You are on page 1of 11

Designation: G 154 – 06

Standard Practice for
Operating Fluorescent Light Apparatus for UV Exposure of
Nonmetallic Materials1
This standard is issued under the fixed designation G 154; the number immediately following the designation indicates the year of
original adoption or, in the case of revision, the year of last revision. A number in parentheses indicates the year of last reapproval. A
--`,,```,,,,````-`-`,,`,,`,`,,`---

superscript epsilon (e) indicates an editorial change since the last revision or reapproval.
Note—A footnote was added to Table X2.1, Table X2.3 was added, a new Note X2.8 was added, and the year date was changed on June 5, 2006.

1. Scope 2. Referenced Documents
1.1 This practice covers the basic principles and operating 2.1 ASTM Standards: 2
procedures for using fluorescent UV light, and water apparatus D 3980 Practice for Interlaboratory Testing of Paint and
intended to reproduce the weathering effects that occur when Related Materials
materials are exposed to sunlight (either direct or through E 691 Practice for Conducting an Interlaboratory Study to
window glass) and moisture as rain or dew in actual usage. Determine the Precision of a Test Method
This practice is limited to the procedures for obtaining, G 53 Practice for Operating Light- and Water-Exposure
measuring, and controlling conditions of exposure. A number Apparatus (Fluorescent UV-Condensation Type) for Expo-
of exposure procedures are listed in an appendix; however, this sure of Nonmetallic Materials
practice does not specify the exposure conditions best suited G 113 Terminology Relating to Natural and Artificial
for the material to be tested. Weathering Tests for Nonmetallic Materials
G 151 Practice for Exposing Nonmetallic Materials in Ac-
NOTE 1—Practice G 151 describes performance criteria for all exposure
devices that use laboratory light sources. This practice replaces Practice celerated Test Devices That Use Laboratory Light Sources
G 53, which describes very specific designs for devices used for fluores- 2.2 CIE Standard:
cent UV exposures. The apparatus described in Practice G 53 is covered CIE-Publ. No. 85: Recommendations for the Integrated
by this practice. Irradiance and the Spectral Distribution of Simulated
1.2 Test specimens are exposed to fluorescent UV light Solar Radiation for Testing Purposes3
under controlled environmental conditions. Different types of 2.3 ISO Standards:
fluorescent UV light sources are described. ISO 4582, Plastics—Determination of the Changes of Co-
1.3 Specimen preparation and evaluation of the results are lour and Variations in Properties After Exposure to Day-
covered in ASTM methods or specifications for specific light Under Glass, Natural Weathering or Artificial Light4
materials. General guidance is given in Practice G 151 and ISO ISO 4892-1, Plastics—Methods of Exposure to Laboratory
4892-1. More specific information about methods for deter- Light Sources, Part 1, Guidance4
mining the change in properties after exposure and reporting ISO 4892-3, Plastics—Methods of Exposure to Laboratory
these results is described in ISO 4582. Light Sources, Part 3, Fluorescent UV lamps4
1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the ISO DIS 11507, Paint and Varnishes—Exposure of Coat-
standard. ings to Artificial Weathering in Apparatus—Exposure to
1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the Fluorescent Ultraviolet and Condensation Apparatus4
safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the
3. Terminology
responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appro-
priate safety and health practices and determine the applica- 3.1 Definitions—The definitions given in Terminology
bility of regulatory limitations prior to use. G 113 are applicable to this practice.
1.6 This standard is technically similar to ISO 4892-3 and
ISO DIS 11507. 2
For referenced ASTM standards, visit the ASTM website, www.astm.org, or
contact ASTM Customer Service at service@astm.org. For Annual Book of ASTM
Standards volume information, refer to the standard’s Document Summary page on
1
This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee G03 on Weathering the ASTM website.
3
and Durability and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee G03.03 on Available from Secretary, U.S. National Committee, CIE, National Institute of
Simulated and Controlled Exposure Tests. Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899.
4
Current edition approved June 5, 2006. Published June 2006. Originally Available from American National Standards Institute (ANSI), 25 W. 43rd St.,
approved in 1997. Last previous edition approved in 2005 as G 154 – 05. 4th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

Copyright © ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, PO Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959, United States.

Copyright ASTM International 1
Provided by IHS under license with ASTM
No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale

