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Figurative Language

Essential Question: What are examples of figurative language?

Questions: Notes:
Authors use figurative language to be more
effective, persuasive, and impactful. Figurative
language, or figures of speech, come in many
different forms.

Some examples of figurative language are:


Questions: Notes:
Some examples of figurative language are:
- Simile
- Metaphor
- Personification
- Onomatopoeia
- Oxymoron
- Hyperbole
- Allusion
- Idiom
- Imagery
- Symbolism
- Alliteration
- Irony
- Sarcasm
- Pun
Questions: Notes:
A simile makes a comparison, showing
similarities between two different things. A
simile draws resemblance with the help of the
words like or as.

Examples:

- The soldiers are as brave as lions.


- This class is as boring as watching paint
dry.
- She sings like an angel.
Questions: Notes:
A metaphor makes an implicit, implied or hidden
comparison between two things that are unrelated
but share some common characteristics.

Examples:
- The assignment was a breeze. (This implies
that the assignment was not difficult.)
- It is going to be clear skies from now on.
(This implies that clear skies are not a threat
and life is going to be without hardships)
Questions: Notes:
Personification is when a thing, an idea or an
animal is given human attributes. The non-human
objects are portrayed in such a way that we feel
they have the ability to act like human beings.

Examples:
- The flowers danced in the gentle breeze.
- The fire swallowed the entire forest.
Questions: Notes:
Onomatopoeia is defined as a word, which
imitates the natural sounds of a thing.

Examples:
The buzzing bee flew away.
The sack fell into the river with a splash.
The books fell on the table with a loud thump.
Questions: Notes:
Oxymoron is when two opposite ideas are joined
to create an effect.

Examples:
That was a seriously funny movie.
She is awfully pretty.
Do you have the original copy?
Questions: Notes:
Hyperbole is derived from a Greek word meaning
over-casting. It is an exaggeration of ideas for
the sake of emphasis.

Examples:
Your suitcase weighs a ton!
She is as heavy as an elephant!
I am trying to solve a million issues these
days.
Questions: Notes:
Allusion is a brief and indirect reference to a person,
place, thing or idea of historical, cultural, literary or political
significance. It does not describe in detail the person or
thing to which it refers. It is just a passing comment and
the writer expects the reader to have enough knowledge
to spot the allusion and understand its importance in a
text.

Examples:
Hey! Guess who the new Newton of our school is?
Newton, means a genius student, alludes to a
famous scientist Isaac Newton.
Dont act like a Romeo in front of her. Romeo is
a reference to Shakespeares Romeo, a passionate
lover of Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet.
Questions: Notes:
An Idiom is an expression or phrase that is not interpreted
literally. The phrase is understood as to mean something
quite different from what individual words of the phrase
would imply.

Examples:
Every cloud has its silver lining.
Im so tired, I had to work the graveyard shift.
If we play our cards right, we will be able to have fun
Friday.
Questions: Notes:
Imagery means to use figurative language to represent
objects, actions and ideas in such a way that it appeals to
our physical senses.

Examples:
It was dark and dim in the forest. The words dark
and dim are visual images.
The children were screaming and shouting in the
fields. Screaming and shouting appeal to our
sense of hearing or auditory sense.
He whiffed the aroma of brewed coffee. whiff and
aroma evoke our sense of smell.
Questions: Notes:
Symbolism is the use of symbols to signify ideas and
qualities by giving them symbolic meanings that are
different from their literal sense

Examples:
The dove is a symbol of peace.
A red rose or red color stands for love or romance.
Black is a symbol that represents evil or death.
Questions: Notes:
Alliteration is derived from Latins Latira. It means letters
of alphabet. It is a stylistic device in which a number of
words, having the same first consonant sound, occur close
together in a series.

Examples:
But a better butter makes a batter better.
A big bully beats a baby boy.
The toothless tiger tried to tear the tree down.
Questions: Notes:
Irony is the expression of one's meaning by using language
that normally signifies the opposite, typically for humorous or
emphatic effect.

Verbal Irony
A verbal irony involves what one does not mean. When in
response to a foolish idea, we say, what a great idea! it is a
verbal irony.
Dramatic Irony
A situational irony occurs when, for instance, a man is
chuckling at the misfortune of the other even when the same
misfortune, in complete unawareness, is befalling him.
Questions: Notes:
Sarcasm is derived from French word sarcasmor and also
from a Greek word sarkazein that means tear flesh or
grind the teeth. Somehow, in simple words it means to
speak bitterly.

Sarcasm is a literary and rhetorical device that is meant to


mock with often satirical or ironic remarks with a purpose
to amuse or hurt someone or some section of society
simultaneously

Examples:
I didnt attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I
approved of it. (Mark Twain)
Not the brightest crayon in the box now, are we?
I majored in liberal arts. Will that be for here or to go?
Questions: Notes:
A Pun is a humorous way of using a word or phrase so
that more than one meaning is suggested.

Examples: