenaneedtotakeaction.
Current State Actions
States have taken a largely regional
approach to the reduction of greenhouse
gases(GHG),realizingthatgreaterreduc-
tions and greater effciencies result from
largergroups.
For example, the Western Regional
Climate Action Initiative involves Ari-
zona, California, New Mexico, Oregon,
Utah and Washington in developing a
regionaltargetforthereductionofgreen-
housegasesandcreatingamarket-based
programtomeetthosegoals.Utahisthe
most recent signatory to this initiative,
demonstratingthatasmorestatesjointhe
initiative, the more compelling it is for
otherstatestojoin.
The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initia-
tive(RGGI)isasimilarprograminvolv-
ing 10 northeastern and Mid-Atlantic
states—Connecticut, Delaware, Maine,
Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hamp-
shire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode
Island and Vermont. Its efforts focus on
reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emis-
sions to 10 percent below the average
annual emissions from 2000–2002 by
2019. RGGI initially will utilize a cap-
and-tradeprogramtoreducegreenhouse
gases from fossil-fred power plants.
On a local level, nearly 600 mayors
have signed the U.S. Mayors Climate
Protection Agreement to reduce carbon
dioxideemissions.AccordingtotheU.S.
ConferenceofMayors,“mayorswhosign
States a·e coo¦·oot|oz c||¬ate c|aoze bv.
|eooc|oz oo.e· o|aot e¬|ss|oos t|·ooz| eoe·zv e¦¦c|eocv ·esoo·ce staooa·os
|oact|oz ·eoe.ab|e e|ect·|c|tv staooa·os
Co·b|oz e¬|ss|oos ¦·o¬ ta||o|oes
|·o¬ot|oz o·oooct e¦¦c|eocv staooa·os
|oso·|oz oe. bo||o|ozs ¬eet C·eeo C|obes o· |||L staooa·os
/coo|·|oz |vb·|o ¦eets
|o|o|oz ·ez|ooa| CC¬ ·eooct|oo oa·toe·s||o o·oz·a¬s soc| as t|e |ez|ooa|
C·eeo|oose Cas |o|t|at|ve (|CC|)
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z 3+
on to the agreement are making a com-
mitment to reduce greenhouse gas emis-
sionsintheirowncitiesandcommunities
to 7 percent below 1990 levels by 2012
throughactionslikeincreasingenergyef-
fciency, reducing vehicle miles traveled,
maintaininghealthyurbanforests,reduc-
ing sprawl and promoting use of clean,
renewableenergyresources.”
Mandates for Action
States also are working to reduce
greenhousegasesthroughmandates,eco-
nomicincentivesorsomecombinationof
the two. The more prominent mandates
include establishing renewable electric-
ity and energy effciency standards (i.e.
requiringacertainpercentageofelectric
powergeneratedmustcomefromrenew-
able energy sources and energy effciency
savings), setting product effciency stan-
dardssimilartoEnergyStarandcontrol-
lingtail-pipeemissions.
California, for example, has signed a
lawthatwouldrequireautomobilemanu-
facturers to cut motor vehicle emissions
by 22 percent by 2012 and 30 percent by
2016.However,thislawispendingadeci-
sion by the EPA. At least 11 other states
are considering adopting the legislation,
andFloridahasrecentlydoneso.
AccordingtoBillPrindleoftheAmer-
ican Council for an Energy Effcient
Economy (ACEEE), energy effciency
resourcestandards—requiringutilitiesto
meet a certain energy effciency savings
target—areconsideredthelowest-costal-
ternativetoreducingcarbondioxideand
havethepotentialtooffsetabout25per-
cent of demand. Energy effciency is also
theoneresourceavailableineverystate.
In addition, according to a recent
report by ACEEE and the American
CouncilonRenewableEnergy,enacting
energy effciency resource standards al-
lows states time to increase renewable
energyproduction.
Incentives for Action
Economic incentives, as opposed to
mandates, allow frms freedom of action
in how they achieve GHG reductions.
Firms choose the most cost-effective
method, whether through technological
innovation, increased effciency or the
purchase of credits or payment of taxes.
The two principal economic incentives
underconsiderationtoreducegreenhouse
gasemissionsarecap-and-tradeprograms
andcarbontaxesorcarbonfees.
Acap-and-tradeprogramlimitstheto-
tal amount of greenhouse gas emissions
fortheentireeconomyorasectorofthe
economy, typically electricity produc-
ers or fuel suppliers. Allowances equal
tooneunitofemissions(1tonCO2)are
allocated or sold (auctioned off), not to
exceedthelimitforthatsector.Producers
that can maximize effciency and reduce
their emissions would be able to trade
their remaining allowances for a proft to
producersthatgeneratedmoreemissions
than their allowance. This gives frms
fexibility in choosing how to meet the
programgoals.Ascircumstancesdictate,
the cap can be adjusted—raised or low-
ered—tomeetfutureGHGtargets.
Carbon taxes, meanwhile, do not set
anabsolutelimitontheamountofemis-
sions. Rather, they are based on a price
per ton of carbon emitted. Producers
thenhaveadirecteconomicincentiveto
reduce their emissions by either becom-
ing more effcient or creating/investing in
new technologies. This allows frms to re-
tainthefundsthatwouldotherwisehave
beenspentonCO2emissions.
A key component of a carbon fee or
tax, as well as the proceeds from an al-
lowanceauction,isthatmoneycollected
by the government can be put back into
the economy to help consumers and in-
dustriesadjusttotheeconomichardships
imposedbythefee.Thechallengeliesin
setting an appropriate price for carbon.
Too low a price might encourage con-
tinued pollution, while too high a price
could prove detrimental to the economy.
Alsoessentialisdeterminingwhetheral-
lowanceswillbeauctionedofforsold.
But economic incentives may not be
enough to satisfy the public’s desire for
action on global warming. Recent re-
searchconductedbyStanfordUniversity,
the nonproft Resources For the Future
andNew Scientistmagazinesuggeststhat
despite the effectiveness of carbon fees
andcap-and-tradeprograms,thepublicis
more supportive of mandates. Mandates
are concrete and measurable, whereas
economic incentives are more abstract
and not guaranteed. Thus, the public is
moreskepticaloftheireffectiveness.