.1.2).2 The lamp’s irradiance level.1 Aging of the glass used in some types of lamps can reproducibility has been established among devices for the result in changes in transmission. the distance to the lamp array.1. biological attack. The more common may be test specimen. They emit significant amounts of radiation below 300 nm.3 Thickness of glass used for lamp tube can have large effects on the amount of short wavelength UV radiation 5. 4.`.3.2. NOTE 6—The main application for UVA-340 lamps is for simulation of the short and middle UV wavelength region of daylight.. Alternatively. tencies in the light falling on the samples.1 Actual irradiance levels at the test specimen surface 4. in different models of apparatus should not be made unless 6.2.7 The timing of a light/dark cycle. NOTE 8—Fluorescent UVB lamps have the spectral distribution of 6.2. the term sunlight is identical to the terms detailed description of the type(s) of lamp(s) used should be daylight and solar irradiance.3. NOTE 7—The main application for UVA-351 lamps is for simulation of 5. A variety of fluorescent UV lamps can outdoors.3 Spectral Irradiance: effects of the UV portion of sunlight. 6. or 4.2 Accumulation of dirt or other residue on lamps can correlation has been established among devices for the material affect irradiance. be used for this procedure.. 10. 4..2.2 Variation in results may be expected when operating conditions are varied within the accepted limits of this practice. these lamp types.3 Comparison of results obtained from specimens exposed tion of fluorescent UV lamps: in same model of apparatus should not be made unless 6. 5. and heat. the exposure may simulate the effects of sunlight through window glass. water vapor onto the test specimen or by spraying the speci.1 Specimens are exposed to repetitive cycles of light and lamps in a fluorescent UV light apparatus may produce major inconsis- moisture under controlled environmental conditions..2 Definitions of Terms Specific to This Standard—As used spectrum may cause significant differences in test results. and 5. these exposures 6. and to monitor and control the radiant energy is recommended.. See Ap- pendix X1 for lamp application guidelines. 6. the age of the lamps. Summary of Practice NOTE 3—Do not mix different types of lamps.2. 6. Consequently. both.1 Laboratory Light Source—The light source shall be global solar radiation.1. mens with demineralized/deionized water.2 Several factors can affect the spectral power distribu- 4. Apparatus radiation peaking near the 313-nm mercury line.1 Moisture is usually produced by condensation of specifically designed to ensure a uniform spectral distribution.1. These --`.3 Spectral Irradiance of UVB-313 Lamps—The spec- It is recommended that at least three replicates of each material tral power distribution of UVB-313 fluorescent lamps shall evaluated be exposed in each test to allow for statistical comply with the requirements specified in Table 3.4 Uniformity and durability of phosphor coating.4 The timing of the light and moisture exposure.1. and 4.1 The fluorescent lamp.1 It is recommended that a similar material of known the short and middle UV wavelength region of daylight which has been performance (a control) be exposed simultaneously with the filtered through window glass (3). The particular testing Terminology G 113. NOTE 2—Caution: Refer to Practice G 151 for full cautionary guidance applicable to all laboratory weathering devices. including the 6. application determines which lamp should be used. moisture.3. G 154 – 06 3. unless the apparatus has been 4.2 The exposure condition may be varied by selection of: 4. NOTE 4—Many fluorescent lamps age significantly with extended use. and laboratory temperature. the air temperature within the chamber and the ambient 4.1. 6.1 Spectral Irradiance of UVA-340 Lamps for Daylight would include moisture in the form of condensing humidity. evaluation of results. 4.```. These numbers represent the deterioration caused by localized weather phenomena. UV—The spectral power distribution of UVA-340 fluorescent lamps shall comply with the requirements specified in Table 1.2.2. and saltwater expo. may vary due to the type or manufacturer of the lamp used. The actual peak emissions are at 343 and 350 nm.`. global as they are defined in stated in detail in the test report.3 The type of moisture exposure.5 The temperature of light exposure.2 Spectral Irradiance of UVA-351 Lamps for Daylight Therefore.1. test specimen to provide a standard for comparative purposes.2. to be tested. a significant reduction in the short wavelength UV emission of 4.6 The temperature of moisture exposure.2. Copyright ASTM International 2 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale .`.1 The use of this apparatus is intended to induce property 6. the nominal cut on wavelength of 6. Differences in lamp intensity or See Table 3. Significance and Use transmitted.1.2. no reference shall be made to results from the use of UV Behind Window Glass—The spectral power distribution of this practice unless accompanied by a report detailing the UVA-351 lamp for Daylight UV behind Window Glass shall specific operating conditions in conformance with the Section comply with the requirements specified in Table 2. A in this practice. Aging of glass can result in material to be tested. sure..````-`-`. the use of a radiometer 4.2. such as characteristic nominal wavelength (in nm) of peak emission for each of atmospheric pollution.4 Comparison of results obtained from specimens exposed some lamp types.1. changes associated with the end use conditions.2. Exposures are not intended to simulate the identified as UVA-340 and UVA-351. Mixing different types of 4. that may result in aging processes not occurring fluorescent UV lamps.1. respectively. Follow the apparatus manufacturer’s instructions on the procedure neces- sary to maintain desired irradiance (1. Use of this lamp is not recommended for sunlight simulation.1. 6.`--- NOTE 5—Fluorescent UVA lamps are available with a choice of spectral exposures may include a means to introduce moisture to the power distributions that vary significantly. Typically.

