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High performance software

to advance communications

USERS MANUAL

HyperACCESS
for Windows
Version 8.3
Information in this manual is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of Hilgraeve
Inc. The software described in this manual is furnished under a license agreement. The software may be used or copied only
in accordance with the terms of the agreement. It is against the law to copy the software on any medium except as specifically
allowed in the agreement. No part of this manual may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of Hilgraeve Inc.

RESTRICTED RIGHTS LEGEND

Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions set forth in paragraph (b)(3)(B) of the Rights in
Technical Data and Computer Software clause of DAR 7-104.9(a). Contractor/Manufacturer is Hilgraeve, Genesis Centre,
111 Conant Avenue, Suite A, Monroe, MI 48161.

TRADEMARKS

Adobe Acrobat is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated.


AT&T is a registered trademark of American Telephone & Telegraph Company.
CompuServe is a trademark of CompuServe, Inc., an H & R Block company.
DEC and VT are registered trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.
Hayes, Smartmodem, and ESP are registered trademarks of Hayes Microcomputer Products, Inc.
Kermit, developed by Columbia University, is included at no additional charge.
MCI Mail is a trademark of MCI Communications Corporation for electronic mail.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
MNP is a registered trademark of Microcom Systems, Inc.
Novell, NASI, and Network Connect are registered trademarks of Novell, Inc.
NPI, NCSI, ACS2, and ACS2/SA are registered trademarks of Network Products Corporation
OS/2, PS/2, PC AT, Microchannel, and IBM are registered trademarks of IBM Corporation.

HAWin, HyperACCESS/5, HyperPilot, HyperProtocol, HyperGuard, and CommSense are trademarks, and HyperACCESS
is a registered trademark of Hilgraeve Inc. Commercial names of products from other manufacturers or developers that appear
in this manual are registered or unregistered trademarks of those respective manufacturers or developers, which have expressed
neither approval nor disapproval of Hilgraeve products.

HyperACCESS includes HyperGuard antivirus technology, US Patent 5,319,776, and technology licensed under US Patent
4,558,302. It also includes CommSense, which is protected by US Patent 5,553,271.

Document version 8.31

Copyright Hilgraeve Inc. 1993-2000. All rights reserved. Simultaneously published in the U.S. and Canada. Printed in the
United States of America.

HyperACCESS was designed and created by Chris Baumgartner, Jadwiga Carlson, Bob Everett, Matt Gray, John Hile, Jeff
Hopwood, Vince Jessee, Bob Kundrat, Susan Lewis, John Masters, Dwayne Newsome, Paul Petrillo, Susan Pinson, Sam
Shipley, Mike Thompson, Ron Vorndam, and Mike Ward.
Document and online help written and produced by Mahler Associates, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI
Table of Contents

Introduction
About This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
HyperACCESS Manual Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
Text Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Keyboard Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Using a Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv
HyperACCESS Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv
Hilgraeve Customer Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv

1 Introduction to HyperACCESS
What You Will Find in This Chapter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-1
HyperACCESS User Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

2 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call


What You Will Find in This Chapter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-1
What You Need to Run HyperACCESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-1
Installing HyperACCESS for the First Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2
Network Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-11
Network Server Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-11
Upgrading From a Previous Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
Upgrading from HyperACCESS for Windows 3.x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
Upgrading from HyperACCESS/5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
Upgrading from HyperTerminal or HyperTerminal PE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-18
Upgrading From Procomm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-18
Placing Your First Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-19
Removing HyperACCESS From Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-23
iv Table of Contents

3 Common Procedures
What You Will Find in This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
General Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Drag and Drop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Using Pop-up Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Working With Notebooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Adding an Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Copying a Notebook Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Modifying Entry Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
Moving an Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
Deleting an Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
Creating Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
Creating Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
Deleting Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Creating Custom Notebooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24
Making Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24
Calling a Remote System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
Starting Communications Sessions From a Command File or Prompt . . . . . . . 3-36
Starting Communications Sessions From the Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-37
Starting Communications Sessions From Windows Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-38
Starting Communications Sessions Using the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-39
Using HyperACCESS With a Web Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-39
Chatting With a User on the Remote PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-41
Quitting HyperACCESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
Receiving and Sending Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
Receiving Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
Capturing Text to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45
Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-47
Sending Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-50
Changing Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-53
Changing Property Sheet Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-53
Changing File Transfer Protocol Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-53
Changing Terminal Emulator Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-55
Configuring Communications Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-55
Modifying Communications Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-56
Modifying Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-59
Table of Contents v

Modifying Dialing Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-60


Modifying Dialing Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-61
Managing Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-62
Using List Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-62
Creating List File Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-62
Placing a Trial Call From the Lists Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-64
Using Message Pad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-65
Sizing and Moving Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-65
Editing Text with Message Pad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-67
Using Advanced Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-71
Creating Keyboard Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-71
Creating Suffixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-74
Using Calling Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-77
Using In-Place Activation and Program Embedding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-78

4 HyperACCESS Reference
What You Will Find in This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Phonebook Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Phonebook Panel File Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Phonebook Panel View Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
Phonebook Panel Notebook Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19
Phonebook Options Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Phonebook Panel Automation Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Phonebook Panel Window Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25
Phonebook Panel Help Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
Phonebook Panel Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
Properties Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27
Description Properties Sheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28
Communications Properties Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29
Communications Properties Sheet for Modem Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31
Communications Properties Sheet for Direct Cable Connections. . . . . . . . . . . 4-41
Communications Properties Sheet for WinSock(TCP/IP) Connections . . . . . . . 4-43
Terminal Emulator Properties Sheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-43
ASCII Receiving Properties Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-46
vi Table of Contents

ASCII Sending Properties Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-47


File Transfer Properties Sheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-49
File Usage Properties Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-50
Preferences Properties Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-52
Runtime Values Properties Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-55
Colors Properties Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-56
Terminal Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58
Features of the Terminal Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58
Terminal Panel Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-60
Terminal Panel File Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-61
Terminal Panel Edit Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-69
Terminal Panel View Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-75
Terminal Panel Properties Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-78
Terminal Panel Transfer Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-79
Terminal Panel Automation Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-85
Terminal Panel Window Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-93
Terminal Panel Help Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-94
Terminal Panel Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-94
<Terminal> Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-95
Standard Terminal Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-96
Message Pad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-98
Call Log Panel and Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-99
Call Log Panel File Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-100
Call Log Panel Edit Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-101
Call Log Panel View Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-102
Call Log Panel Automation Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-103
Call Log Panel Window Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-103
Call Log Panel Help Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-104
Call Log Panel Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-104
Lists Panel and Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-105
Lists Panel File Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-107
Lists Panel Edit Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-110
Lists Panel View Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-112
Lists Panel Automation Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-112
Lists Panel Window Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-112
Lists Panel Help Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-112
Lists Panel Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-112
Table of Contents vii

HyperACCESS Graphics Viewer Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-114


Graphics Viewer Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-115

5 Automation Tools
What You Will Find in This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Automating Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Automatically Generated Vs. Custom-Written Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Generating Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Recording a Logon Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Recording Other Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Assigning Programs to Keys or Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Running Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
Terminating a Macro or Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
Editing Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
Changing Assignment of a Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13
Adding Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
Modifying a Program Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Editing a Program Assigned to a Key or Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Deleting a Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15

6 HyperACCESS Host
What You Will Find in This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Introduction to HyperACCESS Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Preparing to Answer Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Defining Security Settings for Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
Assigning Passwords and Access Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8
File Transfer Properties Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Specifying a Greeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16
Automatically Launching HyperACCESS Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-17
How Callers Access HyperACCESS Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-17
How Callers Connect and Log On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-18
How Callers Command Your PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
viii Table of Contents

Host Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20


Host Support of Long Filenames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20
Commands Available to All Users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-21
Commands for Callers With Download Privileges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-22
Commands for Callers With Upload Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
Commands for Callers With File Management Privileges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-27
Commands Used in Batch Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-28

A Glossary

B Modems, Communications Ports, and Cables


Installing an External Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Installing an Internal Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Defining and Configuring the Modem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Changing Your Modem Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Customizing Modem Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5
Communications Port Selection for HyperACCESS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7
Shared Ports and Modems on Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8
Direct Computer-to-Computer (Null Modem) Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8

C ASCII Characters

D Terminal Emulator Characteristics


Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Terminal Emulators and Their Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Common Emulator Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2
Emulator-Unique Characteristics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4
ADDS Viewpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4
ADM 3A Emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4
ANSI Emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-5
Table of Contents ix

CompuServe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-6
DG210 & DG211 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-6
IBM 3101. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-7
IBM 3278. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-10
SCO ANSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-12
TTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-12
TV910, TV912, TV920, TV925 and TV950 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-13
VT52, VT100, VT102, VT220, and VT320. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-15
Wyse 50 and Wyse 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-20

E File Transfer Protocols


Protocols and Their Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1
ASCII (Text) Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1
1K Xmodem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2
CompuServe B+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-3
HyperProtocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-4
Kermit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-6
Xmodem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-7
Ymodem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-7
Ymodem G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-8
Zmodem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-9

F Command Line Parameters


HyperACCESS Command Line Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-1

Index
x Table of Contents
Introduction

Welcome to the world of high-performance communications. With HyperACCESS


you get online fast with the hottest Windows 95, 98 and NT graphical, 32-bit
communications software. Whether you communicate with mainframes, the Internet,
remote PCs, e-mail services, or bulletin boards, HyperACCESS can transform your
communications in just minutes. From effortless installation, to its intuitive user
interface, youll find HyperACCESS surprisingly easy to use. For example, with
CommSenseTM technology (US Patent 5,553,271) you just enter phone numbers, and
HyperACCESS figures out settings for you. If you really need special settings you
can continue to specify communications parameters manually.
HyperACCESS has the depth and power necessary to handle your needs whether
theyre beginning or advanced. Youll find its wealth of features makes your com-
munications fast, efficient, and productive; and you can customize HyperACCESS
to your taste and applications using keyboard macros or the powerful Visual Basic
(VBScript) or Java (JavaScript) scripting languages. With VBScript you can create
programs that access other VBScript-aware programs (like Excel, PowerPoint, or
Word). You can also create VBScript programs in any of these applications and use
HyperACCESS functionality!
Connect at rates up to 115,200 bps through COM1-COM4 with standard Windows 95
and NT drivers, and you can transfer files with Zmodem, Ymodem, Ymodem-G, 1K
Xmodem, CompuServe B+, Kermit, and HyperProtocol (the fastest of all). Now, as
you download graphics files, youll see them gradually display, so you can keep
receiving those you like, and cancel those you dont.
In addition to these outstanding features, you get 1000s of ready-to-call BBSs, 100s
of Internet service providers, and 100s of Fidonet nodes. You can even get larger,
updated lists free from Hilgraeve!
If youre an experienced Windows 95 or NT user, youll have an intuitive feel for
HyperACCESS because it conforms to all Windows standards. If this is your first
venture into a Windows 95 or NT-based program, youll find that knowledge you
gain using HyperACCESS makes it easier to learn and use other programs under
Windows 95 or NT.
HyperACCESS is not copy-protected, so you can make backups or copy it onto a
hard drive as required. However, you are licensed to use HyperACCESS on only one
computer (see license agreement for terms).
xii Introduction

About This Manual

Your HyperACCESS package includes a CD-ROM (or diskettes) including the


HyperACCESS Users Manual (this manual), and the HyperACCESS Application
Programming Interface Manual. (The diskette version includes a printed copy of this
manual.) In addition, youll find a variety of valuable information, such as how to
subscribe to various online information services.
This manual should answer your questions as you learn and use HyperACCESS. Each
chapter begins with the section What You Will Find in This Chapter to provide you
with an overview of its contents.
Chapter 1, Introduction to HyperACCESS, provides a brief overview of benefits youll
gain from HyperACCESSs features.
Chapter 2, Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call, includes a descrip-
tion of system requirements for HyperACCESS, how to install HyperACCESS on
your computer, and a brief tutorial on how to place your first call.
Chapter 3, Common Procedures, provides a description of how to accomplish tasks
youll need most often. Examples include how to update the HyperACCESS Phone-
book, and how to transfer files.
Chapter 4, HyperACCESS Reference, provides a complete reference to
HyperACCESS menus and dialogs.
Chapter 5, Automation Tools, describes how to automate your communications tasks.
Chapter 6, HyperACCESS Host, describes how to set up your PC so it can be accessed
by remote PC users.
Finally, the appendixes provide useful reference information.

HyperACCESS Manual Conventions

This manual uses a few special symbols and conventions.


HyperACCESS Manual Conventions xiii

Text Conventions

Words and characters shown as ALL CAPITALS in Courier font are folder or file
names. For example, \HAWIN is a folder name; MYPROG.CMD is a filename. Key
names are shown as A, C, E, or H.
Words and characters in bold indicate anything you must type exactly as it appears.
For example, COM1 specifies that you should type the bold characters exactly as
shown. A special bold font identifies push buttons or key words and phrases found in
dialogs. For example, click the Settings... button. In some cases, words and
characters in bold also indicate emphasis.
Words and characters in italics indicate a new term introduced. An explanation
generally follows the italicized term. Appendix A, Glossary, includes many of the
italicized terms. (In this case, as elsewhere in this manual, italics also indicate
references to specific chapter or section titles.)
Mnemonic command letters used in menus and dialogs (e.g., F for File menu) appear
in bold with an underline to be consistent with the screen displays. References to menu
selections appear as File/Open. This means that you should select the Open menu
item from the File menu.

Keyboard Commands

Keyboard commands, key combinations, and key sequences are described as follows:

Keystroke(s) Description
KEY1+KEY2 A plus sign (+) between key names
means to press and hold the first key
(KEY1) and type the second key
(KEY2). For example, A+4 means to
hold down the A key, type the 4 key,
and then release both the A and 4 keys.
KEY1, KEY2 A comma (,) between key names means
to type the keys in the sequence shown.
For example, if youre instructed to type
R, e, you would type the letter R fol-
lowed by the e key.
xiv Introduction

Using a Mouse

A mouse is highly recommended, but not required, for running HyperACCESS. You
normally make choices and selections using the standard left mouse button (also called
button 1), unless you are using a left-hand mouse or have remapped the mouse to use
the right button.
You use the right mouse button (also called button 2) to display pop-up menus and to
drag and drop objects. You can also remap this button for a left-hand mouse.

HyperACCESS Help

There are several techniques for obtaining help from HyperACCESS select Help
from the menu bar, click on a Help button, or press 1.
Regardless of the technique you use, you obtain context-sensitive help whenever
possible. This means that HyperACCESS automatically displays information about
the current window or dialog box. Once this information appears on your screen, in
its own window, procedures for browsing and using help are the same.
Figure i-1 illustrates the Help menu you see when you select Help from the menu bar.

Figure i-1.
The Help menu lets
you select topics from
a list of contents and
view information
about HyperACCESS.

The Help/Help Topics menu item displays an alphabetical list of all Help topics for
HyperACCESS. You can also display Help Contents by pressing 1 from the main
HyperACCESS window with no entries selected. The other Help menu items are:
Using Help Opens a Help window and displays instructions for using
Help.
About Displays important information about HyperACCESS, such
HyperACCESS as the copyright and version.

To locate specific information about HyperACCESS simply click on Help and then
Help Topics. Youll also find that some Help topics refer to other topics. You can view
Hilgraeve Customer Support xv

these related items by clicking on underlined words or phrases. Words with a dotted
underline appear in the glossary, displaying a pop-up that disappears when you press
any key or click anywhere with your mouse.
For additional information on using Help, see your Windows 95 or NT documentation
or Help/Using Help.

Hilgraeve Customer Support

If you have a question about HyperACCESS and cant find the answer in this manual
or in the HyperACCESS Help system, you can reach us by:

Internet

You can reach the Hilgraeve BBS through the Internet using telnet access. The address
is: HBBS.hilgraeve.com or 216.197.24.14. Set your terminal type to ANSI.
To send e-mail to Hilgraeve Customer Support via the Internet, use the address:
support@hilgraeve.com.
You can also communicate with Hilgraeve via our World Wide Web page. Find out
about our latest products and product enhancements, send e-mail to Hilgraeve Cus-
tomer Support, find out more about Hilgraeve, and link to other interesting sites. Use
the address: http://www.hilgraeve.com

Hilgraeve BBS
Call the Hilgraeve BBS at (734) 243-5915 (or through the Internet see above), and
send a message to our Customer Support staff. For your convenience, the
HyperACCESS Phonebook already contains the Hilgraeve BBS telephone number
and correct settings, and Chapter 2 explains what you can expect to see in Placing
Your First Call on page 2-19. We will try to respond to you on the BBS within one
business day, so you can call back at your convenience to get the answer. Asking
questions on our BBS is easy and confidential messages exchanged with our
Customer Support staff are private and never seen by other callers.
xvi Introduction

CompuServe

If you prefer, you can reach Hilgraeve Customer Support through CompuServe. Use
the GO HILGRAEVE command. Youll be sent to the ComVen forum. Then look for
the Hilgraeve section. Send us a message in the category of your choice. You can also
send e-mail to our Customer Support at 71333,31.

Telephone Support

If you need answers quickly, or simply prefer talking to humans, call (734) 243-0576,
between 9:00 am and 6:00 pm Eastern Time. Our Customer Support staff will give
you the advice you need to get the most from HyperACCESS. Before you call, please
register your copy of HyperACCESS by returning the Registration Card or by
accessing the Hilgraeve BBS.
We suggest that you try to duplicate the problem, and as you do so, write down each
step as well as any error messages you see. So that we can provide you with the best
possible customer support, we recommend that you be at your computer when you
call, and try to have the following available:
The version and serial number from the label on the back of the CD-ROM case
or on the your HyperACCESS diskette label.
Windows 95 or NT version number. To display it, do the following:
a) Click the Start button in the task bar to display the start menu.
b) Drag the highlight up (or click on) Settings.
c) Click on Control Panel in the cascade menu.
d) When the Control Panel displays, double-click on the System icon. This
displays the General tab of the System Properties window.
Computer information including type and model of computer, monitor, and
video card. Amount and type of installed memory are also important.
Connection information type of connection (modem, shared port, direct
cable, TCP/IP), physical device (i.e., COM1, COM2).
Modem information brand and model and any custom settings youve
specified.
Hilgraeve Customer Support xvii

Hilgraeve Inc.
Genesis Centre
111 Conant Avenue, Suite A
Monroe, MI 48161

Voice: (734) 243-0576


FAX: (734) 243-0645
BBS: (734) 243-5915 (8N1 ANSI)
BBS via telnet: HBBS.hilgraeve.com (216.197.24.14)
CompuServe e-mail: 71333,31
Internet e-mail: support@hilgraeve.com
Web: www.hilgraeve.com
xviii Introduction
Chapter 1
Introduction to HyperACCESS

What You Will Find in This Chapter

This chapter provides a brief introduction and overview of the major features of
HyperACCESS. Youll find HyperACCESS one of the most exciting new develop-
ments in communications applications. Many of its features and capabilities are not
available in any other communications software and HyperACCESS is easy to
learn and use.

HyperACCESS User Benefits

If youre already familiar with previous versions of HyperACCESS, youll find this
version is even better. The most visible improvement is that HyperACCESS takes
full advantage of the 32-bit operating environment and Graphical User Interface
(GUI) of Windows 95, 98, and NT. And the implementation of the GUI adds a whole
new dimension to the benefits youll receive with this software. Among them:
Learn it easily because HyperACCESS follows Windows 95, 98, and NT
GUI standards, youll find that its easier to learn than other communications
programs. Youll be placing your first call within minutes by double-clicking
on an entry instead of wrestling with menus and manuals for hours.
If you ever need help, the context-sensitive online help system is there when
you need it.
Use it quickly you can use a mouse to click your way through a communi-
cations session because HyperACCESS has a logical menu structure. Youll
also find helpful pop-up (context) menus available at the click of a mouse
button.
Shatter performance barriers youll get faster file transfers, faster termi-
nal emulators, and faster system response with HyperACCESS.
Youll be able to see the difference because other Windows 95, 98, and NT
communications software is just plain slow. What makes HyperACCESS
superior? Our hot Modular Communications Engine (MCE) technology deliv-
ers incredible performance. It divides the program into separate threads that
1-2 Introduction to HyperACCESS

handle low-level I/O, file transfer and terminal emulation, and user interface.
All parts of HyperACCESS work together like a relay team to deliver unbeliev-
able performance that sets a new standard for GUI-based communications
software.
Connect to the Internet use the built-in entry files and scripts to connect to
Telnet sites, Internet IP, or shell accounts. Launch your Web browser from
HyperACCESS or use HyperACCESS from within your browser whenever you
click a hypertext link to a Telnet site. HyperACCESS works seamlessly with
Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Explorer.
With Telnet you can explore some of the best sites on the Internet. Telnet lets
you act as a terminal with thousands of host computers using your local Internet
service provider rather than dialing direct and paying for long distance telephone
charges. Telnet is the most common way to access databases, libraries, and run
applications like Archie, Veronica, Gopher, FTP, Lynx, and Pine on
remote host computers.
Use in-place activation, embedding, and linking operations save time
and effort with advanced Windows features that let you use one program from
within another. You can activate your browser from the HyperACCESS terminal
panel, or have HyperACCESS automatically load and run from your browser
when you click on a Telnet address. HyperACCESS supports the new
ActiveDesktop standards defined for Office 97.
Fend off viruses HyperGuardTM antivirus technology (US Pat 5,319,776)
skirts disaster by warning you instantly if files you download contain any of over
80,000 known viruses. Its X-ray Vision even spots viruses hiding in compressed
files. You can download free updates to your virus protection.
Expand Zip files on-the-fly You can expand Zip files or self-extracting
EXE files as you receive them. This saves you the trouble of running the EXE
or a program like PKUNZIP or WinZip after youve received files.
Create unlimited dialing directories youll find that HyperACCESSs
dialing directories, called notebooks, store complete dialing and configuration
information for an unlimited number of systems. HyperACCESS has the most
powerful and extensive dialing support available in any communications soft-
ware. You can even save Web addresses and automatically connect to your
service provider, launch your Web browser, and access a favorite site with a
simple double-click of your mouse button.
HyperACCESS User Benefits 1-3

Have it your way! you can change virtually everything in HyperACCESS


to fit your needs and style of operation. Define and use custom buttons, define
new keys, or change your notebook organization.
CommSenseTM takes the worry out of communications settings let
HyperACCESS automatically determine correct settings for communicating
with remote systems. You never again have to worry about number of bits,
number of stop bits, or parity settings.
Automate communications automate your communications by using
HyperACCESSs learn mode to generate Visual Basic scripting language
(VBScript) or JavaScript programs to log on to any system for you. Once youve
defined an automatic logon sequence, just double-click the entry, and
HyperACCESS automatically dials, connects, and logs on to that system.
Communicate faster youll see proven high-speed performance with
HyperACCESSs file transfer protocols. If the remote system is also using
HyperACCESS, you can transfer files up to five times your modem speed using
HyperProtocol. Youll save money on connect costs and telephone charges!
Use powerful built-in VBScript or JavaScript perfect tools for automat-
ing your communications. Unlike previous communications programs, which
come with confusing, proprietary script languages to automate or customize
communications, HyperACCESS actually uses industry-standard VBScript or
JavaScript. You can choose which language to use whenever you record a script.
You can run automatically generated or custom VBScript or JavaScript pro-
grams; or you can use the HyperACCESS Application Programming Interface
(HAPI) with any programming language: C, C++, Visual Basic, JavaScript,
REXX, Pascal, and others. Integrate your custom applications with
HyperACCESS to add a whole new dimension to communications for your
business.
Use the powerful Backscroll Buffer you can use each notebook entrys
Backscroll Buffer to review previously received text. This feature lets you scan
an e-mail message while composing a reply online. You can search the Back-
scroll Buffer for keywords, or revise, save, print, and retransmit text. The
Backscroll Buffer saves character formatting including colors, bold, italic, etc.
Save time with Message Pad answer your e-mail easily, quickly, and con-
veniently with HyperACCESSs Message Pad a separate text editor window
that you can open with a single click of the mouse. You can use Message Pad
to manipulate text (like any text editor) with the mouse, keyboard, Edit menu,
1-4 Introduction to HyperACCESS

or pop-up menus. You can read your e-mail in the Backscroll Buffer and quickly
create and send an answer with Message Pad. With Message Pad, you can
eliminate embarrassing spelling errors with the built-in spell checker.
Hundreds of BBS and Internet access numbers provided comes with
BBS and Internet list files that provide access to hundreds of BBSs and Internet
service providers. You can download other lists in this compact format, and add
entries from any list to one or more of your notebooks.
Use pop-up menus and long filenames imple-
ments pop-up menus and long filenames. A pop-up Pop-up menus appear vir-
menu appears next to an object when you click mouse tually everywhere in
HyperACCESS. Just point
button 2 (usually the right button) on the object. The at an object and click
displayed menu items depend on the type and location mouse button 2 to see rel-
of the object, as well as the current task. evant menu selections.
HyperACCESS can handle filenames consisting of up
to 254 characters. Long filenames are case sensitive and can include spaces.
Use drag and drop you can move or create a shortcut to entries from one
notebook to another using drag and drop, and you can create a shortcut to a
notebook entry on your desktop. You can also drag a notebook entry to the
Terminal panel tab to open the entry and initiate connection. You can even drag
an entry from one of our extensive BBS lists to the Terminal panel tab to try out
the BBS.
Do two things at once now you can talk to two or more systems simulta-
neously if you have the right hardware (for example, two or more modems and
communications ports). You can run an instance of HyperACCESS for each
available communications port.
With this feature you can talk to your corporate mainframe in one window and
dial a remote system in another window. You can even cut and paste data
between windows for easy transfer of information from one system to another.
You dont have to worry about whether one computer is compatible with another
because HyperACCESS automatically takes care of that for you.
Get outstanding customer support even advanced users run into tricky
problems once in a while. We take pride in getting you up and running with
HyperACCESS, as well as keeping you up and running with our highly trained
and experienced Customer Support staff.
Chapter 2
Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

What You Will Find in This Chapter

The first part of this chapter provides installation procedures for HyperACCESS. The
second part instructs you on how to make your first phone call to the Hilgraeve
Bulletin Board. This short tutorial guarantees that your installation is successful, and
it is sufficient for many experienced computer users to begin using HyperACCESS
on a regular basis. It also lets you register your software for future upgrade offers.
All users should read the section below. You can then skip to the installation section
for your situation. If youre installing HyperACCESS for the first time, read Installing
HyperACCESS for the First Time on page 2-2. For network installations, see Network
Installation on page 2-11. If youre replacing a previous installation, see Upgrading
From a Previous Version on page 2-17. There are also sections that deal with
upgrades from HyperACCESS/5 (see page 2-17), HyperACCESS for Windows, and
from Procomm (see page 2-18).

What You Need to Run HyperACCESS

You can run this version of HyperACCESS on a personal computer running


Windows 95 or Windows NT.
Before installing HyperACCESS, we recommend that you have the following:
A personal computer with an Intel 80386 microprocessor (or higher) with 8 MB
of memory (or more).
Windows 95 version 4.00.950 or Windows NT 4.0 or later.
An internal or external modem, direct cable connection, or a supported network
modem. HyperACCESS supports virtually any modem. See Appendix B,
Modems, Communications Ports, and Cables, for additional information.
A hard drive with at least 3.5 MB of free space, and a CD-ROM drive or
3.5-inch diskette drive.
A printer (optional) supported by Windows 95 or NT if you want to print during
a HyperACCESS communications session.
2-2 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

A mouse (optional) supported by Windows 95 or NT. Although you dont need


a mouse to use HyperACCESS, we recommend it so that you can take full
advantage of the GUI and HyperACCESS.

Installing HyperACCESS for the First Time

Youll find installing HyperACCESS easy, because our Setup program takes care of
most details for you. Dont try to copy HyperACCESS files from the CD-ROM or
distribution disk(s).
Caution: You must use HyperACCESS Setup to copy all files correctly and properly
update your system files.
Before you begin HyperACCESS installation, we recommend that you first install
your modem. Be sure to follow the manufacturers instructions for installation,
configuration, and testing of your modem. See Appendix B, Modems, Communica-
tions Ports, and Cables, for additional information on installing internal and external
modems.
During the installation process youll provide information about your modem and
communications port.
To install HyperACCESS:
1. Start Windows 95 or NT.
2. Insert the HyperACCESS CD in your CD-Rom drive (usually drive D or E), or
Program Disk #1 into a diskette drive (usually drive A). Windows automatically
starts the setup program when you insert the CD. If youre ready to install
HyperACCESS when you insert the CD, continue with step 4. To install from
diskette or at a later time (after closing the autorun setup program), continue
with the next step.
3. From the desktop, you can either:
Use the Windows Add/Remove Programs option in Control Panel. To do
this:
a. Click the Start menu in the Windows Taskbar. Then select Settings/
Control Panel.
b. In Control Panel, select Add/Remove Programs, then click the
Install... button, and follow instructions provided by the wizard.
Installing HyperACCESS for the First Time 2-3

Open a DOS window. Then:


a. Change to the CD-Rom, diskette drive, or folder that has the
HyperACCESS installation disk. For example, at the [C:\] prompt,
type D:
b. At the [D:\] prompt, type cdsetup (for CD installs) or (setup for
diskette installs) and press e.
Open an Explorer window, then open the drive that contains the
HyperACCESS installation disk. Then:
a. Double-click CDSETUP.EXE. (on CD-ROM) or SETUP.EXE (on
diskette).
Regardless of how it is initiated, the setup program briefly displays an installa-
tion wizard.
4. Once initialized, the program displays the Welcome panel shown in Figure 2-1.
Once youve read the dialog, click Next.

Figure 2-1.
This Welcome panel
suggests that you exit
all other Windows
applications.
2-4 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

5. Use the Program Directory panel (see Figure 2-2) to select where you want
HyperACCESS installed. By default, the setup program suggests a folder under
Program Files. Use the Browse... button to change the directory or drive.

Figure 2-2.
This Program Direc-
tory panel suggests a
folder for installing
HyperACCESS. Use
the Browse... but-
ton to change the
directory or
drive.

6. Use the Data Directory panel (see Figure 2-2) to select where you want
HyperACCESS to install and look for entries and user programs. By default, the
setup program suggests a folder under the HyperACCESS program folder called
My Files. Use the Browse... button to change the directory or drive.

Figure 2-3.
This Data Directory
panel suggests a
folder for installing
and looking for
entries and user pro-
grams. Use the
Browse... button to
change the directory
or drive.

Note: HyperACCESS creates a LISTS subdirectory under the data directory. This
directory stores list files that contain libraries and on-line systems that you can call
from the Lists panel. The data directory is also the parent of the HOSTDATA directory.
HyperACCESS Host uses this directory as the default home directory for users calling
Installing HyperACCESS for the First Time 2-5

your computer. Finally, the data directory is the default parent for the UPLOAD and
DOWNLOAD directories that you will have a chance to specify in step 17.
7. In the Setup Type panel (see Figure 2-4), select one of the radio buttons and
click Next. If you pick Full or Compact, skip to step 9.

Figure 2-4.
This Setup Type panel
lets you select the
type of installation
you want.

8. If you pick Custom, the installation program displays Select Components


dialog (see Figure 2-5) when you click Next. Unselect any components you
dont want to install, and click OK.

Figure 2-5.
This Select Compo-
nents dialog lets you
select individual com-
ponents you want to
install.
2-6 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

9. The Ready to Install panel summarizes your installation selections (see


Figure 2-6 for an example). Click Next if youre satisfied with your selections,
otherwise click Back to return one or more panels to make different choices.
After you click Next the installation program begins copying files to the folder
you specified.

Figure 2-6.
The Ready to Install
panel summarizes
your installation
selections.

10. The setup program then displays progress bars to show how the installation is
proceeding. If necessary, the program displays a dialog requesting the next
diskette. Insert the next diskette in the specified drive, or modify the path (if
necessary) and click OK to continue installation.
11. Finally, the installation program displays a dialog (see Figure 2-7) requesting
permission to reboot Windows so that Windows can update your configuration
information. If you click OK, Windows reboots and automatically executes
HyperACCESS. In either case, HyperACCESS finishes its installation when you
first run it.

Figure 2-7.
HyperACCESS
requests permission
to reboot.

Note: To view changes that the HyperACCESS installation program made to your
system, you can view the INSTALL.LOG file. You will find this file in the data
directory you specified in step 6. Do not delete or modify this file. HyperACCESS
uninstall must use the file if you remove HyperACCESS at some future date.
Installing HyperACCESS for the First Time 2-7

12. Once HyperACCESS starts, it displays the registration dialog shown in


Figure 2-8. Enter your name, address, and other information as requested by
typing in each edit field and pressing T to move from field to field. Press e
or click Next when youve finished filling in all information. You must enter
your name and a valid serial number before HyperACCESS will let you
continue.

Figure 2-8.
Registration dialog
with sample data.

13. HyperACCESS then presents additional panels to complete the installation and
default configuration. The first panel, shown in Figure 2-9, lets you choose an
existing connection or define a new connection.

Figure 2-9.
Select either existing
or new connection.

14. If you need to define a new connection, click the Define a new connection
radio button, otherwise leave the Choose from among existing connections
radio button selected.
15. Click Next. If you left the Choose from among existing connections radio
button selected, continue with step 16. Otherwise, the installation program
2-8 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

displays the Type of Connection panel shown in Figure 2-10. By default, this
dialog shows the Modem or Modem Pool (TAPI) connection selected. Click the
Run Modem Wizard Now... button to define a new TAPI connection. For more
information on creating connections, see Creating Connections on page 3-19.
Then, for Modem connections, click Back and return to step 14. Otherwise, click
Next and continue with step 17.

Figure 2-10.
Select either existing
or new connection.

16. The Existing Connections panel (see Figure 2-11) displays connections that
youve defined through Windows TAPI, previous versions of HyperACCESS,
or other communications or fax programs. Select the connection you want to use
as the default for HyperACCESS connections. Then click Next.

Figure 2-11.
Existing Connections
panel with sample
data.

17. Use the panel shown in Figure 2-12 to enter default folders that you want
HyperACCESS to use for sending and receiving files. By default,
HyperACCESS lists the data folder you specified earlier in the installation with
Download and Upload subdirectories.
Installing HyperACCESS for the First Time 2-9

Figure 2-12.
Enter default sending
and receiving folders
in this dialog.

18. Use the panel shown in Figure 2-13 to specify the default behavior for
HyperACCESS when you download files. Selecting Yes sets the default to
perform on-the-fly virus detection. Selecting No turns off on-the-fly virus
detection by default. In either case, you can change the default settings using the
Receive dialog (see Receiving Files on page 3-43).

Figure 2-13.
Use this panel to indi-
cate whether you
want HyperACCESS
to perform virus
checking by default.
2-10 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

19. To conclude the installation process, read the final dialog (shown in
Figure 2-14), and click Finish.

Figure 2-14.
Click Finish to end
installation.

HyperACCESS loads and updates defaults and predefined entries for calling remote
systems with the information youve supplied.
If you have either Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator installed on your
system and HyperACCESS isnt defined as the default Telnet application, you see the
dialog shown in Figure 2-15 whenever HyperACCESS loads. You can disable display
of this dialog by selecting the check box before clicking Yes or No.

Figure 2-15.
Selecting the default
telnet application.

When HyperACCESS completes loading it displays the Phonebook panel.


After youve finished installation, put the original installation CD-ROM or diskettes
in a safe place. Exposure to sunlight, dust, or magnetic fields (e.g., telephones,
televisions, speakers, etc.) is harmful to diskettes. If you have any difficulties, call our
Customer Support group at (734) 243-0576. Be sure to read Hilgraeve Customer
Support on page xv for additional information.
Network Installation 2-11

Finally, you should check the Readme.txt file, so double-click the HyperACCESS
Readme icon in the HyperACCESS folder.

Figure 2-16.
The HyperACCESS
folder.

Note: If you close the HyperACCESS folder, you can easily reopen it from the Windows
Start menu. Simply select Start/Programs/HyperACCESS/HyperACCESS (folder).

Continue with Placing Your First Call on page 2-19.

Network Installation

You can install HyperACCESS on a network server. Each user must have a separate
data folder for notebooks and custom settings. Any changes made to one users
notebooks are independent of changes other users make.
Note: Please carefully read the license agreement and make certain that you purchase
the number of licenses required.

Network Server Installation

You can use either of two methods to install HyperACCESS on a server:


Server-Only Installation Method installing once on the server and setting
System or User paths.
Server and Workstation Installation Method installing on the server and then
performing a workstation install on each workstation.
2-12 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

Advanced Network Installation for large, widely dispersed organizations.


Each of these methods has relative advantages and disadvantages.