Research by the Pew Center suggests
thatacombinationofeconomicincentives
and mandates—for instance, combining
emission reductions from power plants
with energy effciency standards—may
bethemostpoliticallyfeasiblealternative
forreducingGHGemissions.
Time for Action
Theneedforactiononclimatechange
isclear.Devisingtherightprogram,how-
ever, is not as obvious. Thus it is impor-
tantforlegislatorstocarefullyweighthe
pros and cons of each proposal before
makingadecision.
And though there are costs associated
witheachofthemajorpoliciesdescribed
above, the cost of inaction is far higher.
A proactive approach to climate change
by the states also may help spur federal
actionbymakingiteasiertodeviseana-
tionalsolution.
—Doug Myers is an energy and environ-
ment policy analyst with The Council of
State Governments.
T|e ¦o||o.|oz \eb s|tes o¦¦e· a
.ea|t| o¦ |o¦o·¬at|oo ·e|ateo to
c||¬ate c|aoze aoo eoe·zv.
American Council for an
Energy Effcient Economy
http://www.aceee.org/
/oa|vs|s o¦ eoe·zv e¦¦c|eocv oo||-
c|es aoo o·act|ces
Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change
http://www.ipcc.ch/
|×a¬|oes t|e sc|eoce aoo |¬oacts
o¦ c||¬ate c|aoze
Pew Center on Global Climate
Change
http://www.pewclimate.org/
|×a¬|oes t|e sc|eoce aoo |¬oacts
o¦ c||¬ate c|aoze
Union of Concerned Scientists
http://www.ucsusa.org/
|o-oeot| |o¦o·¬at|oo ·eza·o-
|oz state ·eoe.ab|e e|ect·|c|tv
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U.S. Green Building Council
http://www.usgbc.org/
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lessons taken to
As Utah Rep. Paul Ray, of Clearfeld,
listened to presenters rally state legisla-
torstosupporthealthylifestyleinitiatives
during a CSG Health Policy Forum in
Memphislastyear,somethingclicked.
Ray,whochairstheHouseHealthand
Human Services Committee, had heard
speeches like these before, encouraging
legislatorstosupportmeasuresthatresult
in good nutrition and physical ftness. He
alreadyknewthatahealthylifestyleisa
cornerstoneofpublichealthpolicy.
Butthistime,likeapenitentandchas-
tened sinner heeding the call for a spiri-
tualconversionattheendofatentrevival
meeting,Raysawthelightandmadehis
way to the altar, fguratively speaking,
determinedtochangehisways.
“Itopenedmyeyestowhatlaydownthe
roadformepersonallyifIdidn’tchange
thosehabits,”Rayrecalled.“Iwouldhave
endeduplikeeveryoneelsewithheartis-
suesordiabeticissues.”
Infact,thewarningsignswerealready
inplaceforthe40-year-oldlegislator.Born
with a heart defect, Ray underwent open
heart surgery three times before his 17th
birthday.Despitethecongenitalheartcon-
dition,Rayjoinedthecircusinhisnative
Peru, Ind., and performed daredevil acts
on the trapeze and high wire. A 30-foot
falldamagedhisheartfurther,something
thatwasn’trevealeduntilthisyear.
Inhindsight,though,itappearstiptoe-
ingacrossawireslightlyoverhalfaninch
thick suspended high above the ground
might not be the most dangerous thing
Rayhaseverdonewithhislife.Yearsof
consumingtoomuchjunkfoodandliving
a sedentary lifestyle might have posed a
fargreaterrisktoRay’shealth.
Solastfallwhenhereturnedhomefrom
Memphis, motivated by what he learned
attheHealthPolicyForumsponsoredby
theRobertWoodJohnsonFoundation,he
was determined to get in shape. The frst
things to go were soft drinks and trips
to fast food restaurants. Then he started
walking. Within three months he had
dropped15poundsandlost5percentof
body fat. His blood-sugar level dropped
from a prediabetic level of 106 to a nor-
malrangeinthelow90s.
It didn’t take Ray long to learn what a
life-alteringdecisionhishealthconversion
hadbeen.OnMarch22,asthe2007ses-
sionoftheUtahlegislatureneareditscon-
clusion,RaywasadmittedtoMcKay-Dee
Hospital in Ogden, Utah, for emergency
surgerytorepairanaorticaneurism.Fac-
inghisfourthheartoperation,Rayrecalled
how his surgeon was gravely concerned
about Ray’s condition. But there was one
glimmer of hope. The doctor explained
thatifRayhadn’tbeeningoodhealth,his
chancesofrecoveringfromsurgerywould
havebeenalotworse.
“The doctor was pretty frank about it.
Hesaid,‘Thisisyourfourthheartsurgery.
Mostpeopledon’tsurvivetwo,’”Raysaid.
“Accordingtothedoctor,thereasonIwas
abletocomethroughthiswasthefactthat
Igotintogreatphysicalshape.”
What began as a mere catchy buzz
phrase, “Promoting Healthy Lifestyles,”
32 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
Utah Legislator Credits Healthy States Policy Meeting for Lifestyle Changes
A CSG Health policy meeting hit home for Utah Rep. Paul Ray, who
recognized some poor health habits in himself and has worked to
change them.
By Tim Weldon
No matter how you look at it…
Wyoming is the place to be September 16–19, 2007
Join the Wyoming Legislature and Council of State Governments-
WEST for policy and professional development sessions vital to every
lawmaker in the region. From energy to water to health and education
and much more, the CSG-WEST annual meeting is the place to be.

And it all begins in the Grand Teton National Park.
REGISTER NOW!
Click on www.csgwest.org for more information or call 916-553-4423.
ataconferenceofstatelegislatorsturned
into a serious personal commitment for
Ray. When the 2007 General Legisla-
tive Session began, Ray turned into a
health evangelist, admonishing anyone
whowouldlistenabouttheneedtoadopt
healthy lifestyles. Along the way, he en-
couraged members of the HHS commit-
teetoparticipateinafriendlycompetition
involvingexerciseandhealthynutrition.