2. glass. the instruments associated with the exposure appa.0 percentage of the total irradiance from 290 to 400 nm.F PercentC Spectral Bandpass Minimum Window Glass Filtered Maximum Wavelength l in nm PercentC Daylight PercentD. subjected to the same influences as the test specimens. responsible for determining conformance to Table 1.E. For any individual fluorescent UVA-340 lamp.5 34. Calibration schedule and 6. thermometers.. Contact the expected to differ between exposures using fluorescent UV devices in which the manufacturer of the fluorescent UV devices for specific spectral power distribution spectral power distributions differ by as much as that allowed by the tolerances.`. turer’s recommendation for lamp replacement and rotation. these devices control by black panel temperature results. Annex A1 states how to percentage of the total irradiance from 300 to 400 nm. 6. aging recommendations of the device manufacturer. in addition to the radiant source. Annex A1 states how to B The data in Table 1 are based on the rectangular integration of 65 spectral --`. structions. For any C The minimum and maximum columns will not necessarily sum to 100 % individual spectral power distribution. Because the primary data based on Table 4 of CIE Publication Number 85.2 Test Chamber—The design of the test chamber may expressed as a percentage of the total irradiance from 300 to 800 nm. Test results can be power distributions differ by as much as that allowed by the tolerances. because they represent the minimum and maximum for the data used.0 65. perature sensors shall be in accordance with the descriptions ratus (for example.5. it shall comply with the exposed face of the specimen or for the immersion of the test requirements in Practice G 151. ture in the form of water spray. specimen face complies with the requirements in Practice Thermometers shall conform to the descriptions found in G 151. While this data is provided for comparison purposes only. and radiometers) require periodic calibration to ensure repeatability of test NOTE 9—Typically.. Whenever possible.1 # 0. it atmospheric conditions and altitude chosen to maximize the fraction of short is desirable for the laboratory accelerated light source to provide a spectrum that wavelength solar UV (defined in ASTM G 177) that has been filtered by window is a close match to the benchmark solar spectrum. F For the benchmark window glass filtered solar spectrum. power distributions for fluorescent UV devices operating with UVA 340 lamps of B The data in Table 2 are based on the rectangular integration of 21 spectral various lots and ages. individual spectral power distribution. there are limited data available for visible light emissions of fluorescent UV lamps.5. Practice G 151..6. See Appendix X3 for more information comparing the this data is provided for comparison purposes only.1 The thermometer shall be mounted on the specimen sitioning may be required to obtain uniform exposure of all rack so that its surface is in the same relative position and specimens to UV radiation and temperature.9 5. CIE 85 Table 4. and specimen repo.1 Water Spray—The test chamber may be equipped with 6. or high humidity.2. When required.4 Radiometer—The use of a radiometer to monitor and a means to introduce intermittent water spray onto the test control the amount of radiant energy received at the sample is specimens under specified conditions. accelerated light source to provide a spectrum that is a close match to this F For the benchmark daylight spectrum.8 % 6..3 l < 300 0. data for the fluorescent UVA-340 lamp used. The un-insulated the specimens such that the uniformity of irradiance at the thermometers may be made of either steel or aluminum.8 A Data in Table 1 are the irradiance in the given bandpass expressed as a 360 < l # 400 30. timers. Follow manufac.E.F PercentC l < 290 0. it is desirable for the laboratory solar radiation data used in this standard with that for CIE 85 Table 4. atmospheric conditions and altitude chosen to maximize the fraction of short D The window glass filtered solar radiation data is for a solar spectrum with wavelength solar UV.02.````-`-`. The glass transmission is the average for a series of single strength window E Previous versions of this standard used solar radiation data from Table 4 of glasses tested as part of a research study for ASTM Subcommittee G3. The spectral power distribution data is for lamps within the data are at least the three sigma limits from the mean for all measurements.```. 6. The spectral power distribution data is for lamps within the power distributions for fluorescent UV devices operating with UVA 351 lamps of aging recommendations of the device manufacturer. the UV irradiance (300 to 400 nm) is 8. dry found in Practice G 151. information comparing the solar radiation data used in the standard with that for there are limited data available for visible light emissions of fluorescent UV lamps. calibration should be traceable to only.`.2 % and the visible irradiance (400 to 800 nm) is 91.3 38. For any individual fluorescent UV device maximum limits of Table 1..2 Lamp replacement.1 The radiant source(s) shall be located with respect to white panel thermometers may be used.8 9..`. national or international standards.0 0. the UV irradiance (290 to 400 nm) is benchmark window glass filtered solar spectrum. the calculated percentage in each bandpass must exposures using devices with fluorescent UVA-340 lamps in which the spectral fall within the minimum and maximum limits of Table 2. the calculated percentage for the band- the calculated percentage in each bandpass must fall within the minimum and passes in Table 2 will sum to 100 %. Because the vary. may provide for bandpass.2 66. 9.2 320 < l # 360 60.B Fluorescent UVA-351 Lamps for Daylight UV Behind Window Spectral Bandpass Minimum Benchmark Solar Maximum GlassA.3 360 < l # 400 26. Contact the manufacturer of the fluorescent UV devices for specific spectral power D The benchmark solar radiation data is defined in ASTM G 177 and is for distribution data for the lamps used.3 Instrument Calibration—To ensure standardization and ture control. means of controlling temperature and relative humidity. the calculated percentage for the band. specimen in water. 6.2 32. If a radiometer is used. Positioning and calibration of chamber air tem- accuracy. The minimum and maximum various lots and ages.2 % expressed as a E Previous versions of this standard used window glass filtered solar radiation percentage of the total irradiance from 290 to 800 nm. because they represent the minimum and maximum for the data used. Test results can be expected to differ between operating with UVA 351 lamps. 6. but it should be constructed from corrosion resistant primary emission of fluorescent UV lamps is concentrated in the 300 to 400 nm material and.5 54.. The manufacturer is determine relative spectral irradiance.01 290 # l # 320 5. lamp rotation.9 While CIE Publication Number 85.9 40. See Appendix X3 for more emission of fluorescent UV lamps is concentrated in the 300 to 400 nm bandpass. UV sensors. bulb sensors. The minimum and maximum C The minimum and maximum columns will not necessarily sum to 100 % data are at least the three sigma limits from the mean for all measurements. condensation.5 300 # l # 320 1.5 Thermometer—Either insulated or un-insulated black or 6. wet bulb sensors.8 320 < l # 360 60. humidity sensors.`--- determine relative spectral irradiance. G 154 – 06 TABLE 1 Relative Ultraviolet Spectral Power Distribution TABLE 2 Relative Spectral Power Distribution Specification for Specification for Fluorescent UVA-340 Lamps for Daylight UVA. The spray shall be Copyright ASTM International 3 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale .0 65. 6.2 Some specifications may require chamber air tempera- 6.5 3.6 Moisture—The test specimens may be exposed to mois- procedure should be in accordance with manufacturer’s in.8 % and the visible irradiance (400 to 800 nm) is 90. The manufacturer is A Data in Table 2 are the irradiance in the given bandpass expressed as a responsible for determining conformance to Table 1.B Wavelength l in nm PercentC Radiation PercentD. provision shall be made for the spraying of water on the test specimen for the formation of condensate on the recommended. For any passes in Table 1 will sum to 100 %.

