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Neumann University

Division of Education and Human Services

EDU526: Foundations of Teaching Stress Management

Instructor: Phillip Hochman

Phone Number(s): 610-640-9983

Email(s): pdhochman@yahoo.com

Dates and Times: 4 in-class dates 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM. Followed by 12 hours of
online work to be completed independently and with
instructors. All students will create Social Emotional Learning
Implementation Plans that will create change in the classroom,
school building, and/or School District.

Required Textbook: Provided course site and included Bibliography.

Course Description:
This course focuses on 4 key concepts that are directly relevant and
applicable to the daily stress levels you experience and observe in the
classroom, in the school building and on a playing field. To make
connections to our very own students/athletes is paramount, crucial to
the course as we delve into practical methods to apply and address
stress intermittently, sometimes immediately, throughout the school
year. By increasing our knowledge of core information about stress
and the daily intricacies in which it is embedded, we will have
increased vision and be able to “see” where and when we can apply
this knowledge to our students and their behaviors. As a result we can
decrease stress in their lives, which means less stress for us. Through
reading, sharing, research, collaboration and connecting this
information to our lives in school, we will be more apt to try them in
our “real “classroom. We will build confidence in ourselves and our
ability to see, apply and adapt to many student behaviors and
classroom situations. This course is meant to OPEN EYES, realize
potential and help connect us with our students. We will better listen
to our students’ needs, learn from one another and communicate more
effectively as we learn in a fun, safe, environment that promotes less
stress. By approaching the class with an open-mind and a willingness
to “experiment” and partake in multiple engaging activities, one will be
able to transfer these concepts and activities into one’s classroom.
Ultimately, one will lower the stress levels of students and the
environment as one experience more success and happiness in one’s
career.

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Course Objectives:
Participants will:
- Understand the course’s basic definition for stress and be able to apply it to “real-life”
stress, situations
- Comprehend the Stress Theory Model and grasp its significance to the course by
realizing its progression factor (each phase is built upon the full development of the
previous phase).
- Recognize and identify roadblocks and how important it is to intervene at the earliest
phase of the Stress Theory Model
- Comprehend the relevance of intrapersonal matters and stress and apply
“interventions” to these areas (nutrition and stress, noise and stress, daily challenges
and stress)
- Understand the significance, application and effectiveness of selective awareness on a
regular basis in your class and encourage students to apply it to their lives as well.
- Recognize the power of “listening” to your students, their needs, their requests, and
observing their body language so that you are more capable of acting upon this and
de-stressing the environment.
- Develop confidence and self-esteem in oneself so that “shaking –up” or “shaking –
down” a class with innovative, kinesthetic, communicative, stimulating stress busters
is possible.
- Increase your awareness of the variety of activities available for you to implement
into your class while creating your own activities and trying them (a dress rehearsal)
with this course’s participants.

Mission and Values: Neumann University’s graduate program leading to the Master
of Science in Education with an emphasis in Social Emotional
Learning is consistent with, and driven by, the University’s
Mission Statement. The unique nature and purpose of this
degree program is to provide educators the opportunity to
acquire a wide range of knowledge and skills designed to
prepare them to assess and meet the needs of all learners in
their schools by addressing the unique intersection of cognitive,
affective, and social development. The program degree is
designed to assist educators in providing learners with the
skills they will need to recognize and successfully manage their
emotions, develop positive relationships, make responsible
decisions, and constructively handle challenging situations,
while improving academic learning outcomes. In this way, the
emphasis on social and emotional learning during the academic
process is congruent with the University’s Franciscan mission
to educate “a diverse community of learners based upon the
belief that knowledge is a gift to be shared in the service of
others and that learning is a lifelong process.” Additionally, the
program promotes the University’s Core Values, particularly
Reverence for and Service to all students and their unique
personalities, learning styles, abilities, and challenges.

Graduate Programs Learning Outcomes:

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Active engagement in this course provides Neumann University
students the opportunity to achieve the following learning outcomes:

Comprehension: Think critically, creatively, and analytically
Contemplation: Engage in meaningful reflection
Conscience: To act ethically and responsibly
Compassion: As stewards of God’s universe, respect all creation
Communication: Communicate Effectively

Student Disability Policy: Students requiring accommodations for a physical or diagnosed
learning disability should contact the instructor and the
Learning Assistance Center and refer to the Students with
Disabilities section of the Neumann University Catalog for
procedures.