AccordingtotherulesofUtah’s“Gold
Medal Committee,” legislators earned
points for miles walked, percentage of
bodyfatandpoundslost,andservingsof
fruitandvegetableseaten.Everymember
received a pedometer. Two pharmaceu-
tical companies donated $1,000 to the
charity or school of the winner’s choice.
Not surprisingly, Ray outdistanced his
colleaguesandwonthecompetition.
Inspired by what he learned at the
Health Policy Forum, Ray said he typi-
callywalked10milesperdayduringthe
legislative session—a total of 1.2 mil-
lion steps in less than three months. In
addition to getting in shape, Ray said he
was also motivated by wanting to set an
example to others for the need to live a
healthylifestyle.
“We’regoingtotellthesekidsthatthey
shouldeatright,exerciseandlivehealthy
lifestyles,andyetwe’renot doingit,” he
said. “My whole point in doing this was
to set a good example. We’re preaching
to them about being active and eating
therightfoods.Let’satleastfollowwhat
we’retryingtoteach.”
Utah Rep. Doug Aagard sits behind
RayintheHousechamber,andhasseen
Ray’s commitment to wellness frsthand.
“He’s a physical ftness nut, and it’s
probablyagoodthingheis,orhewould
havehadalottoughertimewithhisheart
surgery,”Aagardsaid.
Ray confesses he needed a nudge to
starthimdownthepathtowardahealthy
lifestyle. That nudge came after hearing
TennesseeGov.PhilBredesentalkabout
his own weight problems during the
HealthPolicyForum.
“What it really showed me is how
Americans are living such an unhealthy
lifestyle.Ilookedatmyown.Ilookedat
my diet, which was awful. I determined
therethatIwasn’tgoingtobeanothersta-
tistic,”Raysaid.
DebraMiller,directorofHealthPolicy
atCSG,saidshewaspleasedthatalegis-
latortookinformationabouthealthpolicy
issuessopersonally.
“When he told about his legislative ft-
nesscompetitionatourmostrecentmeet-
ing on childhood obesity, he challenged
otherlegislatorstotakesimilaractionin
their states, in essence to walk the talk.
At least one legislator seems committed
tofollowup,”Millersaid.
These days, Ray is fercely adhering to
his ftness regime as if his life depends
on it—which it may. On Sept. 22, Ray is
scheduledtosetoffonhismostambitious
andarduousphysicalactivityyet,athree-
day,300-milebicycletripfromSt.George,
Utah,neartheArizonastateline,through
thedesert,toSaltLakeCity.Whenhear-
rivesattheCapitolsteps,Raysaidhewill
announce legislation to create a program
tomakepreventivehealthcareavailableto
morelowincomefamilies.
The bicycle trip, not coincidentally,
will mark the six month anniversary of
his heart surgery, reminding him and
others of the importance to get—and to
stay—physically ft.
—Tim Weldon is a health policy analyst
at CSG.
3+ state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
Behind the scenes in Nebraska—amid
collegecorridorsandcapitolhallways,prai-
ries and private industry—university sci-
entistsareresearchingcuresforAIDSand
avian fu, examining the realities of global
warming, studying infuences of chemicals
inourfood,anddecipheringsecretstothe
clean,safeuseoffossilfuels.
SomethingisstirringinNebraska,asin-
novationbubblestothefrontburner,thanks
to a surge of federal dollars and signifcant
new opportunities that bode well for the
economic development of this Midwest-
ern state. Behind the scenes, EPSCoR (the
Experimental Program to Stimulate Com-
petitive Research) is helping to expand the
roleoftechnologyexplorationinNebraska,
redefne partnerships that link university
inventors with paths to commercialization
andstrengthenthestate’seconomy.
EPSCoRisafederalprogramdesignedto
increaseandenhancescienceandengineer-
ingresearchcapacityinstateslikeNebras-
ka.Thestate’sEPSCoRagencyrecognizes
the importance of that vision, understand-
ingNebraskamustdiversifyitsinvestments
beyond agriculture and look to signifcant
improvementsintheacademicresearchin-
frastructure.
Since 1991 Nebraska’s higher education
institutions have received more than $159
million through the efforts of EPSCoR/
IDeA(theInstitutionalDevelopmentAward
Program).Themoneyhasbeenusedtofuel
the discovery and innovation processes,
serve as a catalyst for faculty to engage in
statewide scientifc research, and help turn
researchdiscoveriesintoenergyforNebras-
ka’seconomy.
“To remain competitive, we need to en-
courage new development in industries
drivenbyinnovation,”NebraskaGov.Dave
Heineman said. “Opportunities to expand
theresearchbeingdoneinourstateareim-
portant to maintaining a competitive edge
inthismoderneconomywhereadvancesin
researcharehelpingfosternewbusinessand
jobgrowth.”
AcrossNebraska,infact,leadersarebe-
ginningtocomprehendthemajoreconomic
impact research universities can have on
the state, the region and the nation—and
that stronger universities translate into
stronger research and stronger economic
development. EPSCoR has been particu-
larlysuccessfulinsupportingthisendeavor,
understanding that if Nebraska is to stay
competitiveinthenationalandglobalmar-
ketplace,ourstatemustexpandthescience
andtechnologybaseofexpertisetomakeit
amoreattractivevenueforincomingindus-
trialinvestment.
The National Science Foundation (NSF)
startedtheEPSCoRprogramin1979under
acongressionalmandate,andNebraskawas
designatedanEPSCoRstatein1991.Each
agency has its own unique favor, and the
Nebraska program has targeted university
researchandeconomicdevelopmentasthe
foundation of its core mission. The result
is a unique partnership of higher educa-
tion,privateindustry,andstateandfederal
agencies, featuring a powerful alliance of
the state’s four major research universities:
CreightonUniversity(CU),theUniversityof
Nebraska-Lincoln(UNL),theUniversityof
NebraskaMedicalCenter(UNMC)andthe
UniversityofNebraskaatOmaha(UNO).
