Paranoid personality disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis characterized by paranoia and a pervasive, long-standing suspiciousness and generalized mistrust

of others. Those with the condition are hypersensitive, are easily slighted, and habitually relate to the world by vigilant scanning of the environment for clues or suggestions to validate their prejudicial ideas or biases. They tend to be guarded and suspicious and have quite constricted emotional lives. Their incapacity for meaningful emotional involvement and the general pattern of isolated withdrawal often lend a quality ofschizoid isolation to their life experience.
[1]

instability in mood; black and white thinking, or splitting; chaotic and unstableinterpersonal relationships, self-image, identity, and behavior; as well as a disturbance in the individual's sense of self. In extreme cases, this disturbance in the sense of self can lead to periods of dissociation.
[2]

As an example, clinicians note that splitting in BDP sufferers can cause them to perceive loved ones as enemies. These beliefs may reverse again subsequently. p50,53,54: I Hate You, Don't Leave Me: Understanding the Borderline Personality (1991) ISBN 978-0-380-71305-9 The disturbances comprising BPD can have a pervasive negative impact on many or all of the psychosocial facets of life. This includes difficulties maintaining relationships in work, home, and social settings. Self-harming is a marked symptom and even attempts at or suicide itself are possible, especially without proper care and effective therapy.
[3]

Schizoid personality disorder (SPD) is a personality disorder characterized by a lack of interest in social relationships, a tendency towards a solitary lifestyle, secretiveness, and emotional coldness.
[1]

There is increased prevalence of the disorder in families

withschizophrenia. SPD is not the same as schizophrenia, although they share some similar characteristics such as detachment or blunted affect. Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD or APD) is defined by the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual as "...a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood."
[1]

There is an ongoing debate among clinicians and patients worldwide about terminology and the use of the word borderline, that this disorder should be renamed.
[5] [4]

and some have suggested

The ICD-10 manual has an alternative

definition and terminology to this disorder, called Emotionally unstable personality disorder.

To be diagnosed, an individual must be age 18 or older, as well as have a documented history of a conduct disorder before the age of 15. People having antisocial personality disorder are sometimes referred to as "sociopaths" and "psychopaths." Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a personality disorder defined in DSM-IV and described as a prolonged disturbance of personality function in a person (generally over the age of eighteen years, although it is also found in adolescents), characterized by depth and variability of moods.
[1] [1]

There is related concern that the diagnosis of BPD stigmatizes people and supports pejorative and discriminatory practices.
[6]

It is common for those suffering from

borderline personality disorder and their families to feel compounded by a lack of clear diagnoses, effective treatments, and accurate information. This is true especially because of evidence that this disorder originates in the families of those who suffer from it
[7]

and has a lot to do with Axis IV factors, rather than belonging strictly in Axis

The disorder typically involves unusual levels of

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