Server-Only Installation Method

This method installs HyperACCESS on the server and provides user access to common
program and data files through either the System or User path. With this technique,
users must have their own data directory.
To perform a server-only installation, follow these steps:
1. On a workstation with access to the server and with a user id with read, write,
and create permission, install HyperACCESS on a network drive using the
normal installation procedures defined in Chapter 2, Installing HyperACCESS
and Placing Your First Call. Make sure you install the program in a network
directory to which users only have read access.
2. Use one of the following two procedures depending on whether you want to give
all users or only some users access to HyperACCESS
Modify the System path if you want all users to have access to
HyperACCESS. To do this, follow these steps:
a. Select Settings/Control Panel and double-click on System.
b. Click on the Environment tab in the System dialog. This displays a
dialog that gives access to the System path.
c. Click on the System path you may have to scroll to find the
statement. Once youve selected the System path statement, you can
use the edit field at the bottom of the dialog to modify it. Make sure
the statement ends in percent, colon (%:) before adding the
HyperACCESS path.
d. Click the Set button. Then click Apply.
e. Users with read access to the HyperACCESS directory can now
execute the program. The first time users run the program from their
workstation, the second phase of the install runs and completes
installation steps beginning with step 12 on page 2-7. This puts an
entry in the Registry file for users on their workstation.
Network Installation 2-13

To give specific users access to HyperACCESS, follow these steps:


a. For each user that you want to give permission to use
HyperACCESS, select Settings/Control Panel and double-click on
System.
b. Click on the Environment tab in the System dialog. This displays a
dialog that gives access to the User path.
c. Click on the User path you may have to scroll to find the
statement. Once youve selected the User path statement, you can
use the edit field at the bottom of the dialog to modify it. Make sure
the statement ends in percent, colon (%:) before adding the
HyperACCESS path.
d. Click the Set button. Then click Apply.
e. Users with a modified User path statement and read access to the
HyperACCESS directory can now execute the program. The first
time users run the program from their workstation, the second phase
of the install runs. This puts an entry in the Registry file for users on
their workstation.

Server and Workstation Installation Method

With this method of network installation, you install HyperACCESS on the server and
perform a silent installation on each workstation. With silent installation, a network
administrator can create an automated installation configuration file, HASETUP.INI,
that installs HyperACCESS on user workstations.
Note: HASETUP.INI is just a suggested filename. Any filename is OK as long as it
has the .INI extension (these filenames are not case sensitive).
During silent installation, HyperACCESS logs all steps of the installation in the
INSTALL.LOG file. This file includes installation prompts, HASETUP.INI file
responses, and any error messages.
The HASETUP.INI file contains the following information:
Pathname of the executable file folder.
Pathname of the data folder.
Shared executable flag.
2-14 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

An application key name (optional) that appears as a heading for information


stored in the system registry.
Figure 2-17 illustrates a HASETUP.INI file. This sample file shows a network drive
and folder (J:\Program Files\HAWin32) as the executable folder, and an
assumed user workstation drive and folder (C:\Program Files\HAWin32\My
Files) as the data folder. The APPKEY is the value placed in the Windows registry
file.

Figure 2-17.
[HAWIN32] Sample
EXEPATH=J:\PROGRAM FILES\HAWIN32 hasetup.ini file.
A network adminis-
DATAPATH=C:\PROGRAM FILES\HAWIN32\MY FILES trator creates this file
APPKEY=8.0 for user workstation
installations.

To perform network installations, follow these steps:


1. On a workstation with access to the server and with a user id with read, write,
and create permission, install HyperACCESS on a network drive using the
normal installation procedures defined in Chapter 2, Installing HyperACCESS
and Placing Your First Call. Make sure you install the program in a network
directory to which users have read access.
Note: If you want users to have a copy of the program on their own workstations
with installation from the server, you can create an install folder and copy the
HyperACCESS installation directories and files to this folder. In this case, dont
install HyperACCESS on the server.
2. Edit the provided HASETUP.INI file incorporating your installation-specific
information.
3. On each workstation that you want to access HyperACCESS, either the network
administrator or user executes the following command in the HyperACCESS
executable (or install) folder:
H32SETUP /S /W HASETUP.INI
Where:
/S Requests silent installation. Setup executes the installa-
tion process without providing any messages to the user.
/W Indicates that this is a workstation install, and that the
HyperACCESS program files are on the server. The
Network Installation 2-15

setup program only copies required DLL files to the


workstation WINDOWS\SYSTEM folder. This switch
also creates the user data directory and shortcuts on the
user workstation.
4. The user completes installation steps beginning with step 12 on page 2-7.
5. After completing installation, the user starts HyperACCESS by double-clicking
its icon.
6. Users can copy old notebook entries from previous versions or other applications
using the instructions in Chapter 3, Common Procedures.

Advanced Network Installation

This procedure is suitable for large, widely dispersed organizations and permits greater
customization and automation of the workstation install.
The HyperACCESS installation program (H32SETUP.EXE) normally runs on each
user workstation. During installation, users respond to prompts for configuration
information, and the installation program creates two registry key trees. To install
HyperACCESS on user workstations without running H32SETUP.EXE requires
other techniques to create these registry key trees.
The following steps let network administrators setup HyperACCESS on the server
and automate workstation installation without prompting users for configuration
details.
1. Install HyperACCESS on one machine (using administrator rights in Windows
NT). Program files may be installed on a network drive.
Note: Make sure you install the program in a network directory to which users
have read access
2. Reboot and answer prompts regarding default setup parameters. Modify pro-
gram settings as desired.
3. On Each Workstation, run the silent install as described in Server and Worksta-
tion Installation Method on page 2-13.
Make sure you use the /W switch if you want workstations to use program files
on a server. With this switch, the setup program only copies required DLL files
to the workstation WINDOWS\SYSTEM folder. This switch also creates the user
data directory and shortcuts on the user workstation.
2-16 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

Note: The HyperACCESS setup program copies several DLL files to the
WINDOWS\SYSTEM directory (if they are newer than existing versions). In
many cases, these files will already exist (installed by programs such as Internet
Explorer). To check a workstation to see if the required DLLs exist, use the utility
provided on the HyperACCESS CD called DLLCHECK.EXE.
Note: If the data directory is on a server drive, you must create separate data
directories for each user because data files are not sharable.
4. Copy the following registry key from the setup machine to the target machine:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Hilgraeve
This registry tree contains configuration information such as notebook entry file
path, notebook entry list, serial number, and several other configuration param-
eters. Export this tree from a machine that is setup as a typical workstation using
Registry/Export Registry file... in the REGEDIT utility. Select the
Hilgraeve key to export the entire branch.
5. Create the following registry key by selecting Registry/Import Registry file...
in the REGEDIT utility. This triggers creation of required connection entries in
the registry.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Hilgraeve\HAWin32\8.0
Value Name: Create Default Key
Value Data: <any connection device name> this includes TAPI devices
(such as a modem), WinSock (TCP/IP), or Direct Cabled COM1
(any connection already set up on that machine). For example,
you might have the following modem defined:
Hayes Optima 288 V.34 + FAX. If the specified TAPI
device does not exists on the machine, HyperACCESS will
prompt for setup parameters when started.
6. Run HyperACCESS on the workstation. The program silently completes addi-
tional required registry modifications.
Upgrading From a Previous Version 2-17

Upgrading From a Previous Version

If youre upgrading from HyperTerminal, HyperTerminal


Private Edition, HyperACCESS for Windows 3.x, or HyperACCESS has a full-
HyperACCESS/5 for DOS, you should install this version featured Application Pro-
gramming Interface,
in a different folder. rather than a proprietary
script language like
If youre upgrading from a previous version of
HyperACCESS/5s
HyperACCESS, follow instructions provided with your HyperPilot.
upgrade.

Upgrading from HyperACCESS for Windows 3.x

You should install HyperACCESS in a new folder. While HyperACCESS for Win-
dows 3.x files are not directly compatible with HyperACCESS 95 and NT, you can
convert their entries.
After installing HyperACCESS, running HyperACCESS Convert creates entries with
the same basic settings as your previous Phonebook entries. These new entries appear
in a HAWin16 Entries notebook (a separate tabbed panel in HyperACCESS).
Convert normally obtains enough information from your previous entries so that you
can place calls immediately. However, because of the requirements of 32-bit imple-
mentation, some of the older features cant be directly translated. If your entries have
user-defined keys, buttons, or recorded scripts, you will have to redefine them for the
new entries. You may also want to assign unique icons to these new entries.

Upgrading from HyperACCESS/5

While none of HyperACCESS/5s files are directly compatible, you can convert its
System List entries for use with HyperACCESS. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Export the desired systems from HyperACCESS/5 as described in its manual.
You can export multiple systems at one time.
2. Run HyperAccess Convert included with HyperACCESS to create .HAW files.
The convert program creates entries with the same basic settings and places them
in a HyperACCESS/5 Entries notebook (a separate tabbed panel in
HyperACCESS). HyperACCESS doesnt support HyperPilot scripts, but you
2-18 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

can easily record new scripts in VBScript or JavaScript, or write them with VBS,
C++, or any other programming language that supports calls to an external API.
3. Use the Phonebook panel File/Import... menu item to assign the converted .HAW
file to an entry with an associated icon and host entry name.

Upgrading from HyperTerminal or HyperTerminal PE

After installing HyperACCESS, running HyperACCESS Convert creates entries with


the same basic settings as HyperTerminal session files. These new entries appear in
a HyperTerminal Entries notebook (a separate tabbed panel in HyperACCESS).
Convert normally obtains enough information from your previous entries, including
the original HyperTerminal icons, so that you can place calls immediately. After
conversion, you can take advantage of the added capabilities of HyperACCESS to
enhance these entries by defining custom keys and buttons, and by recording logon
and other scripts.

Upgrading From Procomm

To upgrade from Procomm Plus for Windows, Procomm Plus 1.x (DOS), Procomm
Plus 2.x (DOS), or Procomm (DOS shareware) to HyperACCESS, follow these steps:
1. Run Procomm and select Compile/Edit from the Scripts menu.
2. Select the HyperACCESS data directory. (By default this is
C:\PROGRAM FILES\HAWIN32\MY FILES, but you may have specified
a different path during installation.)
3. Open PCW?EXP.WAS where ? is 1, 2, or 3 corresponding to the version of
Procomm you are running.
Note: PCW3EXP.WAS is for Procomm Plus for Windows.
4. Click the Compile and run button.
5. The program will prompt you for a dialing directory to convert. Select the
Procomm .DIR file for the dialing directory you want to convert. The
Placing Your First Call 2-19

PCW?EXP.WAS program creates a file named TOHAW32.EXP in the current


directory.
6. Run the CONVERT.EXE utility provided with HyperACCESS to convert the
file TOHAW32.EXP into HyperACCESS .HAW entries. The convert program
also creates a new notebook tab in HyperACCESS with all the converted dialing
directory entries.
7. Run HyperACCESS. If desired, you can drag entries from the new notebook tab
to any other.

Placing Your First Call

Youll find that HyperACCESS is extremely easy to use. To illustrate our point, wed
like to guide you through calling the Hilgraeve Bulletin Board System (BBS). While
youre online, you can register your software so that youll be able to take advantage
of reduced prices on upgrades, enhancements, and new products.
Note: Calling the Hilgraeve BBS is optional. If you prefer, you may register by
returning the enclosed registration card.
If this is your first opportunity to use a bulletin board system, youll find the Hilgraeve
BBS quite easy to use. Its menu driven, so you wont have to memorize any
complicated commands.
If you want to do online registration, be sure that you have the version and serial
numbers that are listed on the HyperACCESS CD-ROM case or distribution diskette.
You can also display the version and serial numbers after youve started
2-20 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

HyperACCESS, by selecting Help/About HyperACCESS. Now youre ready to make


your first call. Follow these steps:
1. If necessary, start Windows 95 and HyperACCESS. Youll see the display
shown in Figure 2-18.

Figure 2-18.
HyperACCESS with
the Main Phonebook
panel visible.

2. Move the mouse pointer to the Hilgraeve BBS icon and double-click the left
mouse button. HyperACCESS displays the Terminal panel, sends modem
initialization commands, and displays the phone number confirmation dialog,
shown in Figure 2-19. You can prevent this dialog from appearing in future calls
to this entry by selecting the Dial without this confirmation dialog check box.

Figure 2-19.
Hilgraeve BBS
Confirm Phone
Numbers dialog.
Placing Your First Call 2-21

3. Click the Dial button and HyperACCESS displays the Connect dialog as shown
in Figure 2-20.

Figure 2-20.
Hilgraeve BBS
Connect dialog.

During this process, you may hear a series of tones, beeps, and high-pitched
squeals as HyperACCESS instructs your modem to dial the phone number
and the modem makes connection. When a connection is firmly established, the
squeal stops and youll see a CONNECT message.
4. HyperACCESS then displays the registration information you entered during
program installation (see Figure 2-21), and lets you correct information on the
screen. When you click OK, it sends your first and last names as responses to
prompts from the BBS. It then requests your password before continuing.

Figure 2-21.
The Hilgraeve BBS
logon script verifies
your registration
information the first
time you log on.
2-22 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call

5. When the Password dialog appears (see Figure 2-22), enter any password you
want, and select the Store as permanent value check box if desired. Then press
e, or click OK. HyperACCESS automatically sends the password you enter.
If you store it as a permanent value, HyperACCESS will automatically send it
each time you log on to the Hilgraeve BBS.

Figure 2-22.
The Password dialog
lets you save your
password for future
automatic log on.

6. After logging on, youre transferred to the Hilgraeve BBS main menu. From
here you can download free programs, view product information, or perform
online registration.
7. To register your Hilgraeve product, type R at the prompt. Youll see the
registration screen as shown in Figure 2-23.

Figure 2-23.
HyperACCESS BBS
registration menu.
Removing HyperACCESS From Your System 2-23

8. Follow the instructions on the BBS menus, and youll have no trouble. When
youre finished, just type H on the BBS Main Menu to hang up from the call.
Note: You can generally get back to the Main Menu by pressing E.
9. Select File/Exit, or double-click the system menu icon in the upper-left corner
of the window to quit HyperACCESS.

Removing HyperACCESS From Your System

To remove HyperACCESS from your system, open the Control Panel and click on
Add/Remove Programs, then select HyperACCESS from the list and click the Add/
Remove... button. Uninstalling HyperACCESS performs the following operation:
Deletes the contents of the program folders.
Removes the application key from the registry file.
Removes HyperACCESS from the Taskbars Start menu.
2-24 Installing HyperACCESS and Placing Your First Call
Chapter 3

Common Procedures

What You Will Find in This Chapter

This chapter contains procedures to guide you through various HyperACCESS tasks.
They are grouped by general category so that you can find them easily. The categories
are:
General Procedures
Working With Notebooks
Making Calls
Receiving and Sending Files
Changing Settings
Managing Lists
Using Message Pad
Using Advanced Features
For complete, detailed descriptions of menus and dialogs, see Chapter 4,
HyperACCESS Reference.

General Procedures

This section provides some general procedures that you will find handy when using
HyperACCESS.

Drag and Drop

The term drag and drop refers to the technique of selecting one or more objects,
usually with your mouse, and moving the object(s) somewhere else. Drag and drop
is a technique generally available for various types of objects in most modern GUIs.
3-2 Common Procedures

In HyperACCESS, the term drag and drop refers to your ability to copy, move, and
create shortcuts. HyperACCESS notebooks are analogous to folders in that they are
containers for objects. Unlike folders, which show all files in a given directory,
HyperACCESS notebooks show internally stored collections of objects. Notebook
objects (called entries throughout this manual) represent files that you may store
anywhere on your disk.
Entries are similar to shortcuts. They are images of data-file objects that appear
elsewhere (specifically, in the drive/directory folder where you store .HAW files).
Double-clicking an entry (in a notebook) opens the corresponding .HAW file and
establishes a connection, whereas double-clicking an .HAW file in its folder starts
HyperACCESS and then opens the file and establishes a connection. If
HyperACCESS is already running, double-clicking an .HAW file starts an additional
instance of HyperACCESS.
Since entries are similar to shortcuts, most drag and drop operations are similar to
operations among folders. Dragging .HAW files from folders to notebooks parallels
the effect of dragging and dropping objects from folders to the Windows desktop
(which, like notebooks, mostly houses shortcuts). The following table summarizes
drag and drop operations involving HyperACCESS entries.

Notebook Entry to
File from Folder Notebook Entry to Same or Other
Drag & Drop Operation to Notebook Folder or Desktop Notebook
Move (button 1) Creates new entry that Moves the file to the Moves entry from one
shows icon and name (desktop) folder. notebook to another.
stored in .HAW file.

Copy (C+button 1) Creates a shortcut of the Copies entry to the Creates a copy of the
file in the notebook. (desktop) folder. entry. If in the same
notebook, the entry
name includes Copy
of and is a different
file on disk.

Shortcut (C+S+button 1) Creates new entry that Prompted to Move or Creates a Copy of
shows icon and name Copy at dropped loca- entry if in the same
stored in .HAW file. tion. notebook, otherwise
Creates a Copy of creates a shortcut of the
entry. existing entry.
General Procedures 3-3

Using Drag and Drop to Create a Notebook Entry

Another application of drag and drop in HyperACCESS notebooks is to copy the New
Entry Template to the same or another notebook (using C+button 1). This is the same
as selecting File/New or clicking on the New button in the Toolbar.

Using Drag and Drop to Make Connection

You can drag an entry and drop it on the Terminal panel tab. Just like double-clicking
the entry, HyperACCESS displays the Terminal panel and establishes a connection
with the remote system.

Using Drag and Drop in the List Panel

From the Lists panel, you can drag an entry from the list and drop it on the Terminal
panel tab. This is the same as selecting File/Place Trial Call or clicking on the Place
Place Trial Call trial call button (see Placing a Trial Call From the Lists Panel on page 3-64). If you
Button
drop the entry on a phonebook tab, HyperACCESS follows the procedure described
in Copying a Notebook Entry From a List File on page 3-14.

Using Pop-up Menus

Pop-up menus (sometimes called context or shortcut menus) appear near the mouse
pointer when you click mouse button 2 (normally the right button). The term pop-up
menu refers to the fact that the displayed menu appears at the mouse pointer location,
and the menu items depend on location of the pointer, type of window currently active,
and application.
In HyperACCESS, pop-up menus provide an additional technique for performing
commonly used functions. You can access all items in HyperACCESS pop-up menus
through menu bar selections or the Toolbar (if its displayed). The advantage of pop-
up menus is that they are right there at the object youre working with. The pop-
up menu is just one mouse-click away, and it contains only those options pertinent to
your present operation/object.
The following sections describe pop-up menus available in HyperACCESS. Refer to
the applicable section in Chapter 4, HyperACCESS Reference, for a complete descrip-
tion of each menu item.
3-4 Common Procedures

Using Notebook Panel Pop-up Menus

There are two different notebook panel pop-up menus:


Over an entry.
Anywhere else in the notebook panel.

Over an Entry
The pop-up that appears when you hold the mouse pointer over an entry and click (or
press) mouse button 2 displays the following items:
New Create a new notebook entry, see Phonebook Panel File/New
on page 4-4.
Open Displays the Terminal panel, see Phonebook Panel File/Open
on page 4-6.
Connect Displays the Terminal panel, connects the port, and dials the
phone number, see Phonebook Panel File/Connect on
page 4-12.
Connect and Displays the Terminal panel, displays the Recording in
Record Logon Progress window, connects the port, dials the phone number,
and records interaction with the remote system for later
automatic logons (see Phonebook Panel File/Connect and
Record Logon on page 4-14).
Connect but Skip Displays the Terminal panel, connects the port, and dials the
Logon phone number. Use this selection when you have an
automatic logon recorded and dont want to use it (see
Phonebook Panel File/Connect but Skip Logon on
page 4-15).

Delete... Deletes the selected notebook entry. Selecting Delete... dis-


plays a warning dialog with the following choices:
Remove from Notebook removes the entry from the
notebook, but doesnt delete its file from the disk.
Delete from Disk removes the entry from the note-
book, and deletes its file from the disk.
Rename Lets you rename an entry by editing the current name or typing
a new name in the entry name field below the icon.
General Procedures 3-5

Properties... Lets you change entry parameters. When selected, displays the
properties notebook.

Anywhere Else in the Notebook Panel


The pop-up that appears when you hold the mouse pointer anywhere in the notebook
panel, except over an entry, and click (or press) mouse button 2 displays the following
items:
Refresh Now Redisplays the notebook. Use this selection when entry files
are added or deleted outside HyperACCESS.
Icons Display the icons view of the notebook (see Phonebook Panel
View/Icons on page 4-16).
Details Display the details view of the notebook (see Phonebook Panel
View/Details on page 4-16).
Entry Names Display the entry name view of the notebook (see Phonebook
Panel View/Entry Names on page 4-16).
Toolbars... Displays the Toolbars dialog (see Phonebook Panel View/
Toolbars on page 4-16).
Status Bar Toggles display of the status bar at the bottom of the
HyperACCESS window (see Phonebook Panel View/Status
Bar on page 4-18).

Using Terminal Area/Backscroll Buffer Pop-up Menus


HyperACCESS displays two different pop-up menus when you click (or press) mouse
button 2 in the terminal area or Backscroll Buffer of the Terminal panel. The menu
depends on whether:
The mouse pointer is over selected text.
The mouse pointer is anywhere else in the terminal area or Backscroll Buffer of
the Terminal panel.

Over Selected Text


When the mouse pointer is over selected text, the pop-up menu has the following items:
Copy Copies selected text to the Clipboard (see Terminal Panel
Edit/Copy on page 4-70).
3-6 Common Procedures

Copy to Remote Copies selected text to the remote computer (see Terminal
Computer Panel Edit/Copy to/Remote Computer With <Enter> on
page 4-71).
Copy to Remote Copies selected text to the remote computer, sends a CR
Computer with character and, optionally, sends a LF character. (Depending
<ENTER> on ASCII Sending properties sheet.)
Copy to File... Copies selected text to a file you specify using the Copy to
File dialog (see Terminal Panel Edit/Copy to/File on
page 4-71).
Copy to Printer Copies selected text to the printer (see Terminal Panel Edit/
Copy to/Printer on page 4-72).
Copy to Message Copies selected text to the Message Pad (see Terminal Panel
Pad Edit/Copy to/Message Pad on page 4-72).
Find... Displays the Find dialog. The Find What edit field contains
the selected text (see Terminal Panel Edit/Find on
page 4-74).
Shortcut to ... If the selected text is a URL for a Web site, this menu selec-
(where ... is the tion launches your default Web browser and displays that
selected text) Web page at that address.

Anywhere Else
When the mouse pointer is anywhere in the terminal area or Backscroll Buffer, other
than over selected text, the pop-up menu has the following items:
Receive File(s)... Displays the Receive dialog (see Terminal Panel Transfer/
Receive File(s) on page 4-79).
Send File(s)... Displays the Send dialog (see Terminal Panel Transfer/Send
File(s) on page 4-83).
Page Setup... Displays the Page Setup dialog (see Terminal Panel File/
Page Setup on page 4-63).
Print Preview Displays the print preview window(see Terminal Panel File/
Print Preview on page 4-64).
Print... Displays the Print dialog (see Terminal Panel File/Print on
page 4-64).
Capture to Printer Copies received text to the printer (see Terminal Panel File/
Capture to Printer on page 4-64).
General Procedures 3-7

Capture to File Copies received text to a file you specify using the Copy to
File dialog (see Terminal Panel File/Capture to File on
page 4-66).
Paste Sends text in the Clipboard to the remote computer. In
HyperACCESS (see Terminal Panel Edit/Paste on
page 4-72).
Paste from File Copies selected text to the host from a file you specify using
the Paste from File dialog (see Terminal Panel Edit/Paste
from File on page 4-73).
Select Terminal Selects all text in the terminal area of the Terminal panel.
Screen
Select All Selects all text in the terminal area and Backscroll Buffer.
Find... Displays the Find dialog. The Find What edit field contains
the selected text (see Terminal Panel Edit/Find on
page 4-74).

Using Message Pad Pop-up Menus

HyperACCESS displays one of two different pop-up menus when you click (or press)
mouse button 2 in the Message Pad window. The menu depends on whether:
The mouse pointer is over selected text.
The mouse pointer is anywhere else in the Message Pad window.

Over Selected Text


When the mouse pointer is over selected text, the pop-up menu has the following items:
Undo Available after a cut or paste operation. Reverses the last
operation.
Cut Copies selected text to the Clipboard and deletes the text
from the Message Pad window.
Cut to Remote Transmits selected text to the remote system and deletes the
Computer text from the Message Pad window. With all text in the Mes-
sage Pad selected, this is the same as clicking Message Pads
Send! menu.
Copy Copies selected text to the Clipboard.
3-8 Common Procedures

Copy to Displays a cascade menu that lets you copy selected text to
the host, printer, or file (see Terminal Panel Edit/Copy to/
Message Pad on page 4-72).
Paste Replaces selected text with text contained in the Clipboard
(see Terminal Panel Edit/Paste on page 4-72).
Paste from File... Copies selected text from a file you specify using the Paste
from File dialog (see Terminal Panel Edit/Paste from File on
page 4-73).
Clear Deletes the contents of the Message Pad and leaves the
window open.
Page Setup... Displays the Page Setup dialog (see Terminal Panel File/
Page Setup on page 4-63).
Print Preview Displays the print preview window(see Terminal Panel File/
Print Preview on page 4-64).
Print... Displays the Print dialog (see Terminal Panel File/Print on
page 4-64).
Find... Displays the Find dialog. The Find What edit field contains
the selected text (see Terminal Panel Edit/Find on
page 4-74).
Select all Selects all text in the Message Pad.
Close Closes the Message Pad without transmitting or removing its
contents.

Anywhere Else
When the mouse pointer is anywhere in the Message Pad pane other than over selected
text, the pop-up menu has the following items:
Undo Available after a cut or paste operation. Reverses the last
operation.
Paste Inserts text contained in the Clipboard at the current insertion
point (see Terminal Panel Edit/Paste on page 4-72).
Paste from File... Copies selected text from a file you specify using the Paste
from File dialog (see Terminal Panel Edit/Paste from File on
page 4-73).
Check Spelling Select this menu item to run a spell checker on Message Pad
text. This item is unavailable (grayed out) after checking the
General Procedures 3-9

text until you modify the Message Pad text. If the checker
completes without detecting an error, a message box appears.
If the spell checker detects an error, it displays a dialog to help
you correct the error. Click the Help button in the dialog for
more information on using the spell checker.
Chat Mode The term chat mode describes an interactive session with a
remote system. It usually implies that another person is on the
other end of the interaction, and that you want to carry on a
conversation with that person.
The Chat Mode menu item displays a check mark when
selected and enables chat mode. When enabled,
HyperACCESS sends the current Message Pad contents when-
ever you press the e key. After sending the Message Pad
contents in chat mode, HyperACCESS clears the Message Pad
window in preparation for your next message. To disable chat
mode, unselect this menu item.
Word Wrap Word wrap occurs when a text editor or word processor breaks
a line at the end of a word or at punctuation. The term word
wrap usually implies that whole words move to the next line
without hyphenation. HyperACCESS supports word wrap in
the Message Pad for readability and because some systems
have relatively short maximum line lengths (for example, MCI
Mail has a maximum line length of 79 characters).
When selected, Word Wrap... displays the Word Wrap dialog
shown in Figure 3-1. This dialog lets you select either auto-
matic or manual line formatting. With automatic formatting
selected, you can set the maximum line width using the edit
field or its associated spin button. When you send text to the
remote computer from the Message Pad, HyperACCESS sends
all visible line endings, whether typed manually by pressing
e or inserted by automatic formatting.

Figure 3-1.
The Word Wrap dia-
log lets you select a
maximum line width
for viewing and
transmission.
3-10 Common Procedures

If you select manual formatting, HyperACCESS sends only


line endings typed manually. If you leave the Wrap to fit
Message Pad check box selected (the default), HyperACCESS
word wraps lines too wide to fit the Message Pad, but doesnt
send corresponding line endings. If you unselect this check
box, you will need to use the horizontal scroll bar to view lines
wider than the Message Pad.
The Message Pad follows settings in the ASCII Sending prop-
erties sheet when sending text. If you need to change line
endings, wait for specific prompt characters, add delays, etc.,
see ASCII Sending Properties Sheet on page 4-47.
Page Setup... Displays the Page Setup dialog (see Terminal Panel File/Page
Setup on page 4-63).
Print Preview Displays the print preview window (see Terminal Panel File/
Print Preview on page 4-64).
Print... Displays the Print dialog (see Terminal Panel File/Print on
page 4-64).
Find... Displays the Find dialog. Find limits its search to the Message
Pad (see Terminal Panel Edit/Find on page 4-74).
Select All Selects all text in the Message Pad.
Close Closes the Message Pad without transmitting or removing its
contents.

Using Toolbar Pop-up Menus


When you right-click any button in a Toolbar, HyperACCESS displays the Toolbar
pop-up menu. The choices that appear in this menu are:
Modify... Displays the Button dialog (see Terminal Panel Automation/
Buttons on page 4-90) with the current settings for the button.
Use this selection to change the definition of a buttons action,
or how its displayed.
New... Displays the Button dialog. Use this selection to create a new
button (see Terminal Panel Automation/Buttons on
page 4-90).
Working With Notebooks 3-11

Copy... This selection displays the Button dialog (see Terminal Panel
Automation/Buttons on page 4-90) with the current buttons
settings as defaults. You can modify any settings to create a
similar button.
Delete Displays a warning dialog for confirmation, and then deletes
the current button.
Begin a Group Selecting this menu item displays a check mark to indicate that
you want a separator line to appear on the toolbar before this
button. You can remove the separator by unselecting this menu
item.

Working With Notebooks

This section provides procedures for creating and modifying notebook entries.

Adding an Entry

There are several techniques available for creating a new entry. (Also see Copying a
Notebook Entry on page 3-13.) One of the easiest is to:
1. Perform one of the following actions:
You may instead want to
With the mouse pointer over any existing entry, copy an existing entry if it
right-click to display the pop-up menu. Then is similar to an existing one
select New. (see Copying a Notebook
Entry on page 3-13).
Click the New button in the Toolbar.
New Button Select the File/New command.
2. Any of these actions displays the Add Entry Wizard New Entry Description
dialog shown in Figure 3-2.
3. Type an entry name, select an icon, and specify a notebook for the entry.
4. The New Entry Description dialog has a Terminal entry field as shown in
Figure 3-2. Select a terminal emulator type that is appropriate for the remote
system you intend to call.
3-12 Common Procedures

Figure 3-2.
The New Entry
Description dialog
lets you specify an
entry name, select an
icon, enter notes,
place the entry in a
notebook, and select
a terminal to
emulate.

When you click Next, HyperACCESS displays the New Entry Connection
dialog shown in Figure 3-3. This dialog shows the default connection type in
the Connect via group box. You can change the connection type by clicking on
the Change... button and following the procedure in Modifying Connections on
page 3-59.

Figure 3-3.
The New Entry
Connection dialog
lets you select a con-
nection.
Working With Notebooks 3-13

When you click Next, HyperACCESS displays the New Entry Destination
dialog shown in Figure 3-4. The contents of this dialog vary depending on the
type of connection selected (for example, modem or TCP/IP). The illustration
shown in Figure 3-4 shows how the dialog looks with a modem selected. Default
values in this dialog come from the New Entry Template.

Figure 3-4.
New Entry Destina-
tion provides controls
for setting the con-
nection, phone
number(s), and
communications
settings.

5. If necessary, you can change the communications


settings. See Modifying Communications Settings on Dont worry if you dont
know the remote systems
page 3-56.
settings. HyperACCESSs
6. Click Next and then Finish in the final dialog of the CommSense feature (US
Patent 5,553,271) will
Add Entry Wizard. This saves the entry and displays determine the correct data
it in the notebook panel you selected. bits, stop bits, and parity
settings for you.

Copying a Notebook Entry


You can copy a notebook entry to another notebook, or copy an entry as an alternative
technique for creating a new entry. (See also, Adding an Entry on page 3-11). In
addition, you can copy an entry from a list file. The following sections describe
techniques to perform these functions.

Copying an Entry from One Notebook to Another

To copy an entry (creating a shortcut) from one notebook to another, follow these
steps (to move an entry, see Moving an Entry on page 3-16):
1. Select the tab that displays the notebook with the entry you want to copy.
3-14 Common Procedures

2. Press C+mouse button 1 on the entry you want to copy.


3. Keep the key pressed while you drag the entry to the tab of the new notebook.
This creates a shortcut of the original entry. Any changes to one of these entries,
regardless of notebook, changes the other.
Note: To create a copy of a notebook entry with its own set of properties (and
possibly a new name), follow the steps in the next section, Copying an Entry to
Create a New Entry.

Copying an Entry to Create a New Entry

One of the easiest ways to create a new entry that is similar to an existing one is to:
1. Select the tab that displays the notebook with the entry you want to copy.
2. Select an existing entry that has similar characteristics, or select the New Entry
Template entry by clicking on it once.
3. Perform one of the following actions:
With the mouse pointer over the selected entry, right-click to display the
pop-up menu and select Open.
Click the Open button.
Select File/Open.
Any of these actions displays the Terminal panel with the selected entry open.
Open Button 4. Select File/Save As... from the Terminal panel. This displays the Save As dialog
that lets you change the entry name.
5. Accept the suggested filename (based on the current entry name), or enter a new
filename in Save as Filename. (HyperACCESS appends a .HAW extension if
you dont enter it.)
6. Click OK. HyperACCESS saves the current entry parameters in the file speci-
fied, and creates the entry with the icon and entry name specified.

Copying a Notebook Entry From a List File

HyperACCESS comes with several lists. In addition, you can download other lists
from various bulletin board systems and online services, or export lists from contact
Working With Notebooks 3-15

programs and personal information managers (PIMs). Some of these lists are very
large (for example, the FIDO list is 3 MB).
To copy one or more entries from a list file to a notebook, you must first define a
template if one doesnt already exist (see Creating List File Templates on page 3-62).
If youre using one of the list files that comes with HyperACCESS, the template
already exists.
Once youve established your list file template, follow these steps:
1. Select the Lists tab to display the Lists panel. HyperACCESS displays the last
list file you selected. If you want to use a different list file, select File/Open...
to display a standard file selection dialog. Use this dialog to open the list file
you want.
2. Select one or more entries in the list using standard mouse or keyboard selection
techniques.
3. To copy the entries to a notebook do one of the following:
Right-click an entry to display the Lists panel pop-up menu. Select Copy
to Notebook... menu item.
Click the Copy to Notebook button.
Copy to Drag the entries onto the notebook tab desired.
Notebook
Button 4. If you use one of the top two options (in Step 3) and you have more than one
notebook defined, HyperACCESS displays the Copy to Notebook dialog.
Select the notebook from the list, and click OK. HyperACCESS copies the entry
to the notebook and saves the entry file.
3-16 Common Procedures

Modifying Entry Defaults

The New Entry Template entry defines defaults that


HyperACCESS uses whenever you create new entries. You You can open the New
can access the settings of this entry using the following Entry Template and access
the properties notebook
steps:
from the Terminal panel.
1. Select the New Entry Template entry. However, if you try to con-
nect or type in the Termi-
2. Perform one of the following actions to display the nal panel with New Entry
Template open,
New Entry Template settings notebook:
HyperACCESS prevents
With the mouse pointer over the New Entry connections with this
entry.
Template entry, right-click to display the pop-
up menu. Use the Properties cascade menu to
select the properties sheet you want to display.
Use the File/Properties cascade menu to select
the properties sheet you want to display.
3. Make changes you want and close the properties notebook.

Moving an Entry

To move an entry from one notebook to another, follow these steps (to copy an entry,
see Copying an Entry from One Notebook to Another on page 3-13):
1. Select the tab that displays the notebook panel containing the entry you want to
move.
2. Drag the entry to the tab of the notebook that you want the entry to appear in
(see Drag and Drop on page 3-1). HyperACCESS moves the entry without
displaying the other notebook panel.

Deleting an Entry

To delete an entry, follow these steps:


1. Select the tab of the notebook that contains the entry.
2. From the panel, select the entry you want to delete.
Working With Notebooks 3-17

3. Perform one of the following actions to display the Delete Entry dialog:
With the mouse pointer over the selected entry, right-click to display the
pop-up menu. Select the Delete... menu item.
Press D.
Select the File/Delete... menu item.
4. In the Delete Notebook Entry dialog, click one of the following push buttons:
Remove from this Removes the entry from the current notebook without
Notebook deleting its file from the disk.
Delete from Disk Removes the entry from the current notebook and
deletes its file from the disk.
Cancel Closes the dialog without removing the entry.