“The university recognizes the consider-
ablepotentialofthisinitiative,”saidCharles
Wilson,chairoftheUniversityofNebraska
Board of Regents. “There is power in the
collaborativeeffortsamongouruniversities,
andpowerintherecognitionthatacademic
researchisimperativeforourstate.”
Here’showthesystemworks:Participat-
ing federal agencies allocate part of their
budgetstoEPSCoRprograms.ThenallEP-
SCoRstates—jurisdictionsthathistorically
have received lesser amounts of federal
researchmoney,suchasNebraska—areeli-
gibletocompeteforthosefederalresearch
dollars. EPSCoR funding for academic
research has nearly tripled since 1991, ac-
cording to the Association of University
TechnologyManagers(AUTM).
Nebraska’sEPSCoRhasdonewell.The
programisadministeredbytheUniversity
of Nebraska’s central administration and
a committee appointed by the governor.
EPSCoR offcials oversee the selection
processofresearchproposalsensuringthe
investments are congruent with the state
vision for economic development as well
asforthestrategicscienceandtechnology
plans. Attracting considerable funding
fromfederalagenciessuchastheNational
Science Foundation and the National In-
FUELS ECONOMY
EPSCoR Helps Stir Economic Development In Nebraska
The Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research aims to increase and enhance
science and engineering research capacity in states like Nebraska. Since 1991 Nebraska’s higher
education institutions have received more than $159 million through the efforts of EPSCoR/IDeA
(the Institutional Development Award Program). That money has helped not only in funding
research, it’s also boosted the state’s economy.
By F. Fred Choobineh and Pete Kotsiopulos
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z 3S
stitutes of Health, university faculty are
involvedincollaborativeresearchthatcan
change the world: research into biofuels,
global warming, biomedical procedures,
curesforviraldiseases.
University research has become a big
business, according to the AUTM, which
found that in 2005 major universities had
received about $40 billion in research and
development funding. New NSF statistics
indicate the University of Nebraska is part
of that wave with $333.1 million in R&D
spendingfor2006andarankingofNo.27
among all public universities in the Unit-
ed States (up six places and an 11 percent
spendingincreasefromthepreviousyear).
“This research has both immediate and
long-term benefts to Nebraska,” said Uni-
versity of Nebraska President James B.
Milliken. “The Bureau of Labor Statistics
reports that every $1 million of academic
R&D spending supports about 33 jobs in
Nebraska. Since the university spent about
$333 million in research and development
lastyear,thatmeansthecreationofalmost
11,000jobs.
“Longer term, the benefts are even great-
er.Innovativeresearchisatalentmagnetfor
excellentfacultyandstudents.Italsoattracts
theinterestoftheprivatesectorandcanbe
the basis for partnerships, investment, and
ultimately new companies and new jobs
thatsustainbusinessgrowth,andkeepour
brightest young graduates in the state. Re-
search contributes to an environment in
which innovation is valued and rewarded:
an environment that makes local, national
andinternationalbusinessessitupandtake
notice,”Millikensaid.
Bottomline—EPSCoR’sgoalistolever-
age these research dollars into economic
growth as the agency constantly explores
additional programs to improve the state’s
researchandeconomicenvironment.
The Nebraska Engineering, Science and
Technology Internship Program links stu-
dents with private and public sectors to
support technology transfer and economic
development.Since2001whentheprogram
was created, 79 students from six colleges
anduniversitieshavebeenmatchedwith50
Nebraska business enterprises. Steve Cass,
fromtheNebraskaCenterforExcellencein
Electronics, explained: “As a not-for-proft
entity, charged with assisting Nebraska’s
manufacturers in getting products to mar-
ket,wegotadditionalresearchstafftotrack
downanddevelopprogramstohelpmanu-
facturers.”
The University-Industry R&D Partner-
ship Program was recently developed to
fostercollaborationforresearchanddevel-
opmentbetweenNebraskabusiness,indus-
tryandacademia.
For the last three years Nebraska EP-
SCoR/IDeAhasco-sponsoredanannual
researchconference,invitingcommunity
leaders from across the state to learn
about and recognize the signifcance of
investinginresearchandinnovation,and
theimportanceofformingpublic-private
partnerships.
The frst Nebraska Research Expo in 2005
brought together faculty, graduate students
and businesspeople for sessions on topics
such as bioinformatics, nutritional genom-
ics,cellbiology,nanomaterialsandwireless
communications.In2006theeventgrewto
include a research expo as well as the frst
Nebraska Innovation Forum, showcasing
researchbutalsoencouraginganexchange
of ideas among businesspeople, scientists,
stateandfederallegislators.Thatfertileex-
change became the impetus to develop an
innovativeinvestmentconsortiumcalledthe
Nebraska Angels, a group created to pro-
vide and attain funding for new Nebraska
technologystart-upcompanies.
Theinitiativecontinuedtogainmomen-
tum.LastwinterNebraskaEPSCoR/IDeA
partnered with the University of Nebraska
and Bio Nebraska to co-sponsor the third
annual Research and Innovation Confer-
ence,acombinationofthetwoeventsthat
pulled together hundreds of community
andstateleaders,andcreatednewconnec-
tionsforthoseconductingcutting-edgere-
search and those investing in commercial
enterprises.
“There is fantastic research and inno-
vation occurring in Nebraska,” said Julie
Karavas, president of Bio Nebraska. “The
ResearchandInnovationConferencehelped
providetheinformationandtoolsnecessary
totransformideasintocommerciallyviable
products and services, and provided the
necessarybusinesstoolstoensureinventors
have the business structure needed to sup-
porttheirideas.”
Planninghasalreadystartedforthe2008
ResearchandInnovationConference,which
will provide further training for beginning
entrepreneurs, and a broader assessment
of the impact that research investment has
on Nebraska’s economy. NU and CU fac-
ulty members are now tracking bioscience
investments and entrepreneurial initiatives
inthestatewithparticularattentiontohow
they affect attraction, development and re-
tentionofhumancapital,aswellasestimat-
edimpactsonstateandlocaltaxrevenues.
Nebraska is at a pivotal point in 2007.