Academic Honesty: Neumann University values honesty. Honesty with self and
others is an essential condition of Christian Humanism. An
environment characterized by honesty is necessary if the
following broad objectives of the University are to flourish:
• To place the quest for truth as the highest value
• To encourage a cultured response to aesthetic treasures of the
past, present, and promise of the future
• To sharpen social awareness and responsibility to the needs of
others
• To provide a solid foundation for graduate studies
• To prepare for intelligent, competent, and dedicated service to
the profession

Grading System: The following grading system has been established for any
student enrolled in Neumann University Graduate Education
programs. This grading scale is utilized by all graduate faculty
who teach in one of these programs.

A (93 – 100)
B+ (89 – 92)
B (85 – 88)
C+ (81 – 84)
C (77 – 80)
F (below 77)

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Evaluation Process: This course will utilize a seminar format, drawing on the
experiences of the students and how they apply the theories,
applications, and tools discussed in class to the students in their
schools. Students will be expected to actively engage
themselves in the learning process, to work collaboratively on
projects, and to examine theories and strategies and their
application to the classroom and teaching pedagogy.

Attendance and Participation: 40 points
This course promotes active learning. In order to satisfy course
objectives, students must come to class prepared. This means
that all reading/video assignments are to be completed prior to
each class period so that students can be actively involved in
group activities and class discussions. Given the accelerated
format and amount of course work that takes place in class,
students are required to attend every class. The final
determination of one’s level of participation will be completed
in accord with the following rubric developed by Dr. Fred
Savits:

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Stress Journal/Log: 20 points
4 hours of alternate instruction
Integrating the stress management practices that have been taught,
discussed, and experienced in class, students will keep a
journal/log for the stressors that they face for two weeks. At the
conclusion of this period of time, learners will be asked to reflect on
their experiences and write about the impact on their daily life and
in the classroom, including what the process was like and the
challenges/obstacles that they faced and how they handled
them. Learners post written work, which is produced, assessed,
and graded according to course rubric and aligned to course
outcomes.

Two Stress Management Plans: 40 points
8 hours of alternate instruction hours
Instructor-guided learning project where students will create an
integrated stress management plan for themselves that is aligned
with course objectives as well as an integrated stress management
plan for their students according to the Stress Theory Model.
Learners will interact face to face and work with the instructor to
research, analyze, and synthesize the plan. Each plan will include at
least 3 roadblocks, give clear explanation of anticipated stressors,
and give detailed directions on how and when these interventions
will be used, all based on the Stress Theory Model. Learners will be
graded according to course rubric and aligned to course outcomes.

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Course Outline:
All classes are 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM with 1 hour for lunch

- ICE BREAKER- what does stress look like to you? Draw, color, finger-
paint it- describe it in one word, give it a feeling, an emotion.
- Do the same thing next, only try to be a Teen, a student and look
through their lens/their perspective? Same, or different?
- The core definition of Stress- understand it, grasp it, and apply it.
- Various methods/modalities will be used to clarify this definition and
Day 1 enhance learning.
- Understand the Stress Theory Model and be able to successfully explain
it via application to “real-life” stress.
- Collaborate, brainstorm and identify situations in which a teacher can
short-circuit” this theory right in the classroom and create a teaching
moment. Realizing it can be done is essential, imperative to the crux of
this course.

- Intrapersonal matters- what are they, why they matter, what can we do
to adjust our lives, our students’ lives?
- Use introspective activities to identify and eliminate (or minimize)
stressors.
- What we need to know about common stressors such as nutrition, noise
and daily challenges (including parents, peers, siblings, coaches) and
life events (divorce, moving, new job)
- Success analysis is the key ingredient. Students will be introduced to
this concept and build upon it.
Day 2 - Success means “what” to us? To our students? Self-revelation is the
beginning of this process to define success and know your view of
success.
- Promote self-awareness and self-assessment for confidence to develop,
grow.
- Analyzing success, identifying daily challenges, looking at yourself
introspectively and making discoveries will aid you in transferring this
information.
- Integrating meaningful activities into your curriculum that create less-
stress, yet more learning is paramount.