These are not neces- aging recommendations of the device manufacturer. B The data in Table 3 are based on the rectangular integration of 44 spectral 8.1 Identify each test specimen by suitable indelible mark- maximum limits of Table 3.8 Apparatus to Assess Changes in Properties—Use the Fluorescent UVB 313 lampsA. E Previous versions of this standard used solar radiation data from Table 4 of testing)..```.1 Spray Water Quality—Spray water shall have a Misleading results may be obtained by this method. This data is provided for comparison purposes only.2 7. number of repetitive cycles.5 Specimen Repositioning—Periodic repositioning of the water quality instructions. vapor.9 7.3 Mounting of Test Specimens—Attach the specimens to For the benchmark solar spectrum. The manufacturer is responsible for determining conformance to Table 3. steel. F 9.. use unexposed file specimens to quantify the property.1 Any exposure conditions may be used as long as the power distributions for fluorescent UV devices operating with UVB 313 lamps of exact conditions are detailed in the report. D The benchmark solar radiation data is defined in ASTM G 177 and is for appropriate properties in accordance with recognized ASTM or atmospheric conditions and altitude chosen to maximize the fraction of short international standards.````-`-`.4 290 # l # 320 47.`. Such instruments shall be shielded from the lamp specimen placement. the UV irradiance (290 to 400 nm) is 9.. sarily preferred and no recommendation is implied.`.3 5. If required (for example. The repositioning schedule shall be agreed test results.5. Brass. Care should be taken conditions to operate continuously throughout the required to keep silica levels below 0.2 % expressed as a percentage of the specimen holders in the equipment in such a manner that the total irradiance from 290 to 800 nm.5. Annex A1 states how to 8.9 40.1 If irradiance at positions farther from the center of the 6.1. The spectral power distribution data is for lamps within the some representative exposure conditions. A Data in Table 3 are the irradiance in the given bandpass expressed as a percentage of the total irradiance from 250 to 400 nm. or copper shall 9. These C The minimum and maximum columns will not necessarily sum to 100 % conditions are provided for reference only.2 Condensation—The test chamber may be equipped the positions farthest from the center of the specimen area is at with a means to cause condensation to form on the exposed least 90 % of that measured at the center of the exposure area.3 Relative Humidity—The test chamber may be exposure area is between 70 and 90 % of that measured at the equipped with a means to measure and control the relative center.2 Place specimens only in the exposure area where the not be used in the vicinity of the test specimens. specimens during exposure is not necessary if the irradiance at 6.. which then is made to condense on the test specimens. fill all of the spaces. Test Specimen 360 < l # 400 1.B apparatus required by the ASTM or other standard that Spectral Bandpass Minimum Benchmark Solar Maximum describes determination of the property or properties being Wavelength l in nm PercentC Radiation PercentD. NOTE 10—Evaluation of color and appearance changes of exposed materials shall be made based on comparisons to unexposed specimens of uniformly distributed over the samples. l < 290 1.F PercentC monitored. 9. Because the primary emission of the specimens are not subject to any applied stress. Interruptions to service the apparatus tively produce water of the required quality. the 9.2 Determine which property of the test specimens will be Contact the manufacturer of the fluorescent UV device for specific spectral power evaluated.1 ppm. steel have been found acceptable. 9. radiation. See Practice G 151 for detailed 9. since the masked conductivity below 5 µS/cm.7 Specimen Holders—Holders for test specimens shall be sure period to ensure that each receives an equal amount of made from corrosion resistant materials that will not affect the radiant exposure.8 5. For any individual spectral power distribution.7 54. Copyright ASTM International 4 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale . water used should be reported. in many cases will affect results.5. Maintain these conditions a combination of deionization and reverse osmosis can effec..0 43. Corrosion resistant alloys of aluminium or stainless upon by all interested parties. Test results can be expected to differ between exposures conducted in fluorescent UV devices using UVB 313 lamps in which the ing.. destructive wavelengthsolar UV. but not on areas used in testing. because they represent the minimum and maximum for the data used.`--- and to inspect specimens shall be minimized. Appendix X2 shows various lots and ages.2 7.1. using blank limited data available for visible light emissions of fluorescent UV lamps. face of the test specimen. Very low levels of silica in spray water can cause significant 9.1. shielding the face of test specimens with an opaque cover for the purpose taminate the water used. The minimum and maximum data are at least the three sigma limits from the mean for all measurements. Prior to exposing the specimens. In addition to distillation. 6.6. To assure fluorescent UV lamps is concentrated in the 300 to 400 nm bandpass.`. See Appendix X3 for more information comparing the See ISO 4582 for detailed guidance.8 65. CIE Publication Number 85. G 154 – 06 TABLE 3 Relative Spectral Power Distribution Specification for 6. one of the following three techniques shall be used for humidity. Test Conditions determine relative spectral irradiance. panels of corrosion resistant material if necessary. the calculated percentage for the band- passes in Table 3 will sum to 100 %. throughout the exposure.. The spray system shall the same material which have been stored in the dark. The pH of the --`.6.1 Refer to Practice G 151. Typically. there are uniform exposure conditions. Masking or be made from corrosion resistant materials that do not con. spectral power distributions differ by as much as that allowed by the tolerances.8 % and the visible irradiance (400 to 800 nm) is 90.6. of showing the effects of exposure on one panel is not recommended. solar radiation data used in this standard with that for CIE 85 Table 4. portion of the specimen is still exposed to temperature and humidity that and leave no observable stains or deposits on the specimens. For any individual UVB 313 lamp.9 320 < l # 360 26. quantify the distribution data for the device operated with the UVB 313 lamp used. irradiance is at least 90 % of the maximum irradiance.1 Periodically reposition specimens during the expo- 6.E. water vapor shall be Irradiance uniformity shall be determined in accordance with generated by heating water and filling the chamber with hot Practice G 151.4 Exposure to Test Conditions—Program the selected test deposits on the surface of test specimens. Procedure calculated percentage in each bandpass must fall within the minimum and 9. 9. contain less than 1-ppm solids.