Community leaders are recognizing the
value of EPSCoR and the value academic
research can bring to economic and job
growth. The excitement is contagious and
the movement is stirring energy and mo-
mentum.
Nebraskaisonthemarch.There’sabright
economic future here, and offcials are opti-
mistic about what that means for the pros-
pectsofNebraskans.

—F. Fred Choobineh is director of Ne-
braska EPSCoR and a Milton E. Mohr
Distinguished Professor of Engineering at
the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Pete
Kotsiopulos is vice president for University
Affairs at the University of Nebraska with
responsibility for economic development
initiatives.
Dr. Michael Meagher, a researcher
at the University of Nebraska-Lin-
coln, received a University-Industry
Research and Development Partner-
ship Award from Nebraska EPSCoR
for his work with the Schering-
Plough Animal Health Corporation.
The Partnership Award is a collab-
orative effort between a university
researcher and a Nebraska business
enterprise.
36 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
Cooz·ato|at|oos to t|e |e.est C|ass o¦ 3|||L |e||o.s
Photo courtesy of Eastman Kodak Company
Thisyear’sgraduatesoftheBowhayInstituteforLegislative
Leadership Development (BILLD) are the 13th class of law-
makers to complete the intensive fve-day program in Madison,
Wis.
Theannualeventhelpsdeveloplawmakers’leadershipskills
through a curriculum of professional development workshops
and policy seminars. The Bowhay Institute is conducted by
CSG’sMidwesternLegislativeConference,inpartnershipwith
the University of Wisconsin’s RobertM.La Follette School of
PublicAffairs.
Midwestern legislators are awarded BILLD fellowships
throughanonpartisan,competitiveselectionprocess.Applica-
tionsfornextyear’sBowhayInstitute,whichwillbeheldAug.
8–12,2008,willbeavailableinDecember.Formoreinforma-
tion, contact Laura A. Tomaka at 630-925-1922 or ltomaka@
csg.org.
Thisyear’sclassincludedIndianaSen.KarenTallian,South
DakotaSen.SandyJerstad,MinnesotaRep.Augustine“Willie”
Dominquez,MLAFlorMarcelinoofMan.,WisonsinRep.Joan
A.Ballweg.NorthDakotaRep.JasperSchneider,KansasRep.
MarioGoico,IowaRep.TamiWienceck,MinnesotaRep.Carol
McFarlane,IowaRep.AndrewWenthe,NebraskaSen.GregL.
Adams, MLA Dustin Duncan of Saskatchewan, South Dakota
Sen. Michael Vehle, South Dakota Sen. Tom Katus, Michigan
Rep.RobertDean,IowaSen.StaciAppel,WisconsinSen.Lena
C. Taylor, North Dakota Sen. Dave Oehlke, Mike Petersen of
Kansas, Illinois Rep. Deborah L. Graham, Kansas Rep. Raj
Goyle, Ohio Rep. Jay P. Goyal, Wisconsin Rep. Louis J. Mo-
lepske Jr., Michigan Rep. Mark S. Meadows, Ohio Sen. Jason
Wilson,MLAAndyIwanchuckofSaskatchewan,NorthDakota
Rep. Patrick R. Hatlestad, Nebraska Sen. Tom Carlson, Ohio
Rep. Kevin Bacon, Indiana Rep. Thomas P. Dermody, Minne-
sotaRep.JohnBerns,MPPDaveLevacofOntario,IllinoisSen.
MattMurphy,IndianaSen.PhilipL.Boots,MichiganRep.Ken-
nethB.Horn,andNebraskaSen.DavePankonin.Notpictured
isIllinoisSen.KwameRauol.
||eoteoaot Cove·oo·s |o·soe |oe·zv |·oz·a¬s
measureencouragesstatestosetupprograms,likeMissouri’s,
whichenablestateemployeestoserveasmentors.
Members also approved a Reduction of Phosphorous in
HouseholdDishwashingDetergentsresolution.NLGAwillalso
continueitsnationalhealthcampaigns:“EndingCervicalCan-
cerinourLifetime”and“HelpingAmericansBreatheEasier—
AsthmaAwareness.”
NLGAChairmanLt.Gov.JohnCherryofMichiganpraised
thenetworkingdevelopedatNLGAmeetings.
“Thenetworkingestablishedatthesemeetingsdirectlyben-
efts every region of the country,” he said. “Illinois Lt. Gov. Pat
QuinnandIhaveworkedonGreatLakesissues,andVermont
Lt.Gov.BrianDubiehasinvolvedmorethanahalf-dozenlieu-
tenantgovernorsinaerospaceissues.”
The NLGA Executive Committee was selected for 2007–
2008:
North Dakota Lt. Gov. Jack Dalrymple of North Dakota,
centerinphoto,isthenewchair;WisconsinLt.Gov.Bar-
bara Lawton is the new vice chair; and Virginia Lt. Gov.
BillBollingistreasurer.
Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony Brownd, Arkansas Lt. Gov.
BillHalterandFloridaLt.Gov.JeffKottkampwereadded
asnewmemberstotheExecutiveCommittee.
n
n
The states’ seconds-in-command are pursuing programs re-
garding energy, health and children as they welcome new offcers
toleadtheNationalLieutenantGovernorsAssociation(NLGA).
Thirty-onelieutenantgovernorsgatheredinWilliamsburg,Va.,
fortheNLGAAnnualMeetinginJuly.
Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Barbara Lawton had 20 lieutenant gov-
ernors co-sponsor the Energy Independence and Climate Pro-
tection Resolution, pledging to use their offces for the goals of
reducingenergydependenceandgainingcleanerair.Shewill
worktogainfederalresourcestohelpstatesfundincentivesto
bringtheprivatesectorintoactivepartnershipontheissue,ac-
cordingtotheWisconsinRadioNetwork.
Members also passed a resolution in Support of Mentor-
ing youth, sponsored by Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder. The
conferencecalendar
t|e coooc|| o¦ state zove·o¬eots ....csz.o·z 3¯
CSC Sta¦¦e·s /oo·ess |at|ooa| C·ooo o¦ State|oose |oo·oa||sts
Werholtz,Kansassecretaryofcorrections.Thesessionwasmod-
erated by Lori Grange, senior offcer, Pew Center on the States.