Creating Buttons

You can use a button to issue any combination of key strokes, a menu command, or
to execute a program. You can define buttons for any HyperACCESS panel or entry.
Each panel and entry has its own set of buttons.
From any panel menu bar you can select Automation/
Buttons... to display the Buttons for <panel name> dia- You can use the Toolbar
log. From the Terminal panel, this selection defines buttons pop-up menu to create or
modify buttons. Simply
for the current entry, and the dialog title is Buttons for click mouse button 2 on
<entry>. any button to display the
pop-up menu.
1. From the dialog, select a button in the list and click
Modify..., or New... to create a new button. Either of
these actions displays the Button dialog.
2. Select one of the predefined buttons in the scrollable area.
3. You then assign one of the following actions to the button:
Click the Macro text option button to activate the edit field and let you
enter keystrokes that you want HyperACCESS to output when you click
the button. For example:

2 displays <F2>

S +2 displays <SHIFT-F2>
3-18 Common Procedures

C+S+2 displays <CTRL-SHIFT-F2>


You may enter any key combination including, for example, a users name.
Note: The Macro radio button and edit field are available only on the
Terminal panel because they operate only on the terminal screen.
Select a menu command from the Command drop-down list. You can
assign only one command to a key combination. Commands in the list
include all HyperACCESS menu selections for the current panel. This lets
you perform any operation with a single click.
Specify a program to run using the Program edit field, drop-down list, or
Browse... push button. (For a complete description of browse dialogs, see
File Browse dialogs on page 4-8.)
4. You can enter a line of button help information in the ToolTip edit field. This
line displays whenever you hold the mouse pointer over a button for a couple of
seconds.
5. Click OK to return to the Button for <entry> (or <panel name>) dialog.
6. Click OK to complete the button definition.
You can move a button by
The button appears with the standard HyperACCESS but- dragging it (with
tons in the Toolbar. S+button 1) to its new
position.

Assigning Programs to Keys or Buttons

To assign a program that uses the HyperACCESS API (HAPI), simply specify the
path and filename in the Program edit field.
For example, assume you enter the following in the Program edit field:
c:\Program Files\Accessories\Wordpad.exe readme.txt
Pressing the button (or key) associated with this program causes HyperACCESS to
attempt to start Wordpad and have it open the readme.txt file.
Note: You can assign a VBScript or JavaScript file to the Program edit field.
Working With Notebooks 3-19

Creating Connections

HyperACCESS lets you create groups of communications settings called connections.


Connections establish a path that entries use to connect to remote systems. Entries can
share connections and each entry can reference multiple connections. However, before
you use an entry, you must select the connection you want it to use.
Different types of connections require different parameters. You can specify global
parameters that affect all entries that use a connection, and you can specify local
parameters that affect the current entry.
In Windows 95, 98, and NT, modems are a shared resource under control of the
telephony application programming interface (TAPI). HyperACCESS uses TAPI
connections whenever you access a modem, so you must create TAPI connections
through the Control Panel Modems selection. However, as a convenience to
HyperACCESS users, you can access the Control Panel Modem Properties dialog
from the Communications properties sheet as described below.
You can create a new connection when you define a new entry (from the New Entry
Connection dialog) or at any other time using the Communications properties sheet.
To create a new connection, follow these steps:
1. With the New Entry Connection dialog or Communications properties sheet
open, click the Change... button in the Connect Via group box. This displays
the Existing Connections dialog shown in Figure 3-5.

Figure 3-5.
The Existing Connec-
tions dialog lets you
define and modify
connections.

2. Click the New Connection... button to display the


Type of New Connection dialog shown in Figure 3-6. Contact Hilgraeve if you
This dialog lets you select the type of connection from need support for addi-
tional connection types.
a scrollable list. Once you select a connection type, it
becomes permanently associated with the connection.
3-20 Common Procedures

You can modify other parameters of a connection, create new connection types,
delete connection types, or select a different connection type for an entry, but
you cant change a connection type once its created. Valid types include:
Direct cable
Modem or Modem Pool (TAPI)
Winsock (TCP/IP)

Figure 3-6.
Select the type of
connection from the
scrollable list.

3. Select a connection type and click OK. What happens next depends on the type
of connection you select. See the appropriate section:
Modem or Modem Pool Connections, see below.
Direct Cable Connections, see page 3-22.
For WinSock (TCP/IP) Connections, see page 3-22.

Modem or Modem Pool Connections


For Modem or Modem Pool connections, HyperACCESS displays a warning dialog
that informs you that you must create modem connections using standard Windows
TAPI modem properties dialog. Click Yes to go to the TAPI dialog. This dialog is
shown in Figure 3-7.
For a description of the parameters in this dialog, see Communications Settings on
page 4-35 or refer to the online Windows help.
Follow these steps to complete the definition of the connection:
1. Click the Add... button to display the TAPI Install New Modem wizard, and
follow the instructions in the wizard dialogs.
Working With Notebooks 3-21

Figure 3-7.
The standard Win-
dows TAPI Modem
Properties dialog for
creating TAPI
connections.

2. Accept or modify the Default baud rate using the drop-down list. The baud rate
you specify in this dialog is the default for all connections that use this modem
on this port. To modify the baud rate for the current entry, change the setting in
the Communications Settings dialog or properties sheet, see Modifying Com-
munications Settings on page 3-56.
3. You may want to review the Connection tab to verify Connection preferences
and Call preferences. In general, you should set Data bits to 8, Parity to None,
and Stop bits to 1. Check with the system administrator of the remote system
to see if you must change any of these settings.
4. If you need to specify special modem commands, click the Advanced... button
To display the Advanced Connection Settings dialog. Use this dialog to enter
additional modem commands in the Extra settings edit field. You also use this
dialog to modify error and flow control.
Note: Whenever possible, we recommend that you use hardware flow control.
5. Click OK to return to the Existing Connections dialog, and click Close to return
to the New Entry Connection dialog or properties sheet.
3-22 Common Procedures

Direct Cable Connections

After clicking either the Modify Connection... or New Connection... button in the
Existing Connections dialog for a direct cabled connection, the Connection dialog
appears and looks like Figure 3-8.

Figure 3-8.
The Connection
dialog for Direct
Cable connections.

Follow these steps to complete the definition of the connection:


1. The Connect Through group box indicates the current physical connection. To
change the physical connection, click the Change... button in this group. This
displays the Connect Through dialog. For details of this dialog see Connect
Through dialog on page 3-23.
2. Click OK to return to the Connection dialog, then OK again to return to the
Existing Connections dialog, and click OK again to return to the New Entry
Connection dialog or Communications properties sheet.

For WinSock (TCP/IP) Connections

There are no user modifiable settings for Winsock (TCP/IP) connections.


Working With Notebooks 3-23

Connect Through dialog

Clicking the Change... button in the Connect Via group box of the Connection dialog
displays the dialog shown in Figure 3-9.

Figure 3-9.
The Connect Through
dialog for Direct
Cabled connections.

Continue with selections from this dialog:


1. Select a Type of interface from the drop-down list.
Figure 3-9 illustrates the selections available for Standard Com Port.
2. Select a port from the list.
Note: COM ports greater than COM4 do not appear in the list. To select a COM
higher port, simply type the COM port desired (for example, COM6) in the Com
port edit field.

3. Once youve selected an interface type and port, click OK. HyperACCESS
returns to a dialog that depends on the connection type.
4. Click OK or Close in intermediate dialogs to return to the New Entry Connection
dialog or Communications properties sheet.

Deleting Connections

You can delete a connection when you define a new entry (from the Communications
dialog) or at any other time using the Communications properties sheet. To delete a
connection, follow these steps:
1. From the Communications dialog or the Communications properties sheet,
select the Change... button in the Connect Via group box.
3-24 Common Procedures

2. In the Existing Connections dialog, select the connection you want to delete.
3. Click the Delete button.
4. Click OK when HyperACCESS displays the warning dialog.

Creating Custom Notebooks

HyperACCESS comes with one predefined notebook called Phonebook.


You can add entries to this predefined notebook (see Adding an Entry on page 3-11),
or you can define new notebooks and copy or add entries to them. Each notebook you
create has its own panel tab.
You can create a new notebook containing just the New Entry Template, or you can
copy all entries from a current notebook to a new one.
To create a new notebook follow these steps:
1. If necessary, select a notebook panel tab to display a notebook.
2. Select Notebook/New... to display the Notebook Name dialog.
3. Enter any name (up to 32 characters long) in the edit field and click OK.
This creates a new notebook panel with a tab using the name you specified. The new
notebook has only one entry, New Entry Template.
To copy all entries from a current notebook to another, follow these steps:
1. If necessary, select the notebook panel tab to display the notebook you want to
copy.
2. Select Notebook/Copy... to display the Notebook Name dialog.
3. Enter any name (up to 32 characters long) in the edit field and click OK.
This creates a new notebook panel with a tab using the name you specified. The new
notebook has all the entries that were in the original.

Making Calls

This section describes procedures for making calls to remote systems.


Making Calls 3-25

Calling a Remote System

There are many ways you can call a remote system using HyperACCESS. The easiest
is to set up an entry for systems you want to call (see Adding an Entry on page 3-11
for procedures to create entries). If you havent used communications software before,
you may also find it helpful to refer to Placing Your First Call on page 2-19.

Calling CompuServe

HyperACCESS comes with a complete logon script for calling CompuServe. To call
CompuServe and add your logon ID and password to the script, follow this procedure:
With the Phonebook panel displayed and active:
1. If you know your local CompuServe telephone num-
ber, enter it by following these first two steps. Other- Your calls to CompuServe
will be cheaper if you use a
wise, skip to step 3. Display the CompuServe
local number instead of the
Communications properties sheet using one of the default 800 number.
techniques described in Changing Property Sheet Set-
tings on page 3-53.
2. In the Phone Number edit field, replace the default 800 number with your local
CompuServe telephone number. Then click OK.
3. To connect to CompuServe perform one of the following actions:
Right-click the CompuServe entry icon to display the pop-up menu. Then
select Connect.
Select the CompuServe entry icon, and click the Connect notebook entry
button in the Toolbar.
Select the CompuServe entry icon, and then File/Connect.

Connect Notebook
Drag the CompuServe entry to the Terminal tab (see Using Drag and Drop
Entry Button to Make Connection on page 3-3).
HyperACCESS opens the Terminal panel, sends modem initialization com-
mands, and dials the number listed in your entry.
4. Once you connect with CompuServe the Enter User ID dialog appears. Type in
your ID, select the Store as permanent value check box, and click OK.
3-26 Common Procedures

5. When the Enter Password dialog appears, type in


your password, select the Store as permanent value If you select Store as per-
check box, and click OK. manent value, you can also
select the Hide value in
6. Interact with CompuServe, and logout normally when properties page check box
to protect your password.
youre finished.
The next time you call CompuServe, HyperACCESS will enter your user ID and
password for you.

Calling Other Systems

HyperACCESS comes with one predefined notebook, called Phonebook. You can add
your own custom notebooks and copy or move entries from one notebook to another.
To select a notebook, click its tab (for information on creating a custom notebook, see
Creating Custom Notebooks on page 3-24).
To call an existing entry, use one of the following techniques:

Double-click
With the proper notebook panel displayed:
If an entry doesnt have a
1. Move the mouse pointer to the icon representing the phone number defined,
system you want to call. and you attempt to dial,
HyperACCESS displays a
2. Double-click the desired entry. dialog to obtain the phone
number.
HyperACCESS displays the Terminal panel, sends modem
initialization commands, and dials the number listed in your
entry.

Connect
With the proper notebook panel displayed:
1. Move the mouse pointer to the entry you want to call.
2. Select it by clicking on it one time.
3. Perform one of the following actions:
Right-click the entry to display the pop-up menu. Then select Connect.
Connect Notebook
Entry Button
Click the Connect notebook entry button in the Toolbar.
Select the File/Connect command.
Making Calls 3-27

Drag the entry to the Terminal panel tab (see Using Drag and Drop to
Make Connection on page 3-3).
HyperACCESS displays the Terminal panel, sends modem initialization commands,
and dials the number listed in your phonebook entry.

Connect and Record Logon


With the proper notebook panel displayed:
1. Move the mouse pointer to the entry you want to call.
2. Select it by clicking on it one time.
3. Perform one of the following actions:
Right-click the entry to display the pop-up menu. Then select Connect
and Record Logon.
Click the Connect and record logon button in the Toolbar.
Select the File/Connect and Record Logon command.
HyperACCESS displays the Terminal panel, dials the number, and displays the
Recording in Progress window.
Connect and
Record Logon
Button Connect but Skip Logon
With the proper notebook panel displayed:
1. Move the mouse pointer to the entry you want to call.
2. Select it by clicking on it one time.
3. Perform one of the following actions:
Select the File/Connect but Skip Logon command to connect without
using the entrys logon script.
Right-click the entry to display the pop-up menu. Then select Connect but
Skip Logon.
This lets you connect without using a predefined logon script.
HyperACCESS displays the Terminal panel and dials the number.
3-28 Common Procedures

Open
With the proper notebook panel displayed:
If you type in the Terminal
1. Move the mouse pointer to the entry you want to call. panel, HyperACCESS auto-
matically opens the com-
2. Select it by clicking on it one time. munications port without
dialing. This lets you type
3. To display the Terminal panel, perform one of the
commands to your
following actions: modem.
Right-click the entry to display the pop-up
menu. Then select Open.
Click the Open button in the Toolbar.
Select File/Open.
4. You can now change any communications parameters, prepare files for transfer,
Open Button
or compose a message in Message Pad before initiating connection.
5. Follow instructions in Connecting From the Terminal Panel on page 3-36.

Using the Toolbar


There are three standard buttons in the notebook panel that provide similar techniques
for initiating calls. They are:
Connect notebook Performs the same function as File/Connect (see Connect,
entry above).

Connect Notebook
Entry Button

Open Displays the Terminal panel with parameters set for the
selected entry. To make a connection to a remote system, fol-
low instructions in Connecting From the Terminal Panel on
page 3-36.
Open Button

Connect and Performs the same function as File/Connect and Record


record logon Logon (see above).
Connect and
Record Logon
Button
Making Calls 3-29

Calling Systems Not in a Notebook

Systems may not appear in a notebook for the following reasons:


The entry filename doesnt end with a .HAW extension.
The entry file isnt in the user data folder. For example, it may reside on a
diskette.
The entry is in another notebook.
If youre calling a system that doesnt appear in the notebook for any of the above
reasons, you can use File/Import to access the entry file. If youre calling a system for
the first time, or one that hasnt been saved before, follow the steps outlined in Adding
an Entry on page 3-11.

Calling Multiple Systems

HyperACCESS lets you communicate concurrently with any number of remote


systems. Youre limited only by the number of communications ports and available
system memory. To access multiple systems, you start additional instances of
HyperACCESS. Each instance is independent of all others. You can, however, cut
and paste between instances using the Clipboard.
Note: Under Windows 95, HyperACCESS can support a maximum of 28 COM ports.

Calling Telnet Sites

HyperACCESS is the ideal communications software for accessing telnet sites


whether you use dial-up accounts or TCP/IP networks. Telnet is the fastest, most
widely accessible, and least expensive part of the Internet. It is also widely used in
large corporate intranets.
In addition to accessing telnet sites from shell accounts, you can configure
HyperACCESS as the default telnet application for either Microsoft Explorer or
Netscape Navigator. Then, anytime you access a telnet address from within your
browser, HyperACCESS automatically loads and provides your telnet interface.
Even while using telnet, HyperACCESS lets you launch your Web browser using a
simple button push on the HyperACCESS toolbar, or you can highlight a Web address
Launch Browser in the HyperACCESS Terminal panel, right-click to display a pop-up menu, and then
Button
3-30 Common Procedures

select Shortcut to. This displays your default browser and accesses the Web address
you have selected.
The following sections describe simple procedures to use HyperACCESS to access a
telnet site using a TCP/IP network, dial-up IP account, or dial-up shell account. To
permit one notebook entry to create multiple concurrent sessions with a host system,
select the When I try to open a notebook entry that is already open, create another
window check box in the Startup tab of the Options notebook (see Phonebook Panel
Options/Startup on page 4-23). For information on how to access a telnet site with
HyperACCESS from within your browser, see Using HyperACCESS With a Web
Browser on page 3-39.
Note: When a telnet terminal accesses a telnet server, an invisible exchange of data
occurs that includes the terminal type, or terminal ID. HyperACCESS uses standard
terminal IDs for each of the terminals it emulates. However, some telnet servers dont
recognize standard terminal IDs. If you get a message indicating that the telnet server
doesnt recognize your terminal type, simply change the Telnet terminal entry field
on the Terminal Emulator properties sheet (see Terminal Emulator Properties Sheet
on page 4-43).

Using a TCP/IP Network to Access a Telnet Site


This procedure assumes that your computer is connected to a TCP/IP network and
that you have system software loaded to support the network. If you are unsure of your
network type and whether your PC is properly configured, contact your local system
administrator. Then follow these steps:
1. If you havent already done so, create a WinSock (TCP/IP) connection using the
procedure described in Creating Connections on page 3-19. Then continue with
the steps in For WinSock (TCP/IP) Connections on page 3-22.
2. Use the procedures described in Adding an Entry on page 3-11 to create an entry
for the telnet site you want to access. When the New Entry Connection dialog
displays, follow these steps:
a) Unless the Connect Via group box already lists WinSock (TCP/IP), click
its Change... button; select WinSock (TCP/IP) from the Existing Connec-
tions dialog; and click Close to return to the New Entry Connection
dialog.
b) Enter the IP address or name of the telnet site in the Remote IP address
entry field. The IP address is of the form: 123.12.12.123. Some telnet
sites have names that are recognized by a domain name server. These sites
have names like: HBBS.hilgraeve.com.
Making Calls 3-31

c) Generally, you should leave the Remote port number unchanged. Change
this value only if you are specifically instructed to do so by the adminis-
trator of the telnet site you want to access.
d) Click Next in the New Entry Connection dialog and then Finish in the
final dialog of the Add Entry Wizard. This saves the entry and displays it
in the notebook panel you selected.
3. To connect with the telnet site, simply double-click the entry you have just
created.
4. Generally, you will be required to enter a logon ID and password when you
connect to a telnet site. You can automate this logon procedure using
HyperACCESSs recording capability (see Recording a Logon Sequence on
page 5-5).
5. Continue with normal terminal interaction.

Using a Dial-up IP Account to Access a Telnet Site


This procedure assumes that you have a dial-up IP account with an Internet service
provider (or other server), and you have system software loaded to support dial-up IP
network access. If you are unsure of whether your PC is properly configured, contact
your local system administrator. Then follow these steps:
1. If you havent already done so, create a WinSock (TCP/IP) connection using the
procedure described in Creating Connections on page 3-19. Then continue with
the steps in For WinSock (TCP/IP) Connections on page 3-22.
2. Use the procedures described in Adding an Entry on page 3-11 to create an entry
for the telnet site you want to access. When the New Entry Connection dialog
displays, follow these steps:
a) Unless the Connect Via group box already lists WinSock (TCP/IP), click
its Change... button; select WinSock (TCP/IP) from the Existing Connec-
tions dialog; and click OK to return to the New Entry Connection dialog.

b) Enter the IP address or name of the telnet site in the Remote IP address
entry field. The IP address is of the form: 123.12.12.123. Some telnet
sites have names that are recognized by a domain name server. These sites
have names like: HBBS.hilgraeve.com.
c) Generally, you should leave the Remote port number unchanged. Change
this value only if you are specifically instructed to do so by the adminis-
trator of the telnet site you want to access.
3-32 Common Procedures

d) Click Next in the New Entry Connection dialog and then Finish in the
final dialog of the Add Entry Wizard. This saves the entry and displays it
in the notebook panel you selected.
3. Create a SLIP or PPP connection for your Internet service provider (ISP) using
Windows Dial-Up Networking or third-party TCP/IP software. Consult your
ISP and TCP/IP documentation for details. If you are using Windows Dial-Up
Networking, you will need to create a connection for your ISP in the Dial-Up
Networking folder (generally under My Computer in any Explorer window).
To create a new dial-up connection follow these steps:
Note: These instructions are based on Windows Dial-Up Networking in Win-
dows as of the publication date of this manual. You should check your online
Microsoft help if these instructions arent correct for your system.
a) Double-click My Computer on your desktop to open the My Computer
window.
b) Double-click the Dial-Up Networking folder to open it. If this is your first
Dial-Up Network connection, skip to step d.
c) Double-click the Make New Connection icon to display the first dialog
of the Make New Connection Wizard.
d) The first dialog of the Make New Connection Wizard has your default
modem selected. If the wrong modem appears, use the drop-down list to
select the correct modem. Then click on Next.
e) Enter the Area code, Telephone number, and Country code of your
Internet service provider (ISP).
f) Click Finish in the last dialog of the wizard.
g) In the Dial-Up Networking window, select Connections/Settings... to
display the Dial-Up Networking settings dialog.
h) Select the Prompt to use Dial-Up Networking radio button, and click OK.
4. To connect with the telnet site, simply double-click the entry you have just
created in HyperACCESS. HyperACCESS automatically launches the dialer.
You can modify your ISP telephone number and enter user id and password in
the Connect to dialog. If you select the Save password check box Windows
retains your user id and password for later use. However, this may be inappro-
priate in some installations due to the potential to breach security. After Win-
Making Calls 3-33

dows dialer connects to your ISP, you can minimize the connection dialog.
(Youll need to access this task later, so remember that its name is the Dial-Up
Networking connection name you created.) HyperACCESS gains control and
connects to the telnet site you specified.
5. Generally, you will be required to enter a logon ID and password when you
connect to a telnet site. You can automate this logon procedure using
HyperACCESSs recording capability (see Recording a Logon Sequence on
page 5-5).
6. Continue with normal terminal interaction.
CAUTION: Disconnecting from a telnet site by logging off or using any
technique to disconnect from within HyperACCESS does NOT disconnect you
from your ISP. You must manually disconnect from your ISP by opening the task
on the task bar that has your Dial-Up Networking connection name. Then click
the Disconnect button.
Note: By default, Dial-Up Networking connections disconnect after 30 minutes
of inactivity. You can change this default in the connections properties. To
display the connection properties, select My Computer from your desktop. Then
select Dial-Up Networking. In the Dial-Up Networking window, right-click the
connection and select Properties. In the connections properties dialog, click
the Configure... button. Then select the Connection tab. Select the Disconnect
a call if idle more than check box, and enter a time value in the edit field. Finally,
click OK in all dialogs and close the windows.

Using a Dial-up Shell Account to Access a Telnet Site


This procedure assumes that you have a dial-up shell account with an Internet service
provider (or other service). Follow these steps:
1. If you havent already done so, create a modem connection using the procedure
described in Creating Connections on page 3-19. Then continue with the steps
in Modem or Modem Pool Connections on page 3-20.
2. Use the procedures described in Adding an Entry on page 3-11 to create an entry
for the telnet site you want to access. When the New Entry Connection dialog
displays, follow these steps:
a) Unless the Connect Via group box already lists your modem, click its
Change... button; select your modem from the Existing Connections
dialog; and click Next to return to the New Entry Connection dialog.
3-34 Common Procedures

b) Enter the telephone number for the Internet service provider in the Phone
number entry field. If necessary, use the Dialing Properties dialog to
specify a calling card or other special requirements (see Modifying Dialing
Properties on page 3-61).
c) Click Next in the New Entry Connection dialog and then Finish in the
final dialog of the Add Entry Wizard. This saves the entry and displays it
in the notebook panel you selected.
3. To connect with the telnet site, double-click the entry of the Internet service
provider you have just created.
4. Generally, you will be required to enter a logon ID and password when you
connect to an Internet service provider. You can automate this logon procedure
using HyperACCESSs recording capability (see Recording a Logon Sequence
on page 5-5).
5. At the service provider prompt, type the telnet command followed by the
address of the telnet site, for example, telnet HBBS.hilgraeve.com.
The IP address is of the form: 123.123.123.123. Some telnet sites have
names that are recognized by a domain name server. These sites have names
like: HBBS.hilgraeve.com.
6. Continue with normal terminal interaction.
Note: You can also create a custom entry and/or button by recording your telnet logon.
Start with the telnet command, for example, telnet HBBS.hilgraeve.com,
and continue with your user ID and password following the telnet site prompts. See
Recording a Logon Sequence on page 5-5.

Queued Calling

You can call multiple remote systems in turn using HyperACCESS. When
HyperACCESS connects with an entry, it removes that entry from the queue. After
you disconnect from an entry, HyperACCESS tries the next entry in the queue.
HyperACCESS cycles through the queue until canceled or until it removes all entries.
HyperACCESS removes an entry from the queue upon successful connection or when
it exceeds the number of dialing attempts specified in the entrys Dialing Details
dialog.
Making Calls 3-35

To use queued dialing, follow these steps:


1. In the Phonebook (or any notebook) panel, select multiple entries using one of
the following techniques:
Use drag selection. Position the mouse pointer over a blank area of the
panel and drag the selection box over the group of entries you want to
select.
Use C+mouse button 1 to individually select (or unselect) multiple
entries.
2. Connect using one of the following techniques:
Select File/Connect.
Select Connect from the pop-up menu.
Click the Connect notebook entry button.
Drag the selected entries to the Terminal panel tab (see Using Drag and
Drop to Make Connection on page 3-3).
Note: Double-clicking a member of a group deselects the group and selects
Connect Notebook
Entry Button the entry you double-clicked.
3. HyperACCESS displays a warning dialog that displays Queued Call Status.
After displaying this dialog for five seconds, HyperACCESS calls the first entry
in the queue. You can click Cancel to abort queued calling, or Pause to
temporarily stop calling. (After clicking Pause, the button becomes Resume.
Click Resume to continue queued calling or click Cancel to abort.)
4. Each time a call connects, you can interact with the remote system in your normal
manner. When you disconnect, the warning dialog reappears with the Queued
Call Status showing the number of calls completed and the number remaining.
If you dont Cancel or Pause, HyperACCESS makes the next call in five
seconds.
Note: If you select Cancel from the Connect dialog that appears during dialing,
you only cancel the call to that entry. Queued calling to remaining entries
continues.
Note: To place a call to an entry not in the queue, select the entry from the
Phonebook (or any other notebook) while youre connected to one of the queued
entries. When HyperACCESS prompts with Do you want to disconnect,
respond by clicking the Yes button. HyperACCESS disconnects from the current
queued entry, removes it from the queue, and places a call to your selected entry.
3-36 Common Procedures

When you complete the call and disconnect, HyperACCESS continues with
queued calling as before.

Connecting From the Terminal Panel

Once youve opened an entry and displayed the Terminal panel, you can connect to
the remote system using any of the following techniques:
Select File/Connect. This initializes the modem and dials the number listed in
your phonebook entry.
Select the File/Connect and Record Logon command or click the record button
in the Toolbar to have HyperACCESS learn a new logon sequence.
Select the File/Connect but Skip Logon command to connect without using the
entrys logon script.
Click the Connect notebook entry button in the Toolbar. This performs the
same function as File/Connect.
Type in the terminal screen to manually enter dialing commands. (When you
type in the Terminal panel, HyperACCESS automatically opens the communi-
Connect Notebook cations port without dialing.)
Entry Button

Starting Communications Sessions From a Command File or Prompt

If you want to start HyperACCESS or HyperACCESS Host from a command file or


command line prompt, you can type the path of the HyperACCESS folder as part of
the command. For example,
C:\Program Files\HAWin32\Hawin32.exe
or
C:\Program Files\HAWin32\Hahost32.exe
Alternatively, you can add the folder to your PATH (in Windows 95) statement (in
config.sys), or the Environment section of the System Properties in the Control
panel for Windows NT. For more information on PATH, config.sys, or environ-
ment variables, see your Windows documentation or online help. Once youve
Making Calls 3-37

modified your config.sys or environment variables and rebooted, you can execute
HyperACCESS by typing:
HAWIN32
and for HyperACCESS Host, you can type:
HAHOST32
Assuming youve modified your PATH or environment variables, you can launch a
specific notebook entry by referencing that entrys path and filename. For example,
HAWIN32 C:\Program Files\HAWin32\My Files\Hilgraeve BBS.haw
or
HAHOST32 C:\Program Files\HAWin32\My Files\Modem Host.hhw
Note: when entering a path with one or more spaces in a folder (directory) name or
filename, you must enclose the entire path in quotes, as shown above.

Starting Communications Sessions From the Desktop

HyperACCESS and HyperACCESS Host let you start communications sessions by


simply clicking an icon on your desktop. To use this option, create an entry (as defined
on page 3-11), or use one of the predefined entries. Then follow these steps:
1. If necessary, start HyperACCESS or HyperACCESS Host.
2. Select the notebook panel tab for the notebook that has the entry you want on
your desktop.
3. Drag the entry icon anywhere on the desktop (see Drag and Drop on page 3-1).
This creates a shortcut of the entry that automatically launches HyperACCESS
(or HyperACCESS Host) and dials the remote system (or begins waiting for a
call). The shortcut shows the same icon that appeared in the notebook along with
the .HAW (or .HHW) filename.
The icon appears on the desktop. To start HyperACCESS (or HyperACCESS Host)
and establish a connection with that entry, simply double-click your new icon.
3-38 Common Procedures

Starting Communications Sessions From Windows Startup

This procedure describes how to automatically launch HyperACCESS Host whenever


you turn on your computer, reboot, or restart Windows. This section deals specifically
with a Host example, since this is the most common application of this procedure. As
you can see from other examples in this set of Starting procedures, you can easily
modify this concept to any HyperACCESS entry.
Whenever Windows starts, it automatically launches any programs in the
Windows/Start Menu/Programs/StartUp folder. To start HyperACCESS
Host and automatically begin waiting for calls, follow these steps:
1. If necessary, start HyperACCESS Host and open an Explorer window.
2. If necessary, make the Explorer window active (use A+T).
3. Use the folder tree (left side) of the Explorer window to display the
\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\StartUp folder. When you select
this folder, it displays the shortcuts of programs that automatically launch
whenever Windows starts.
4. Make HyperACCESS Host active (use A+T), and arrange your windows so
you can see the entry that you want in the Host Entries notebook. In the Explorer
window, you need to be able to see the contents of the StartUp folder (right
side) or StartUp folder icon in the folder tree (left side).
Note: If your display is too small to see both HyperACCESS Host and the
Explorer window at the same time, minimize the Explorer window.
5. Use C+mouse button 1 to drag a copy of the desired entry to the StartUp
folder (on either the right or left side of the Explorer window).
Note: If you minimized the Explorer window, move the mouse pointer to the
Explorer button on the Taskbar (be careful if you have more than one Explorer
window open). Windows will open the Explorer window and you can drop the
file in the StartUp folder.
Windows will now automatically launch HyperACCESS Host whenever you turn on
your computer, reboot, or restart Windows. This instance of HyperACCESS Host will
automatically begin waiting for calls using the entry you selected.
Making Calls 3-39

Starting Communications Sessions Using the Start Menu

Generally, when you start HyperACCESS (or HyperACCESS Host) from the Win-
dows Start menu on the Taskbar, HyperACCESS displays the last notebook displayed.
To have the Start menu automatically launch HyperACCESS and begin communica-
tions, follow these steps:
1. If necessary, start HyperACCESS (or HyperACCESS Host) and open an
Explorer window.
2. If necessary, make the Explorer window active (use A+T).
3. Use the folder tree (left side) of the Explorer window to display the
\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\HyperACCESS folder. When you
select this folder, it displays the shortcuts that appear in the Start cascade menu
for HyperACCESS.
4. Make HyperACCESS active (use A+T), and arrange your windows so you
can see the entry that you want in the HyperACCESS notebook and the Explorer
window. In the Explorer window, you need to be able to see the contents of the
HyperACCESS folder (right side) or HyperACCESS folder icon in the folder
tree (left side).
Note: If your display is too small to see both HyperACCESS and the Explorer
window at the same time, minimize the Explorer window.
5. Use C+mouse button 1 to drag a copy of the desired entry to the HyperACCESS
start menu folder (on either the right or left side of the Explorer window).
Note: If you minimized the Explorer window, move the mouse pointer to the
Explorer button on the Taskbar (be careful if you have more than one Explorer
window open). Windows will open the Explorer window and you can drop the
file in the HyperACCESS start menu folder.
The entry icon appears in the Start/Programs/HyperACCESS cascade menu, so you
can directly launch it and begin communications from the Start menu.

Using HyperACCESS With a Web Browser

HyperACCESS is Web enabled to let you get the most out of communicating through
the Internet. You can launch your Web browser from within HyperACCESS to
connect to Web sites, or you can launch HyperACCESS from your browser to access
telnet sites.
3-40 Common Procedures

If you have more than one Web browser on your system, HyperACCESS launches
the browser defined as the Windows default. You can change the default browser by
launching the non-default browser from Windows and making the appropriate selec-
tion from the dialog that appears.

Launching Your Web Browser From Within HyperACCESS

There are two ways to launch your Web browser from within HyperACCESS:
Click the Launch Browser button on the toolbar. This starts your default browser
in its own window.
Launch Browser
Button Select an address (URL) of a Web site in the Terminal panel. This could be a
URL that appears in e-mail or some other screen of information from a telnet
site. Right-click over the selected URL, and select Shortcut to from the pop-up
menu. This opens your default browser and displays the Web site.

Launching HyperACCESS From Within Your Web Browser

You can launch HyperACCESS from within your Web browser if you have defined
HyperACCESS as the default telnet application (see Making HyperACCESS the
Default Telnet Application, below), and you perform one of the following operations:
Access (click on) a telnet address on a Web page.
Use the history list to access a telnet address.
Use the Open dialog to access a telnet address.
Any of these techniques display HyperACCESS in its own window.

Making HyperACCESS the Default Telnet Application

If you had a pre-existing browser when you installed HyperACCESS, you were asked
if you wanted HyperACCESS to be the default telnet application for your browser(s).
If you responded positively, HyperACCESS notified Windows that it is the default
telnet application. If you responded negatively, each time you launch HyperACCESS
(and you have a browser), a dialog appears asking if HyperACCESS should be your
default telnet application.
Making Calls 3-41

You can tell HyperACCESS not to display this dialog by selecting the check box in
the dialog. Later you can re-enable display of this telnet request dialog using the
Options/Startup menu in the Phonebook (see Phonebook Panel Options/Startup on
page 4-23).

Chatting With a User on the Remote PC

HyperACCESS lets you carry on a dialog with the user on the remote PC (chatting).
Procedures for initiating a chat session are similar regardless of whether you are on
the calling or host end of the connection. The following sections provide procedures
for initiating from either end. Additional procedures describe how to carry on the
dialog once initiated.

Initiating Chat as the Caller

As a HyperACCESS user calling a HyperACCESS Host system, follow these steps


to initiate chat mode after successfully logging on to the host system:
1. In the Terminal panel, at the host prompt, type chat followed by e.
Note: Only one side (caller or host operator) needs to issue the chat command.
2. If necessary, type C+G (bell) several times to get the host operators attention.
Note: The host operator must restore HyperACCESS Host if it is minimized, and
respond by typing in the Host panel or in the Message Pad on the host PC.
3. Open the Message Pad by performing one of the following operations:
Click the Message Pad button.
Select View/Toolbars... and then Message Pad from the Toolbars dialog.
4. In the Message Pad, select Options/Chat Mode. This automatically sends the
contents of the Message Pad whenever you press the e key.
Message Pad
Button 5. Use the Terminal panel to view text written by the host operator, and use the
Message Pad to type text you want to send to the remote system. You can use
normal editing operations within the Message Pad before sending any message
(see Editing Text with Message Pad on page 3-67).
Note: You can type directly in the Terminal panel without using the Message
Pad, but you wont have the advantages of Message Pads editing capabilities.
3-42 Common Procedures

6. Whenever youre ready to send Message Pad text to the remote system, press
the Send button, A+S, or the e key.
Send Text Button
7. Take turns reading and responding. Use the Terminal panel and your Message
Pad while the host operator uses the Host panel and his/her Message Pad.
Note: Both your messages and the host operators messages appear in the
Terminal panel.
8. Press E or C+C to return both sides to the host prompt.

Initiating Chat as the Host

As a HyperACCESS Host operator, follow these steps to initiate chat mode after the
caller successfully logs on:
1. If HyperACCESS Host is minimized, restore it.
2. In the Host panel, at the host prompt, type chat followed by e.
Note: Only one side (caller or host operator) needs to issue the chat command.
3. If necessary, type C+G (bell) several times to get the callers attention.
4. Open the Message Pad by selecting View/Toolbars... and then Message Pad
from the Toolbars dialog, or click the Message Pad button in the Toolbar.
5. In the Message Pad, select Options/Chat Mode. This automatically sends the
contents of the Message Pad whenever you press the e key.
6. Use the Host panel to view text written by the caller, and use the Message Pad
to type text you want to send to the remote system. You can use normal editing
operations within the Message Pad before sending any message (see Editing
Text with Message Pad on page 3-67).
Note: You can type directly in the Host panel without using the Message Pad,
but you wont have the advantages of Message Pads editing capabilities.
7. Whenever youre ready to send Message Pad text to the remote system, press
the Send button, A+S, or the e key.
Send Text Button
8. Take turns reading and responding. The caller uses the Terminal panel and his/
her Message Pad while you use the Host panel and your Message Pad.
Note: Both your messages and the callers messages appear in the Host panel.
Receiving and Sending Files 3-43

9. Press E or C+C to return both sides to the host prompt.

Quitting HyperACCESS

To exit HyperACCESS, select File/Exit, double-click the system menu icon in the
window title bar, or press A+4. If you are connected to a remote system, youll see
a warning message that closing the window also disconnects the communications
session. HyperACCESS automatically saves any changes you have made to the current
entry.