that the gloss values for a series of materials could be ranked with a high level of reproducibility between laboratories.1. time or radiant exposure in an exposure test conducted accord- 9. periodic maintenance to maintain uniform exposure conditions. In round-robin studies conducted by Subcommittee mance differences can be determined. fluorescent UV lamps. laboratory weathering. a definite property level after a specific time or radiant weathering Copyright ASTM International 5 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale .`.```. accelerated weathering.1.3 If a standard or specification for use between two or Perform required maintenance and calibration in accordance three parties requires a definite property level after a specific with manufacturer’s instructions. 11.2 If a standard or specification for general use requires lightfastness. ratories or organizations that would normally conduct the --`.8 Expose the test specimens for the specified period of ing to this practice.. on statistical analysis of results from at least two separate..1 accelerated. The variability shown in these round-robin studies restricts the use 12. light. take care not to handle or disturb the measure the property of interest.7 Apparatus Maintenance—The test apparatus requires exposure and property measurement. 9.`. according to this practice have not been established through round-robin testing.2 Bias—Bias can not be determined because no accept- exposed in different laboratories using identical test devices able standard weathering reference materials are available.5). neously with the test specimen(s) in the same device. the 60° gloss values of replicate PVC tape specimens 11. G03.03.. quantify the appropriate independent exposures in each laboratory. non-metallic materials.6 Inspection—If it is necessary to remove a test specimen variability due to the exposure and the test method used to for periodic inspection. ultraviolet. and exposure cycles showed significant variability (3). obtained in a round-robin that takes into consideration the 9.1. 12.. See Practice G 151 for further guidance.`. 11. sure.````-`-`. When 10.. performance requirements for materials 11.. Report reproducibility in results from an exposure test conducted 10.1. Keywords of “absolute specifications” such as requiring a specific prop. the specified property level shall be based on results irradiance uniformity requirements as defined in 9.1 The repeatability and reproducibility of results ob.1 Precision: material.5. the specified property level shall be based exposure. NOTE 11—Periods of exposure and evaluation of test results are 11.1. expo- erty level after a specific exposure period (4.1. Precision and Bias shall be specified in terms of comparison (ranked) to a control 11. The control specimens shall be exposed simulta- 11.1 The test report shall conform to Practice G 151. After inspection. The round-robin shall be test surface. G 154 – 06 9.1.5. temperature.9 At the end of the exposure. The design of the properties in accordance with recognized ASTM or interna.`--- 9. The tained in exposures conducted according to this practice will specific control material used shall be agreed upon by the vary with the materials being tested. Expose replicates of the test specimen and being measured. durability.3 To compensate for test variability randomly position exposure in an exposure test conducted according to this replicate specimens within the exposure area which meets the practice. the material property concerned parties. and the specific test conditions and cycles that the control specimen so that statistically significant perfor- are used.1 demonstrated addressed in Practice G 151. experiment used to determine the specification shall take into tional standards and report the results in conformance with consideration the variability due to the exposure and the test Practice G 151.. method used to measure the property of interest.4 The round-robin studies cited in 11. the test specimen shall be conducted according to Practice E 691 or Practice D 3980 and returned to the test chamber with its test surface in the same shall include a statistically representative sample of all labo- orientation as previously tested.

2 nm) throughout the spectral region used. lowest measurement wavelength must be reported.2 All spectral power distributions (SPDs) shown in X1.2 Simulations of Direct Solar UV Radiation Exposures: X1. DETERMINING CONFORMANCE TO RELATIVE SPECTRAL POWER DISTRIBUTION TABLES (Mandatory Information for Equipment Manufacturers) A1. ( El i l 5C niques can be used to evaluate spectral power distribution data. Manufacturers of equip. or Table 3.2 The relative spectral power distribution data for this li5B standard were developed using the rectangular integration ( El i li5A technique. Eq A1.. A = lower wavelength of wavelength bandpass.```. equal for all bandpasses). determining conformance to the relative spectral irradiance ment claiming conformance to this standard shall determine requirements for a fluorescent UVB-313 lamp.. or 250 increments. may NOTE X1. and ment cannot measure wavelengths as low as 250 nm. X1.`.1 General: specimen surface will vary due to the type and/or manufacturer of the lamp used. AZ at solar noon at the summer spectrum. and provide information on main. this practice.1.`--- the type(s) of lamp(s) used shall be stated in detail in the test report. When comparing relative where: spectral power distribution data to the spectral power distribu. G 154 – 06 ANNEX A1. Actual irradiance levels at the test 300 nm (that is considered the “cut-on” wavelength for Copyright ASTM International 6 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale . measurement conformance to the spectral power distribution tables for all from 250 nm to 400 nm is required.1) irradiance using rectangular integration. A1. measure the spectral power distribution calculating relative spectral irradiance (290 nm for from 250 nm to 400 nm.1—All SPDs in this appendix were measured using a spec- be used. Differences in lamp energy or spectrum may cause solstice with a clear sky. nm for UVB 313 lamps). E = irradiance at wavelength li (irradiance steps must be tion technique. The lamps shown in this section are representa- tive of their type. Other lamps. i but may give different results.. 300 nm for UVA 351 lamps.2. wavelength bandpass is then summed and divided by the tenance procedures to minimize any spectral changes that may specified total UV irradiance according to Eq A1. The total irradiance in each fluorescent lamps provided.1. Other integration tech.. APPENDIXES (Nonmandatory Information) X1. The fluorescent UV SPDs were measured at the sample plane in the center of the allowed sample area. the li = wavelength at which irradiance was measured. and the air temperature within the chamber.````-`-`.`. with the spectroradiometer on an equatorial significant differences in test results. the age of the lamps. A1.1 UVA-340 Lamps—For simulations of direct solar this section are representative only and are not meant to be UV radiation the UVA-340 lamp is recommended.1 is used to determine the relative spectral IR 5 li5400 3 100 (A1. or combinations of lamps.. this is done at 2 nm UVA 340 lamps. SPDs for the total amount of UV energy emitted and their wavelength sunlight were measured in Phoenix.3 To determine whether a specific fluorescent UV lamp B = upper wavelength of wavelength bandpass. tion requirements of this standard. A detailed description of follow-the-sum mount. C = lower wavelength of total UV bandpass used for Table 2. The particular application determines which lamp troradiometer with a double grating monochromator (1-nm band pass) should be used. If the manufacturer’s spectral measurement equip..`.. The lamps discussed in this Appendix differ in with a quartz cosine receptor. For the different lamps that can be used. Use of this occur during normal use. Typically.1 Conformance to the relative spectral power distribu.1. --`. IR = relative irradiance in percent. equation requires that each spectral interval must be the same (for example. the distance to the lamp X1. use the rectangular integra. for a fluorescent UV device meets the requirements of Table 1. The lowest tion tables is a design parameter for fluorescent UV device with wavelength measured shall be no greater than 270 nm. Because used to calculate or estimate total radiant exposure for tests in UVA-340 lamps typically have little or no UV output below fluorescent UV devices.1 A variety of fluorescent UV lamps may be used in array. APPLICATION GUIDELINES FOR TYPICAL FLUORESCENT UV LAMPS X1.