Ruiz participated in a panel discussion about the diffculty state
and federal offcials have in getting a grip on the emotionally
charged issue of immigration. Other participants in the session,
moderatedbyPamelaPrah,reporterforStateline.org,wereSheri
Steisel,policyexpertwiththeNationalConferenceofStateLegis-
latures,andGretchenLivingston,researchassistantwithThePew
HispanicCenter.
Trendsinstatebudgetsandhowstatesaregrapplingwithtax
issueswerethetopicsoftheTaxesandBudgetpanelthatincluded
CanagaRetna.AlsoparticipatinginthediscussionwereChrisAt-
kins, senior tax counsel and director of state fscal projects for the
TaxFoundation,andChrisEdwards,directoroftaxpolicystudies
fortheCatoInstitute.
ThreeCouncilofStateGovernmentsstaffmemberspartici-
patedatCapitolbeat,theannualmeetingoftheAssociationof
CapitolReportersandEditors,whichwasheldinPhiladelphia
Aug.2–4.
Michael Thompson, director of CSG’s Justice Center; Edgar
Ruiz, director of the Border Legislative Conference in CSG’s
Western regional offce; and Sujit CanagaRetna, senior fscal ana-
lyst in CSG’s Southern offce, were panelists on sessions designed
toprovidestatehousereportersinsightonthecomplexitiesofis-
sues facing state offcials.
Thompsonparticipatedonapanelabouthowstatesaretaking
ahardlookattherapidlyrisingcostsoftheircorrectionssystems.
OthersonthepanelwereKermitBrashear,aformerstatesenator
and speaker of the legislature in Nebraska, Adam Gelb, project
directorofthePewPublicSafetyPerformanceProject,andRoger
csgspotlight
|.S.. |e×|co State /tto·oevs Ceoe·a| |eet
CriminalInvestigationTechniqueswithErnestFigueroaof
the Nevada Attorney General’s Offce and Kris Dighe of
theU.S.DepartmentofJustice;
Presentation of Evidence in Organized Crime Cases with
Frank Collins of the Arizona Attorney General’s Offce and
AdriannaViecooftheU.S.DepartmentofJustice;and
Responding to Human Traffcking with Imelda Buncab of
Coalition to Abolish Slavery & Traffcking (CAST), Cam-
eron “Kip” Holmes of Arizona Attorney General’s Offce
andAdriannaViecoofU.S.DepartmentofJustice.
Thenextmeetingwilltakeplaceduringthebiannualreunion
of the National Conference of Attorney Generals of Mexico
(CNPJ by its Spanish acronym) in Tuxtla-Gutierrez, Chiapas,
Sept.19–21,2007.
For more information visit www.borderlegislators.org or
www.cwagweb.org,orcontactEdgarRuiz,programdirectorof
theBorderLegislativeConference,at(916)553-4423ext.102or
viae-mailateruiz@csg.org.
n
n
n
StateattorneysgeneralfromtheU.S.andMexicodiscussed
issues of common interest and exchanged information at the
July Conference of Western Attorneys General (CWAG) in
Anaheim,Calif.
The facilitation of binational cooperation among U.S. and
MexicoattorneygeneralsispartofthenewlyestablishedU.S.–
Mexico State Alliance Partnership among The Council of
State Governments, the U.S. Agency for International Devel-
opment(USAID),CWAGandMexicostateattorneysgeneral.
ThepartnershipbuildsontheworkoftheBorderLegislative
Conference.
The meeting—attended by 27 U.S. and fve Mexican state
attorneys general—included a focus on U.S.–Mexico judicial
issuessuchasbinationalcooperation,extraditionsandhuman
traffcking.
Breakout sessions covered specifc topics:
SelectionandRecruitmentofLawEnforcementPersonnel
withBillMickelsonofSouthDakotaDCIandRickOules
oftheCaliforniaDepartmentofJustice;
n
S|C Se|ects |e. C¦¦ce·s
from the 16 member states. The meeting included a plenary
session which featured Rep. Jim Guest of Missouri and Sen.
Larry Martin of South Carolina who discussed the fnancial
andotherimplicationsofthefederalREALIDprogram.For-
merU.S.HouseSpeakerNewtGingrichspokeattheopening
plenarysession.TheclosingplenaryfeaturedDr.WilliamM.
Kelso,directorofarchaeologyforthePreservationofVirginia
Antiquities,whodiscussedthediscoveriesfromtheexcavation
atthe1607JamesFortsite.
TheSLCwillholditsFallIssuesConferenceOct.26–29in
SanAntonio,Texas.
Rep.JuliaHowardofNorthCarolinaisthenewchairofthe
SouthernLegislativeConferenceofTheCouncilofStateGov-
ernments.
HowardwasselectedforthepostduringtheJulySLCmeet-
inginColonialWilliamsburg,Va.
Also selected during the meeting were South Carolina
SpeakeroftheHouseBobbyHarrellasvicechairandSen.Jeff
WentworthofTexasaschair-elect.Theimmediatepastchairis
SpeakerGlennRichardsonofGeorgia.
The61stAnnualMeetingoftheSouthernLegislativeCon-
ferencedrewnearly1,700delegates,legislativestaffandguests
38 state oe.s seote¬be· 200¯
September 2007
Seot. 6–¯ CSG/Eastern Regional Conference—Powerless People Need
Powerful Friends: A Policymaker’s Conference on Early Childhood
Education and Care—Using the Data—||/SS 3ostoo-|eooeov
||b·a·v—¬||too Loob|et·ee 3avs|oe ¬ote|. Cootact ||c|e||e S||-
.a¬be· at (6+6) 383-S¯28 o· mshiwamber@csg.org.
Seot. +6–+` CSG/CSG-WEST—Annual Meeting—|ac'soo |a'e |ooze. \vo.
Cootact |o||ta |··ot|a at (`+6) SS3-++23 o· csgw@csg.org.