Receiving and Sending Files

This section describes procedures for transferring files between your PC and the
remote system. It also includes procedures for capturing received data to a file or
printer.

Receiving Files

HyperACCESS supports many different file transfer protocols. This section describes,
generically, how you receive files regardless of file transfer protocol selected. For a
brief description of the protocols and their default settings, see Appendix E, File
Transfer Protocols.
To receive one or more files from a remote system, follow these steps:
1. Use one of the following actions to display the mod-
eless Receive dialog. See Figure 3-10. Modeless dialogs let you
continue to interact with
With the mouse pointer anywhere in the the remote system with
Terminal panel, except over selected text, right- the dialog displayed.

click to display the pop-up menu and select


Receive Files... to display the dialog.
Click the Receive files button.
Select Transfer/Receive File(s)... to display the dialog.

Receive Files
Button
3-44 Common Procedures

Figure 3-10.
Receive is a
modeless dialog.
It can remain on
screen while you
issue commands
to the host
system.

2. The Place received file in the following folder edit field shows the default or
last path used. You can:
Edit the path in the edit field.
Select one of the previously received files from the drop-down history list.
Use the Browse... push button to select an existing directory. (For a
complete description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.)
3. If necessary, use the Transfer protocol drop-down list box to select a different
file transfer protocol. The sending system must be using the same file transfer
protocol specified.
4. If you need to change settings for the selected file transfer protocol, click the
Settings... push button to see a dialog for the selected protocol. See Appendix E,
File Transfer Protocols, for additional information on these settings.
5. If the file transfer protocol sends filename information, you can select the Use
received file time/date and/or the Use received path information check
boxes; otherwise, the check boxes are dimmed. See Terminal Panel Transfer/
Receive File(s) on page 4-79.
6. Select (or unselect) the options to check received files for viruses using
HyperGuard and to perform on-the-fly unzipping.
Receiving and Sending Files 3-45

7. Select one of the options in the If File Already Exists group box. For more
information on these options, see Terminal Panel Transfer/Receive File(s) on
page 4-79.
8. Type commands to the remote system to send the
file(s). (Commands vary from system to system, so File transfers use multi-
we cant provide detailed instructions in this manual.) threading techniques so
that you can review the
When the remote system is ready, click the Receive Backscroll Buffer and per-
push button. This causes HyperACCESS to enter form other HyperACCESS
receive mode and displays the receive progress dialog. operations while receiv-
ing files.

Capturing Text to a File

HyperACCESS gives you two ways to capture text displayed in the terminal area or
Backscroll Buffer. (To capture data directly to the printer, see Printing Incoming
Information as It Arrives on page 3-49, or Printing Information After Its Received on
page 3-50.)
You can copy from the terminal area or Backscroll Buffer to a file.
You can use the File/Capture to File command in the Terminal panel to capture
data as it arrives.

Capturing Terminal Area and Backscroll Buffer Data

You can copy information from the terminal area or Backscroll Buffer to a file to save
your current interaction. Follow these steps:
1. Use the vertical scroll bar, if necessary, until the beginning or end of the section
you want to capture is visible in the Terminal panel.
2. Select the character(s), word(s), and/or line(s) of text desired. You can double-
click to highlight a single word, and extend in either direction; or position the
mouse pointer anywhere in the text and perform normal text selection.
3. To display the dialog in Figure 3-11, perform one of the following actions:
Select Edit/Copy to File... from the menu bar.
Position the mouse pointer over the selected text and right-click to display
the pop-up menu. Select Copy to File... from the pop-up menu.
3-46 Common Procedures

Figure 3-11.
Copy to File lets you
specify a file and path
for the destination of
the copy.

4. Enter a filename (with path, if necessary), or use the Browse... push button. (For
a complete description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.)
5. Select Append or Overwrite.
6. Click OK.

Capturing Text as It Arrives

Before you can begin capturing incoming text, you must display the Terminal panel.
To capture your interaction with the remote system, follow these steps:
1. Perform one of these actions to display the dialog in Figure 3-12:
Right-click anywhere in the Terminal panel (but not over selected text) to
display the pop-up menu. Then select Start... from the Capture to File
cascade menu.
Click the Capture to file button in the Toolbar.
Select Start... from the File/Capture to File cascade menu.

Figure 3-12.
Capture to File
Capture to File lets
Button
you specify a file
and how it will be
used for saving
your interaction
with the remote
system.

2. If youve defined a default capture file for the entry, that filename appears in the
File edit field. If you dont have a default capture file defined for the entry, either
Receiving and Sending Files 3-47

type a path and filename or click the Browse... push button to help you specify
a capture file. (For a complete description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.)
3. Select one of the options in the group If File Already Exists. For information
about these options, see Capture to File dialog on page 4-66.
4. Select one of the options in the group Capture Mode. For information about
these options, see Capture to File dialog on page 4-66.
5. Select the Make these the default settings check box if you want all changes
youve made in this dialog to become default settings for future sessions.
6. Click Start to return to the Terminal panel and begin
capturing data according to specified options. To capture a snapshot of
the panel, select the text
7. See Printing on page 3-47, if you want to print text you want captured and use
while youre capturing it to a disk file. the pop-up menu. See Cap-
turing Terminal Area and
Backscroll Buffer Data on
page 3-45.
Stopping, Pausing, and Resuming Text
Capture

Once a capture has been initiated, selecting File/Capture to File displays a cascade
menu with the following choices:
Stop Stops file capture and closes the cur-
rent capture file. If you end the communica-
tions session, or exit with-
Pause Suspends file capture, but doesnt out selecting Stop,
close the current capture file. If cap- HyperACCESS closes the
capture file automatically.
ture is already paused, this menu
item is grayed out (unavailable).
Resume Restarts file capture using the current capture file. If capture is
already active, this menu item is grayed out (unavailable).

Printing

HyperACCESS provides four ways to print text. You can:


Print incoming information as it arrives.
Print information from the terminal area or Backscroll Buffer after its received,
or from the Message Pad before its sent.
3-48 Common Procedures

Permit the host to issue print commands (if supported by the terminal emulator).
HyperACCESS supports both continuous and selected printing for applicable
terminal emulators (for example, VTxxx).
Print information from a capture file (see Capturing Text to a File on
page 3-45 for more information) using another application.
You can use the Terminal panel pop-up or File menu to select either Print or Capture
to Printer to initiate printing at any time, even before HyperACCESS connects to the
remote system. However, before actually printing, you should make sure that your
printer is set up properly.

Changing Printer Setup

HyperACCESS lets you select a predefined printer using the following techniques
from any panel:
Select File/Print... (or use the C+P shortcut key combination) to display the
Print dialog. In the Print dialog, select the printer from the Name drop-down list.
Select File/Page Setup... to display the Page Setup dialog. In the Page Setup
dialog, click the Printer... button. In the next dialog, select the printer from the
Name drop-down list.
Select File/Print Preview to display the print preview window. In the print
preview window, click the Print... button to display the Print dialog. In the Print
dialog, select the printer from the Name drop-down list.
Click the Print button from any Toolbar to display the Print dialog. In the Print
dialog, select the printer from the Name drop-down list.
Print Button
Change the Windows default printer using the Printers folder. To access the
Printers folder, click the Start button in the Taskbar, then select Settings/
Printers. Right-click on the printer you want to select as the Windows default,
and select Set As Default from the pop-up menu.
Receiving and Sending Files 3-49

Printing Incoming Information as It Arrives

HyperACCESS lets you print your interaction with the remote system while youre
online. To initiate this type of printing, follow these steps:
1. Verify that your Printer Setup is defined correctly. See Changing Printer Setup,
above, for more information.
2. Verify that your printer is turned on and has plenty of paper.
3. To start printing, perform one of the following actions to display the Capture
to Printer dialog shown in Figure 3-13.
Click the Capture to printer button.
With the mouse pointer anywhere in the Terminal panel (except over
Capture to Printer
Button selected text), right-click to display the pop-up menu and select the
Capture to printer cascade menu. Then select the Start... option.
Select the File/Capture to printer cascade menu. Then select the Start...
option.
The dialog shows the active printer.

Figure 3-13.
Capture to Printer lets
you control how and
when your remote
system interaction
prints.

4. Select the appropriate option in the Capture Mode group box to specify what
information you want to capture. For more information, see Capture to Printer
dialog on page 4-64.
5. Select the appropriate option in the Print Method group box. For more infor-
mation, see Capture to Printer dialog on page 4-64.
6. You can make your selections the default for all future capture to printer
operations by selecting the Make these the default settings check box.
7. Click the Start push button to print data using the options you selected.
3-50 Common Procedures

Printing Information After Its Received

To print a section of the terminal area, Backscroll Buffer, or the Message Pad follow
these steps:
1. Verify that your printer is turned on and has plenty of paper, and that your Printer
Setup is defined correctly. See Changing Printer Setup on page 3-48 for more
information.
2. Select the text to be printed in the terminal area, Backscroll Buffer, or Message
Pad. (If you want to print the entire terminal area and Backscroll Buffer, you
dont need to make a selection.)
3. In the Terminal panel, use the Print button, select Edit/Copy to Printer, File/
Print, or use the pop-up menu. When the dialog appears, select either All or
Selected text from the Print Range group box, and click OK. HyperACCESS
will print the range selected.
Print Button

Stopping, Pausing, and Resuming Printing

Once youve initiated printing operations for a session, selecting File/Capture to


printer displays a cascade menu with the following choices:
Stop Stops capturing data for the printer and closes the printer
connection (this enables the spooler to release the information
to the printer).
Pause Suspends capturing data for the printer, but doesnt close the
printer connection. If the printer is already paused, this menu
item is grayed out (unavailable).
Resume Restarts capturing data for the printer using the current printer
connection. If the printer is already active, this menu item is
grayed out (unavailable).

Sending Files

HyperACCESS provides straightforward methods for sending files to a remote system


using whatever protocol that system has available. The simplest technique requires
that you send one file at a time. However, most file transfer protocols supported by
HyperACCESS can send groups of files.
Receiving and Sending Files 3-51

The following sections describe, generically, how you send files regardless of file
transfer protocol selected. For a brief description of the protocols and their default
settings, see Appendix E, File Transfer Protocols.

Simple File Transfer

You can send one file or a group of files, which you select using wildcards, following
these steps:
Note: Most file transfer protocols supported by HyperACCESS can send groups of
files using wildcards (for more information, see Appendix E, File Transfer Protocols).
1. Issue commands to the remote system to receive files from you. (Commands
vary from system to system, so we cant provide detailed instructions in this
manual.)
Note: You can delay this step until just before step 5.
2. Use one of the following actions to display the mod-
eless Send dialog. See Figure 3-14. Modeless dialogs let you
continue to interact with
With the mouse pointer anywhere in the the remote system with
Terminal panel, except over selected text, right- the dialog displayed.

click to display the pop-up menu and select


Send Files... to display the dialog.
Click the Send files button.
Select Transfer/Send File(s)... to display the dialog.
3. Enter a filename with its full path in the Filename edit field, or use the Browse...
Send files Button push button to select a file. (For a complete description of browse dialogs, see
page 4-8.) Filenames entered in the edit field can include wildcards. In this case,
HyperACCESS sends each file in the specified path that satisfies the wildcard
selection.
Note: If you select the Include paths when sending filenames check box,
HyperACCESS also searches subdirectories of the specified path for matching
files.
4. If necessary, use the Transfer protocol drop-down list box to select a different
file transfer protocol. The receiving system must be using the same file transfer
protocol.
3-52 Common Procedures

Figure 3-14.
Send is a modeless
dialog. It can remain
on-screen while you
issue commands to
the host system.

5. Click the Send button. This causes HyperACCESS to enter send mode and
displays the send progress dialog.

Specifying Multiple Files to Send

There are several techniques available to send multiple files with HyperACCESS. You
can:
Use the Browse button to display a file selection dialog. From within a selected
folder, use the S or C key in combination with mouse button 1 to perform
multiple selection within the current folder. All selected files appear in the
Filename edit field.
Note: You cant select files across directories, and you cant specify wildcards
in a filename using this technique. This technique changes your default send
directory.
Enter any number of files in the Filename edit field. Enclose each file (including
its full path if provided) in quotes. Separate filenames with a space. For example,
you could enter:
*.txt d:\uw\exe\win.dbg\download\*.gif file.txt
Note: You can combine this technique with the one above. Remember that you
must use browse selection before adding filenames to the Filename edit field.
Regardless of the technique you use to enter multiple files in the Filename edit field,
the file history list doesnt store the multiple selection.
Changing Settings 3-53

Changing Settings

This section provides procedures that describe how to modify communications,


protocol, and terminal emulator settings.

Changing Property Sheet Settings

The properties notebook consists of multiple tabbed panels called sheets. You can
access these sheets using one of the following procedures:
In a notebook, with the mouse pointer over the selected entry, right-click
to display the pop-up menu. Select Properties from the menu. When the
properties notebook appears, select the tab of the sheet you want to display.
Click the Notebook entry settings button. Depending on the panel you
are in, this displays either the Description or Communications properties
sheet. Select the tab of the sheet you want to display.
In the Phonebook panel, select Properties from the File menu. When the
Notebook Entry properties notebook appears, select the tab of the sheet you want to display.
Settings Button
In the Terminal panel, select the desired sheet from the Properties menu.

Changing File Transfer Protocol Settings


You can change file transfer protocol settings from either a notebook panel or the
Terminal panel. Regardless of where you make changes to these settings, each entry
has its own uniquely saved values. This means you can access multiple remote systems
using the same protocol (for example, Zmodem), and you can define each entry with
its own combination of settings.
This section outlines various procedures for accessing the protocol Settings dialog.
For details on actual settings and permitted values for each protocol, see Appendix E,
File Transfer Protocols.
3-54 Common Procedures

Changing Protocol Settings

When you change Transfer Protocol settings from a notebook or Terminal panel,
youre specifying default values. You can also modify these values on-the-fly in the
Receive or Send dialogs.

Changing Default Protocol Settings


1. Display the File Transfer properties sheet using one of the techniques described
in Changing Property Sheet Settings on page 3-53.
2. In the Default File Transfer Protocols group, select the desired file transfer
protocol from the For receiving and For sending drop-down lists.
3. Click the desired Settings... push button.
Note: If both sending and receiving protocols are the same, either Settings...
button affects both directions.
4. Make desired selections from the protocol-unique dialog, and click OK.
5. You can change default receiving or sending folders using one of the following
techniques:
Use the drop-down list of the combo box to select a folder from the history
list of previously used folders.
Use the Browse... push button to select a folder. (For a complete descrip-
tion of browse dialogs, see File Browse dialogs on page 4-8.)
Type a relative or full path in the edit field of the drop-down combo box.
When you exit the properties notebook by clicking OK, HyperACCESS automatically
saves all changes youve made for the current entry.

Changing Send or Receive Protocol Settings on-the-Fly


1. Select Transfer/Receive File(s)... or Transfer/Send File(s)....
2. Select the desired file transfer protocol from the Transfer protocol drop-down
list.
3. Click Settings....
Note: If both sending and receiving protocols are the same, either Settings...
button affects both directions.
4. Make desired selections from the protocol-specific dialog, and click OK.
Changing Settings 3-55

Changes you make are saved with the entry.

Changing Terminal Emulator Settings

You can change terminal emulator settings from either a notebook or the Terminal
panel. Regardless of where you make changes to these settings, each entry has its own
uniquely saved values. This means you can access multiple remote systems with the
same basic emulator (for example, VT100), and you can define each entry with its
own combination of setting values.
This section outlines procedures for accessing the Terminal Emulator properties sheet
and emulator-specific dialogs. For details on actual settings and permitted values for
each terminal emulator, see Appendix D, Terminal Emulator Characteristics.
The Terminal Emulator properties sheet has settings that are common to all terminal
emulators, and it provides access to a dialog that has emulator-specific options. To
access this sheet and dialog for any terminal emulator:
1. Display the Terminal Emulator properties sheet using one of the techniques
described in Changing Property Sheet Settings on page 3-53.
2. Select the desired terminal emulator from the Terminal drop-down list.
3. Make selections by clicking on desired radio buttons, or change the number of
rows and columns using the spin buttons (or edit fields).
4. If it is active, click the Settings... push button. This displays an emulator-specific
dialog for additional settings. This button is unavailable (grayed out) if there are
no emulator-specific settings.
5. If applicable, make desired selections from the emulator-specific dialog, and
click OK.
When you exit the properties notebook, HyperACCESS automatically saves all
changes youve made for the current entry.

Configuring Communications Ports

See Creating Connections on page 3-19 or Modifying Connections on page 3-59.


3-56 Common Procedures

Modifying Communications Settings

You can modify communications settings when you define a new entry using the New
Entry Destination dialog (of the New Entry wizard) or at any other time using the
Communications properties sheet. The procedure you use depends on whether you
have a modem or direct cable connection (there are no modifiable settings for WinSock
(TCP/IP) connections).

Modifying Modem Communications Settings

To modify a connection, follow these steps:


1. With the New Entry Destination dialog (of the New Entry wizard) or Commu-
nications properties sheet open, click the Communications Settings... button.
This displays the standard TAPI modem properties dialog.
2. In the General panel, shown in Figure 3-15, of the modem properties dialog, you
can select a valid Port from the drop-down list; set the Speaker volume using
the slider bar; and set the Maximum speed for data transfer between your
computer and the modem using the drop-down list. For some modems, Windows
enables the Only connect at this speed check box. Generally, you want to leave
this check box unselected.

Figure 3-15.
The General panel of
the TAPI modem prop-
erties dialog.
Changing Settings 3-57

3. The Connection panel, shown in Figure 3-16, of the modem properties dialog
has drop-down lists for Data bits, Parity, and Stop bits. It also has selections
for Call preferences and Port Settings... and Advanced... buttons that display
additional dialogs. For more information on these options, see your Windows
documentation, click the ? in the dialog and select the object on which you need
help, or right-click on a drop-down list, check box, or entry field title and select
Whats this? from the pop-up menu.

Figure 3-16.
The Connection panel
of the TAPI modem
properties dialog.

4. To change flow control, click the Advanced... button and select the appropriate
radio button.
3-58 Common Procedures

5. The Options panel, shown in Figure 3-17, lets you modify, among other param-
eters, the delay time to wait for a credit card tone. For more information on these
options, see your Windows documentation or click the ? in the dialog and select
the object on which you need help, or right-click on a drop-down list, check box,
or entry field title and select Whats this? from the pop-up menu.

Figure 3-17.
The Options panel of
the TAPI modem prop-
erties dialog.

6. Click OK in the modem properties dialog.


7. Click OK in the New Entry Connection dialog or Communications properties
sheet.

Modifying Direct Cable Communications Settings

To modify a Direct Cable connection, follow these steps:


1. With the New Entry Destination dialog (of the New Entry wizard) or Commu-
nications properties sheet open, click the Change... button in the Communica-
tions Settings group box. This displays the port properties dialog shown in
Figure 3-18.
2. The Bits per second drop-down list lets you select a custom baud rate for this
entry.
3. The Data bits, Parity, and Stop bits drop-down lists provide standard selections
for each of these parameters. Select values appropriate for this connection.
Changing Settings 3-59

Figure 3-18.
The port properties dia-
log lets you customize
parameters for direct
cable connections.

4. The Flow control drop-down list lets you select between Hardware (RTS/CTS),
Xon/Xoff (software), or None (no) flow control.
5. Click OK in the port properties dialog.
6. Click OK in the New Entry Destination dialog or Communications properties
sheet.

Modifying Connections

You can modify a connection when you define a new entry using the New Entry
Destination dialog (of the New Entry wizard) or at any other time using the Commu-
nications properties sheet. To modify a connection, follow these steps:
1. With the New Entry Destination dialog (of the New Entry wizard) or the
Communications properties sheet open, click the Change... button in the Con-
3-60 Common Procedures

nect Via group box. This displays the Existing Connections dialog shown in
Figure 3-19.

Figure 3-19.
The Existing
Connections dialog
lets you define and
modify connections.

2. Select the connection you want to modify, and click the Modify Connection...
button. What happens next depends on the type of connection you select, but is
similar to the procedure for new connections. For modem or modem pool type
connections, see Modem or Modem Pool Connections on page 3-20. For direct
cable connections, see Direct Cable Connections on page 3-22. For TCP/IP
connections, see For WinSock (TCP/IP) Connections on page 3-22.

Modifying Dialing Details

Dialing details include options that determine how HyperACCESS places calls. For
example, you can specify how long to wait for a carrier from the remote modem, and
number of dialing attempts. In addition, you can specify global options for all entries,
such as Tone or Pulse dialing and speaker volume.
To modify Dialing details follow these steps:
1. With the Communications dialog or Communications properties sheet open,
click the Dialing Details... button. This displays the Dialing Details dialog.
2. Make desired changes (see Dialing Details on page 4-39).
3. Click OK to close the dialog, and then OK to close the properties notebook.
Changing Settings 3-61

Modifying Dialing Properties

To modify dialing properties, follow these steps:


1. With the New Entry Destination dialog (of the New Entry wizard) or the
Communications properties sheet open, click the Dialing Properties... button.
This displays the TAPI standard Dialing Properties dialog shown in
Figure 3-20.

Figure 3-20.
The Dialing Proper-
ties dialog lets you
define multiple loca-
tions and dialing pro-
cedures from each
location.

2. To create a new location, click the New... button and enter a unique name in the
Create New Location dialog. Otherwise, select a current location from the I am
dialing from drop-down list.
3. Enter the area code for the current location in The area code is edit field.
4. Select the country of the current location in the I am in drop-down list.
5. Fill in the edit fields and select check boxes as appropriate in the How I dial
from this location group box. For procedures to create new Calling Card types
or suffixes, see Creating Suffixes on page 3-74.
6. Select either the Tone dialing or Pulse dialing radio button.
7. Click OK to close the dialog, and then OK to close the properties notebook.
3-62 Common Procedures

Managing Lists

This section describes procedures that relate to the Lists panel. You can use entries in
lists to create entries or to place trial calls.

Using List Files

HyperACCESS comes with several list files. You can retrieve updated lists from the
Hilgraeve BBS, and additional lists from other BBS and online services. Some of these
lists are very large.
HyperACCESS users responsible for corporate support may want to create a list file
enumerating PCs in your organization that have HyperAccess Host. This is especially
convenient if the number of PCs is large, and you dont want to use the added space
normal notebook entries would require. You can easily generate this list from a TCP/
IP hosts file or corporate database.
HyperACCESS lets you copy entries from a list file to a notebook or try accessing an
entry prior to copying it. Before you can perform either of these actions, you must
define a template if one doesnt already exist (see Creating List File Templates,
below). If youre using a list file that comes with HyperACCESS, the template already
exists.
To copy one or more list entries to a notebook, see Copying a Notebook Entry From
a List File on page 3-14.
To try a list entry, see Placing a Trial Call From the Lists Panel on page 3-64.

Creating List File Templates

List files are a compact way to obtain and store a large number of phone numbers for
remote systems. HyperACCESS comes with several predefined list files. You can get
additional lists from the Hilgraeve BBS and other sources.
Lists must be ASCII files, and each line must include at least a name and phone
number. Other entries are optional (see list below). Each list file must have a template
so that HyperACCESS can interpret the contents of the list.
When you first open a list file that doesnt have a template defined, HyperACCESS
displays the warning dialog shown in Figure 3-21. The following sections describe
Managing Lists 3-63

the two options for creating a template for a list file from the No Template Found
dialog.

Figure 3-21.
The No Template
Found warning dialog
lets you copy a previ-
ous template, create a
new template, or
cancel.

Creating a New Template

To create a list file template from the No Template Found dialog, follow these steps:
1. Select the New... push button.
2. Enter a name in the Name edit field.
3. Use the Field separated by drop-down list to indicate how HyperACCESS
determines where fields begin and end. Choices in the drop-down list are:
Comma
Tab
Quote
Column Spacing
Note: In lists using Column Spacing, the first position of the line is
column 1.
4. Use the Name field location edit field to specify the position of the data field
that has the entry name. Enter the field number or column number (depending
on separator selected).
5. Use the Phone number field location edit field to specify the position of the
data field that has the phone number. Enter the field number or column number
(depending on separator selected).
6. Use the Data begins in line number edit field to specify the number of lines to
ignore at the beginning of the list file. This lets you ignore lines at the beginning
of a list file that are headings, notices, or other text, and prevents you from
accidently selecting lines that dont represent remote systems.
3-64 Common Procedures

7. Use the Comment lines begin with edit field to specify a special character that
defines comment lines. Lines that contain comments typically begin with a
specific character (for example, a semicolon) to distinguish them from data lines.
If there arent any comments after the initial header (see Data begins in line
number, above), you can leave this field blank.
8. Click OK to close the dialog.
9. To verify your template settings, select an entry in the list, and click either the
Copy to notebook or Place trial call button (see Using List Files on page 3-62).

Copying a Template

1. Select the Copy... push button from the No Template Found dialog.
HyperACCESS displays the dialog shown in Figure 3-22.

Figure 3-22.
This dialog lets you
select a list file
whose template is
similar to the new
one you want to
create.

2. Select the list file whose template is similar to the one you want to create.
3. Change any settings as required (see procedure, Creating a New Template,
above).

Placing a Trial Call From the Lists Panel

You can place a call from a list file prior to moving it to a notebook. This capability
lets you see if the system is one that you want to use before actually saving it. To try
an entry, follow these steps:
1. Select the Lists panel tab.
2. If necessary, open a list file by selecting File/Open from the Lists panel menu.
Enter the filename, select a file from the file list, or click the Browse... push
Using Message Pad 3-65

button to select an existing file. (For a complete description of browse dialogs,


see page 4-8.)
3. Select an entry from the list, and do one of the following:
With the mouse pointer over the selected entry, right-click to display the
pop-up menu, and select Place Trial Call from the menu.
Click the Place trial call button.
Select File/Place Trial Call.
Place Trial Call
Button Drag the entry to the Terminal panel tab.
4. HyperACCESS displays the Confirm Phone Numbers dialog to let you verify
the phone number before proceeding.
5. When you complete your trial call and either try to open another entry or exit,
HyperACCESS prompts you with a dialog to see if you want to save the list
entry to a notebook. Youll have a chance to specify the notebook that you want
to use.

Using Message Pad

This section describes how to use Message Pad features.

Sizing and Moving Message Pad

By default, the Message Pad appears as a single-line docked window at the bottom of
the HyperACCESS window (above the status bar). You can enlarge the docked
window size; detach it so that it becomes a separate window; and re-dock it to either
to top or bottom of the Terminal panel. This section describes how to perform these
actions with the Message Pad. For more information on dockable toolbars see
Dockable Toolbars and Windows on page 4-59.
3-66 Common Procedures

Sizing Message Pad

To enlarge or shrink the Message Pad (as a docked window), follow these steps:
1. Move your mouse pointer over the bar that divides the Message Pad from the
rest of the Terminal panel.
2. When the mouse pointer becomes a double line with opposing pointing vertical
arrows, press mouse button 1.
3. You can drag the separator bar either up or down to increase or decrease the
Message Pad.
4. Release the mouse pointer when the Message Pad is the size you want.
To resize the Message Pad as an undocked window, simply drag a window border or
corner as you would to resize any window.

Moving the Message Pad

You can detach the Message Pad so that it becomes a separate, undocked window.
You can then re-dock it on either the top or bottom of the Terminal panel.
HyperACCESS remembers its last location whenever you open Message Pad. To
move the Message Pad, follow these steps:
1. Move your mouse pointer over the bar that divides the
Message Pad from the rest of the Terminal panel. The Message Pad has a
blank area near the Send
2. When the mouse pointer becomes a double line with button. You can also dou-
opposing pointing vertical arrows, double-click ble-click this area or the
sizing edge of the Mes-
mouse button 1. This detaches the Message Pad and sage Pad to undock the
creates a separate window. window.

3. Move the window anywhere on your screen by press-


ing mouse button 1 with the mouse pointer in the title bar. This displays a box
the size of Message Pad until you release the mouse button.
4. You can resize the detached Message Pad window as you would any window
by dragging a border.
Using Message Pad 3-67

5. To re-attach the window, you can move the Message


Pad to either the top or bottom of the Terminal panel You can also double-click
the title bar (or blank area
until the box suddenly changes size to equal the size
near the Send button) to
of the HyperACCESS window. return the Message Pad to
its former docked
6. Release mouse button 1 to attach the Message Pad. position.

Editing Text with Message Pad

Youll use the Windows Notepad (or any other text editor) to edit a text file, such as
a file youve captured to disk or a Visual Basic scripting language (VBScript) program
file. You can use Notepad at any time. You may also choose to use Message Pad,
particularly if you intend to prepare a message that youll send as text. The sections
below describe how you use the Message Pad.
The Message Pad provides a convenient scratch pad area for creating text you would
normally type directly to the remote system. The advantage of using Message Pad is
that you can freely move about and edit text using standard Windows techniques. You
dont have to concern yourself with the idiosyncrasies of editing on the remote system.
Using editing techniques described here, along with saving Message Pad text
described in Copying Text From Message Pad on page 3-69, its possible to use the
Message Pad just as you would use any other editor. This gives you complete text
editing capability without ever leaving HyperACCESS. As youll see in the following
sections, pop-up menus make this especially convenient.

Displaying the Message Pad


You can display the Message Pad from the Terminal panel using either of the following
techniques:
Click the Message Pad button.
Select View/Message Pad.

Message Pad Modifying Message Pad Text


Button

Manually editing text in the Message Pad is identical to techniques used in Windows
Notepad and other applications.
3-68 Common Procedures

To delete or replace a block of text, you can:


1. Move the mouse pointer (I-beam) to the beginning of the text. Press the left
mouse button and drag the selection cursor to select (highlight) the text you want
to delete.
2. You can then perform one of the following operations:
Cut Button To delete the text, select Cut from the pop-up menu, use the Cut button,
the Edit/Cut menu item, or the cut shortcut key C+X.
To replace the highlighted text, select Paste from the pop-up menu, use
the Paste button, the Edit/Paste menu item, or the paste shortcut key C+V.

Paste Button Copying Text to Message Pad

There are several techniques available to copy text from the terminal area or Backscroll
Buffer to the Message Pad. One technique is:
1. Move the mouse pointer (I-beam) to the place in the Message Pad where you
want to copy the selected text, and click.
2. Select the text in the terminal area and/or Backscroll Buffer that you want to
copy by moving the mouse pointer (I-beam) to the beginning of the text. You
can double-click a word and/or drag the I-beam until youve selected desired
text. (You can select text from anywhere within the terminal area and/or
Backscroll Buffer.)
3. Use the Edit/Copy to/Message Pad command to copy the selected text.
Alternatively, you can:
1. Select the text to be copied by moving the mouse pointer (I-beam) to the
beginning of the text.
2. Double-click a word and/or drag the I-beam until youve selected desired text.
(You can select text from anywhere within the terminal area/Backscroll Buffer.)
3. Select the Edit/Copy command (or C+C copy shortcut key) to copy the selected
text to the Clipboard.
4. Move the mouse pointer (I-beam) to the place in Message Pad where you want
to copy the selected text and click.
5. Paste from the Clipboard to Message Pad using one of the following techniques:
Use the pop-up menu (mouse button 2), and select: Paste.
Using Message Pad 3-69

Use C+V shortcut key.


Select Edit/Paste.
You can also copy text from a file to the Message Pad with these steps:
1. Move the mouse pointer (I-beam) to the place in the Message Pad where you
want to insert the file.
2. Use one of the following techniques to paste from a file:
Select Paste from File... from the pop-up menu (mouse button 2).
Select the Edit/Paste from File... menu item. Make sure you select the
Message Pad radio button in the Paste from File dialog.

Copying Text From Message Pad

You can easily save information you enter in the Message Pad following these steps:
1. Select the text to be copied by moving the mouse pointer (I-beam) to the
beginning of the text.
2. Double-click the word and/or drag the I-beam until youve selected the desired
text.
Note: You can select all text in the Message Pad by pressing C+H followed
by C+S+n, or select the Edit/Select All menu item.
3. Copy to the file using one of the following techniques:
Use the pop-up menu (mouse button 2) and select Copy to/File....
Select the Edit/Copy to/File... menu item.
4. Use the dialog to indicate what you want to do if the file exists.
5. Enter the filename, use the drop-down file list, or click the Browse... push button
to select an existing file. (For a complete description of browse dialogs, see
page 4-8.)
6. Click the Copy push button.
3-70 Common Procedures

Printing Message Pad Text

You can print all text in the Message Pad by following these steps:
1. Click in the Message Pad.
2. Select File/Print to display the Print dialog.
3. Select All radio button in the Print Range group box, and click the Print button.
To print selected text, make your selection and then do one of the following:
Use the Print button.
Select File/Print and specify Selected text in the Print Range group box of the
Print Button Print dialog.

Sending Message Pad Text to the Remote Computer

Once youve completed entering and editing text in the Message Pad window, youll
want to send it to the remote system. To do this, click the Send button. This causes
Send Text Button
HyperACCESS to send the contents of the Message Pad as if a very fast typist were
keying the data. Settings specified in the ASCII Sending properties sheet control how
text is sent. (Select Properties/ASCII Sending... in the Terminal panel to view this
sheet.)
Note: The Send button sends selected text or, if no text is selected, sends all text in
the Message Pad.
The text appears in both the Terminal panel and the remote computers Host panel.
To prevent the Host from interpreting text sent from the Message Pad as Host
commands, you should type the Host chat command prior to sending text.

Using Message Pad for Chat Mode

The Message Pad is convenient for chat mode operations when youre communicating
with another individual on the remote system. With Message Pad set to Chat Mode,
you can compose what you want to send while the Terminal panel displays what the
other party sends you. To use Message Pad in Chat Mode, follow these steps:
1. From the Terminal panel, click the Message Pad button or select View/Toolbar
Message Pad and select Message Pad in the Toolbars dialog to display the Message Pad.
Button
Using Advanced Features 3-71

2. From the Message Pad, click mouse button 2 to display the pop-up menu, then
select Chat Mode to enable Chat Mode operations. When selected, Chat Mode
has a check mark.
3. With Chat Mode enabled, the Message Pad transmits the contents of the window
whenever you press e.
For more information on chatting, see Chatting With a User on the Remote PC on
page 3-41.

Using Advanced Features

This section describes procedures the more advanced users may want to use.

Creating Keyboard Macros

HyperACCESS has a simple, straightforward technique for keyboard mapping and


creating keyboard macros. Techniques described in this section are in addition to the
powerful, built-in automatic generation of either Visual Basic or Java scripting
languages (VBScript or JavaScript, respectively) programs and complete language
coupling through the HyperACCESS Application Programming Interface (HAPI). For
more information on HyperACCESSs VBScript and JavaScript program generation
and HAPI, see Chapter 5, Automation Tools.
You can create a keyboard macro that is any combination of key strokes, a menu
command, or executes a program. You can define keyboard macros for any entry.
Each phonebook entry has its own set of keyboard macros.
To create a keyboard macro (or map keys on your keyboard), follow these steps:
1. From the Terminal panel, select Automation/Keys... to display the Keys for
<entry> dialog. This displays a scrollable list of keyboard macros for the current
entry.
2. Click the New... push button. This displays the Key dialog with the insertion
pointer in the Key edit field.
3. Enter a key combination in the Key edit field. For example, press A+H and the
edit field displays <ALT-h>. To redefine e or T, press I followed by e
or T.
3-72 Common Procedures

Note: If the key combination you enter currently defines a standard Windows
shortcut, HyperACCESS displays a warning dialog, and lets you change the
sequence.
4. You then assign one of the following actions to the combination of keys in the
Key edit field:
Click the Macro text option button. This activates the edit field and lets
you enter keys that you want HyperACCESS to output when you press the
key combination defined in the Key edit field. For example:

2 displays <F2>

S +2 displays <SHIFT-F2>

C+S+2 displays <CTRL-SHIFT-F2>


You may enter any key combination including, for example, a users name.
Select a menu command from the Command drop-down list. You can
assign only one command to a key combination. Commands in the list
include all HyperACCESS menu selections for the Terminal panel. This
lets you perform any operation with a single click.
Specify a program to run using the Program edit field, drop-down list, or
Browse... push button. (For a complete description of browse dialogs, see
File Browse dialogs on page 4-8.) For more information on assigning a
program to a key combination, see Assigning Programs to Keys or Buttons
on page 3-18.
5. Click OK to return to the Keys for <entry> dialog.
6. Click OK to complete the macro definition.