Ordinary glass is essentially transparent to light above about 370 nm.`.`. NOTE X1.````-`-`. These are known commercially as the UVB-313 and the FS-40. X1.5.1 Spectral Power Distributions of UVA-340 Lamp and X1. Furthermore. Because of this.1 All UVB-313 lamps emit UV below the normal sunlight cut-on. FIG. X1. but both peak at 313 nm and produce the same UV wavelengths in the same relative proportions. as shown in Fig.. The UVA-351 is used for these applications because the low end cut-on of this lamp is similar to that of direct sunlight which has been filtered through window glass (Fig. the glass-filtered UVB-313 is actually less severe than a UVA Lamp. X1.2 UVB-313 Lamps—The UVB region (280 to 315 nm) includes the shortest wavelengths found in sunlight at the earth’s surface and is responsible for considerable polymer damage.4).`. X1. X1. or other factors. Window glass filters of illustration.2.. G 154 – 06 terrestrial sunlight).```. This is because window glass filters out about 80 % of the energy from UVB-313 lamps. UVA-351 lamps are recommended. more damaging UVB wavelengths are the most greatly affected. production lot. X1. As a result of filtering out these short wavelengths.2 UVA-351 Lamps—For simulations of sunlight through window glass. its total effective energy is very limited. For purposes accompanying graphs.2 illustrates the difference between the lamps.1 illustrates the SPD of the UVA-340 lamp compared to noon.3—UVB-313 lamps are not recommended for simulations of sunlight through window glass. the filtering effect becomes more pronounced with decreasing wavelength. but they may allow enhanced correla- tion with actual outdoor weathering.3 Direct Sunlight and Sunlight Through Window Glass ever. X1. X1.1 Filtering Effect of Glass—Glass of any type acts as a filter on the sunlight spectrum (see Fig. thickness.. Fig. X1. How.3. summer sunlight.2. X1. This may lead to anomalous results. In tests using the same cycles and tem- peratures..3.2 shows the spectral power distribution (SPD) of typical UVB-313 lamps compared to the SPD of noon. shorter times to failure are typically observed when FIG.2. Note that glass transmission character- istics will vary due to manufacturer.3 Simulations of Exposures to Solar UV Radiation Through Window Glass: X1. Tests using UVA-340 lamps have been found useful for comparing different nonme- tallic materials such as polymers. The shorter.. X1. NOTE X1.2—The Fig. This short wavelength UV can produce rapid polymer degradation and often causes degradation by mecha- nisms that do not occur when materials are exposed to sunlight. These lamps emit different amounts of total energy. very little energy from this short wavelength region will reach materials in “behind glass” applications. Further. Most of the emission of UVB-313 lamps is in the short wavelength UV that is filtered very efficiently by glass. they usually do not degrade materials as rapidly as UVB lamps. because there is little longer wavelength energy.. X1. FIG.3).2 Spectral Power Distributions of UVB Lamps and the lamp with higher UV irradiance is used.4 Simulations of Exposures Where Glass or Transparent Sunlight Plastic Forms Part of the Test Specimen: --`.`--- Copyright ASTM International 7 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale . and UV stabilizers. X1. tests Sunlight using the same cycles and temperatures with these two lamps may exhibit differences in ranking of materials due to differ- ence in the proportion of UV to moisture and temperature. textiles. Fig.. only one type of window glass is used in the out most of the wavelengths below about 310 nm. There are two commonly available types of UVB-313 lamps that meet the requirements of this document. summer sunlight.

the use of UVA-340 lamps is recom- mended since the glass or plastic will filter the spectrum of the lamp in the same way that it would filter sunlight.`. X1.3—Surface temperature of specimens is an essential test Copyright ASTM International 8 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale .```. --`. Window Glass X2..1 UVA-340 Lamps—In some instances (for example. X1. Cycle 7 has been used for thermal shock and for erosion testing of coatings for wood. These are not necessarily of coatings and plastics. glass or transparent plastic is part of the test specimen itself and normally acts as a filter to the light source.5 Spectral Power Distributions of Unfiltered UVB-313 Lamp.1).. NOTE X1. condensation.2—When selecting programs of UV exposure followed by are provided for reference only (See Table X2.````-`-`.`. X1. X1.4 Spectral Power Distributions of UVA-351 Lamp and Window Glass Sunlight Through Window Glass NOTE X1. UVB-313 Through Window Glass. See Note X1. and Sunlight Through glass. UVA-351 Through Window Glass. Fig.4.4—UBV-313 lamps are lamps not recommended for expo- sures where glass or transparent plastic forms part of the test specimen.1 Any exposure conditions may be used. Cycle 5 has been used exact conditions are detailed in the report. As shown in Fig. This is because the UVA-351 has a special power distribution in the short wave UV region that is similar to sunlight that has already been filtered by window glass.6 compares the spectral power distribution of sunlight filtered through window glass to the spectral power distribution of the FIG.7. as long as the have been used for exterior automotive materials. X1. X1... allow at least 2 h per interval to assure attainment of NOTE X2.5—UVA-351 lamps are not recommended for exposures where glass or transparent plastic forms part of the test specimen.6 Spectral Power Distributions of Unfiltered UVA-340 Lamp.`--- G 154 – 06 FIG.`. and Sunlight Through FIG. Cycle 6 has been used for high irradiance exposures representative exposure conditions.. both unfiltered and filtered through window Lamp. and plastics.. Cycle 2 has been widely used for coatings. UVA-340 Through Window Glass..7 Spectral Power Distributions of Unfiltered UVA-351 UVA-340 lamp.3. These conditions NOTE X2.1—Cycle 1 is a commonly used exposure cycle for coatings equilibrium. FIG. window sealants). preferred and no recommendation is implied. and Sunlight Through Window Glass X1. using this lamp through window glass or other transparent material further filters out the short wavelength UV and results in a spectrum that is deficient in the short wavelength UV. EXPOSURE CONDITIONS X2. Cycles 3 and 4 NOTE X2. Following are some for roofing materials. In these special cases.