Seot. +6–+` CSG/National Association of State Treasurers—NAST Annual
Conference—Soo·|ve·. C·e. Cootact /ooee ¬a¬||too at (8S`)
2++-8+¯+ o· ahamilton@csg.org.
Seot. +`–2+ Alliance Partnership Forum in Conjunction with Mexico’s Nation-
al Conference of Attorneys General (CNPJ)—To×t|a-Cot|e··ez.
C||aoas. Cootact |oza· |o|z at (`+6) SS3-++23 o· eruiz@csg.org.
Seot. 2+–26 CSG/Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision—
2007 Annual Business Meeting—C·|aooo. ||—Co·ooaoo So·|ozs
|eso·t. \a|t L|soev \o·|o. Cootact |e||| |·|ce ¦o· ·ez|st·at|oo |o-
¦o·¬at|oo at kprice@interstatecompact.org o· (8S`) 2++-823S o· ¦o·
¬o·e |o¦o·¬at|oo v|s|t www.interstatecompact.org/resources/annual/
default.shtml.
Seot. 2¯–Cct. 2 CSG/National Emergency Management Association—NEMA An-
nual Conference—C'|a|o¬a C|tv—Co× Cooveot|oo Ceote· aoo
|eoa|ssaoce C'|a|o¬a C|tv. Cootact |a·eo Cobo|o|s at (8S`) 2++-
8++3 o· kcobuluis@csg.org.
Seot. 2`–Cct. + CSG—2007 Henry Toll Fellowship Program—|e×|oztoo. |v.—
¬||too So|tes at |e×|oztoo C·eeo. Cootact |·|sta ||oe|a·t at
krinehart@csg.org o· (8S`)2++-82+` o· www.csg.org/leadership/
tollfellows/default.aspx.
October 2007
Cct. +8–20 XVI Border Legislative Conference-Saota |e. ||. Cootact |oza·
|o|z at (`+6) SS3-++23 o· eruiz@csg.org.
Cct. 26–2` SLC Fall Issues Conference—Sao /otoo|o. T×. Cootact Co||eeo
Coos|oeao o· |||zabet| |e.|s at (+0+)633-+866 o· v|s|t www.slcat-
lanta.org ¦o· aoo|t|ooa| |o¦o·¬at|oo.
November 2007
|ov. S–8 CSG/CSG-WEST—Western Legislative Academy—Co|o·aoo
So·|ozs. Co|o. Cootact |a·v |oo Coooe· at (`+6) SS3-++23 o·
csgw@csg.org.
|ov. ++–++ CSG Annual State Trends and Leadership Forum—C'|a|o¬a C|tv.
C'|a. Cootact |ez|st·at|oo at +-800-800-+`+0 o· registration@csg.org.
|ov. +2–++ CSG/State International Development Organizations—Annual
Meeting—C'|a|o¬a C|tv. C|. Cootact C|·|s \|at|ev. L|·ecto· o¦
|ote·oat|ooa| |·oz·a¬s. at cwhatley@csg.org o· (202) 62+-S+60.
December 2007
Lec. 2–S CSG/National Association of State Treasurers—NAST Treasury
Management Conference—Sao /otoo|o. T×-¬vatt |ezeocv ¬|||
Cooot·v. Cootact /ooee ¬a¬||too at (8S`) 2++-8+¯+ o· ahamil-
ton@csg.org.
February 2008
|eb. +0–+3 CSG/American Probation and Parole Association—Winter Train-
ing Institute—||oeo|×. /z.—||oeo|× ¬vatt |ezeocv. Cootact |·|s
at (8S`) 2++-820+ o· v|s|t www.appa-net.org.
March 2008
|a·c| +0–++ CSG/National Emergency Management Association—NEMA Mid-
Year Conference—\as||oztoo. LC.—|\ |a··|ott. Cootact |a·eo
Cobo|o|s at (8S`) 2++-8++3 o· kcobuluis@csg.org.
|a·c| +2–++ CSG/National Lieutenant Governors Association—State Fed-
eral Meeting—\as||oztoo. L.C. |o· ¬o·e |o¦o·¬at|oo. v|s|t
www.nlga.us.
April 2008
/o·|| 8–+0 CSG/State International Development Organizations—SIDO
White House Forum—\as||oztoo. LC. Cootact C|·|s \|at|ev.
L|·ecto· o¦ |ote·oat|ooa| |·oz·a¬s. at cwhatley@csg.org o· (202)
62+-S+60.
July 2008
|o|v +3–+6 CSG/Midwestern Legislative Conference—63
rd
Annual Meet-
ing—|ao|o C|tv. S.L. Cootact C|oov /oo·e.s at (630) `2S-+`22 o·
candrews@csg.org, o· v|s|t www.csgmidwest.org ¦o· ¬o·e |o¦o·¬at|oo.
August 2008
/oz. 3–6 CSG/American Probation and Parole Association-33rd Annual
Training Institute—|as Vezas. |ev.—||o /||-So|te ¬ote|. Cootact
|·|s at (8S`) 2++-820+ o· v|s|t www.appa-net.org.
/oz. 8–+2 CSG/Midwestern Legislative Conference—14th Annual Bowhay
Institute for Legislative Leadership Development (BILLD)—|ao|-
soo. \|s.—||ooo Ceote· o¦ |×ecot|ve |oocat|oo. Cootact |ao·a
To¬a'a at (630) `2S-+`22 o· ltomaka@csg.org. o· v|s|t http://www.
csgmidwest.org ¦o· ¬o·e |o¦o·¬at|oo.
/oz. `–++ CSG/Southern Governors’ Association—SGA Annual Meeting—
\||te So|o|o· So·|ozs. \V-T|e C·eeob·|e·. Cootact ||z |o·ov at
(202)62+-S8`¯ o· sga@sso.org.
/oz. +6–20 CSG/Southern Legislative Conference—C'|a|o¬a C|tv. C'. Coo-
tact |||zabet| |e.|s at t|e Soot|e·o |ez|s|at|ve Coo¦e·eoce at (+0+)
633-+866 o· v|s|t www.slcatlanta.org ¦o· aoo|t|ooa| |o¦o·¬at|oo.