Creating a Macro Two Examples


The following sections illustrate how you create keyboard macros. The first example
creates a keyboard macro to issue a hypothetical command to a remote system to send
a file using Zmodem. The second section illustrates how you remap the keyboard using
HyperACCESSs macro capability.
Using Advanced Features 3-73

Macro to Issue a Host Command


This macro lets you issue a commonly used host command to download a standard
parts database. To create the macro, perform the following steps:
1. Select the entry for the remote system.
2. Use one of the following actions to display the Terminal panel:
With the mouse pointer over the selected entry, right-click to display the
pop-up menu. Select Open.
Click the Open button.
Select File/Open.
3. Select Automation/Keys... (you could follow the same basic steps to assign this
macro to a button see Creating Buttons on page 3-17).
Open Button
4. From the Keys for <entry> dialog, click the New... push button.
5. In the Key edit field, press the key combination you want to use to issue this
command. For example, you might press 5.
6. In the Macro edit field, type the host command. For example, you might type:
zsend c:\database\parts.*

7. Click OK.
8. In the Keys for <entry> dialog, click OK.
Youre now ready to use the 5 key to issue this host command.

Macro to Remap Keyboard


HyperACCESS maps the VT220 emulators PF keys to 1-0. (Theres also an option
to map PF1-PF4 to the four keys above the keypad, to match the physical location of
these keys on actual DEC terminals.) Since the VT220 terminal emulator and Win-
dows both use these and other special PC keys (1 for Help, 6 for switching among
windows, U and N for scrolling, etc.), there are some potential conflicts.
Fortunately, HyperACCESS provides several ways to deal with such conflicts.
Each emulator that uses such keys has an option that lets you specify whether the
emulator or Windows will get these keys. If youre using the terminal emulator to
access systems where special terminal emulator keys arent required, you can simply
devote these keys to Windows (the default). If you choose to use these keys for
terminal emulation, you can still use them to control Windows, by simply pressing
3-74 Common Procedures

L (selecting text also creates an implicit Scroll Lock). During Scroll Lock, keys
required for terminal emulation revert to Windows.
But suppose you need to use PF1-PF10 for terminal emulation, but also want to be
able to use 1-0, etc., for Windows control without having to press L first. You
can accomplish this by remapping PF1-PF10 to other keys, such as C+S+1 through
C+S+0 along the top row of the keyboard.
As an illustration of the technique required to perform this task, follow these steps to
reassign the PF1 key to C+S+1.
1. Select the entry for the remote system.
2. Use one of the following actions to display the Terminal panel:
With the mouse pointer over the selected entry, right-click to display the
pop-up menu. Select Open.
Click the Open button.
Select File/Open.
3. Select Automation/Keys... to display the Keys for <entry> dialog.
Open Button 4. Click the New... push button.
5. In the Key edit field, press C+S+1. Notice the resulting
<CTRL-SHIFT-1> in the edit field.
6. In the Macro edit field, press I, 1. Notice the resulting <F1> in the edit field.
Note: You must press I because 1 normally displays context sensitive help for
a dialog.
7. Click OK.
8. In the Keys for <entry> dialog, click OK.
Youre now ready to use the C+S+1 key combination to issue the same code as
PF1 to the host. Continue using the same procedure to reassign the other function keys.

Creating Suffixes

HyperACCESS uses standard Windows dialogs to create modem (TAPI) connections.


The advantage of this approach is that you define modems once, and all your Windows
applications can use and share them. Users upgrading from other HyperACCESS
products may notice that creating and using calling cards in TAPI is similar to suffixes
Using Advanced Features 3-75

in other versions of HyperACCESS. If you used suffixes to handle accounting codes


supported by some telephone systems, you can use TAPI calling card support to
perform the same functions.
To create a suffix, follow these steps:
1. With the New Entry Destination dialog (of the new entry wizard) or Commu-
nications properties sheet open and a modem selected in the Connect Via group
box, click the Dialing Properties... button. This displays the TAPI standard
Dialing Properties dialog.
2. In the Where I am group box of the Dialing Properties dialog, click the New...
button to define a new dialing location. In the Create New Location dialog,
enter a unique name to use for the suffix youre creating.
3. In the Dialing Properties dialog, select the Dial using Calling Card check box.
If the check box was previously unselected, selecting it automatically displays
the Change Calling Card dialog shown in Figure 3-23. If the check box was
already selected, click its associated Change... button.

Figure 3-23.
The Change Calling
Card dialog lets you
create or modify
calling cards
(suffixes).

4. In the Change Calling Card dialog, click the New... button. This displays the
Create New Calling Card dialog with a single text edit field.
5. Enter the same name you used for the location in Step 2 and click OK. This
returns you to the Change Calling Card dialog with your new name in the Calling
card to use drop-down list. By default, the Calling Card number edit field is
unavailable.
6. Click the Advanced... button to display the Dialing Rules dialog shown in
Figure 3-24.
7. In general, you enter codes in each edit field of this dialog to specify the sequence
of numbers you want Windows to use when dialing with this Calling Card. For
3-76 Common Procedures

Figure 3-24.
The Dialing Rules
dialog lets you
define the dialing
sequence to use for
a Calling Card.

example, with direct touch tone compatible lines to your modem, you should
enter the following:

Calls within the same G


area code

Long distance calls 1FG$TH


International calls 01EFG$TH

If you use a third party long distance carrier and want to dial an access code
before the area code and phone number (formerly implemented as a prefix in
HyperACCESS), you could enter the following:

Calls within the same G


area code

Long distance calls 102221FG$TH


International calls 1022201EFG$TH

where 10222 is the access code for MCI. Other possible codes are 10333 for
Sprint and 10288 for AT&T. Check with your local service provider or long
distance carrier to determine whether you need to enter a prefix.
Note: For a complete list of dialing codes and their meaning, click the ? button
in the Dialing Rules dialog and then click one of the edit fields, or right-click
one of the entry field titles and select Whats this? from the pop-up menu.
Note: You can enter one or more commas (,) to specify a fixed, two-second pause
for each comma.
8. Click the Close button to return to the Change Calling Card dialog.
Using Advanced Features 3-77

9. The Calling Card number edit field is now available. Enter the suffix you want
to use, and click OK to return to the Dialing Properties dialog.
Note: You can set the time to Wait for credit card tone in the TAPI modem
Options panel. See Modifying Connections on page 3-59 for instructions on how
to display that panel.
10. In the Dialing Properties dialog, verify the selection of the This location has
call waiting check box (Windows selects it by default).
11. Select the Dial as long distance call check box to enable the calling card dialing
procedure even for local number.
12. Click OK in the Dialing Properties dialog to return to the New Entry Destina-
tion dialog or Communications properties sheet. Then click Next to continue
defining a new connection, or click OK to close the properties notebook.
Youre now ready to use the location and calling card combination for dialing with a
suffix. Make sure you select the Confirm phone numbers before dialing check box
(the default) in the Dialing Details dialog (see Dialing Details on page 4-39). Then,
each time you make a connection, you can verify and, if necessary, simply change the
location you use in the Confirm Phone Numbers dialog (leave the Dial without this
confirmation dialog check box unselected).
Caution: If you make a local call to an Internet service provider for e-mail and Web
access, Microsofts Dial-Up Networking uses the same, global value for the location
youre dialing from. Youll have to change your location back to Default Location
after using this technique to make sure that your calls to your Internet service provider
dont get charged to the accounting code represented by the location-calling card you
last used when making a call in HyperACCESS.

Using Calling Cards


HyperACCESS uses standard Windows dialogs to create modem (TAPI) connections.
TAPI supports calling card dialing, and lets you define multiple locations so that you
can use your calling card in one location but not another.
You can use one of the predefined calling cards or you can create your own. This
procedure describes how to use one of the predefined calling cards. For a more
advanced discussion of creating a new calling card and, optionally, new locations, see
the related topic, Creating Suffixes on page 3-74.
3-78 Common Procedures

To use a calling card, follow these steps:


1. With the New Entry Destination dialog (of the new entry wizard) or Commu-
nications properties sheet open and a modem selected in the Connect Via group
box, click the Dialing Properties... button. This displays the TAPI standard
Dialing Properties dialog.
2. In the Dialing Properties dialog, select the Dial using Calling Card check box.
If the check box was previously unselected, selecting it automatically displays
the Change Calling Card dialog shown in Figure 3-25. If the check box was
already selected, click its associated Change... button.

Figure 3-25.
The Change Calling
Card dialog lets you
create or modify
calling cards
(suffixes).

3. Use the Calling Card to use drop-down list to select your calling card.
4. If the Calling Card number edit field is available, enter your calling card
number, and click OK to return to the Dialing Properties dialog.
Note: You can set the time to Wait for credit card tone in the TAPI modem
Options panel. See Modifying Connections on page 3-59 for instructions on how
to display that panel.
5. In the Dialing Properties dialog, verify the selection of the This location has
call waiting check box (Windows selects it by default).
6. Click OK in the Dialing Properties dialog to return to the New Entry Destina-
tion dialog or Communications properties sheet. Then click Next to continue
defining a new connection, or click OK to close the properties notebook.

Using In-Place Activation and Program Embedding

In-place activation and program embedding are major advantages of Office 97,
Internet Explorer, and future versions of Windows. With these features you can run
Using Advanced Features 3-79

HyperACCESS from within Internet Explorer or automatically connect to a


HyperACCESS entry from programs such as Word and Excel.

In-Place Activation

To use in-place activation you need a program that supports ActiveX, such as Internet
Explorer from Microsoft. Within Internet Explorer, you can add telnet sites to your
favorites list. Then when you want to connect to that telnet site while running Internet
Explorer, you simply select the entry from your favorites list and Internet Explorer
launches HyperACCESS and executes it inside the Internet Explorer window.
For example, you could follow these steps:
1. Start Internet Explorer and connect to the Web.
2. Within Internet Explorer, select File/Open.
3. In the Open dialog, use the Browse... button to find the .HAW file that connects
to your telnet site. Click OK until Internet Explorer launches HyperACCESS.
HyperACCESS automatically runs your login script (if youve created one).
4. Once youve connected to the telnet site, youll see the HyperACCESS toolbar
(if youve selected it to be visible) and HyperACCESS menu selections on the
menu bar in addition to Internet Explorer menus.
5. Select Favorites/Add to Favorites... to save an entry for this telnet site.
6. The next time you use Internet Explorer and want to connect to this telnet site,
simply select the entry from the Favorites drop-down menu.

Program Embedding

With program embedding you can place a HyperACCESS entry in another program
and then automatically launch HyperACCESS and make a connection when you
double-click the entry object icon.
For example, you can place the Dow Jones entry file in an Excel spread sheet and
automatically connect to Dow Jones and run a prepared script to update prices in your
spread sheet. To accomplish this you would:
1. Start Excel and load your spread sheet.
2. Select Insert/Object... to display the Object dialog.
3-80 Common Procedures

3. In the Object dialog, select the Create from File tab, and enter the path or use
the Browse... button to select the .HAW (Dow Jones.haw) file you want to
access.
4. Select the Display as Icon check box (you can change the icon if you want), and
click OK.
5. When youre ready to connect to the Dow Jones service and update your spread
sheet (assuming that you have a properly prepared Script to run upon connec-
tion, see Recording a Logon Sequence on page 5-5), double-click the
HyperACCESS icon.
Chapter 4
HyperACCESS Reference

What You Will Find in This Chapter

This chapter has major sections for each panel in HyperACCESS, plus it includes
reference sections for secondary windows that HyperACCESS creates. These sec-
tions provide a complete reference to HyperACCESS menus and dialogs, and appear
in the following order:
Notebook Panels and Menus
Properties Sheets
Terminal Panel and Menus
Message Pad Panel and Menus
Lists Panel and Menus
Call Log Panel and Menus
Graphics Viewer Window
HyperACCESS menu bars and menus differ depending on the panel or window
youre using.
To access a panel in the primary HyperACCESS window, you can click its tab or
select it from the Window menu (see Phonebook Panel Window Menu on page 4-25).
When selected, a panel moves to the top, and the menu bar and Toolbar change for
that panel. For example, the Terminal panel has a Transfer menu and the other panels
dont, and all panels have File and View menus.
Youll find that the View menu on each panel and secondary window lets you
customize the appearance of HyperACCESS.
4-2 HyperACCESS Reference

Phonebook Panel

Figure 4-1 shows the default Phonebook panel display. Since most users have only
this one notebook, this section specifically describes the Phonebook panel, and uses
the term Phonebook interchangeably with notebook. All information in this section
applies to the default Phonebook panel as well as any notebook you create.
The Phonebook panel is a notebook that includes phonebook entries. You can create
additional notebooks and use them as phonebook panels (see Phonebook Panel
Notebook/New on page 4-20). New notebooks appear as additional tabbed panels.
Youll find that double-clicking on an entry is usually the easiest way to begin a
communications session; however, there are other techniques. For example, you can
drag the entry and drop it on the Terminal tab, or you can use the File menu to begin
a communications session, as youll see in Phonebook Panel File Menu on page 4-4.
To select an entry, you can either click on it or move your mouse pointer over the
entry. If your mouse pointer hovers over an entry for more than one second,
HyperACCESS selects that entry without requiring a mouse click.
There are a series of index tabs at the top of each notebook panel. The * tab displays
all entries in the current notebook sorted alphabetically. Selecting an individual tab
letter displays a sheet with entries that have names beginning with that letter.

Figure 4-1.
The Phonebook
panel with its menu
bar.
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-3

Phonebook Panel Menu Bar

Each menu on the menu bar generally gives you some control over the Phonebook
panel and how its used or displayed. Briefly, the menus are:
File gives you the capability to add and delete entries as well as begin commu-
nications sessions.
View lets you customize various features related to the display. You have many
options available to change the Phonebook panel display.
Notebook lets you create, delete, and copy notebooks.
Options lets you specify a text viewer and sounds to use for HyperACCESS
events. It also selects whether HyperACCESS should display the Terminal panel
on startup and checks whether or not it is the default Telnet application.
Automation lets you run predefined programs and macros, and set up custom
buttons.
Window lets you change to a different HyperACCESS panel.
Help provides additional information on how to use HyperACCESS.
The following sections describe the Phonebook panel menus in more detail. Youll
find the menus in the same order as they appear in the menu bar (from left to right).
4-4 HyperACCESS Reference

Phonebook Panel File Menu

The Phonebook panel File menu is useful for adding and deleting entries, beginning
a communications session, and exiting HyperACCESS. Figure 4-2 shows the Phone-
book panel File menu.

Figure 4-2.
The phonebook
panel File menu lets
you add and delete
phonebook entries as
well as begin com-
munications sessions.

Phonebook Panel File/New

Regardless of the entry selected, New displays the New Entry wizard that guides you
through the process of creating a new entry. The first dialog is the New Entry
Description dialog shown in Figure 4-3. Type an entry name, select an icon, and
specify a notebook and terminal emulator. Then click Next.
Note: HyperACCESS uses the entry name as the filename and adds a .HAW extension
(.HHW for Host entries). This is the name that appears under the icon Phonebook
panel and in the Terminal panel title bar.
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-5

Figure 4-3.
The New Entry
Description dialog
lets you specify an
entry name, an icon,
and a notebook. You
can also enter notes
for later reference.

HyperACCESS then displays the New Entry Connection dialog shown in Figure 4-4.
This dialog lets you select or create the type of connection you want to use. The default
connection type is determined from the New Entry Template. For more information
on creating connections, see Creating Connections on page 3-19 or Modifying Con-
nections on page 3-59.

Figure 4-4.
The New Entry
Connection dialog
lets you accept the
default or select a dif-
ferent connection
type.
4-6 HyperACCESS Reference

Clicking Next displays the New Entry Destination dialog (see Figure 4-5) that lets
you change any of the default settings. This new entry uses settings from the New
Entry Template.

Figure 4-5.
The New Entry Desti-
nation dialog lets you
specify connection
attributes.

The contents of this dialog depend on the type of connection selected. For more
information on creating connections, see Creating Connections on page 3-19 or
Modifying Connections on page 3-59. To complete the definition of the entry, click
Next and then Finish.
Opening another entry or exiting HyperACCESS automatically saves your new entry.
HyperACCESS creates a filename based on the entry name you entered in the New
Entry Description dialog.

Phonebook Panel File/Open


The Open... menu item performs one of two functions:
With an entry selected, Open displays the Terminal
panel with the name of the selected entry in the title If you type in the screen of
bar, and sets communications parameters to those of an open entry,
HyperACCESS automati-
the entry. It does not connect to the communications cally opens the communi-
port or dial the phone number. cations port without
dialing (for modem con-
Without an entry selected, this menu item displays a nections). This lets you
browse dialog. (For a complete description of browse type commands to your
dialogs, see page 4-8.) Once you select an entry to modem. For other types of
connections, opening the
open, HyperACCESS displays the Terminal panel as port performs the
described above. connection.
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-7

Note: You can open the New Entry Template, and modify default settings from the
Terminal panel. However, you cant connect to a remote system or type in the Terminal
panel with the New Entry Template open. For more information on modifying default
settings, see Modifying Entry Defaults on page 3-16.

Phonebook Panel File/Save As

This menu selection lets you save the selected entry with a new name. It displays the
standard Save As dialog shown in Figure 4-6. This dialog lets you change the filename
or drive and folder to use for the save. The filename you enter becomes the entry name
in the Phonebook panel (see note on page 4-4), and the original entry remains
unchanged.
Note: Entries have a .HAW extension, and Host entries have a .HHW extension.

Figure 4-6.
The Save As dialog
lets you change the
filename or drive and
directory to use for
the save.

Phonebook Panel File/Import


You can import entry files that dont currently appear in the notebook. Selecting
Import... displays the Import File browse dialog, from which you can select a drive,
folder, and file. (For a complete description of browse dialogs, see below.) Once you
select one or more entry files, HyperACCESS displays the entries in the current
notebook.
Note: You can also perform an import by dragging an entry file from Windows 95
Explorer onto the notebook panel on which you want it to appear.
4-8 HyperACCESS Reference

Figure 4-7.
The Import Files dia-
log is a common
browse dialog. It lets
you select a drive,
directory, and file.

File Browse dialogs


The Import Files dialog in Figure 4-7 is similar to other standard file browse dialogs
used throughout HyperACCESS. A standard file browse dialog always has a title
consistent with the context of its use and has the following components:
Look in This drop-down list with its associated shortcut buttons and
list box let you select any drive or folder connected to your
computer. By default, HyperACCESS displays the directory
that contains your entry files. For more information, see your
Windows documentation or click the ? in the dialog and
select the object on which you need help.
File name The File name edit field lets you enter a path or filename or
wildcard selection.
Files of type This drop-down list provides standard selections for the Look
in list.

Directory (Folder) Browse dialogs


Where the context requires, a browse dialog may only permit selection of the drive
and directory path. In this case, there is a graphic folder tree with the title Pick a folder,
and the dialog title is Browse for Folder.
To select a directory, double-click the graphical directory tree diagram until the
directory youre interested in appears above the directories list box. Then click OK or
press e.
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-9

Phonebook Panel File/Delete

Delete... displays a warning dialog with the following


choices: When you delete an entry
file from the disk, it goes
Remove from Notebook removes the entry from to the Windows recycle
the notebook, but doesnt delete its file from the disk. bin. If you later decide to
restore the file from the
Delete from Disk removes the entry from the recycle bin, you must use
notebook, and deletes its file from the disk. File/Import for it to reap-
pear in the notebook.

Phonebook Panel File/Properties

The Properties selection displays the properties notebook. For a description of the
properties notebook and its sheets, see Properties Sheets on page 4-27.
Among parameters specified through properties sheets are entry name; communica-
tions settings like connection and phone number; terminal emulator and custom
settings for the emulator; ASCII receiving and sending parameters; file transfer
protocols; paths used for logon program, capture file, and log file; and default
preferences for mouse behavior, colors, and other settings.

Phonebook Panel File/Page Setup

Page Setup... displays the standard Windows dialog shown in Figure 4-8. This dialog
lets you specify printer parameters and select from among available printers. You can
use the Printer... button to display another standard Windows dialog to select the
printer. HyperACCESS uses the printer you select for all its printing. You can also
select the Font... button in the Page Setup dialog. The resulting Font dialog lets you
select a font to use for your printer output. For more information on any of these
4-10 HyperACCESS Reference

dialogs, see your Windows documentation or click the ? in the dialog and select the
object on which you need help.

Figure 4-8.
The Page Setup
dialog lets you specify
printer parameters
and select a printer to
use in HyperACCESS.

Phonebook Panel File/Print Preview


Displays a standard Windows print preview window that shows what printed pages
will look like. HyperACCESS prints a summary of all or selected entries in the
Phonebook.
The buttons at the top of the window perform the following functions:
Print... Closes the preview window and displays the standard printer
dialog for output to a printer.
Next Page This button is available if more than one page would print and
youre not looking at the last page.
Prev Page This button is available if more than one page would print and
youre not looking at the first page.
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-11

Figure 4-9.
The print preview
window shows what
HyperACCESS will
print.

Two Page This button is available if more than one page would print. It
displays pairs of pages in the preview window.
One Page This button is available if two or more pages are displayed. It
displays the current (left-most) page in the preview window.
Zoom In This button is available if the preview isnt at the highest level
of zoom. Clicking this button zooms in one level of magnifi-
cation. The preview window supports three zoom levels. Click-
ing in the preview window when it is not at its highest level of
magnification zooms in one level.
Note: Moving your mouse pointer into the zoom window
changes the pointer to a magnifying glass if additional zoom
levels are available. Clicking in the window increases the zoom
one level with the focus at the point you clicked.
4-12 HyperACCESS Reference

Zoom Out This button is available if the preview isnt at the lowest level
of zoom. Clicking this button zooms out one level of magnifi-
cation. The preview window supports three zoom levels. Click-
ing in the preview window when it is at its highest level of
magnification zooms all the way out.
Note: When the mouse pointer does not change to a magnifying
glass in the zoom window (or changes back to an arrow), no
additional zoom levels are available. In this case, clicking in
the window zooms all the way out.
Close Closes the preview window without printing.

Phonebook Panel File/Print

Print... displays the standard dialog shown in Figure 4-10. In the Phonebook, this
dialog prints a summary of all or selected entries in the notebook. For more informa-
tion, see your Windows documentation or click the ? in the dialog and select the object
on which you need help.

Figure 4-10.
The Print dialog lets
you select a printer
and specify what will
print.

Phonebook Panel File/Connect

The Connect menu item opens the Terminal panel, makes a connection, and dials the
phone number (if appropriate). This selection is grayed out (unavailable) if
HyperACCESS is already connected to a remote system.
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-13

If you select an entry with a modem connection that doesnt


have a phone number defined, HyperACCESS displays the Leave the Phone number
Telephone Number dialog shown in Figure 4-11. This dia- blank in the Communica-
tions properties sheet if
log lets you enter a phone number or use the drop-down list you often need different
to select a number from one of the last six you used. Selecting phone numbers for the
the check box in this dialog saves the phone number in the same entry.
entry definition.

Figure 4-11.
This dialog lets you
enter a telephone
number for an entry
that doesnt have one
predefined. You can
save this number in
the entry by selecting
the check box.

For modem connections with a phone number defined and


the Confirm phone numbers before dialing check box Use this dialog to conve-
selected in the Dialing Details dialog (see Dialing Details on niently change your loca-
tion when you travel.
page 4-39), HyperACCESS displays the Confirm Phone
Numbers dialog (see Figure 4-12). You can disable display
of this dialog, for all entries, in the Dialing Details dialog or by selecting the Dial
without this confirmation dialog check box. Selecting the Modify... button displays
the Communications properties sheet, so you can permanently change the phone
numbers to dial or create a new location using the Dialing Properties... button (see
Dialing Properties on page 4-32). When the phone numbers and location are correct,
click the Dial button.

Figure 4-12.
The Confirm Phone
Numbers dialog
appears for modem
connections.

Figure 4-13 shows the dialog that displays while HyperACCESS attempts a modem
connection to the desired system. If HyperACCESS detects an abnormal event during
4-14 HyperACCESS Reference

modem setup or dialing, it displays a dialog that summarizes the problem and offers
help. The help information explains possible causes and remedies.

Figure 4-13.
While attempting to
dial a remote system,
HyperACCESS dis-
plays this dialog.

You can specify the number of retries and time between retries in the Dialing Details
dialog (see page 4-39). You access this dialog when applicable for the connection
device (for example, a modem) by clicking the Dialing Details... button in the
Communications properties sheet.

Phonebook Panel File/Connect and Record Logon

The Connect and Record Logon menu item displays the Terminal panel and the
Recording in Progress window, and makes the connection as in File/Connect, above.
Once HyperACCESS establishes connection with the remote system, you must
manually log on to the system.
HyperACCESS begins learning your keystrokes as soon as youre connected to the
remote system. When you complete all commands you want HyperACCESS to learn,
select Stop! from the menu bar of the Recording in Progress window. For more
information, see Chapter 5, Automation Tools.
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-15

Phonebook Panel File/Connect but Skip Logon

Use the Connect but Skip Logon menu item to ignore a standard logon script that was
previously recorded. It displays the Terminal panel, and makes the connection as in
File/Connect, above. Once HyperACCESS establishes connection with the remote
system, you must manually log on to the system. This selection is grayed out
(unavailable) if HyperACCESS is already connected to a remote system.

Phonebook Panel File/File List

The File menu includes a numbered list of the four most recently opened entry files.
Selecting one of these files in the list opens the entry.

Phonebook Panel File/Exit

The Exit menu item terminates HyperACCESS. If there is an active connection with
a remote system, HyperACCESS displays a warning dialog.

Phonebook Panel View Menu

If you want to customize the way HyperACCESS displays the current notebook, use
the View menu. Figure 4-14 shows the menu.

Figure 4-14.
The View menu lets
you control how the
panel displays
entries.

The first group has only one menu item, Refresh Now. In the second group, which
controls what the current panel displays, you can check only one menu item at a time.
The remaining groups provide independent selections that affect the appearance of
the HyperACCESS window and the notebook panel.
4-16 HyperACCESS Reference

Phonebook Panel View/Refresh Now

Redisplays the panel to show changes made outside the program; for example, deletion
of entry files.

Phonebook Panel View/Icons

With Icons selected (the default), the Icons menu item displays a check mark, and
youll see a notebook panel similar to Figure 4-1 on page 4-2. In this case, each icon
and entry name identifies a remote system.

Phonebook Panel View/Details

With Details selected, the menu item displays a check mark. The details displayed are
values specified in the Communications properties sheet (see page 4-29), plus the full
path of the entry file.

Phonebook Panel View/Entry Names

With Entry Names selected, the Entry Names menu item displays a check mark. In
this case, HyperACCESS displays each entry in a multi-column list format with entry
names and their icons shown.

Phonebook Panel View/Toolbars

When selected, Toolbars... displays the Toolbars dialog that lets you select toolbar
options. The Toolbars dialog has a Toolbars list with check boxes for toolbars
available in HyperACCESS. Select whichever toolbars you want to use. This dialog
also has check boxes for additional options. Some selections you make are global for
all panels while others impact specific panels. For more information about docking
and undocking these toolbars, see Dockable Toolbars and Windows on page 4-59.
The toolbars available are:
<Terminal> This toolbar is entry-specific (<Terminal> represents the name
of the entry), and appears on the Terminal panel. Initially, all
entries have the same buttons, and this toolbar appears below
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-17

the menu bar at the left side of the toolbar section of the panel.
This toolbar consists of entry-specific buttons that provide
shortcuts to menu selections. Adding, modifying, or deleting
buttons on this toolbar only impacts the current entry. Display-
ing or hiding this toolbar also only impacts the current entry.
Note: HyperACCESS stores the buttons on this toolbar and its
display status in the entry file. You copy the toolbar definition
when you copy the entry file.
Standard Terminal This toolbar appears on all Terminal panels. Initially, it appears
to the right of the <Terminal> toolbar. Adding, modifying, or
deleting buttons on this toolbar impacts all entries. Displaying
or hiding this toolbar also impacts all entries.
Note: HyperACCESS stores the buttons on this toolbar and its
display status in the Windows Registry. Since the Windows
Registry is machine specific, you should not place buttons on
this toolbar that you want to use on other PCs when you copy
entry definitions.
Notebooks This toolbar appears on all notebook panels. Initially, this
toolbar appears below the menu bar at the left side of the
toolbar section of notebook panels. Adding, modifying, or
deleting buttons on this toolbar impacts all entries. Displaying
or hiding this toolbar also impacts all entries.
Call Log This toolbar appears on the Call Log panel. Initially, this
toolbar appears below the menu bar at the left side of the
toolbar section of Call Log panel. Adding, modifying, or
deleting buttons on this toolbar impacts only the Call Log
panel. Displaying or hiding this toolbar also impacts only the
Call Log panel.
Lists This toolbar appears on the Lists panel. Initially, this toolbar
appears below the menu bar at the left side of the toolbar
section of Lists panel. Adding, modifying, or deleting buttons
on this toolbar impacts only the Lists panel. Displaying or
hiding this toolbar also impacts only the Lists panel.
Modem Status The Modem Status toolbar only appears on the Terminal panel.
It simulates the most common front panel indicator lights on
external modems. With devices other than modems, such as
4-18 HyperACCESS Reference

direct cable connections, the LEDs indicate equivalent status


information.
By default, the Modem Status toolbar appears to the right of
the Standard Terminal toolbar.
The modem LEDs are:
AA Auto Answer
Modem Status Toolbar CD Carrier Detect
RD Receive Data
SD Send Data
OH Off Hook
Note: The LED display closely matches actual modem indica-
tors, but its not precisely in sync due to Windows communi-
cations drivers and buffering.
The additional check boxes in this dialog are:
Large Buttons When selected, toolbar buttons appear in a large format. If you
have a high resolution display and want to enlarge buttons in
the toolbar, select this menu item. This selection is global for
all panels and toolbars.
Show ToolTips When selected, toolbar buttons display a short description
whenever your mouse pointer lingers over a button. This
selection is global for all panels and toolbars.

Phonebook Panel View/Status Bar

When selected, Status Bar displays a check mark and the status bar appears at the
bottom of the window. This is the default. Clicking on this menu item removes the
check mark and status bar. The selection you make is global for all panels.
The status bar has five fields. From left to right, they are:
Help line The left-most section of the status bar displays a single line of
help information for the current selection or menu item.
Connect status If connected to a port, this field displays the word Connected
and the elapsed time for the current connection in hours,
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-19

minutes, and seconds. If HyperACCESS isnt connected to a


port, this field has the word Disconnected.
Terminal Emulation Displays the terminal emulator for this session, and the Capture
indicator (Capt) when youve selected capture to file or (Prn)
for capture to printer.
Communications Displays the baud rate, number of data bits, parity, and num-
Settings ber of stop bits. For WinSock (TCP/IP) connections, this
field displays WinSock.

Script Status Displays a symbol that indicates whether or not a script is


executing. The symbol is animated when a script is running.
Holding your mouse pointer over the symbol tells the name of
the executing script.

Phonebook Panel View/Tabs

When selected, Tabs displays a check mark and panel tabs appear below the toolbar
in the HyperACCESS window. This is the default. Clicking on this menu item removes
the check mark and panel tabs. These tabs provide single-click access to
HyperACCESS panels (Terminal, Phonebook, Call Log, Lists, and user created
phonebook tabs). When unselected, the panel tabs no longer appear. To switch
between panels, you can use the Window menu, or re-enable the panel tabs. The
selection you make is global for all panels.

Phonebook Panel Notebook Menu

The Notebook menu lets you create or delete notebooks. You can also copy a
notebook or rename it. Figure 4-15 shows the Notebook menu.

Figure 4-15.
The Notebook menu
lets you create, copy,
or delete custom
notebooks.
4-20 HyperACCESS Reference

Phonebook Panel Notebook/Rename

This menu item displays the Rename dialog (see Figure 4-16) that lets you change
the name of the current notebook. The notebook tab permits names up to 30 characters
long.

Figure 4-16.
This dialog lets you
change the name of
the current note-
book. The new name
appears on the tab.

Phonebook Panel Notebook/New

This menu displays the Notebook Name dialog (see Figure 4-16) that lets you specify
the name of a new notebook. When you enter a new name and click OK,
HyperACCESS displays a notebook panel with a tab that shows the new name. The
notebook tab permits names up to 30 characters long. The only entry in the new
notebook is the New Entry Template.

Phonebook Panel Notebook/Copy

This menu lets you copy all entries from the current notebook to a new notebook. It
displays the Notebook Name dialog (see Figure 4-16) that lets you specify the name
of the destination notebook. The notebook tab permits names up to 30 characters long.
HyperACCESS creates the notebook, and the notebook tab shows the new name. You
cant copy to an existing notebook.

Phonebook Panel Notebook/Delete

This menu displays a confirmation dialog. When you click OK, HyperACCESS deletes
the notebook panel. This selection doesnt delete the entry files contained in the
deleted notebook.
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-21

Phonebook Options Menu

The Phonebook Options menu provides selections that affect overall operation of
HyperACCESS. For example, you can specify a text viewer that you want
HyperACCESS to use. Figure 4-17 shows the Options menu. Selecting any of these
menu items displays a tabbed panel of the Options dialog.

Figure 4-17.
With the Options
menu you can specify
text viewer and
sound files for differ-
ent events.

Phonebook Panel Options/Text Viewer

Selecting Text Viewer displays the Options dialog with the Text Viewer tab visible,
as shown in Figure 4-18. This dialog lets you change the text viewer program used by
HyperACCESS. By default, HyperACCESS uses Notepad for the Text viewer.

Figure 4-18.
With the Text Viewer
tab of the Options
dialog, you can spec-
ify programs used by
HyperACCESS.

Note: The text viewer is used to edit programs, (see Terminal Panel Automation/Edit
Program on page 4-88.
4-22 HyperACCESS Reference

Phonebook Panel Options/Sound

Displays the Options dialog with the Sound tab visible, as shown in Figure 4-19.

Figure 4-19.
The Sound dialog lets
you associate .WAV
files with
HyperACCESS
events.

This panel has a drop-down list that lets you select system sound, custom sound, or
off. In more detail these selections are:
System sound This selection is the default if your system doesnt have mul-
timedia drivers installed. If selected, HyperACCESS beeps the
system speaker whenever one of the listed events occurs.
Custom sound This selection is the default if your system has multimedia
drivers installed. If selected, the Event list and Associated file
combo field become available. These fields let you associate
.WAV files with HyperACCESS events.
If you select Custom sound, you associate a file with each event by following these
steps:
1. Select an event from the Event list (for example, Disconnected).
2. Use the Associated file combo field to enter a filename, select a filename from
the drop-down history list, or use the Browse... push button to select a .WAV
file for the event. (For more information on browse dialogs, see page 4-8.)
3. Use the play and stop buttons to preview the .WAV file.
4. Click OK when you have completed all associations.
To disable multimedia sound for an event, make sure its Associated file edit field
indicates (None).
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-23

Phonebook Panel Options/Startup

Selecting Startup displays the Startup tab of the Options dialog shown in Figure 4-20.

Figure 4-20.
The Startup tab of the
Options dialog lets
you specify whether
HyperACCESS should
display the Terminal
panel on startup, and
whether it should
verify that it is the
default Telnet
application.

There are four check boxes on this panel. They are:


Display Terminal Selecting this check box displays the Terminal panel instead
panel upon of the Phonebook panel (or other default notebook panel)
startup when HyperACCESS starts. By default, this check box is
unselected.
Open last used Selecting this check box causes HyperACCESS to open the
notebook entry last used entry when it begins execution. This is convenient if
on startup you select Display Terminal panel upon startup. By default,
this check box is selected.

Note: If you run multiple instances of HyperACCESS on a


regular basis, you may prefer to unselect the Open last used
notebook entry on startup to avoid an error message regard-
ing loading an in use entry when you start another instance of
the program.
HyperACCESS Selecting this check box causes HyperACCESS to determine
should check to if it is the default Telnet application each time you launch it.
see whether it is If it is not and it determines that you have a browser,
the default Telnet
HyperACCESS displays a dialog asking if you want to make
application
it the default Telnet application. By default, this check box is
selected.
4-24 HyperACCESS Reference

When I try to Selecting this check box causes HyperACCESS to start a


open a notebook daughter instance of itself if you open a notebook entry that
entry that is is already open. This is a temporary copy that includes a copy
already open,
of the current backscroll buffer for the entry.
create another
window This feature lets you conduct multiple simultaneous telnet
sessions with the same host system using one notebook entry.
Any interactions in a daughter instance are independent of the
parent. When you close a daughter, the backscroll data and
modifications to any settings arent saved.

Note: Opening the properties notebook of a daughter instance


of a notebook entry indicates in the title bar that these are
properties for a temporary copy. Changes to any settings are
temporary and are only for this one copy.
Note: External programs using the HyperACCESS API
(HAPI) can only access the original notebook entry session.
HAPI cant access any daughter instances.