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- Interpersonal matters- What are they, what is their impact on stress
levels, how do we learn about them and then make “real” adjustments to
reduce our stress?
- Enlighten your students, exercise your new knowledge and skills from
the verbal to the nonverbal, from being passive to aggressive to
assertive.
- Making connections to the present, to the “real-life” that we all
participate in now will be emphasized and applied to our classroom
situations.
- Talking, listening, observing is critical to how we exist in the classroom
with our students, for our students and for ourselves.
Day 3 - Learning to “flip” things around is important to mastering this material
as we try to go inside their minds as they are trying to apply these new
concepts; viewing the interpersonal matters from the students’
perspective is extremely relevant.
- Learn new ways to communicate, new words to choose, new attitudes to
take, new approaches to make, so that you can better educate your
students in a “less-stressed” environment.
- Conflicts exist in life, in school; therefore, learning how to resolve them
means your interpersonal relationships will be better; you will be less
stressed, have fewer stressors and be healthier.
- Identify our M.O. (modus operandi) and then delve into methods to
increase our knowledge and enhance our interpersonal skills.

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- Perception intervention- what is this and how much impact can it have
on your stress levels?
- Selective awareness is a key ingredient to reducing stress levels- look at
examples, review, discuss and realize the power of perception
- Realize and practice the skill of magnifying the positives in life, in
many situations and de-emphasizing, smoldering the negatives.
- Take time to smell the roses; learn, absorb and share the experience of
life with your students by PAUSING, whenever deemed necessary, or
appropriate.
- An attitude of gratitude can go a long way in life and in reducing stress-
realize this, exercise this concept and promote it in your classroom so
Day 4 that students “get it” and realize its positive effect on life, be consistent.
- Laughter is truly the best medicine- learning about the physiological and
psychological benefits of laughter/humor is important to this course and
applying it to this class, your classes and your life is beneficial to all.
Humor is essential to relieve daily stress, keep things I perspective and
feel good about oneself. (remember not to hurt others along the way and
turn it into distress)
- Practice, apply, analyze and re-apply is a kinesthetic, necessary process
for this course. It is paramount to the course’s effectiveness. The
educator must develop confidence in the material and recognizes
how/where and when to insert into his/her classroom to minimize
individual stress and collective stress.

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Stress Journal/Log: 20 points
4 hours of alternate instruction
Integrating the stress management practices that have been
taught, discussed, and experienced in class, students will
keep a journal/log for the stressors that they face for two
weeks. At the conclusion of this period of time, learners will
be asked to reflect on their experiences and write about the
impact on their daily life and in the classroom, including
what the process was like and the challenges/obstacles that
they faced and how they handled them. Learners post
written work, which is produced, assessed, and graded
according to course rubric and aligned to course outcomes.
Out of
Two Stress Management Plans: 40 points
Class Work
8 hours of alternate instruction hours
Instructor-guided learning project where students will
create an integrated stress management plan for
themselves that is aligned with course objectives as well as
an integrated stress management plan for their students
according to the Stress Theory Model. Learners will interact
face to face and work with the instructor to research,
analyze, and synthesize the plan. Each plan will include at
least 3 roadblocks, give clear explanation of anticipated
stressors, and give detailed directions on how and when
these interventions will be used, all based on the Stress
Theory Model. Learners will be graded according to course
rubric and aligned to course outcomes.

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Class Hours and Alternative Instructional Equivalency Hours
Subject Hours Description
Lecture, Discussion, and 30 4 Classes x 7.5 Hours
In-Class Activities
Stress Journal/Log 4 Integrating the stress management practices that have
been taught, discussed, and experienced in class,
students will keep a journal/log for the stressors that
they face for two weeks. At the conclusion of this
period of time, learners will be asked to reflect on their
experiences and write about the impact on their daily
life and in the classroom, including what the process
was like and the challenges/obstacles that they faced
and how they handled them. Learners post written
work, which is produced, assessed, and graded
according to course rubric and aligned to course
outcomes.
Two Stress Management 8 Instructor-guided learning project where students will
Plans create an integrated stress management plan for
themselves that is aligned with course objectives as
well as an integrated stress management plan for their
students according to the Stress Theory Model.
Learners will interact face to face and work with the
instructor to research, analyze, and synthesize the plan.
Each plan will include at least 3 roadblocks, give clear
explanation of anticipated stressors, and give detailed
directions on how and when these interventions will be
used, all based on the Stress Theory Model. Learners
will be graded according to course rubric and aligned to
course outcomes.
Total Hours 42

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