September 2008
Seot. 8–++ CSG/National Emergency Management Association—NEMA
Annual Conference—|o·t|aoo. C·.—Cootact |a·eo Cobo|o|s at
(8S`) 2++-8++3 o· kcobuluis@csg.org.
December 2008
Lec. +–¯ CSG Annual State Trends and Leadership Forum—C¬a|a. |eb.
Cootact |ez|st·at|oo at +-800-800-+`+0 o· registration@csg.org.
August 2009
/oz. +S–+` CSG/ Southern Legislative Conference—Annual Meeting—\|o-
stoo-Sa|e¬. |c. Cootact |||zabet| |e.|s at t|e Soot|e·o |ez|s|a-
t|ve Coo¦e·eoce at (+0+) 633-+866 o· v|s|t www.slcatlanta.org ¦o·
aoo|t|ooa| |o¦o·¬at|oo.
/oz. `–+2 CSG/Midwestern Legislative Conference—64
th
Annual Meeting—
Cve·|aoo |a·'. |s. Cootact C|oov /oo·e.s at (630) `2S-+`22 o·
candrews@csg.org. o· v|s|t www.csgmidwest.org ¦o· ¬o·e |o¦o·¬at|oo.
Spring and Fall 2008
CSG/State International Development Organizations—SIDO China Market Re-
search Missions. Cootact C|·|s \|at|ev. L|·ecto· o¦ |ote·oat|ooa| |·oz·a¬s. at
cwhatley@csg.org o· (202) 62+-S+60.
This calendar lists meetings as designated by CSG’s Annual
MeetingCommittee.Fordetailsofameeting,callthenumber
listed. “CSG/” denotes affliate organizations of CSG. Visit
www.csg.orgforupdatesandmoreextensivelistings.
Other meetings have value to state offcials. Purchase a meet-
inglistingbycalling(800)800-1910orbye-mailingsales@csg.
org.Announceyourmeetingstothousandsinthestategovern-
mentmarketthroughanadvertisementoraWeblisting.
conferencecalendar
40 Years Ago—September 1967
Returning Prisoners to Society
The problem of assisting prisoners in making the transition
from prison to the community received widespread attention at
thestatelevelinthesummerof1967.AnarticleintheSeptem-
ber1967State Government Newshighlightedtwostateprograms
aimedatassistingthattransition.
Legislation enacted in Illinois authorized the Department of
PublicSafetytoestablishandmaintainbothhalfwayhousesand
work-releasecenters.Thelegislationpermittedthestatetotrans-
fertothosetransitionallocationsanyprisonerwhohadcompleted
atleasthalfofhisminimumsentenceandhadnotbeenconvicted
ofaggravatedkidnapping,treasonormurder.
The South Carolina Board of Corrections authorized the di-
rectorofCorrectionstoestablishcommunitycorrectionscenters
inthestate’smostpopulousregions.Thecommunitycorrections
centersweredesignedtomeettheneedsofprisonerswhowould
be returned to their communities, primarily the lack of educa-
tionandsalableskills.Thecenterswouldalsohelptheprisonerto
graduallybecomeaccustomedtobeingbackinsociety.
Update
The Council of State Governments Justice Center recently
convened a meeting to discuss how to improve collaborations
between state governments and community and faith-based
organizations to serve people released from prisons and jails.
Representatives from federal and state agencies, community and
faith-based organizations, and private foundations offered their
perspectives on the most signifcant factors limiting successful
re-entry partnerships, and what can be done to address them.
The Justice Center convened the meeting with support from the
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, and
the Center for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, U.S. De-
partment of Labor.
25 Years Ago—September 1982
Budgets: From Shaky to Stable
States were having a diffcult time balancing their budgets in
1982. A story in the September 1982 State Government News
reviewed the problems facing state governments after a fnan-
ciallyunstableyear.Thearticlefoundthepersistentrecession,
federalprogramchangesandbudgetcuts,alongwithself-im-
posed tax and spending limitations threatened many states’
fnancial security.
Althoughthefederalgovernmenttendstogetmoreattention,
state offcials are often on the front lines of cutting-edge trends
andissues.Ontheotherhand,sometimesinthecommunityof
state governments, the more things change, the more they stay
thesame.
In print since 1958, State News (formerly State Government
News)haschronicledmanyofthechanges…andcontinuities.
Here’swhatwereportedon:
The article also found ending state balances for the fscal year
felldangerouslybelowthesafetymargin(5percentofexpendi-
tures). The National Association of State Budget Offcers (NAS-
BO)reportedtheprojectedaggregatespendingbalanceforFY
1982was1.5percentdown,downfrom4.5percentin1981.
Update
NASBO’s Fiscal Survey of the States for June 2007 found
most states continue to experience stable fnancial conditions,
due in part to continued revenue growth that has exceeded
budget expectations.
The NASBO report, available at www.nasbo.org, found that
states have been able to absorb “persistent and mounting”
spending pressures in areas such as health care, infrastructure,
education, employee pension systems and employee benefts.
The report did fnd that three states—Michigan, Rhode Is-
land and Wisconsin—were forced to make mid-year budget
cuts totaling approximately $170 million fscal 2007.
10 Years Ago—September 1997
High-Performance Higher Education
Stateswereconsideringtyingfundingtoperformanceforhigh-
ereducationinstitutions,withSouthCarolinaleadingtheway.
According to aSeptember 1997 State Government Newsar-
ticle,SouthCarolinatied100percentofthestate’shighereduca-
tionbudgettomeasurableachievements.Thatbillhadpassedin
1996,and10statessubsequentlypassedsimilarlegislation.
Theperformance-fundingbillestablishedmissionstatements
forthestateandtheinstitutions.Itrewardsinstitutionsforqual-
ityandprescribesconsequencesforfailure.Thestatewasplan-
ningtophasein37performanceindicatorsthrough2000.
Update
According to a report from The Rockefeller Institute of Gov-
ernment in 2000, the number of states using performance fund-
ing for higher education grew from 10 in 1997 to 17 in 2000. The
report found that interest in performance funding had dropped
over the years.
timeline
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