If in doubt. so running at the new set points will represent a change in the actual irradiance of the test. air in the test decrease with increasing chamber temperature. discontinue the test ambient temperatures above or below this range may produce and correct the cause of the disagreement before continuing. Therefore.55 W/m2/nm 340 nm 8 h UV at 70 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature.3. degradation processes accelerate with increasing irradiances different from devices operated in the recom- temperature.. The set points shown in this edition of G 154 do not change the actual irradiances that have been historically used by these users. 4 h Condensation at 50 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature 4 UVA-340 1. for most users. 0.55. 7 UVA-340 1. G 154 – 06 TABLE X2.. in testers minimal difference between the temperature of an insulated or uninsulated without feed-back-loop control of irradiance. Some fluorescent UV devices use laboratory ambient air to cool the lamps and X2. 4 h Condensation at 50 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature. or different colored samples (3). the primary heating of the specimen surface is by NOTE X2.71 W/m2/nm 310 nm 4 h UV at 60 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature. temperatures (see Note X2. X2. 3..55 W/m2/nm 340 nm 8 h UV at 60 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature. operate the apparatus to main- apparatus without feed-back-loop control of irradiance be tain the operational fluctuations specified in Table X2.4—Irradiance data shown is typical. 4 h Condensation at 50 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature 3 UVB-313 0. and 0. UV apparatus.2 For the most consistent results.1 Common Exposure Conditions NOTE 1—Previous editions of ASTM G 154 contained non-mandatory irradiance set points in Table X2.`.49 W/m2/nm 310 nm 8 h UV at 70 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature. In fluorescent ance is not controlled in this type of exposure device.77 and 1. it is recommended that NOTE X2. users should consult the manufacturer of their device for clarification. 4 h Condensation at 50 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature 2 UVB-313 0.```. However..62 W/m2/nm 310 nm 20 h UV at 80 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature.35 W/m2 at 340 nm for UVA-340 lamps and 0. specimen surface.63 W/m2 for UVB-313 lamps. test depends on the material to be tested and on the aging criterion under consideration. tion when compared to xenon arc and carbon arc sources. 4 h Condensation at 50 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature 5 UVB-313 0.. chamber. Consequently. 4 h Condensation at 50 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature quantity.25 h water spray (no light). NOTE X2.75 h condensation at 50 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature 8 UVB-313 28 W/m2 270 to 700 nm 8 h UV at 70 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature.89 W/m2/nm 340 nm 8 h UV at 60 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature. --`. for users of equipment made by another manufacturer. The specimen temperature permissible for the accelerated mended manner.5—The light output of fluorescent lamps is affected by the convection from heated air passing across the panel.3 for the parameters operated in an environment in which the ambient temperature in Table X2. If the actual operating conditions do not agree with the is maintained between 18 and 27°C. Frequently. The measurement data used to establish these set points was inaccurate. Generally. the irradi.. due to an error in calibration on the part of one manufacturer. 0. the lamp output will black or white panel thermometer. Apparatus operated in machine settings after the equipment has stabilized. Cycle Lamp Typical Irradiance Approximate Wavelength Exposure Cycle 1 UVA-340 0. For operational fluctuations see Table X2.55 W/m2/nm 340 nm 8 h UV at 60 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature. NOTE X2.2.`--- Copyright ASTM International 9 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale .5). The previous set points were 0.44..3 For conversion of test cycles described in Practice thereby compensate for the drop in light output at higher exposure G 53 to test cycles described in Practice G 154 see Table X2. there is a temperature of the air which surrounds the lamps.1 that were commonly used in the industry.````-`-`. 4 h Condensation at 50 (6 3) °C Black Panel Temperature 6 UVA-340 1. temperature not controlled.`. It has been found that.1.8—Unless otherwise specified.`.7—Fluorescent UV lamps emit relatively little infrared radia- NOTE X2. the irradiance control system did not have the measurement inaccuracies described above. the actual irradiance when running at the previous set points was 11 to 15% higher than the indicated set point.6—Laboratory ambient temperature may have an effect on the light output of devices without feed-back-loop control of irradiance.

K. C. and Emery.`.” Solar Energy.2 describes default cycle of 4 hours UV at the Practice G 53 default cycle 60°C.2 Conversion of Test Cycles Described in Practice G 53 to Test Cycles Described in Practice G 154 Practice G 53 Test Cycle Corresponding Test Cycle in Description Practice G 154 Practice G 53 describes one Cycle 2 of Table X2. Table X3.2 Previous versions of this standard used CIE 85 Table Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Distributions: Hemispherical on 37 48 as the benchmark solar spectrum. C. SMARTS2 Solar Radiation Model for Spectral X3. 325-346. Vol 71.2 compares irradiance (calculated using rectangular integration) and relative irradiance for the bench- 5 Gueymard.. These cycles use UV exposure were 50°C. Feb. 7 8 Myers.02 W/(m2• nm) Irradiance (monitored at 270– 700 nm) 6 0.. “Proposed Reference Irradiance Spectra for Solar Energy Systems Testing.” Solar Energy. 42nd Engineering. 1st actions of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. and the Spectral Distribution of Simulated Solar Radiation for Testing Purposes. ADJG0173. D. pp.. 2002.5. pp..5°C Irradiance (monitored at 340 nm or monitored at 310 nm) 6 . COMPARISON OF BENCHMARK SOLAR UV SPECTRUM AND CIE 85 TABLE 4 SOLAR SPECTRUM X3. New York.3 Operational Fluctuations On Exposure Conditions Maximum Allowable Deviation from the Set Point at the Control Parameter Point Indicated by the Readout of the Calibrated Control Sensor During Equilibrium Operation Black Panel Temperature 62.2 describes 6 specific cycle of 8 hours UV and 4 hours exposure cycles that use 8 hours condensation is widely used. 4 hours condensation at using UVB-313 lamps. 2001. either UVA-340 or UVB-313 70°C lamps.`. The solar spectrum is calculated using basic atmospheric conditions used for the benchmark solar the SMARTS2 solar radiation model.. C.````-`-`.3 Table X3. 443-467... the bandpasses used in this standard. This benchmark solar spectrum is published in ASTM G 177.6.```.. 6 Gueymard.” Trans. A. Emery. 1989 (Available from American National Standards Institute.`--- Copyright ASTM International 10 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale .. K. G 154 – 06 TABLE X2..5 W/m2 X3. No.. Practice G 53 indicated that a Table X2. 2004. TABLE X2. Standard Tables for Reference X3. and Gueymard. “Revising and Validating Spectral CIE-Publication Number 85: Recommendations for the Integrated Irradiance Irradiance Reference Standards for Photovoltaic Performance Evaluation.1 This standard uses a benchmark solar spectrum based Radiation provides the program and documentation for calcu- on atmospheric conditions that provide for very high level of lating solar spectral irradiance. UV followed by 4 hours Suggested temperatures during condensation. 11 W.. St..1 compares the degree Tilted Surface. but fluorescent UVA lamps with peak emission at 343 nm or 351 nm may also be used. 5. 60°C. The default lamp for this and other cycles is the UVB lamps with peak emission at 313 nm. R. “Parameterized Transmittance Model for Direct Beam and mark solar spectrum and the CIE 85 Table 4 solar spectrum.7 ASTM Adjunct spectrum and the CIE 85 Table 4 solar spectrum.`. pp 567–574. Vol 126. Myers. Vol 73.. Journal of Solar Energy Edition. solar ultraviolet radiation. in Circumsolar Spectral Irradiance. D. 13th Floor.. 50°C. --`. NY 10036). No 6.