Phonebook Panel Automation Menu

The Automation menu provides four selections to Run, Abort, Edit Program, and
assign programs to Buttons (see Figure 4-21). These selections are a subset of the
available menu items in the Terminal panel Automation menu. For a complete
description of all automation menu items see Terminal Panel Automation Menu on
page 4-85.

Figure 4-21.
The phonebook
panel Automation
menu has items to
run, edit, or abort
programs, and assign
programs to buttons.
Phonebook Panel Menu Bar 4-25

Phonebook Panel Window Menu

The Window menu (see Figure 4-22) lets you select HyperACCESSs panels. The
currently active panel appears with a check mark.

Figure 4-22.
The Window menu
has items that let you
display HyperACCESS
panels.

Phonebook Panel Window/Terminal

Selecting Terminal displays the Terminal panel where you interact with the remote
system (see Features of the Terminal Panel on page 4-58).

Phonebook Panel Window/Phonebook

Selecting Phonebook displays the Phonebook panel containing the default phone-
book. If you change the name or delete this notebook, the menu list reflects this change.
The mnemonic for Phonebook, the first notebook, is 1.

Phonebook Panel Window/Other Notebook(s)


Any additional notebooks that you create (see Creating Custom Notebooks on
page 3-24) appear in this menu. The name that appears in the list is the same name
that appears on the panel tab, and the mnemonic is a number indicating the tab position,
for example, 2 My Notebook in Figure 4-22.

Phonebook Panel Window/Call Log

Selecting Call Log displays the Call Log panel.


4-26 HyperACCESS Reference

Phonebook Panel Window/Lists

Selecting Lists displays the Lists panel.

Phonebook Panel Help Menu

The Phonebook panel Help menu items let you get Help information about
HyperACCESS. See HyperACCESS Help on page xiv in the Introduction.

Phonebook Panel Buttons

You can optionally display or hide toolbars for all panels using View/Toolbar. You
can also create your own buttons or reposition buttons using drag and drop (press S
in combination with the left mouse button and drag the button to its new location).
Default buttons provided with HyperACCESS (in their default order) are:

New

Performs the same function as File/New (see page 4-4).

Open

Performs the same function as File/Open (see page 4-6).

Print
Performs the same function as File/Print (see page 4-12).

Print Preview

Performs the same function as File/Print Preview (see page 4-10).


Properties Sheets 4-27

Connect Notebook Entry

Performs the same function as File/Connect (see page 4-12).

Connect and Record Logon

Performs the same function as File/Connect and Record Logon (see page 4-14).

Notebook Entry Settings

Performs the same function as File/Properties followed by selection of the Commu-


nications properties sheet (see page 4-29).

Change Notebook View

Cycles between Icons, Details, Entry names, and File names phonebook displays.

Help

Performs the same function as Help (see HyperACCESS Help on page xiv in the
Introduction).

Properties Sheets

The properties notebook is a modal window (that is, you must select OK or Cancel or
close the window before you can continue working in HyperACCESS). It has sheets
that let you specify various communications parameters for an entry. You can display
the properties notebook by selecting a menu item from the Properties menu of the
Terminal panel, or by selecting the Properties menu item from a notebook panel File
menu or an entrys pop-up menu, or by clicking the Settings button.
The following sections describe each sheet of the properties notebook. To display a
sheet, once you have the properties notebook displayed, simply click its tab.
4-28 HyperACCESS Reference

Description Properties Sheet

The Description properties sheet (Figure 4-23) lets you change the entry name, pick
an icon, and enter a brief comment.

Figure 4-23.
The Description prop-
erties sheet lets you
change an entry
name, pick an icon,
and enter a brief
comment.

The edit fields and buttons on this sheet are:

Name
Use this edit field to enter or change the name for the entry (its filename without the
.HAW or .HHW extension). In Icons view, this name appears under the icon. You can
enter a name up to 256 characters (including path).

Icons

Use this scrollable region to select an icon to represent the entry in Icons view. The
selected icon is highlighted. To change a selection, simply click another icon.
Note: You can use these icons for objects outside HyperACCESS by selecting the file
HADLL32.DLL in the HyperACCESS program directory. Simply select this file when
assigning icons to shortcuts and select the icon you want to use.
Properties Sheets 4-29

Notes

This scrollable edit field lets you add any textual information about the entry. For
example, you might want to keep the system administrator or help desk phone number
in this field.

Communications Properties Sheet

The Communications properties sheet lets you define how HyperACCESS connects
to the remote system. The edit fields and buttons that appear on this sheet depend on
the connection you define using the Change... button in the Connect Via group box.
For example, Figure 4-24 shows the communications sheet for a modem connection.
This sheet lets you define one or more phone numbers, and communications settings.

Figure 4-24.
The Communications
properties sheet lets
you define telephone
numbers and other
settings for an entry.

Connections

HyperACCESS lets you create groups of communications settings called connections.


Connections establish a path that an entry uses to connect to a remote system. Entries
can share connections and each entry can reference multiple connections. However,
before you use an entry, you must select the connection you want it to use.
4-30 HyperACCESS Reference

Different types of connections require different parameters. You can specify global
parameters that affect all entries that use a connection, and you can specify local
parameters that affect the current entry.
When you create connections, you specify the connection
type (see Creating Connections on page 3-19). Valid types Contact Hilgraeve if you
include: need support for addi-
tional connection types.
Modem or modem pool (TAPI)
Direct cable
Winsock (TCP/IP)
Depending on the type of connection, you can specify other
connection parameters. For example, a modem connection If you have any third-party
lets you select a standard communications port. If you pick communications drivers,
install them according to
Standard Com Port, you can then assign the port to a manufacturers instruc-
physical device (i.e., COM1, COM2), assign a modem name, tions prior to using
and specify modem setup details. These are all global HyperACCESS.
parameters for the connection.
Connection definitions dont include settings for dialing procedures (that is, how many
times and how often to try dialing). Since these settings may vary from call to call,
they are local to the current entry, and you can specify these settings for each entry
using the Communications properties sheet (see Dialing Details on page 4-39).
Settings such as data bits, stop bits, and parity appear in standard Windows TAPI
dialogs for defining modems and connections. For information on changing these
settings, see Communications Settings on page 4-35 and the Windows online help
system.

Connect Via

The Connect Via group box at the top of the Communications properties sheet is
common to all connection types. This group box displays the name and type of the
current connection. Other entries on the sheet vary depending on connection type.
You can add or modify connections using the Change... button. For details on the
dialogs used to create, modify, and delete connections, see Creating Connections on
page 3-19, Modifying Connections on page 3-59, and Deleting Connections on
page 3-23. Those sections define the details of the dialogs required for each procedure.
Properties Sheets 4-31

The following sections define the Communications properties sheet depending on type
of connection.

Communications Properties Sheet for Modem Connections

This section defines the text fields and buttons on the Communications properties
sheet when the connection type is through a modem (see Figure 4-24 on page 4-29).
Phone number to By default, this field indicates that the phone number infor-
dial mation is for the First phone number to try. Use the up or
down arrow buttons to select one or two alternate phone
numbers.
Country code This drop-down combo box lets you specify one of the pre-
defined country codes for the phone number youre calling.
Area code This edit field lets you specify an area code for the phone
number youre calling.
Phone number Use this edit field to enter the tele-
phone number. If you always call If you leave the Phone
the same phone number to access a number field blank,
HyperACCESS will prompt
remote system, its best to enter the you for a number when
Phone number. However, there you try to connect to the
may be advantages to leaving this remote system.
field blank attempting to con-
nect with an entry that doesnt have a phone number displays
a dialog to obtain the number.
Dial phone The Dial phone number only check box lets you indicate
number only that HyperACCESS should only dial the phone number spec-
ified in the Phone number edit field.
Dialing Use this button to display the Dialing Properties dialog (see
Properties... Dialing Properties, below).
Dialing Details The Dialing Details... push button on the Communications
properties sheet displays the Dialing Details dialog
Communications Use this button to display standard Windows TAPI dialogs to
Settings.... modify modem connection parameters from HyperACCESS.
For more information, see Communications Settings on
page 4-35.
4-32 HyperACCESS Reference

Dialing Properties

The Dialing Properties... button in the Communications properties sheet displays the
Dialing Properties dialog shown in Figure 4-25. This dialog lets you enter information
about your default location and any number of remote locations. You can either pre-
define these locations or define them as the need arises.

Figure 4-25.
The Dialing Proper-
ties dialog lets you
enter dialing infor-
mation for multiple
locations.

The drop-down lists, edit fields, check boxes, and push buttons in this dialog are:

Where I Am
The Where I am group box specifies parameters for the default location, and lets you
define additional locations. The drop-down list, edit fields, and push button in this
group box are:
I am dialing from This drop-down list displays currently defined locations. Make
a selection from the list or click the New... push button.
New This push button lets you create a new location. Clicking on
New... displays a dialog that lets you enter the name of the
location. Type a name and click on OK or press e. The
Dialing Properties dialog displays the new name in the I am
dialing from drop-down list, and keeps previous dialog
attribute values as defaults for the new entry.
Properties Sheets 4-33

Remove This push button is unavailable (grayed out) for the Default
Location. Selecting any other location in the I am dialing from
drop-down list activates this button. Clicking on Remove
displays a dialog requesting confirmation before removing the
location.
The area code is The edit field lets you define the area code for the current
location. This number determines whether dialed numbers use
long distance or local access.
I am in This drop-down list displays a list of countries. Select the
country of the current location. This selection determines
whether dialed numbers include a country code.

How I Dial From This Location


The How I dial from this location group box specifies parameters for the current
location. The edit fields, drop-down list, check boxes, and radio and push buttons in
this group box are:
To access an These edit fields let you enter numbers to access outside
outside line, first lines. You can enter commas (,) to insert two-second pauses.
dial The first entry is for local dialing. The second entry field is
for long distance dialing. The access codes can be the same
or different.
Dial using Calling Use this check box to indicate that you want to use a long dis-
Card tance calling card. Selecting this box when it is unselected
displays the Change Calling Card dialog (see Change Call-
ing Card Dialog on page 4-34). When a calling card is
selected, the name of the calling card appears in the space
next to this check box label.
This location has Use this check box to send a dialing code that disables call
call waiting. To waiting before the call and then enables call waiting at the
disable it dial conclusion of the call. The associated drop-down combo list
lets you select one of the common codes for disabling and
enabling call waiting, or you can enter the code required for
your telephone service.
4-34 HyperACCESS Reference

The phone system These two radio buttons let you select either Tone dialing or
at this location Pulse dialing. The selection you make is a function of the
uses telephone company or in-house PBX capabilities.
HyperACCESS uses the selection you make for all entries
that use this connection.

Change Calling Card Dialog

You access the Change Calling Card dialog (see Figure 4-26) by selecting the Dial
using Calling Card check box or by clicking its associated Change... button. For
procedures using this dialog to create a calling suffix required for some phone systems,
see Creating Suffixes on page 3-74).

Figure 4-26.
Change Calling Card
lets you select from
among predefined
entries and enter a
calling card number
when applicable. It
also lets you create
new calling card
entries.

The drop-down list, edit field, and push buttons in this dialog are:
Calling Card to use Use this drop-down list to select a pre-defined calling card, or
click the New... push button (see below) to define a new calling
card.
Calling Card number Use this edit field to enter a calling card number. This edit field
is unavailable unless the defined calling card requires a num-
ber.
New... Use this push button to display the Create New Calling Card
dialog. This dialog lets you enter the name of the new calling
card. Enter the name in the edit field and click on OK or press
e.
Remove Use this push button to remove the current calling card from
the drop-down list.
Advanced... Use this push button to display the Dialing Rules dialog that
lets you customize the sequence of numbers used to place calls
Properties Sheets 4-35

with a calling card. For more information on this dialog, click


the ? in the dialog and select one of the edit fields to see the
codes used to program a calling sequence.

Communications Settings

The Communications Settings... button in the Communications properties sheet


displays standard Windows TAPI dialogs to modify modem connection parameters
from HyperACCESS. You can also modify modem parameters by selecting Modem
in the Windows Control Panel.
This section describes the Windows modem properties dialog, for a description of
how to access this dialog from within HyperACCESS, see Creating Connections on
page 3-19 or Modifying Communications Settings on page 3-56.
The title bar of the modem properties dialog shows the name of the modem whose
properties you are viewing and/or modifying. When displayed from HyperACCESS,
this dialog has three tabs:
General
Connection
Options
The following sections describe each panel of the dialog for a standard modem.
4-36 HyperACCESS Reference

General
The General panel, shown in Figure 4-27, displays the modem name, plus has
additional controls to modify modem parameters.

Figure 4-27.
The General tab of
the Windows modem
properties dialog.

The drop-down lists, check box, and slider control in this dialog are:
Port This drop-down list displays the available communications
ports available on the system.
Speaker volume This slider bar lets you adjust the modem speaker. To move
the slider, either click on the slider track at one of the markers
or drag the slider to the desired marker. The slider only
moves in discrete increments shown by the markers.
Maximum speed This group box has a drop-down list and check box. The
drop-down list provides common transmission rates between
110 and 115,200 baud. This parameter determines the maxi-
mum transfer speed in bits per second (bps) between your PC
and modem.
Only connect at Selecting this check box, in the Maximum speed group,
this speed specifies that your modem must connect at exactly this speed
regardless of the capabilities of the two modems making the
connection.
Properties Sheets 4-37

Connection
The Connection panel, shown in Figure 4-27, displays connection and call
preferences.

Figure 4-28.
The Connection tab
of the Windows
modem properties
dialog.

The drop-down lists, check box, and edit fields in this dialog are:
Connection This group box includes drop-down lists for Data bits, Par-
preferences ity, and Stop bits. The most common settings for these
attributes are: 8, None, and 1, respectively. If you fail to con-
nect with these settings, contact the system administrator of
the system youre calling to see if you should use different
settings.
Call preferences The check boxes (and edit fields) in this group box are:
Wait for dial tone before dialing select this check
box to have the modem wait before dialing. See the online
help for more information.
Cancel the call if not connected within select this
check box and enter a value in the edit field to have
Windows disconnect and cancel the call if the modem
doesnt indicate connection within the allotted time.
Disconnect a call if idle for more than select this
check box and enter a value in the edit field to have
Windows disconnect the call if no characters are trans-
mitted in either direction for the specified time.
4-38 HyperACCESS Reference

Port Settings... This push button displays the Advanced Port Settings dialog.
For more information on this dialog, see Windows online help.
Advanced... This push button displays the Advanced Connection Settings
dialog. For more information on this dialog, see Windows
online help.

Options
The Options panel, shown in Figure 4-27, is in the dialog when you click the
Communications Settings... button in the HyperACCESS Communications proper-
ties sheet. This panel doesnt appear when you display this dialog from the Windows
Control Panel. (However, it does appear when you display this dialog using the
Configure... button in the Properties dialog of a Windows Dial-Up Networking entry.)
The options panel lets you configure connection control, dial control, and status
control. The only section applicable to HyperACCESS is Dial control.

Figure 4-29.
The Options tab of
the Windows modem
properties dialog.

The three group boxes in this dialog and the attributes they provide are:
Connection Control This group box has two check boxes that let you configure
TAPI to display a terminal window before and/or after dialing.
Select Bring up terminal window before dialing to manually
enter modem commands before TAPI issues dial commands to
the modem.
Select Bring up terminal window after dialing to manually
enter commands to the remote computer after TAPI dials. For
Properties Sheets 4-39

example, some Internet service providers require a manual


logon before switching to PPP mode for Telnet access or Web
browsing.
Dial Control This group box has a check box to enable Operator assisted
or manual dial. Select this check box if you need to manually
dial before connecting to the remote computer. There is also a
Wait for credit card tone spin button in this group box. This
attribute determines how long TAPI waits between dialing the
last phone number digit and the first credit card number digit.
Status Control This group box has a check box to enable Display modem
status. Selecting this option puts the modem tray icon n the
Windows status bar.
See the Windows online help for more information about the attributes in this panel,
or click the ? in the dialog and select the object on which you need help.

Dialing Details

The Dialing Details... push button on the Communications properties sheet displays
the Dialing Details dialog shown in Figure 4-30. HyperACCESS specifies reasonable
defaults for each of these settings. Settings in the upper group box of this dialog affect
only this entry, and are independent of settings used when calling other systems.
Settings in the lower group box affect calls to all entries.

Figure 4-30.
Dialing Details lets
you specify number
of retries, when to
retry, and other dial-
ing options.
4-40 HyperACCESS Reference

The edit fields and check box in this dialog are:


Attempt to dial HyperACCESS automatically retries if the called number is
busy or doesnt answer. Use the spin button or edit field to
specify the number of retries (the minimum is 1). If you have
specified alternate phone number(s) (see Communications
Properties Sheet for Modem Connections on page 4-31),
HyperACCESS cycles through each number in turn until it
has dialed the number of times specified.
Retry after This spin button and edit field let you specify the time delay
between retry attempts.
Accept callback This check box indicates that the system youre calling will
from remote disconnect and call back as part of its logon security or to
system reverse telephone charges. This selection places the modem
in answer mode upon completion of the current call.
Retry automati- Use this check box to have HyperACCESS automatically
cally if no dialtone redial if the modem provides a no dialtone return.
Confirm phone Use this check box to have HyperACCESS display the Con-
numbers before firm Phone Numbers dialog before you connect to a remote
dialing system. This option is extremely useful for laptop and other
mobile computers.
Properties Sheets 4-41

Communications Properties Sheet for Direct Cable Connections

When the connection type you select is through a direct cable, the Communications
properties sheet displays two parameters with corresponding Change... push buttons
as shown in Figure 4-31.

Figure 4-31.
The Communications
properties sheet for
direct cable connec-
tions.

The parameters are:


Connect Via see description in Connect Via on page 4-30.
Communications click the Change... button to display the Port Settings dialog
Setting shown in Figure 4-32.

Port Settings

This dialog has the following drop-down lists and buttons:


Bits per second Use this drop-down list to pick a transmission rate between 110
and 921,600 bps. This parameter determines the maximum
transfer speed in bits per second (bps) between your PC and
the direct cable-connected PC.
4-42 HyperACCESS Reference

Figure 4-32.
The Port Settings dia-
log used for direct
cable connections.

Data bits Use this drop-down list to specify the number of bits per
character. Possible settings include 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. Most
systems use eight.
Parity Use this drop-down list to select the type of character parity.
The options are None, Odd, Even, Mark, and Space.
Note: When using Odd, Even, Mark, or Space parity, you will
customarily set data bits to 7.
Stop bits Use this drop-down list to specify the number of stop bits per
character. The choices are 1, 1.5, and 2. Most systems use one
stop bit.
Flow control This drop-down list lets you select Hardware (RTS/CTS),
software (Xon/Xoff), or no (None) flow control.
Advanced... This push button displays the Advanced Connection Settings
dialog. For more information on this dialog, see Windows
online help.
Restore Defaults This push button returns all drop-down lists in this dialog to
their previously saved state.
Properties Sheets 4-43

Communications Properties Sheet for WinSock(TCP/IP) Connections

This section defines the text fields and buttons on the Communications sheet when
the connection type is through WinSock. For WinSock connections, the Communica-
tions properties sheet displays three parameters. as shown in Figure 4-31.

Figure 4-33.
The Communications
properties sheet for
WinSock (TCP/IP)
connections.

The parameters are:


Connect Via This group box is the same as Connect Via on page 4-30.
Remote IP address Enter a remote IP address in this edit field. For example, you
could enter MSEN.COM to access MSEN or
LOCIS.LOC.GOV for the Library of Congress. You can also
enter a numeric address, such as, 19.1.5.255 to access a
specific IP node.
Remote port Enter the remote port number that you want to use for the
Number connection. Most systems use port 23 (the default) for Telnet
access.

Terminal Emulator Properties Sheet

The Terminal Emulator properties sheet (shown in Figure 4-34) lets you select a
terminal that you want HyperACCESS to emulate. It also lets you define settings that
4-44 HyperACCESS Reference

are applicable to any emulation. The Settings... button displays a dialog that is unique
for each terminal emulator (see Appendix D, Terminal Emulator Characteristics for
emulator-specific settings).

Figure 4-34.
The Terminal
Emulator properties
sheet defines which
emulator you want to
use and how you
want the emulator to
behave.

The edit fields and buttons in this sheet are:


Terminal This drop-down list box displays the terminal emulations
supported by HyperACCESS.
For information about these terminal emulators, see
Appendix D, Terminal Emulator Characteristics.
Telnet terminal This edit field is only active for Winsock (TCP/IP) connec-
tions. It displays the default Telnet terminal ID for the emula-
tor. HyperACCESS uses this ID during Telnet sessions. If a
Telnet server that you connect to displays a message that it does
not recognize your terminal type, enter a different value in this
edit field. For example, some systems dont recognize the
standard DEC-VT100 and expect just VT100 instead. Check
with your system administrator for the correct terminal ID.
Properties Sheets 4-45

Function, Arrow, and Control Keys Act as

This group box has two radio buttons that let you specify whether you want the
function, arrow, and control keys to perform as Terminal keys or as System keys.
Selecting Terminal keys causes HyperACCESS to override Windows system keys,
such as C+V.

Backspace Key Sends

This group box has three radio buttons that let you determine what HyperACCESS
sends the remote system each time you press B. Your choices are:
Ctrl+H Send the value associated with C+H ASCII backspace
(08H).
Del Send the value associated with Del (7FH).
Ctrl+H, Space, Send an ASCII backspace, replace the character at that posi-
Ctrl+H tion with a space character, and backspace again. This pro-
vides a destructive backspace for systems that provide only a
nondestructive backspace.

Cursor

This group box has two radio buttons that select between an Underline and Block
cursor. It also has a check box that lets you select a blinking (selected) or nonblinking
(unselected) cursor.

Number of Rows and Columns

These two spin buttons and their associated edit fields let you specify the terminal
screen height (Rows) and width (Columns). You can specify a minimum of 2 and a
maximum of 64 rows, and a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 132 columns. The
Default push button returns the number of rows and columns to appropriate settings
for the selected terminal.
Note: Selecting a number of Rows or Columns different than the default values may
cause text on the terminal screen to appear misaligned with remote systems that lack
support for this capability.
4-46 HyperACCESS Reference

ASCII Receiving Properties Sheet

The ASCII Receiving properties sheet (shown in Figure 4-35) lets you specify options
that only apply to normal terminal interaction with remote systems. These options
dont affect file transfer protocols.

Figure 4-35.
The ASCII Receiving
properties sheet lets
you specify options
that apply only to
terminal interaction
with remote systems.

The check boxes on this sheet are:


Append line feeds This check box forces a CR and LF at the end of each line.
to incoming line The default is to leave the lines as received. Lines sent to you
ends by most remote systems will already end with CR and LF.
Force incoming Converts 8 bit data characters to standard ASCII by replacing
data to 7-bit ASCII the eighth bit with a zero.
By setting this check box, you can suppress spurious
extended ASCII characters caused by line noise or incorrect
parity and/or bits per character settings. With systems that
send extended ASCII characters, leave this check box
unselected. The default is unselected.

Note: HyperACCESS ignores this setting when you use the ANSI
emulator because it must support graphic characters that use the
eighth bit.
Properties Sheets 4-47

Echo incoming The default is no echo. When set, this option transmits every
data to sender received character back to the remote system.
You may want to select this check box when youre commu-
nicating terminal-to-terminal.
Wrap lines that When off, discards characters beyond the terminals maxi-
exceed terminals mum line length. When on, the default, long lines appear on
width multiple terminal lines.
Show hex value The default is off. When on, control characters, escape
of nonprinting sequences, and screen control codes no longer control your
characters screen; instead they display as hexadecimal values in square
brackets.
By comparing these values with the table in Appendix C,
ASCII Characters, you may be able to spot troublesome char-
acters or sequences.
Tab spacing for The default replaces each tab character with eight contiguous
incoming text spaces. Use the spin button or associated edit field to change
the number of contiguous spaces used to convert a tab char-
acter. Set this value to zero to turn conversion off.

ASCII Sending Properties Sheet

The ASCII Sending properties sheet (shown in Figure 4-36) lets you specify options
that only apply to normal terminal interaction with remote systems. For example, this
sheet lets you specify whether or not to append LF characters to the end of outgoing
lines. You can also specify line and character delays to correct problems with lost
characters. These options dont affect file transfer protocols.
The check boxes and combo boxes on this sheet are:
Send line feed Default is CR. Check this box to have HyperACCESS send a
with each line CR and LF at the end of each line.
Expand blank The default permits null lines (two CRs without any interven-
lines to include a ing characters). Check this box to force HyperACCESS to
space always include at least one space character between two CRs.
4-48 HyperACCESS Reference

Figure 4-36.
The ASCII Sending
sheet lets you specify
options that apply
only to normal termi-
nal interaction with
remote systems.

Echo typed The default is no echo. When set, this option displays trans-
characters locally mitted characters in the terminal area. Select this option when
youre communicating with remote systems that expect you
to be operating in half duplex (sometimes called echoplex)
mode.
After sending The default is no waiting. However, if selected, the default
each line, wait for character causes HyperACCESS to wait for an echoed CR
character character (decimal 13) before sending the next line. Most
remote systems operate in full duplex mode, so all characters
sent are echoed back. Waiting for CR can help synchronize
transmission to slower remote systems. The spin button lets
you select the decimal value of the character you want to wait
for.
Convert outgoing The default is no conversion. However, if checked, the
tabs to default is eight spaces. You can change the number of spaces
using the spin button or associated edit field.
Delay after each The default is zero milliseconds. If you experience loss of
character characters when performing ASCII transmissions to slow
remote systems, increasing this setting may improve trans-
mission integrity. Use the spin button or associated edit field
to change the number of milliseconds.
Properties Sheets 4-49

Delay after each The default is zero milliseconds. If you experience loss of
line characters at the beginning of lines when performing ASCII
transmission to slow remote systems, increasing this setting
may improve transmission integrity. Use the spin button or
associated edit field to change the number of milliseconds.

File Transfer Properties Sheet

The File Transfer properties sheet (shown in Figure 4-37) lets you specify default
protocols for sending and receiving files. You can also set default folders for sending
and receiving.

Figure 4-37.
The File Transfer
properties sheet lets
you define default
protocols and folders
for sending and
receiving files.

The following sections define group boxes and their corresponding edit fields and
buttons.

Default File Transfer Protocols

This group box has drop-down lists of supported protocols for receiving and sending.
(The associated display boxes dont permit manual entry. You must make a selection
from the drop-down list.) In addition, the dialog has Settings... push buttons for
receiving and sending that display a dialog for each protocol. If you specify the same
4-50 HyperACCESS Reference

protocol for both sending and receiving, either Settings... button defines settings for
both directions.
Appendix E, File Transfer Protocols describes supported protocols and lists their
options and defaults.

Default Transfer Folders

This group box lets you define folders that you want to use as default receiving and
sending folders.
For receiving Defines a default folder for files received from the remote
system. You can change the receiving folder during a session.
The drop-down list shows the last six folders used to receive
files using this entry. The Browse... push button associated
with this entry field displays a directory browse dialog that
permits selection of drive and folder. The file selection list isnt
present in the browse dialog. For a complete description of
browse dialogs, see page 4-8.
For sending Defines a default folder for files transmitted to the remote
system. You can change the sending folder during a session.
The drop-down list shows the last six folders used to send files
using this entry. The Browse... push button associated with this
entry field displays a directory browse dialog that permits
selection of drive and folder. The file selection list isnt present
in the browse dialog. For a complete description of browse
dialogs, see page 4-8.

File Usage Properties Sheet

The File Usage properties sheet lets you specify files that you want HyperACCESS
to use for various operations (see Figure 4-38). HyperACCESS defines one file for
Properties Sheets 4-51

each listed function. By default, the program uses these files for all entries. You can
use this sheet to define unique files for the current entry.

Figure 4-38.
The File Usage prop-
erties sheet lets you
specify files that you
want HyperACCESS
to use for various
operations.

The Usage list defines functions that require files. When you select an entry in the
Usage list, the Associated file edit field shows the current filename (and relative or
full path if required). The drop-down list associated with the edit field shows the six
most recently used files for this selection. You can enter or modify the edit field, select
an entry from the drop-down list, or use the Browse... push button to select a file. For
a complete description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.
The functions defined in the Usage list are:

Call log file


Defines the log file for the entry. It is an ASCII text file that contains the time and
date of key events that take place. You can view this file from within HyperACCESS
by selecting the Call Log panel tab.
Note: By default all entries use C:\Program Files\HaWin32\My
Files\CallLog.Txt as their log file.
4-52 HyperACCESS Reference

Default capture file

Defines a default capture file. You can change the capture file during a communica-
tions session. Changing the default capture file here has the same effect as changing
it in the Terminal panel File/Capture to File (see Terminal Panel File/Capture to File
on page 4-66).

Script to run before connecting

This file is a program thats automatically run before you connect with a remote
system. It does not automatically connect the program must explicitly initiate
connection using appropriate HAPI functions. You can use this feature to substitute
a user-defined modem handling routine for the built-in mechanisms. These files should
have a .TXT extension for VBScript or JavaScript, .EXE for compiled code written
in any language (Visual Basic, Microsoft C, etc.), or .BAT for batch files.

Script to run upon connecting

This file is a program thats automatically run when you connect with a remote system.
These files should have a .TXT extension for VBScript or JavaScript, .EXE for
compiled code written in any language (Visual Basic, Microsoft C, etc.), or .BAT for
batch files.

Script to run after disconnecting


This file is a program thats automatically run after a caller disconnects. For example,
you can use this feature to substitute a user-defined modem handling routine for the
built-in mechanisms. These files should have a .TXT extension for VBScript or
JavaScript, .EXE for compiled code written in any language (Visual Basic, Microsoft
C, etc.), or .BAT for batch files.

Preferences Properties Sheet

The Preferences properties sheet (see Figure 4-39) lets you specify how
HyperACCESS reacts to your mouse clicks, and how it handles the Backscroll Buffer.
Properties Sheets 4-53

Figure 4-39.
The Preferences
properties sheet lets
you specify how
HyperACCESS reacts
to mouse button
clicks and how large
it makes the Back-
scroll Buffer.

The following sections define the group boxes and their radio buttons and the edit
fields that appear on this sheet:

Button 1 Double-Click

This group box has three radio buttons that determine the action taken when you
double-click the mouse selection button (normally the left button). The options are:
Selects word Selecting this radio button deselects any selected text, and
selects the word currently under the mouse pointer. This
action can occur in the terminal viewing area or Backscroll
Buffer.
This is the default action, and is consistent with normal Win-
dows interface standards. Extended selection can proceed
from the selected word by dragging the mouse pointer (with-
out releasing on the second click), or using extended selec-
tion keys (S+l, S+r, C+S+l, or C+S+r).
4-54 HyperACCESS Reference

Copies word or Selecting this radio button automatically transmits the word
selected text to under the mouse pointer; or if the mouse pointer is pointing
remote computer to selected text, transmits the selected text to the remote sys-
tem. If the mouse pointer is over white space, nothing is
transmitted.
Copies word or Selecting this radio button causes a button 1 double-click to
selected text to behave just like the previous option; plus transmits a CR
remote computer character after any text. If the mouse pointer is over white
with ENTER space, HyperACCESS transmits a single CR character.

Button 2 Click

This group box has four radio buttons that determine the action taken when you click
the second mouse button (normally the right button of a two or three-button mouse).
The options are:
Displays pop-up Selecting this option causes display of pop-up menus within
menu the terminal viewing area or Backscroll Buffer. See Using
Terminal Area/Backscroll Buffer Pop-up Menus on page 3-5
for complete information on how to use these menus. This is
the default.
Positions remote Selecting this option causes repositioning of the remote sys-
computers cursor tems cursor position, provided the terminal being emulated
has the capability to transmit cursor control characters. For
those terminals, HyperACCESS typically transmits multiple
cursor control characters equivalent to the number of times
arrow keys would have been pressed to arrive at the new
position.
Because few remote systems respond properly to this feature,
HyperACCESS makes no attempt to verify appropriate
response. However, an error message displays when cursor
repositioning is used with terminal emulators that dont sup-
port cursor control characters.
Copies single let- Selecting this option causes automatic transmission of the
ter to remote single character under the mouse pointer. Clicking on white
computer space sends an <ENTER> character to the remote system.
Properties Sheets 4-55

Does nothing Selecting this option disables HyperACCESS response to


mouse button 2.

Other Options

The remaining options in this section of the properties sheet are:


Track terminal This check box determines behavior of the terminal window
cursor when the current view doesnt include the terminal cursor
position. When checked, the view shifts automatically to fol-
low the cursor whenever received characters cause the cursor
to linger in a portion of the terminal screen that is not cur-
rently visible. When not checked, the terminal /Backscroll
view doesnt automatically track the cursor position.
Backscroll This entry field and its associated spin button determine the
maximum size size of the Backscroll Buffer. The default is 500 lines. Any
number between 0 and 5000 is valid. Manually entered num-
bers larger than 5000 are automatically set to 5000.
Portion of This entry field and its associated spin button determine the
maximum size percentage of the Backscroll Buffer saved between uses of
nonvolatile this phonebook entry. The default is 100%. Any integer
between 0 and 100 is valid. If less than 100%,
HyperACCESS removes the oldest information in the Back-
scroll Buffer before saving to the file.

Runtime Values Properties Sheet


The Runtime Values properties sheet (see Figure 4-40) lets you specify variable data
that your automation programs can use. You can enter values for User Name, User
ID, and Password, plus 20 other general-purpose strings that you enter in a combo list
box. To enter a value in a particular string, select the string number in the list and type
or edit the text in the String #? entry field (where ? is the string number selected).
To maintain password security, enter text in the Password entry field and click the
Hide button. Once the password is hidden, this button changes to Show... to indicate
that a dialog appears that requires you to type the correct password before you can see
it again. After youve correctly entered the password, HyperACCESS redisplays it in
the Runtime Values properties sheet Password edit field.
4-56 HyperACCESS Reference

You can have HyperACCESS use any of these values during program execution. For
information on inserting HyperACCESS statements that use these runtime values, see
Action Menu on page 5-8.

Figure 4-40.
The Runtime Values
properties sheet lets
you specify variable
data that your auto-
mation programs can
use.

Colors Properties Sheet

The Colors properties sheet (see Figure 4-41) lets you select colors for the Terminal
panel text and background from 16 predefined selections. To select a color, click it.
Text preview shows your selections and lets you try other combinations before
selecting OK.
The colors you define here become default colors for this entry. If you connect with
a computer that sends color redefinition codes to HyperACCESS, your screen colors
will change.
Properties Sheets 4-57

Figure 4-41.
The Colors properties
sheet lets you select
colors for the Host
panel text and back-
ground.
4-58 HyperACCESS Reference

Terminal Panel

You can begin a communications session many ways. One technique is to double-
click an entry. When your communications session begins, youll see a Terminal panel
that looks like the one shown in Figure 4-42.

Toolbars Figure 4-42.


The Terminal panel
with its key features.
Panel Tabs
Modem LEDs

Backscroll
Terminal area/
Buffer
Backscroll Buffer Terminal Area
Separator Bar

Scroll Bar

Message Pad

Send Button
Status Bar

Features of the Terminal Panel


Because youll be using the Terminal panel for most of your communications, youll
want to become familiar with its principal features.

Terminal Area and Backscroll Buffer

In Figure 4-42, a bar separates the terminal display area from the Backscroll Buffer
(above the bar). When you first display the Terminal panel, you dont see the
Backscroll Buffer. By default, the Backscroll Buffer appears when one or more lines
Terminal Panel 4-59

of text from the current communications session scroll into it. You can hide the
Backscroll Buffer until you explicitly use the scroll bar (or cursor keys) to view
information that has scrolled up.
The terminal youre emulating and the Terminal Emulator
properties sheet (see Terminal Emulator Properties Sheet If a remote system dis-
on page 4-43) determine the size of the terminal screen. This plays new data by selec-
tively erasing or
area (whether or not its fully visible) contains your most overwriting data instead
recent interaction with the remote system. If youre emulat- of scrolling or clearing
ing a terminal that scrolls lines off the top of the screen, the screens, no information
Backscroll Buffer stores everything that scrolls off the passes into the Backscroll
Buffer.
screen. Lines also move to the Backscroll Buffer if the
remote system sends a code to clear your screen.
Each entry has its own Backscroll Buffer. When the number
of incoming lines exceeds the Backscroll Buffers capacity You can set the size of the
Backscroll Buffer using
(the default is 500 lines), HyperACCESS deletes the oldest
the Preferences proper-
lines, as required, to make room for new lines. ties sheet.

The Backscroll Buffer is nonvolatile memory. It retains


information even after you log off the system and exit HyperACCESS. The next time
you start HyperACCESS and open the entry, the Backscroll Buffer contains lines from
your last communications session.

