Gender as a Variable in Writing Studies

:
Ethics and Methodology
Brian N. Larson, JD PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology

Cite this presentation as:
Larson, B. (2017, February). Gender as a Variable in Writing Studies: Ethics and
Methodology. Conference presentation at Writing Research Across Borders IV, Pontificia
Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.

Slides, notes, and bibliography available at http://tiny.cc/WRAB2017

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