Kinmonth. PO Box C700. 610-832-9555 (fax).000 290 # l # 320 3.`. J. W. which you may attend. N. Vol 3(1). American Society for Testing and (5) Fischer..8 % 11.. G 154 – 06 TABLE X3.2 Irradiance and Relative Irradiance Comparison for Benchmark Solar Spectrum and CIE 85 Table 4 Solar Spectrum Benchmark Bandpass CIE 85Table 4 Solar Spectrum Solar Spectrum 2 Irradiance (W/m ) in stated bandpass l < 290 0.org). ASTM International takes no position respecting the validity of any patent rights asserted in connection with any item mentioned in this standard. M. are entirely their own responsibility.00 Albedo (ground reflectance) Light Soil wavelength Constant at 0.300 678.780 Percent of 290 to 400 nm irradiance l < 290 0. Warren K.`--- Copyright ASTM International 11 Provided by IHS under license with ASTM No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale .000 0.050 290 # l # 400 64. “Results of Round-Robin Studies of Light. West Conshohocken. Robbins.0 % 290 < l # 320 5. J. Ketola and Douglas Grossman.” Journal of Testing and Evaluation.. or service@astm. G. W.. PA 19428-2959.10 500 nm TABLE X3. United States. S. ASTM STP Window Glass. M.. Editors. “Surface Temperatures of Materials Materials.org (e-mail). R. Warren K.4 % Percent of 290 to 800 nm irradiance 290 # l # 400 9.” Accelerated and Outdoor Durability Testing of 1202. Organic Materials.762 42. Individual reprints (single or multiple copies) of this standard may be obtained by contacting ASTM at the above address or at 610-832-9585 (phone). either reapproved or withdrawn.8 Aerosol optical thickness at 0.. “Spectral Energy Grossman. Editors. If you feel that your comments have not received a fair hearing you should make your views known to the ASTM Committee on Standards. D.060 320 < l # 360 25. in Exterior Exposures and Artificial Accelerated Tests.. 1993.astm. ASTM STP 1202. 15–20.171 74.” Accelerated and Outdoor Dura- 1975. Your comments will receive careful consideration at a meeting of the responsible technical committee. American Society for Testing and Materials. bility Testing of Organic Materials.0 % 0. American Society for Testing Exposure Testors.2 % 56. Water-Exposure Standard Practices.748 4. Editors. --`. This standard is subject to revision at any time by the responsible technical committee and must be reviewed every five years and if not revised.and Black Lights. and the risk of infringement of such rights.” Accelerated (3) Ketola. 100 Barr Harbor Drive. This standard is copyrighted by ASTM International.30 0. 1993. 1993.560 290 # l # 800 652.. R.. Distributions and Aging Characteristics of Fluorescent Sun Lamps and (4) Fischer.2 dependent Aerosol extinction Shettle & Fenn Rural Equivalent to Linke (humidity dependent) Turbidity factor of about 2. A. P.````-`-`. “UV Transmission of Single Strength and Outdoor Durability Testing of Organic Materials.2 % 360 < l # 400 54.8 % 5.” Accelerated and Outdoor Durability Testing of and Materials.57 1. Your comments are invited either for revision of this standard or for additional standards and should be addressed to ASTM International Headquarters. ASTM STP 1202. at the address shown below.. Ketola and Douglas Society for Testing and Materials.4 % 320 < l # 360 40. or through the ASTM website (www.05 1.. and Ketola. and Brennan.. R.05 0.1 Comparison of Basic Atmospheric Conditions Used for Benchmark Solar Spectrum and CIE 85 Table 4 Solar Spectrum Atmospheric Benchmark CIE 85 Table 4 Solar Spectrum Condition Solar Spectrum Ozone (atm-cm) 0. P..34 Precipitable water vapor (cm) 0.0 % REFERENCES (1) Mullen..```.0 % 38. (2) Fedor. American Organic Materials.. “Irradiance Control in Fluorescent UV Ketola and Douglas Grossman.42 Altitude (m) 2000 0 Tilt angle 37° facing Equator 0° (horizontal) Air mass 1..450 360 < l # 400 34. Users of this standard are expressly advised that determination of the validity of any such patent rights. ASTM STP 1202. Warren D.`..`. A. R. 1993. D. and Searle.661 28.