Dockable Toolbars and Windows

The Terminal panel has two dockable toolbars a Standard


Terminal Toolbar and an entry-specific toolbar (see Phone- The Message Pad has a
blank area near the Send
book Panel View/Toolbars on page 4-16 for information on
button. You can double-
enabling and disabling either or both of these toolbars). In click this area or the sizing
addition to these toolbars, HyperACCESS treats Modem edge of the Message Pad
Status as a dockable toolbar, and the Message Pad as a when your mouse pointer
changes to two parallel
dockable window. Initially, the toolbars, Modem Status, lines with opposing verti-
and Message Pad are docked. cal arrows

Note: The rest of this section describes operations on tool-


bars and their undocked palette window. The same techniques apply to the Message
Pad as a dockable window. For more information specifically on Message Pad, see
Sizing and Moving Message Pad on page 3-65.
4-60 HyperACCESS Reference

You can double-click in a blank area in a toolbar to display a floating palette (or
undocked) window, or you can drag a toolbar off its docked location to create a floating
palette window.
You can resize these palette windows using normal windows techniques by dragging
on a border or corner, and you can move them anywhere on your screen even off
the HyperACCESS window. HyperACCESS remembers where you last positioned
these toolbars when you toggle their display (see Terminal Panel View Menu on
page 4-75) or exit and restart.
You can close a palette window by clicking its close button in the upper right corner.
This closes the window, removes the check mark from the corresponding entry in the
Toolbars dialog (accessed from View/Toolbars...). For Message Pad, closing the
palette window unselects the Toolbar button and the entry in the View menu.
To redock palette windows, you can double-click the title bar to return it to its previous
docked position. You can redock the palette window elsewhere by positioning your
mouse pointer over the title bar and dragging your mouse pointer to a HyperACCESS
window border. As you move your mouse pointer, an outline of the palette window
appears. As you approach a dockable border for the toolbar (Modem Status and
Message Pad are only dockable at the top or bottom panel border), the outline snaps
into its docked position. Depending on the size of the toolbar and HyperACCESS
window, you may be able to move the docked outline along the border; for example,
you can move the Modem Status toolbar to the right side of the bottom border. As you
move your mouse pointer away from the dockable border, the palette window outline
snaps back to your pointer.

Terminal Panel Menu Bar

Each menu on the menu bar provides control over the Terminal panel and how its
used or displayed. Briefly, the menus are:
File gives you some of the same capabilities as the phonebook panel File menu.
For example, you can begin a communications session or exit HyperACCESS.
In addition, you can disconnect a session or capture interaction with the remote
system to a file or printer.
Edit lets you copy and paste text. It also features a search capability with the
Find... menu item.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-61

View lets you customize various features for the Terminal panel. From this menu
item, you can display the Message Pad panel and specify how you want the
HyperACCESS window to appear.
Properties displays menu items that open different sheets of the properties
notebook. These sheets let you change various communications parameters
pertaining to this entry, such as name, phone number, terminal emulation, and
so on.
Transfer lets you send and receive files.
Automation lets you learn or run programs and set up custom keys and buttons.
Window lets you display different HyperACCESS panels.
Help provides additional information on how to use HyperACCESS.
The following sections describe the Terminal panel menus in the same order as they
appear in the menu bar (from left to right). Only menu items unique to the Terminal
panel menu bar are fully described. Other menu items appear with a reference to the
relevant section in the Phonebook panel section of this chapter.

Terminal Panel File Menu

The Terminal panel File menu is useful for opening, closing, and saving entries. It also
provides selections that let you connect and disconnect from a remote system, capture
and print remote system interaction, and exit from HyperACCESS. Figure 4-43 shows
the Terminal panel File menu.

Terminal Panel File/New

See Phonebook Panel File/New on page 4-4.

Terminal Panel File/Open

Selecting Open... displays the Open browse dialog that lets you open any entry file.
For a complete description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.
4-62 HyperACCESS Reference

Figure 4-43.
The Terminal panel
File menu has entries
to initiate or discon-
nect a session, or
capture session infor-
mation to a file or
printer.

Terminal Panel File/Save

Selecting Save uses the current entry file to save the options and parameters. If the
entry is untitled, youll see the Save As dialog (see below).

Terminal Panel File/Save As

Selecting Save As... displays a standard Save As dialog shown in Figure 4-44. The
File name edit field displays a proposed filename.

Figure 4-44.
The Save As dialog
lets you specify a file-
name and path for an
entry.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-63

You can enter any filename (with or without an extension). However, if you enter any
extension other than .HAW HyperACCESS automatically adds an .HAW extension.

Terminal Panel File/Connect

Selecting Connect connects to the port and dials the phone number (if appropriate).
See Phonebook Panel File/Connect on page 4-12 for more information. This selection
is grayed out (unavailable) if HyperACCESS is already connected to a remote system.

Terminal Panel File/Connect and Record Logon

Selecting Connect and Record Logon dials the phone number, and displays the
Recording in Progress window upon successful connection. See Phonebook Panel
File/Connect and Record Logon on page 4-14 for more information. This selection is
grayed out (unavailable) if HyperACCESS is already connected to a remote system.

Terminal Panel File/Connect but Skip Logon

The Connect but Skip Logon menu item dials the phone number without running any
scripts. See Phonebook Panel File/Connect but Skip Logon on page 4-15 for more
information. This selection is grayed out (unavailable) if HyperACCESS is already
connected to a remote system.

Terminal Panel File/Disconnect

Disconnect is available only if HyperACCESS has made a connection. Otherwise,


this menu item is grayed out (unavailable). Selecting Disconnect terminates a com-
munications session by hanging up the phone line (if appropriate) and releasing the
connection.

Terminal Panel File/Page Setup

Page Setup... displays the standard Windows Page Setup dialog. See Phonebook
Panel File/Page Setup on page 4-9.
4-64 HyperACCESS Reference

Terminal Panel File/Print Preview

Displays a standard Windows print preview window that shows what printed pages
will look like. See Phonebook Panel File/Print Preview on page 4-10.

Terminal Panel File/Print

Print... displays the standard dialog shown in Figure 4-10 on page 4-12. This dialog
lets you print all or selected text in the Terminal panel. For more information, see your
Windows documentation or online Help.

Terminal Panel File/Capture to Printer

The Capture to Printer menu item displays a cascade menu with the following entries:
Start... Displays the Capture to Printer dialog described below, and
displays Prn in the status line while capture is active. Start...
is grayed out (unavailable) if printing is already started.
Stop Stops printing and closes the printer. The print data are released
to the print spooler. If printing hasnt started, this menu item
is grayed out (unavailable).
Pause Suspends printing, but doesnt close the printer. If printing
hasnt started or is already paused, this menu item is grayed
out (unavailable).
Resume Restarts printing using the current printer. If the printer hasnt
started or is already active, this menu item is grayed out
(unavailable).

Capture to Printer dialog


The Capture to Printer dialog shown in Figure 4-45 lets you specify how
HyperACCESS captures interactive information for printing, and whether it releases
the information to the printer By page or By session. Releasing the printer By session
is important if youre printing to a network printer.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-65

Figure 4-45.
The Capture to
Printer dialog
determines how
HyperACCESS cap-
tures incoming infor-
mation and releases it
to the printer.

The information displayed, and the parameters and options of the dialog are:
Printer Displays the current printer. This is either the system default
printer or the printer selected using the Page Setup dialog, see
Terminal Panel File/Page Setup on page 4-63.
Capture Mode This group box specifies what HyperACCESS captures for
printing. It has the following three radio buttons:
Characters prints all incoming data except escape
sequences.
Lines prints each line when the CR character at its end
is received (the default). It also prints the line youre on
when you stop or suspend printing, unless that line is
blank.
Screens prints the entire screen whenever the remote
system clears the screen or you stop or suspend printing.
Print Method This group box specifies when HyperACCESS releases cap-
tured data to the printer. The buttons provide two choices:
By page prints each page as its received.
HyperACCESS uses information from the system to
determine page length.
By session releases data to the printer after you stop
capture or you terminate the communications session.
Make these Selecting this check box makes the options youve selected
the default the default settings for future capture to printer operations.
settings
4-66 HyperACCESS Reference

Start This push button initiates printing on the selected printer using
the options specified.

Terminal Panel File/Capture to File

The Capture to File menu item displays the cascade menu


described below: You can use Capture to File
to receive text files by acti-
Start... Displays the Capture to File dialog vating this feature before
described below, and displays Capt commanding the remote
system to display each file.
in the status line while capture is
active. Start... is grayed out
(unavailable) if capture to file is
already started.
Stop Stops file capture and closes the current capture file. If capture
hasnt started, this menu item is grayed out (unavailable).
Pause Suspends file capture, but doesnt close the current capture file.
If capture hasnt started or is already paused, this menu item is
grayed out (unavailable).
Resume Restarts file capture using the current capture file. If capture
hasnt started or is already active, this menu item is grayed out
(unavailable).

Capture to File dialog


The Capture to File dialog (see Figure 4-46) lets you specify a file for capturing your
interaction with the remote system. It also provides various ways for you to use the file.

Figure 4-46.
Capture to File lets
you specify a file and
how to use it for sav-
ing your interaction
with the remote
system.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-67

The information displayed, and the parameters and options of the dialog are:
Folder The full path of the current folder.
File This drop-down list, with its associated Browse... push button,
lets you specify a path and name for the capture file.
If youve previously specified a default capture file in the File
Usage properties sheet (see File Usage Properties Sheet on
page 4-50), or youve previously used a capture file for this
session, HyperACCESS displays that filename in the drop-
down history list box.
The drop-down list displays the last six files used for capture.
You can edit the path or name in the list box, select a file from
the drop-down list, or use the Browse... push button to select
a capture file. For a complete description of browse dialogs,
see page 4-8.
If File Already This group box has the following four radio buttons:
Exists
Append if the file exists, this selection adds new
session interaction to the end of the current file. If the file
doesnt exist, HyperACCESS creates it.

Overwrite if the file exists, this selection deletes the


old file and creates a new capture file. If the file doesnt
exist, HyperACCESS creates it.
Rename by date HyperACCESS creates filenames
by appending the date/sequence to the original name. The
date/sequence format is MMDD999, where MM is the
month (values 01 to 12), DD is the day (values 01 to 31),
and 999 is a sequence number from 000 to 999 for the
files created on that date. If the pathname is already at its
maximum length (255), the date/sequence replaces char-
acters at the end of the name.
Rename sequentially appends a sequence number
from 0 to 999 to the end of the filename. If the pathname
is already at its maximum length (255), the sequence
number replaces characters at the end of the name.
4-68 HyperACCESS Reference

Capture Mode This section has the following four radio buttons:
Characters captures all incoming data except control
or escape sequences.
Lines captures each line when the CR character at its
end is received. It also captures the line youre on when
you stop or suspend capturing.
Screens captures whatever passes into the Backscroll
Buffer, plus the terminal screen when you stop or sus-
pend capturing.
Raw data captures all incoming data, including con-
trol or escape sequences.
Make these This check box appears at the bottom of the dialog. Selecting
the default it makes the file specified the default capture file, with the
settings options youve selected as the default settings.

Start This push button returns to the Terminal panel and begins
capturing data according to selected options.

Terminal Panel File/Redisplay File

The Redisplay File... menu item displays a standard file selection dialog that lets you
select a file for display. If the file is one that Graphics Viewer supports,
HyperACCESS launches Graphics Viewer and displays the file in the Graphics
Viewer window. Otherwise, HyperACCESS displays the file in the Terminal panel.
In this case, data in the file replaces the current Terminal panel contents. If you are
online, HyperACCESS displays a warning dialog before displaying the file in the
Terminal panel. Data displayed in this manner appears only on your screen and isnt
transmitted to the remote system.
For more information on Graphics Viewer, see HyperACCESS Graphics Viewer
Window on page 4-114.
Note: Since you can display any file, HyperACCESS has no way of knowing whether
data will display properly with the current emulator. Displaying garbage characters
may produce strange looking results, but it is harmless.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-69

Terminal Panel File/File List

The File menu includes a numbered list of the four most recently opened entry files.
Selecting one of these files in the list opens the entry.

Terminal Panel File/Exit

The Exit menu item terminates HyperACCESS. If there is an active connection with
a remote system, HyperACCESS displays a warning dialog. Click OK to disconnect
and exit or Cancel to continue the connection without exiting.

Terminal Panel Edit Menu

The Terminal panel Edit menu provides text manipulation tools. Figure 4-47 shows
the Edit menu.

Figure 4-47.
The Terminal panel
Edit menu has items
useful for text
manipulation.

This menu provides items to copy and paste information.

Terminal Panel Edit/Undo

Undo is only available after you have performed an operation that modifies the
Message Pad. This selection reverses the last operation.
4-70 HyperACCESS Reference

Terminal Panel Edit/Cut

Cut is only available when you select text in the Message Pad. This selection copies
selected text to the Clipboard and removes it from the Message Pad. Note that you
must select text before attempting to use Cut. See also Terminal Panel Edit/Paste on
page 4-72, Terminal Panel Edit/Paste on page 4-72, and Terminal Panel Edit/Paste
on page 4-72.

Terminal Panel Edit/Cut to Remote Computer

If you want to copy selected text directly to the remote system and remove it from the
Message Pad, use Cut to Remote Computer. This menu item is available only with
Message Pad text selected.

Terminal Panel Edit/Copy

Selecting Copy copies selected text from the terminal area or Backscroll Buffer to the
Clipboard. Note that you must select text before attempting to use Copy (the Copy
command is unavailable if you dont select text first). See also Terminal Panel Edit/
Paste on page 4-72.

Terminal Panel Edit/Copy to

Use this cascade menu if you want to copy selected text directly to the remote
computer, a file, printer, or the Message Pad. One or more of these menu items are
available with text selected in the terminal area, Backscroll Buffer, or Message Pad.
This cascade menu has the following selections:
Remote Computer
Remote Computer with <Enter>
File...
Printer
Message Pad
The following sections describe these cascade menu items.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-71

Terminal Panel Edit/Copy to/Remote Computer

Use Copy to/Remote Computer, if you want to copy selected text directly to the
remote system from the terminal area, Backscroll Buffer, or Message Pad. This menu
item is available only with text selected.

Terminal Panel Edit/Copy to/Remote Computer With


<Enter>

Use Copy to/Remote Computer with <Enter>, if you want to copy selected text
directly to the remote system from the terminal area, Backscroll Buffer, or Message
Pad, and append a CR character to the end of the text sent. This menu item is available
only with text selected.

Terminal Panel Edit/Copy to/File

Use Copy to/File... if you want to copy selected text to a file. This menu item displays
the Copy to File dialog shown in Figure 4-48.

Figure 4-48.
Copy to File lets you
specify a file and path
for the destination of
the copy.

The edit field, options, and buttons are:


Copy to file This drop-down combo box displays up to six files previously
used for copy operations. Either enter a filename or select one
from the drop-down list.
4-72 HyperACCESS Reference

Browse... Use this push button as an alternative to the drop-down list to


specify a file for the copy operation. For a complete description
of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.
If File Already This group box lets you specify whether you want to Append
Exists or Overwrite the file if it already exists.

OK Use this push button to initiate the copy operation and close
the dialog.

Terminal Panel Edit/Copy to/Printer

Sends selected text to your printer.

Terminal Panel Edit/Copy to/Message Pad

If necessary, this selection opens the Message Pad, and copies selected text to the
Message Pad. This selection is not available for text selected in Message Pad with
focus in the Message Pad.

Terminal Panel Edit/Paste

The Paste menu item copies text from the Clipboard to the remote system or Message
Pad depending on which has focus (where you last clicked your mouse). See Terminal
Panel Edit/Copy on page 4-70 for information on how to copy text to the Clipboard.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-73

Terminal Panel Edit/Paste from File

Selecting Paste from File... displays the Paste from File dialog shown in
Figure 4-49.

Figure 4-49.
Paste from File lets
you copy data from a
file to the remote
computer or Mes-
sage Pad.

The edit field, options, and buttons are:


File This drop-down combo box has a history list that displays up
to six files previously used for paste operations. Enter a file-
name in the edit field or select a file from the drop-down list.
Browse... Use this push button to specify a file for the copy operation.
For a complete description of browse dialogs, see
page 4-8.
Paste to This group box has two radio buttons that let you select whether
you want to paste text from the file to the Remote Computer
or Message Pad.
OK Use this push button to copy the contents of the file to the host
system and close the dialog.

Terminal Panel Edit/Select Terminal Screen

The Select Terminal Screen menu item selects all text in the terminal area of the
Terminal panel.

Terminal Panel Edit/Select All

The Select All menu item selects all text in the terminal area and Backscroll Buffer
of the Terminal panel.
4-74 HyperACCESS Reference

Terminal Panel Edit/Find

Selecting Find... displays the Find dialog as shown in Figure 4-50. This dialog lets
you find a text string in either the terminal area or Backscroll Buffer.
The search begins at the current insertion point and proceeds in the direction specified
in the dialog. You can reposition the insertion point while the Find dialog remains
active simply by clicking at the desired location.

Figure 4-50.
Find lets you search
for a string of charac-
ters in the terminal
area or Backscroll
Buffer.

The Find dialog edit field and options are:


Find Enter the string you want to find in this edit field, or select a
string from the drop-down history list.
Direction This drop-down list provides choices for searching Up or
Down from the current insertion point or text selection. The
default is Up.
Match case Mark this check box if you want to find only exact matches
with the same upper/lower case characters. The default for this
option is unselected.
Match whole Mark this check box if your search string is a whole word.
word only When selected, HyperACCESS will find only occurrences of
the string that are delimited on both sides by spaces, punctua-
tion, tabs, or new line characters. The default for this option
is unselected.

Find next This push button initiates or continues a search. You can
continue to search for the next occurrence until you find what
youre looking for, or see a Not found message.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-75

Terminal Panel View Menu

If you want to customize the way HyperACCESS displays its window, use the View
menu. Figure 4-51 illustrates the Terminal panel View menu. There are several entries
in common with the notebook panel View menu.

Figure 4-51.
The View menu lets
you customize how
HyperACCESS
appears.

Terminal Panel View/Scroll Lock

With Scroll Lock selected, the Scroll Lock menu item displays a check mark, and the
Terminal panel stops scrolling received text in the terminal area/Backscroll Buffer.
You can use Scroll Lock when you want to force the view to remain stationary for
reading, to select text, or to make keys available for local uses that would otherwise
perform terminal functions.

Effects of Scroll Lock


Scroll Lock is a condition that applies to the terminal area and Backscroll Buffer of
the Terminal panel. When scroll lock is on, HyperACCESS stops scrolling text in the
terminal panel and wont send characters to the remote system. There are two
conditions that cause the panel to be locked. They are:
Pressing L.
Selecting View/Scroll Lock.
Both methods display the Scroll Lock menu item check mark, and cause the Scroll
Lock indicator to light on the keyboard. Selecting text in the terminal area or
Backscroll Buffer also causes an implicit scroll lock condition, which ceases as soon
as you unselect the text.
4-76 HyperACCESS Reference

Terminal Panel View/Message Pad

Displays the Message Pad. For a description of Message Pad, see page 4-98.
The Message Pad is a detachable and can appear as a floating window. You can then
dock the Message Pad to either the top or bottom border of the Terminal panel (see
Dockable Toolbars and Windows on page 4-59).

Terminal Panel View/Backscroll

When selected, Backscroll shows a check mark and displays the Backscroll Buffer
when you explicitly scroll into it. You may want to unselect this option if you find the
Backscroll Buffer distracting or confusing. The default is selected.

Terminal Panel View/Scroll Bar(s)

When selected, Scroll Bar(s) shows a check mark and displays vertical and horizontal
(if necessary) scroll bars in the Terminal panel. Unselecting this menu item surpresses
scroll bars. The default is selected.

Terminal Panel View/Toolbar

When selected, Toolbars... displays the Toolbars dialog that lets you select toolbar
options. The Toolbars dialog has a Toolbars list with check boxes for toolbars
available in HyperACCESS. Select whichever toolbars you want to use. This dialog
also has check boxes for additional options. The selections you make are global for
all panels.
Toolbars are detachable and can appear as floating palettes. You can dock toolbars to
a border of the HyperACCESS window (see Dockable Toolbars and Windows on
page 4-59). For more information on toolbars available in HyperACCESS and the
Toolbars dialog, see Phonebook Panel View/Toolbars on page 4-16.

Terminal Panel View/Status Bar

See Phonebook Panel View/Status Bar on page 4-18.


Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-77

Terminal Panel View/Tabs

See Phonebook Panel View/Tabs on page 4-19.

Terminal Panel View/Fonts

Fonts... displays the standard Windows font selection dialog shown in Figure 4-52.
This dialog lets you select a font, style, and size to use in the Terminal panel. You can
also have HyperACCESS automatically adjust font size based on window size.

Figure 4-52.
The Font dialog lets
you select the font,
style, and size to use
in the Terminal panel.
You can also have
HyperACCESS auto-
matically adjust font
size based on win-
dow size.

The lists with their associated edit fields, check boxes, and drop-down lists in this
dialog are:
Font This edit field displays the font
selected in the scrollable list below Not all fonts contain
graphics characters
the field. You can type in this field
needed for proper termi-
(you should only enter a font name nal emulation. Using a
in the list), or select a font from the font without graphics
list. HyperACCESSs default font characters may produce
unusual results.
provides all standard ANSI graphics
characters.
Note: HyperACCESS only lists monospace fonts, since propor-
tionally spaced fonts usually arent appropriate for communi-
cations.
4-78 HyperACCESS Reference

Font style This edit field displays the style selected in the scrollable list
below the field. You can type in this field (you should only
enter a style in the list), or select a style from the list.
Size This edit field displays the current size selected. You can type
any size in this field, or select from among the standard sizes
displayed in the list. This selection is ignored if you select the
Automatically adjust font size to terminal window size
check box (see below).
Sample Displays a sample of the currently selected font, style, and size.
Use IBM PC Select this check box to have HyperACCESS display line
character set draw characters with any non-symbol TrueType font. This is
particularly helpful for accessing BBSs that use line draw
characters for borders on their menus.
Automatically With this check box selected (the default), HyperACCESS
adjust font size to automatically picks the best point size for the font and style
terminal window selected and the terminal area size.
size

Terminal Panel Properties Menu

The Terminal panel Properties menu has an entry for each properties sheet. When
you select an entry from this menu, HyperACCESS opens the properties notebook
with the selected sheet on top. The properties notebook applies to the Terminal panels
entry. HyperACCESS always saves changes you make in the properties notebook
when you click OK. The selections in this menu and the properties sheets they display
are:
Description See Description Properties Sheet on page 4-28.
Communications See Communications Properties Sheet on page 4-29.
Terminal See Terminal Emulator Properties Sheet on page 4-43.
Emulator
ASCII Sending See ASCII Sending Properties Sheet on page 4-47.
ASCII Receiving See ASCII Receiving Properties Sheet on page 4-46.
File Transfer See File Transfer Properties Sheet on page 4-49.
File Usage See File Usage Properties Sheet on page 4-50.
Preferences See Preferences Properties Sheet on page 4-52.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-79

Runtime Values See Runtime Values Properties Sheet on page 4-55.


Colors See Colors Properties Sheet on page 4-56.

Terminal Panel Transfer Menu

You can use the Terminal panel Transfer menu items to send and receive files.

Terminal Panel Transfer/Receive File(s)

Selecting Receive File(s)... displays a non-modal dialog (see Figure 4-53) that you can
position anywhere on your screen. The dialog lets you set the file transfer protocol
and other parameters for receiving files from a remote system. You can continue to
interact with the remote system with this dialog displayed. This lets you prepare to
receive files, issue commands to the remote system, then click the Receive button.

Figure 4-53.
Receive is a non-
modal dialog. It can
remain on screen
while you issue com-
mands to the host
system.

Some option check boxes may be unavailable (grayed out or dimmed) for the selected
file transfer protocol. The options and parameters specified in this dialog are:
Place received This edit field with its associated
files in the drop-down list and Browse... push You can define a default
directory and protocol to
following folder button lets you specify a folder path
use for receiving files on
for receiving file(s). the File Transfer properties
sheet.
4-80 HyperACCESS Reference

If youve already received a file in the current session, the


path appears in the edit field (without the filename). The
drop-down history list shows the paths of the most recently
received files. The Browse... push button displays the stan-
dard file browse dialog from which you can select a drive and
folder. (For a complete description of browse dialogs, see
page 4-8).
Transfer protocol This drop-down list displays the default transfer protocol for
this entry. You can select another protocol from the drop-
down list (you cant type into the box associated with the
drop-down list). For more information on transfer protocols,
see Appendix E, File Transfer Protocols.
In addition, the dialog has a Settings... push button that dis-
plays a custom dialog for each protocol. Appendix E
describes each protocol and lists its options and defaults.
Use received file This check box is available if the selected protocol is capable
time/date of sending a files time and date attributes. If selected,
HyperACCESS uses the received files time and date when
saving the file. If not selected, HyperACCESS uses the cur-
rent time and date for the file.
Use received path This check box is available if the selected protocol is capable
information of sending path information. Otherwise it is dimmed or
grayed out (unavailable). Selecting this option instructs
HyperACCESS to use the path sent as part of the file transfer.
Filter received This check box indicates that you want HyperACCESS to
files for known check received files for viruses using HyperGuardTM antivi-
viruses rus technology (US Patent 5,319,776).
HyperGuard instantly warns you if files you download con-
tain any of over 4,000 known viruses. Its X-ray Vision even
spots viruses hiding in compressed files and Word macros.
Upon detection of a virus, HyperACCESS displays a warning
message and aborts the file transfer. If you want to receive a
file that appears to have a virus, you must unselect this check
box and repeat the file transfer.

Note: You can download free updates to your virus protection


from the Hilgraeve BBS, (see Hilgraeve BBS on page xv).
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-81

Expand .ZIP files When you select this check box HyperACCESS expands
compressed (ZIP and self-extracting EXE) files, on-the-fly,
as they are received.
If a compressed file contains other compressed (either ZIP or
self-extracting EXE) files, HyperACCESS does not extract
(or virus check) these second-level compressed files. You can
still uncompress and virus check these files using third party,
standalone programs.
If File Already This group box provides six radio buttons that determine how
Exists HyperACCESS handles received files that have the same
name as files that already exist. The options are:
Overwrite deletes existing files and replaces them
with incoming data.
Refuse HyperACCESS refuses the file transfer if the
file already exists.
Refuse unless newer HyperACCESS checks the date
and time of incoming files to see if they are newer. If a
file is newer HyperACCESS will overwrite the existing
file; otherwise, HyperACCESS will refuse the file
transfer.
Append adds incoming data to existing files.
Rename use this drop-down list to select how you
want HyperACCESS to handle duplicate filenames.
There are options that let you elect to rename the Existing
file or the newly Received file. For each of these options,
you can have HyperACCESS rename files sequentially
or using date (a total of four choices). Definitions of
sequentially and date renaming are:
sequentially HyperACCESS appends a sequential
number, starting with zero, to the filename. If the
pathname is already at its maximum length (255), the
sequence number replaces characters at the end of the
name.
4-82 HyperACCESS Reference

using date creates filenames by appending the


date/sequence to the original name. The date/sequence
format is MMDD999, where MM is the month (values
01 to 12), DD is the day (values 01 to 31), and 999 is
a sequence number from 000 to 999 for the files
created on that date. If the pathname is already at its
maximum length (255), the date/sequence replaces
characters at the end of the name.
Save partial files if This check box indicates that HyperACCESS is to save partly
transfer is completed file transfers. (This permits you to use Zmodem
interrupted and HyperProtocol crash recovery procedures.) If left
unchecked, HyperACCESS deletes partly transferred files.
Display graphics With this check box selected (the default), HyperACCESS
files while automatically displays .GIF file images using Graphics
receiving Viewer (see HyperACCESS Graphics Viewer Window on
page 4-114) as you download files. You can disable auto-
matic display by unselecting this check box.
Receive This push button initiates the receive sequence for the
selected protocol and displays the receive progress dialog.
See Figure 4-54. Be sure to issue commands to the remote
system instructing it to begin sending before you click
Receive.
Close This push button closes the Receive dialog without initiating
a file transfer operation. This selection is different than
Cancel in that it saves entries you modified in the dialog.

Receive Progress
The receive progress dialog has a window title that includes
both the entry name and protocol. The dialog has tabbed If you minimize
HyperACCESS during a
panels that show various details about the progress of the transfer, the globe icon
file transfer, which includes information that depends on the fills in like a dial to show
protocol in use. Typically this information includes one or that transfer is in progress
two progress bars, the number of retries, and the name of for protocols that report
total amount of data to be
the current file. Information on the Statistics panel may sent in advance of transfer.
include estimated time remaining for the transfer, packet
size, total retries, elapsed time, throughput, and whether or
not virus detection and on-the-fly unzipping are enabled. This dialog has a Cancel
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-83

button, and may include a Skip File button. Figure 4-54 shows a sample HyperProtocol
receive progress dialog.

Figure 4-54.
The receive progress
dialog has a tabbed
panel that shows
detailed status of the
file transfer.

To hang up when the transfer is complete, select the Disconnect after transfer check
box.

Terminal Panel Transfer/Send File(s)

Selecting Send File(s)... displays a non-modal dialog (see Figure 4-55) that you can
position anywhere on your screen. The dialog lets you set the file transfer protocol
and other parameters for sending files to a remote system. You can continue to interact
with the remote system with this dialog displayed. This lets you prepare to send files,
issue commands to the remote system, then click the Send button.

Figure 4-55.
Send is a non-modal
dialog. It can remain
on screen while you
issue commands to
the host system.

The options and parameters specified, and information displayed in this dialog, are:
Folder This area of the dialog displays the current full path to which
file selection applies. The path changes when you select a file
in the file browse dialog.
4-84 HyperACCESS Reference

Filename This drop-down combo field and Browse... push button let you
specify a filename you want to send. (You can enter absolute
or relative paths with or without wildcard filename selection.)
If youve already sent and/or
selected files or paths in the current You can define a default
directory and protocol to
session, those names appear in the
use for receiving files on
drop-down history list, and the most the File Transfer properties
recently selected file or path appears sheet.
in the edit field. The Browse... push
button displays the standard file browse dialog, from which
you can select a drive, folder, and file. (For a complete descrip-
tion of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.)
Transfer protocol This drop-down list displays the default transfer protocol for
this session. You can select another protocol from the drop-
down list (you cant type into the display box associated with
the drop-down list). For more information on transfer proto-
cols, see Appendix E, File Transfer Protocols.
In addition, the dialog has a Settings... push button that dis-
plays a custom dialog for each protocol. Appendix E describes
each protocol and lists its options and defaults.
Include matching When selected this option causes HyperACCESS to search
files from subfolders of the path specified in the Filename edit field.
subfolders Files matching the filename or wild card selection are sent.
Include paths This check box, when selected, causes HyperACCESS to
when sending send the full path along with the filename. This option is
filenames available only when its supported by the selected protocol.

Send This push button initiates the transmission sequence for the
selected protocol and displays the send progress dialog. See
Figure 4-56.
Close This push button closes the Send dialog without initiating a
file transfer operation. This selection is different than Cancel
in that it saves entries you modified in the dialog.

Send Progress
The send progress dialog has a window title that includes both the entry name and
protocol. The dialog has tabbed panels that show various details about the progress of
the file transfer, which includes the name of the current file, one or two progress bars,
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-85

the number of retries, the estimated time remaining or elapsed time for the transfer,
and throughput. This dialog has a Cancel button, and may include a Skip File button.
Figure 4-56 shows sample HyperProtocol send progress dialog.

Figure 4-56.
The HyperProtocol
send progress dialog
has a tabbed panel
that shows detailed
status of the file
transfer.

To hang up when the transfer is complete, check the Disconnect after transfer check
box.

Terminal Panel Automation Menu

The Terminal panel Automation menu (see Figure 4-57)


has the same items as its Phonebook panel counterpart (see You can also create your
own programs using any
page 4-24), plus additional selections related to language that can refer-
HyperACCESSs powerful recording capabilities. ence an external function
HyperACCESS can actually record your interaction with library.
remote systems, and generate Visual Basic scripting lan-
guage (VBScript) or JavaScript programs to automate your communications. This
section describes options used for recording and running programs. Chapter 5,
Automation Tools, describes the recording procedure itself.

Figure 4-57.
The Terminal panel
Automation menu.

The generated VBScript or JavaScript programs use the HyperACCESS Application


Programming Interface (HAPI) functions. If youre interested in learning more about
4-86 HyperACCESS Reference

HAPI, and the definition of the functions available, see HyperACCESS Application
Programming Interface Manual. That manual also provides programming examples
for both simple and complex tasks.
Note: Depending on the product you purchase, the HyperACCESS Application
Programming Interface Manual may only be on disk.

Terminal Panel Automation/Run

Selecting Run... displays a standard file browse dialog, from which you can select a
drive, folder, and file. (For a complete description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.)
The file you select can be an automatically generated VBScript or JavaScript program,
or a program youve written or modified using VBScript or JavaScript. Alternatively,
you can select any .EXE program or .BAT file.

Terminal Panel Automation/Abort

The Abort cascade menu is grayed out (unavailable) unless one or more HAPI
programs are executing. Selecting an entry from the Abort cascade menu terminates
the program.

Terminal Panel Automation/Record

Selecting Record... starts automatic generation of a VBScript or JavaScript program.


HyperACCESS opens a window for recording generated statements. The title bar of
this window is Recording in Progress, and the window includes initialization state-
ments as soon as you begin recording.
Your keystrokes and interaction with the remote system generate additional statements
in the Recording in Progress window. If desired, this window lets you edit statements
as they appear, or you can wait and customize the generated program after youve
stopped recording.
For more information on the recording, see Generating Programs on page 5-5.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-87

Terminal Panel Automation/Recording Options

Selecting Recording Options displays the dialog shown in Figure 4-58.

Figure 4-58.
Recording Options
lets you choose how
the user can termi-
nate the generated
program.

This dialog provides two radio buttons:


Record simplified Selecting this radio button creates recorded programs that use
scripts by omit- default values for functions that have a timeout parameter.
ting timeout This is the default. Unselecting this button generates state-
value
ments with timeout values (and pause values if appropriate).
For more information on HAPI functions, check the
HyperACCESS Application Programming Interface Manual.
Record scripts Selecting this radio button creates recorded program state-
using timeout ments that generate a timeout after the specified number of
value of seconds, and aborts the generated program if the remote sys-
tem hasnt responded. You specify the number of seconds for
the timeout using the spin button or associated edit field.
Script language By default, this drop-down list shows VBScript as the script-
ing language to use for recording. You can use this drop-
down list to select JavaScript.

Terminal Panel Automation/Runtime Values

Selecting Automation/Runtime Values displays the Runtime Values properties sheet.


For more information, see Runtime Values Properties Sheet on page 4-55.
You can have HyperACCESS use these values during program execution. For
information on inserting HyperACCESS statements that use these runtime values, see
Action Menu on page 5-8.
4-88 HyperACCESS Reference

Terminal Panel Automation/Edit Program

Selecting Edit Program... displays a standard file browse dialog from which you can
select a drive, folder, and file that contains the source program you want to edit. (For
a complete description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.) Once selected, the file is
opened in Windows Notepad, or whichever editor youve specified in the Text Viewer
dialog (see Phonebook Panel Options/Text Viewer on page 4-21).

Terminal Panel Automation/Keys

Selecting Keys... from the Automation menu displays the dialog shown in
Figure 4-59. This dialog displays existing user-defined key combinations that invoke
a macro, command, or program. The ability to define macros provides a powerful
technique within HyperACCESS to remap your keyboard. In addition to simple
keyboard remapping, macros let you assign multiple keystrokes to a single key or key
combination. This provides a simple, straightforward, nonprogramming method to
automate commonly used words, phrases, and key combinations.

Figure 4-59.
This dialog lets you
add, modify, or
delete the
assignment of
macros, commands,
or programs to key
combinations.

In addition to assigning macros, commands, or programs to key combinations, you


can assign these functions to a custom or system-provided button (see Terminal Panel
Automation/Buttons on page 4-90). These buttons appear in the Toolbar with system-
defined buttons.
The controls in this dialog are:
Existing keys This scrollable list shows existing key combinations that have
macros, commands, or programs defined. Entries in the list
include the word Macro, Program, or Command to indicate
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-89

what type of action the key combination represents. To modify


or delete an entry, select it and click the appropriate button.
Modify... Use this push button to modify an existing macro, program,
command, or key combination assignment. After selecting an
entry in the list, clicking this button displays the dialog shown
in Figure 4-60 with the selected key combination and its action
displayed.
New... Use this push button to define a new macro, program, or
command for a key combination. Clicking this button displays
the empty dialog shown in Figure 4-60.
Delete Use this push button to delete an existing key combination
assignment. After selecting an entry in the list, clicking this
button displays a warning dialog that lets you confirm your
selection.

Figure 4-60.
The Keys dialog lets
you add or modify
macros or programs
assigned to key
combinations.

The Key dialog lets you assign keyboard macros, HyperACCESS commands, auto-
matically generated or manually created VBScript programs, or any .EXE program
file.
The edit fields and buttons in this dialog are:
Key This edit field lets you assign a key combination to a macro,
command, or program. Simply press the key (or combination
of keys) that you want to use. To assign T, e, E, B,
D, or other cursor control keys, first press I, followed by
the desired key.
4-90 HyperACCESS Reference

Action This group box has three radio buttons with associated edit
fields that let you define what type of action you want to assign
to a key combination. You must select a radio button and enter
text in an edit field or make a selection from the associated
drop-down list (or Browse... push button) for that action type.
Macro this radio button and its associated edit field
let you define a macro (a sequence of keystrokes or key
combinations). Simply press the keys (or combination of
keys) in the sequence you want them issued. To assign
T, e, E, B, D, or other cursor control keys,
first press I, followed by the desired key.
Command this radio button lets you make a selection
from the drop-down list of HyperACCESS commands.
You can assign only one command to a key combination.
Commands in the list include all HyperACCESS menu
selections for the current panel. This lets you perform
any operation with a single keystroke.
Program this radio button, with its associated edit
field, drop-down list, and Browse... push button, lets you
specify a program filename and path. (For a complete
description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.) The pro-
gram file can be a VBScript or JavaScript program, an
.EXE program file, or .BAT file (see Assigning Pro-
grams to Keys or Buttons on page 3-18).
OK Selecting OK without specifying an action displays a warning
dialog that lets you return to define an action. If the key
combination specified already has an action associated with it,
you will see a warning dialog that asks if you want to replace
the current action.

Terminal Panel Automation/Buttons

Selecting Buttons... from the Automation menu displays the dialog shown in
Figure 4-61. This dialog displays existing system and user-defined buttons that invoke
macros, commands, or programs. The ability to define macros and assign them to
buttons provides a simple, straightforward, nonprogramming method to automate
commonly used words, phrases, and key combinations.
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-91

Figure 4-61.
This dialog lets you
add, modify, or
delete the assign-
ment of macros,
commands, or pro-
grams to buttons.

You can define or modify system-defined buttons that appear in the Toolbar. In
addition to assigning macros, commands, or programs to buttons, you can assign
similar functions to key combinations (see Terminal Panel Automation/Keys on
page 4-88).
Note: You can rearrange buttons on any toolbar using drag and drop (press S in
combination with the left mouse button and drag the button to its new location).
The lists and buttons in this dialog are:
Toolbar This drop-down list lets you select either the (HyperACCESS)
Terminal or (Windows) Standard button bar.
Existing buttons This scrollable list shows existing buttons on the selected
Toolbar that have macros, commands, or programs defined.
Entries in the list include the word Macro, Program, or Com-
mand to indicate what type of action the button represents. To
modify or delete an entry, select it and click the appropriate
button.
Modify... Use this push button to modify an existing macro, command,
program, or button assignment. After selecting an entry in the
list, clicking this button displays the dialog shown in
Figure 4-62.
New... Use this push button to define a new macro, command, or
program for a button. Clicking this button displays the dialog
shown in Figure 4-62.
4-92 HyperACCESS Reference

Delete Use this push button to delete an existing button assignment


(or Separator). After selecting an button entry in the list,
clicking this button displays a warning dialog that lets you
confirm your selection.
Begin a group Selecting this check box indicates that you want a separator
line to appear on the toolbar before this button. You can remove
the separator by unselecting this check box or by selecting the
Separator entry in the Existing buttons list and clicking the
Delete button.

Figure 4-62.
The Button dialog
lets you add or
modify macros or
programs assigned
to buttons.

The Button dialog lets you assign keyboard macros, HyperACCESS commands,
automatically generated or manually created VBScript or JavaScript programs, any
.EXE program, or .BAT file.
The edit fields and buttons in this dialog are:
Button This group box contains an Icon scrollable area showing icons
you can assign to a button.
Action This group box has three radio buttons with associated edit
fields that let you define what type of action you want to assign
to a button. You must select a radio button and enter text in an
edit field or make a selection from the associated drop-down
list (or Browse... push button) for that action type.
Macro text this radio button and its associated edit
field let you define a macro (a sequence of keystrokes or
key combinations). Simply press the keys (or combina-
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-93

tion of keys) in the sequence you want them issued. To


assign T, e, E, B, D, or other cursor control
keys, first press I, followed by the desired key.
Command this radio button lets you make a selection
from the drop-down list of HyperACCESS commands.
You can assign only one command to a button. Com-
mands in the list include all HyperACCESS menu selec-
tions for the current panel. This lets you perform any
operation with a single click.
Program this radio button and its associated edit field,
drop-down list, and Browse... push button, let you spec-
ify a program filename and path. (For a complete descrip-
tion of browse dialogs, see page 4-8.) The program file
can be VBScript or an .EXE program file (see Assigning
Programs to Keys or Buttons on page 3-18).
ToolTip This edit field lets you define help text for a button. This line
displays whenever you hold the mouse pointer over the button
for a couple of seconds.
OK Selecting OK without specifying an action displays a warning
dialog that lets you exit or return to define an action. If the
button has the same text label as an existing button, you will
see a warning dialog that asks if you want to replace the current
action.

Terminal Panel Window Menu


The first two groups (four menu items) in the Window menu (see Figure 4-63) are
unique for the Terminal panel. The remaining items are the same as its Phonebook
panel counterpart. The first four menu items are described below. For information on
the remaining items, see Phonebook Panel Window Menu on page 4-25.

Terminal Panel Window/Clear Backscroll

Select Clear Backscroll to erase the contents in the Backscroll Buffer of the Terminal
panel.
4-94 HyperACCESS Reference

Figure 4-63.
The Terminal panel
Window menu.

Terminal Panel Window/Clear Screen

Select Clear Screen to erase the contents in the terminal area of the Terminal panel.
HyperACCESS scrolls lines in the terminal area up into the Backscroll Buffer.

Terminal Panel Window/Reset Terminal

Select Reset Terminal to return the terminal emulator to its default settings. The
defaults depend on the terminal type, and may include parameters such as tab stops,
cursor type, colors, etc.

Terminal Panel Help Menu

The Help menu items lets you get information about HyperACCESS. For more
information, see HyperACCESS Help on page xiv in the Introduction.

Terminal Panel Buttons


The Terminal panel has two toolbars, a Standard Toolbar and a <Terminal> toolbar
(where <Terminal> is the name of the current entry. You can optionally display or
hide toolbars for Terminal panel entries using View/Toolbar. You can also create your
Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-95

own buttons or reposition buttons using drag and drop (press S in combination with
the left mouse button and drag the button to its new location).

<Terminal> Toolbar

Default buttons provided with HyperACCESS (in their default order) are:

Establish Connection

Performs the same function as File/Connect (see page 4-63).

Disconnect

Performs the same function as File/Disconnect (see page 4-63).

Start Recording

Performs the same function as File/Connect and Record Logon (see page 4-63).

Toggle Capture to File

Performs the same function as File/Capture to File... (see page 4-66).

Toggle Capture to Printer


Performs the same function as File/Capture to Printer... (see page 4-64).

Settings

Performs the same function as Properties/Communications... (see page 4-29).


4-96 HyperACCESS Reference

Send File(s)

Performs the same function as Transfer/Send File(s)... (see page 4-83).

Receive File(s)

Performs the same function as Transfer/Receive File(s)... (see page 4-79).

Message Pad

Performs the same function as View/Message Pad (see page 4-76).

Launch Browser

Starts the default Web browser.

Standard Terminal Toolbar

Default buttons provided with HyperACCESS (in their default order) are:

New

Performs the same function as File/New (see page 4-4).

Open

Performs the same function as File/Open (see page 4-6).

Save

Performs the same function as File/Save (see page 4-62).


Terminal Panel Menu Bar 4-97

Print

Performs the same function as File/Print (see page 4-12).

Print Preview

Performs the same function as File/Print Preview (see page 4-10).

Spelling

Only available with modified text in the Message Pad. Performs the same function as
the Message Pad popup menu Check Spelling (see page 3-7).

Cut

Only available for text selected in the Message Pad. Performs the same function as
Edit/Cut (see page 4-70).

Copy

Performs the same function as Edit/Copy (see page 4-70).

Paste
Performs the same function as Edit/Paste (see page 4-72).

Undo

Only available after modifying text in the Message Pad. Performs the same function
as Edit/Undo (see page 4-69).
4-98 HyperACCESS Reference

Help

Displays the Help Topics window. For more information, see HyperACCESS Help on
page xiv of the Introduction.

Message Pad

The Message Pad is a special text editor that includes a spelling checker. You can use
the Message Pad to type responses to the remote system. It lets you manipulate text
with the mouse, keyboard, or Edit menu. You can use Message Pad for creating and
sending text messages. For example, you can read an incoming e-mail message using
the terminal screen and Backscroll Buffer, and concurrently create an answer using
the text editing and manipulation capabilities of the Message Pad. You can also use
Message Pad in chat mode to carry on an interactive dialog with a user on the remote
system. Simply select Chat Mode from the Message Pad pop-up menu, and issue the
CHAT command. Chat mode lets you send text to the remote system each time you
press e. For more information on chat mode, see Chatting With a User on the
Remote PC on page 3-41.
With Message Pad, youll save time because you wont have to use an e-mail editor;
or switch from your communications session, use your own editor to create your
message, save the message, switch back to the session, and send your message. The
Send button sends selected text or the entire contents of the Message Pad to the remote
system.
You open the Message Pad, shown in Figure 4-42 on page 4-58, either by clicking on
the Terminal panels Message Pad button or using its View/Message Pad (see
page 4-76) menu selection.
You can detach the Message Pad and move it anywhere on your screen as a separate
window (see Sizing and Moving Message Pad on page 3-65 for procedures to do this).
Message Pad
Button Once the Message Pad is a separate window, you can dock it at either the top or bottom
Call Log Panel and Menus 4-99

of the Terminal Panel. HyperACCESS remembers where you last had the Message
Pad each time you choose to display it.

Call Log Panel and Menus

The Call Log panel lets you view log files. A log file is an
ASCII file that contains a record of calls and file transfers. HyperACCESS writes mes-
sages to the Call Log panel
By default, HyperACCESS uses the same log file,
as file transfers occur. You
CallLog.txt, for all entries. You can specify a unique can select this panel to ver-
log file for any or all entries. ify that file transfers have
completed and where
Figure 4-64 shows the Call Log panel. When you select its received files were
tab, the Call Log panel displays the current call log. You written.
can open any ASCII file in this panel. HyperACCESS keeps
this file in the panel until you explicitly open another file, or load another entry and
then display the Call Log panel again.

Figure 4-64.
The Call Log panel
displays the current
log and lets you
open, edit, and save
log files.

Note: Although you can explicitly open any ASCII file, HyperACCESS continues to
log events to the log file specified in the File Usage properties sheet.
Each menu on the menu bar provides control over the Call Log panel and how its
used or displayed. Briefly, the menus are:
File provides selections that let you open any ASCII file. You can also find menu
items to print the file, and exit HyperACCESS.
4-100 HyperACCESS Reference

Edit features a search capability with the Find... menu item.


View lets you customize various features of the Call Log panel.
Automation lets you run programs and set up custom keys and buttons.
Window lets you change the display of windows within HyperACCESS.
Help provides additional information on how to use HyperACCESS.
The following sections describe the Call Log panel menus in the same order as they
appear in the menu bar (from left to right).

Call Log Panel File Menu

The File menu items let you open, save, and print the Call Log panel. Figure 4-65
shows the File menu.

Figure 4-65.
The File menu lets
you open, save, and
print a call log file.

Call Log Panel File/Open

Open... displays a standard file browse dialog that lets you select and open any ASCII
file. For more information on browse dialogs, see page 4-8. This doesnt change the
current log file. HyperACCESS continues to log events to the log file specified in the
File Usage properties sheet.

Call Log Panel File/Save As

Selecting Save As... displays a standard Save As dialog that lets you specify a new
filename and path to save the contents of the Call Log panel.
Call Log Panel and Menus 4-101

Call Log Panel File/Page Setup

Page Setup... displays a dialog that lets you specify printer parameters and select from
among system-defined printers. HyperACCESS uses the printer you select for all its
printing. For more information, see Phonebook Panel File/Page Setup on page 4-9.

Call Log Panel File/Print Preview

Print Preview displays a standard Windows print preview window that shows what
printed pages will look like. See Phonebook Panel File/Print Preview on page 4-10.

Call Log Panel File/Print

Selecting Print... displays a standard Print dialog to print the current list file.

Call Log Panel File/Exit

The Exit menu item terminates HyperACCESS. If there is an active connection with
a remote system, HyperACCESS displays a warning dialog. HyperACCESS automat-
ically saves any changes that you make to the log file. The next time you display the
Call Log panel, HyperACCESS displays the file that was last open, or, if you load a
different entry, HyperACCESS displays the log specified for that entry.

Call Log Panel Edit Menu

The Call Log panel Edit menu has items useful for text manipulation. Figure 4-66
shows the Edit menu

Figure 4-66.
The Call Log panel
Edit menu has entries
useful for text
manipulation.
4-102 HyperACCESS Reference

Call Log Panel Edit/Copy

The Copy menu item copies selected text from the Call Log panel to the Clipboard.
If you prefer, you can use the Copy shortcut key sequence: C+C.

Call Log Panel Edit/Select All

This menu item selects (highlights) the entire contents of the Call Log panel.

Call Log Panel Edit/Find

The Find... menu item locates a text string in the list. For more information on the
Find dialog, see Terminal Panel Edit/Find on page 4-74.

Call Log Panel Edit/Clear Call Log

This menu item deletes the contents of the Call Log panel and file.

Call Log Panel View Menu

If you want to customize the way HyperACCESS displays, you can use the View
menu. Figure 4-67 illustrates the Call Log panel View menu.

Figure 4-67.
The Call Log panel
View menu has items
that let you change
what HyperACCESS
displays.
Call Log Panel and Menus 4-103

Lets take a brief look at each of these menu items from top to bottom:

Call Log Panel View/Toolbar

When selected, Toolbars... displays the Toolbars dialog that lets you select toolbar
options. The Toolbars dialog has a Toolbars list with check boxes for toolbars
available in HyperACCESS. Select whichever toolbars you want to use. This dialog
also has check boxes for additional options.
Toolbars are detachable and can appear as floating palettes. You can dock toolbars to
HyperACCESS window borders (see Dockable Toolbars and Windows on page 4-59).
You can create your own buttons on toolbars or reposition buttons using drag and drop
(press S in combination with the left mouse button and drag the button to its new
location). For more information on toolbars available in HyperACCESS and the
Toolbars dialog, see Phonebook Panel View/Toolbars on page 4-16.

Call Log Panel View/Status Bar

When selected, Status Bar displays a check mark, and the status bar appears at the
bottom of the window. This is the default. Clicking on this menu item removes the
check mark and status bar. The selection you make is global for all panels. For more
information about this feature, see Phonebook Panel View/Status Bar on page 4-18.

Call Log Panel Automation Menu

You can use the Call Log panel Automation menu to record and edit programs that
will operate HyperACCESS. It has the same items as its Phonebook panel counterpart
(see Phonebook Panel Automation Menu on page 4-24).

Call Log Panel Window Menu

You can use the Call Log panel Window menu to select a panel to make active. The
Call Log panel Window menu has the same items as its Phonebook panel counterpart
(see Phonebook Panel Window Menu on page 4-25).
4-104 HyperACCESS Reference

Call Log Panel Help Menu

The Call Log panel Help menu items let you obtain help information about
HyperACCESS. For more information, see HyperACCESS Help on page xiv of the
Introduction.

Call Log Panel Buttons

You can optionally display or hide toolbars for all panels using View/Toolbar. You
can also create your own buttons or reposition buttons using drag and drop (press S
in combination with the left mouse button and drag the button to its new location).
Default buttons provided with HyperACCESS (in their default order) are:

Open

Performs the same function as File/Open (see page 4-6).

Print

Performs the same function as File/Print (see page 4-12).

Print Preview
Performs the same function as File/Print Preview (see page 4-10).

Copy Selected Text


Performs the same function as Edit/Copy (see page 4-102).

Help

Displays the Help Topics window. For more information, see HyperACCESS Help on
page xiv of the Introduction.
Lists Panel and Menu Bar 4-105

Lists Panel and Menu Bar

The Lists panel provides a tool for viewing lists of remote systems. HyperACCESS
comes with several lists. In addition, you can download other lists from various
bulletin board systems, or export lists from contact programs and personal information
managers (PIMs). Large companies may want to create lists of PCs with
HyperACCESS Host licenses so that support personnel and others may connect to
them. These lists may be exportable as comma-delimited files from a corporate
database of network users. Other companies may be able to use the HOSTS file that
exists on workstations in a TCP/IP network.
Lists give you the option of calling thousands of systems, yet the space required to
store the information is minimal compared to regular notebook entries. Figure 4-68
shows the Lists panel.

Figure 4-68.
The Lists panel lets
you view and select
from a list of remote
system entries. You
can copy entries to a
notebook or make a
trial call from this
panel.

Note: Lists Panel Disclaimer HyperACCESS comes with libraries of thousands of


on-line systems that you can call. These libraries are ASCII files containing lists of
BBSs and other on-line services compiled by independent, third-party authors. You
can download new versions of these lists, plus a huge variety of similar lists from BBSs
and on-line services all over the world.
4-106 HyperACCESS Reference

Authors of these lists consider them copyrighted material. Therefore, we only include
lists with the authors consent and in original, unaltered form. The authors retain the
copyright and sole right to revise and update these lists.
If you find anything in a list that you feel needs to be updated or revised, please notify
the independent, third-party author of the list, not Hilgraeve. Only the author has the
right to update or revise a list.
Certain lists may include BBSs that provide access to explicit materials materials
you may find offensive or unsuitable for minors. Hilgraeve in no way condones
electronic distribution of such materials. If you find materials on a BBS offensive,
please be aware that the List panel does permit you to delete entries from your copy
of the list.
The Lists panel diplays grid lines between list entries. You can select an entry in the
lists panel by clicking anywhere on an entry line or by letting your mouse pointer reset
over a line for more than one second.
To use a list file, it must have a template. The list files that come with HyperACCESS
have predefined templates. You can create templates for list files you download or
create (see Creating List File Templates on page 3-62).
Each menu on the menu bar provides control over the Lists panel and how its used
or displayed. Briefly, the menus are:
File lets you open or save a list file, copy entries to a phonebook, or place a trial
call. You can also find menu items to create a list template, print a list, and exit
HyperACCESS.
Edit lets you cut or copy selected text to the clipboard. It also features a search
capability with the Find... menu item.
View lets you customize various features of the Lists panel.
Automation lets you run programs and set up custom buttons.
Window lets you change the display of windows within HyperACCESS.
Help provides additional information on how to use HyperACCESS.
The following sections describe the Lists panel menus in the same order as they appear
in the menu bar (from left to right).
Lists Panel and Menu Bar 4-107

Lists Panel File Menu

The File menu items let you open, save, and print lists. You can also find items to copy
entries to a notebook, place a trial call, and create a list file template. Figure 4-69
shows the File menu.

Figure 4-69.
The File menu lets
you open, save, and
print lists; copy
entries to a note-
book; place a trial
call; and create a
template.

Lists Panel File/Open

Open... displays a standard file browse dialog that lets you select and open a list file
(actually any ASCII file). For more information on browse dialogs, see page 4-8.

Lists Panel File/Save

Selecting Save writes the contents of the current Lists panel to the current list file.
This selection doesnt prompt you for a filename since it saves to the same file that is
open.

Lists Panel File/Save As


Selecting Save As... displays a standard Save As dialog that lets you specify a new
filename and path to save the contents of the Lists panel.

Lists Panel File/Copy to a Notebook

With one entry selected in the Lists panel, this menu item displays the sequence of
dialogs required to define a new notebook entry (see Copying a Notebook Entry From
a List File on page 3-14). With multiple entries selected in the Lists panel, this menu
4-108 HyperACCESS Reference

item displays the dialog shown in Figure 4-70. Using this dialog, you select a notebook
that you want to use as the destination for a copy of selected entries. Entries appear
in the notebook with a default icon and the entry name specified in the list.

Figure 4-70.
The Copy to
Notebook dialog lets
you specify a note-
book to copy multiple
entries from the Lists
panel.

The list in this dialog displays defined notebooks. You can select any notebook from
the list.

Lists Panel File/Place Trial Call

Selecting this menu item lets you call an entry in the Lists panel before copying the
entry to a notebook. Follow the procedure described in Placing a Trial Call From the
Lists Panel on page 3-64. If you have more than one entry selected, this menu item is
grayed out (unavailable).

Lists Panel File/Template


Template... displays the dialog shown in Figure 4-71. This dialog lets you define a
template for the current list file. HyperACCESS requires a template for every list file
so that it can interpret the data in the file (see Creating a New Template on page 3-63
for the procedure to use with this dialog).
The edit fields and buttons in this dialog are:
Template for The name of the list filename.
Lists Panel and Menu Bar 4-109

Figure 4-71.
The Template dialog
lets you define the
format of list files.

Fields separated This drop-down list lets you pick a character (or technique)
by used to separate data items in each entry. Choices in this list
are:
Column Spacing
Comma
Quote
Tab
Note: With Column Spacing selected, the field location
entries change to show from and to column locations (see
Figure 4-71). The left-most character in each line is col-
umn 1.
Name field This edit field lets you select which field number in each
location entry represents the notebook entry name.
Phone number This edit field lets you select which field number in each
field location entry represents the notebook entry telephone number.
Data begins in Use this edit field to define the number of lines at the begin-
line number ning of the file that dont include notebook entries. Such lines
may include copyright information and file attribution. This
field causes HyperACCESS to display a warning if you
attempt to dial or copy lines that are within this region.
Comments lines This edit field lets you specify a character that defines a com-
begin with ment line in the list file. Entering a character in this field
causes HyperACCESS to display a warning if you attempt to
dial or copy lines that begin with the specified character.
Add prefix to dial This check box and edit field let you specify a prefix to use
before dialing a phone number in the list.
4-110 HyperACCESS Reference

Lists Panel File/Page Setup

Page Setup... displays a dialog that lets you specify printer parameters and select from
among system-defined printers. HyperACCESS uses the printer you select for all its
printing. For more information, see Phonebook Panel File/Page Setup on page 4-9.

Lists Panel File/Print Preview

Print Preview displays a standard Windows print preview window that shows what
printed pages will look like. See Phonebook Panel File/Print Preview on page 4-10.

Lists Panel File/Print

Selecting Print... displays a standard Print dialog to print the current list file.

Lists Panel File/Exit

The Exit menu item terminates HyperACCESS. If there is an active connection with
a remote system, HyperACCESS displays a warning dialog. HyperACCESS automat-
ically saves any changes that you make to the list file. The next time you display the
Lists panel, HyperACCESS displays the file that was last open.

Lists Panel Edit Menu


Youll find the Lists panel Edit menu items useful for
copying, cutting, removing, and finding entries in a list file You can Cut or Copy entire
lines in the Lists panel, but
(actually any ASCII text file). Figure 4-72 shows the Edit
you cant type new entries
menu. or paste from the
Clipboard.
Lists Panel and Menu Bar 4-111

Figure 4-72.
The Lists panel Edit
menu has entries use-
ful for copying, cut-
ting, removing, and
finding entries in a list
file.

Lets take a brief look at each of these menu items from top to bottom:

Lists Panel Edit/Undo

The Undo menu item is available after a cut or clear operation. It reverses the last
operation.

Lists Panel Edit/Cut

The Cut menu item removes selected entries from the Lists
panel and copies them to the Clipboard. Cut and Copy operations
are grayed out unless you
have text selected.

Lists Panel Edit/Copy

The Copy menu item copies selected text from the Lists panel to the Clipboard.

Lists Panel Edit/Clear


The Clear menu item removes selected entries from the list.

Lists Panel Edit/Find

The Find... menu item locates a text string in the list. You specify the search string
and criteria in the dialog. For more information, see Terminal Panel Edit/Find on
page 4-74.
4-112 HyperACCESS Reference

Lists Panel View Menu

You can use the Lists panel View menu to change the appearance of the
HyperACCESS window. It has the same items as its Call Log panel counterpart (see
Call Log Panel View Menu on page 4-102).

Lists Panel Automation Menu

You can use the Lists panel Automation menu to run and edit programs that will
operate HyperACCESS. It has the same items as its Phonebook panel counterpart (see
Phonebook Panel Automation Menu on page 4-24).

Lists Panel Window Menu

You can use the Lists panel Window menu to select a panel to make active. The Lists
panel Window menu has the same items as its Phonebook panel counterpart (see
Phonebook Panel Window Menu on page 4-25).

Lists Panel Help Menu

The Lists panel Help menu items let you obtain help information about
HyperACCESS. See HyperACCESS Help on page xiv in the Introduction.

Lists Panel Buttons

You can optionally display or hide toolbars for all panels using View/Toolbars.... You
can also create your own buttons or reposition buttons using drag and drop (press S
in combination with the left mouse button and drag the button to its new location).
Default buttons provided with HyperACCESS (in their default order) are:

Open

Performs the same function as File/Open (see page 4-6).


Lists Panel and Menu Bar 4-113

Save

Performs the same function as File/Save (see page 4-107).

Print

Performs the same function as File/Print (see page 4-12).

Print Preview

Performs the same function as File/Print Preview (see page 4-10).

Cut

Only available for text selected in the Message Pad. Performs the same function as
Edit/Cut (see page 4-70).

Copy

Performs the same function as Edit/Copy (see page 4-70).

Undo

Only available after modifying text in the Message Pad. Performs the same function
as Edit/Undo (see page 4-69).

Copy to Notebook

Performs the same function as File/Copy to a Notebook (see page 4-107).

Place Trial Call

Performs the same function as File/Place a Trial Call (see page 4-108).
4-114 HyperACCESS Reference

Help

Displays the Help Topics window. For more information, see HyperACCESS Help on
page xiv of the Introduction.

HyperACCESS Graphics Viewer Window

HyperACCESS supports a graphics viewer that automatically displays graphic file


images as you download them. You can disable this function in the Receive dialog
(see Terminal Panel Transfer/Receive File(s) on page 4-79). The HyperACCESS
Graphics Viewer can also display many other graphics file formats after download.
The graphics viewer is so simple and straightforward (see Figure 4-73) that you will
be able to use it without a lengthy description of its menus and features. To display a
file, simple select File/Open..., click the Open button, or press C+O. To see a list of
supported graphics file types, click the Files of type drop-down list in the Open dialog.

Figure 4-73.
The HyperACCESS
Graphics Viewer with
a graphic displayed.
HyperACCESS Graphics Viewer Window 4-115

Among the file formats supported are animated GIF, TIFF, and PCX. The Graphics
Viewer automatically detects and plays animated graphics files even during file
download.
In addition to discrete zooming using the keyboard shortcut (I), the Edit/Zoom In menu
selection, or the Zoom In button (see below), the Graphics Viewer supports drag
selection of a zoom area. Simply drag the mouse over a section of the image and the
Viewer displays a rectangle. Release the mouse button, and the image zooms to fill
the current window with the selected area.

Graphics Viewer Buttons

Open

Displays a standard file browse dialog that lets you select and open any supported
graphics file. For more information on browse dialogs, see page 4-8.

Print

Performs the same function as File/Print (see page 4-101).

Print Preview

Performs the same function as File/Print Preview (see page 4-10).

Copy

Copies the graphic to the Clipboard.

Zoom In

This button is available if the graphic isnt at the highest level of zoom. Clicking this
button zooms in one level of magnification.
4-116 HyperACCESS Reference

Zoom Out

This button is available if the graphic isnt at the lowest level of zoom. Clicking this
button zooms out one level of magnification.

Size to Window

Resizes the graphic to fit in the window while maintaining the graphics aspect ratio.

Help

Displays the Help Topics window. For more information, see HyperACCESS Help on
page xiv of the Introduction.
Chapter 5
Automation Tools

What You Will Find in This Chapter

This chapter contains a description of HyperACCESSs powerful tools for automat-


ing your communications sessions. They are:
Automatically generated programs.
Redefining Keys.
Creating Buttons.
In addition to these capabilities, HyperACCESS provides other automation tools
described elsewhere. One of these major automation tools is the ability to use either
Visual Basic (VBScript) or Java (JavaScript) scripting language instead of a propri-
etary script language. You can program your own procedures using VBScript or
JavaScript, and you can use HyperACCESSs Application Program Interface (HAPI)
with Visual BASIC, C++ and other programming languages.
See the HyperACCESS API Guide provided on your CD-Rom. You can obtain a
printed copy from Hilgraeve at nominal cost.

Automating Communications

As with any application, youll find that you perform certain communications tasks
repeatedly. For example, logon procedures for a remote system remain essentially
unchanged from session to session. You may also find that youre often repeating the
same remote system commands. HyperACCESS provides several complementary
tools for automating these repetitive tasks. You can create automatic sequences that
do such things as:
Producing many keystrokes when you press a single key, and sending these
characters to the remote system.
Waiting for prompts from a remote system and sending a response.
Waiting for a certain time of day or a given length of time before executing a
series of commands.
5-2 Automation Tools

Customizing HyperACCESS for data processing procedures required by large


corporations. Users within these companies can be given programs that facilitate
their interaction with the companys host systems.
Creating automatic sequences is easy. You can create keyboard macros; have
HyperACCESS record your keystrokes and remote system responses as you interact
with the remote system; or create custom programs using any programming language
that can call external functions.
Once created, youll have the option to assign a macro or program to:
A special key combination (for example, C+S+4).
A predefined button.
Automatically execute when connecting to a remote system.
Automatically execute a program when you load HyperACCESS.
You create keyboard macros simply and easily using the session Automation/Keys...
menu item (for information on using this menu selection, see page 4-88). Alterna-
tively, HyperACCESS can create VBScript or JavaScirpt programs as it learns your
actions and system responses. The systemscript interpreter executes these programs
whenever theyre run.
For those of you who dont want to think about or learn a programming language
dont worry, HyperACCESS takes care of everything for you. However, if you already
know Visual Basic or JavaScript, you can easily modify and extend these automati-
cally generated programs; and if youve never used this programming language and
want to learn it, you can watch statements appear in a window as HyperACCESS
learns your interaction with a remote system. To learn Visual Basic or JavaScript,
youll have to turn to other tutorials.

Macros

The ability to define macros within HyperACCESS provides a powerful technique to


remap your keyboard. In addition to simple keyboard remapping, macros let you
assign multiple keystrokes to a single key or key combination, and/or a button. This
provides a simple, straightforward, nonprogramming method to automate commonly
used words, phrases, and key combinations. For additional information on creating
keyboard macros, see Creating Keyboard Macros on page 3-71.
Automating Communications 5-3

Automatically Generated Vs. Custom-Written Programs

Since you can assign either automatically generated or custom-written programs to


keys and buttons, you may be asking what the difference is. The most important
distinction is that HyperACCESS executes its automatically generated programs with
a VBScript or JavaScript interpreter, while you can write programs in any language
for execution by HyperACCESS. All you need is a compiler for the language that is
compatible with Windows 95 and lets you access external functions. Of course, you
can also write VBScript or JavaScript programs.
There are some situations where an automatically generated program wont have the
capability required. In cases like this, you need a general-purpose program to handle
the decisions required.
We can briefly summarize the pros and cons of the two techniques in the following
two tables:

PRO CON

Generated programs Automatic generation Rigid structure due to


automatic generation

You can only record steps


that interact with the remote
system; no dialog interac-
tion is recorded except for
file transfers and captures

Assign to key or button

No programming experi-
ence required

Uses VBScript or Everything else being equal,


JavaScript language a compiled program usually
executes more quickly
5-4 Automation Tools

PRO CON

Other Programs Any general-purpose Requires programming


programming language experience
available through HAPI

Assign to key, button, or


automatic execution

Can automate sequences


using dialogs

Permit generation of
custom communications
interface for corporate
systems

Compiled programs can


be widely distributed
without risk of end-user
tampering

Many compilers pro-


vide built-in debugging
capability

Everything else being


equal, a compiled
program usually
executes more quickly
than an interpreted
program
Generating Programs 5-5

Generating Programs

All HyperACCESS panel and window menu bars have an Automation menu. How-
ever, only the Terminal panel includes recording menu selections. HyperACCESS
records your interaction with remote systems in the Terminal panel. It also records
file transfer and capture operations in the Terminal Panel, but does not record
interaction with menus, dialogs, and program locations.
Figure 5-1 shows the Automation menu in the Terminal panel. The following sections
review the recording processes.

Figure 5-1.
The Terminal panels
Automation menu
includes recording
options that arent
available from other
menu bars.

Recording a Logon Sequence

There are five sequences of operations that let you record your logon interaction. They
are:
1. Using the Terminal panel Automation menu:
a) Open the desired entry.
b) Select Automation/Record.
c) Select File/Connect or press the Establish Connection button.
Establish
Connection
2. Initiating from a notebook panel using menu selection:
Button
a) Select an entry.
b) Select the File/Connect and Record Logon menu item.
3. Initiating from a notebook panel using a button:
a) Select an entry.
5-6 Automation Tools

b) Click the Start recording button. HyperACCESS opens the entry, con-
nects, and begins recording.
4. Initiating from the Terminal panel using a button:

Start Recording a) Open an entry.


Button
b) Click the Start recording button. HyperACCESS connects and begins
recording.
5. Using the Terminal panel File menu:
a) Open an entry.
b) Select File/Connect and Record Logon.
Regardless of which technique you choose to record a new logon sequence,
HyperACCESS dials the remote system and learns its messages and your responses.
When youve completed the logon sequence, follow these steps:
1. Select Action/Stop Recording from the menu bar in the Recording in Progress
window. HyperACCESS displays the Stop Recording dialog with the Run this
script upon connecting check box selected. See Figure 5-2.

Figure 5-2.
The Stop
Recording
dialog lets you save a
program as the
logon task.

2. Enter a filename by typing in the edit field, making a selection from the history
drop-down list, or making a selection using the Browse... push button (for a
complete description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8).

Recording Other Programs

Recording any program is no different from techniques 1 or 4 described above for


learning a logon sequence. You simply select Terminal panel Automation/Record or
click the Terminal panels Start Recording button to begin. Your actions and the
Generating Programs 5-7

remote system responses generate VBScript or JavaSript statements in the Recording


in Progress window.
Note: HyperACCESS records your interaction with remote systems in the Terminal
panel. It also records file transfer and capture operations in the Terminal Panel, but
does not record interaction with menus, dialogs, and program locations.
In the rest of this section, well describe additional capabilities available through the
menu bar of the Recording in Progress window. Figure 5-3 shows an example of one
of these windows.

Figure 5-3.
The Recording in
Progress window dis-
plays statements as
they are generated.

File Menu

The Recording in Progress window File menu has standard print selections. For a
description of these selections, see Phonebook Panel File/Print on page 4-12, Phone-
book Panel File/Print Preview on page 4-10, and Phonebook Panel File/Page Setup
on page 4-9.

Edit Menu

Selecting Edit displays the menu shown in Figure 5-4. The menu items provide editing
capabilities comparable to standard Windows 95 shortcut editing keys.
5-8 Automation Tools

Figure 5-4.
The Edit menu pro-
vides an abbreviated
set of editing tools.

Action Menu

The Action menu has the following entries:


Insert User Name Selecting this menu item displays the User Name dialog shown
in Figure 5-5 if you havent previously stored a value in the
Runtime Values dialog (similar to the Runtime Values prop-
erties sheet on page 4-55), or in the Runtime Values properties
sheet. Enter a name in the edit field and select the Store as
permanent value check box to save the name as a runtime
value. Click OK to insert program statements that obtain the
User Name runtime value and send the text string to the remote
system.

Figure 5-5.
The User Name dia-
log lets you enter a
user name for use in
the program.

Insert User ID Similar to Insert User Name, above, except that the runtime
value is the user ID.
Insert Password Similar to Insert User Name, above, except that the runtime
value is the user password.
Insert Text Query Selecting this menu item displays the Insert Response Box
dialog (Figure 5-6). The first edit field in this dialog lets you
enter the title for the displayed dialog. The second, larger edit
field lets you enter instructions to the user.
Generating Programs 5-9

Figure 5-6.
The Insert
Response Box lets
you create your own
dialogs to get infor-
mation when your
program executes.

Selecting OK generates program statements that display the


dialog with the title and instructions youve specified, and an
edit field for user entry. Another statement sends typed text to
the remote system.
Stop Recording Selecting this menu item stops recording and displays the Stop
Recording dialog, see Figure 5-2 on page 5-6, above. Enter a
filename by typing in the edit field, making a selection from
the history drop-down list, or making a selection using the
Browse... push button (for a complete description of browse
dialogs, see page 4-8). After youve entered a filename, you
can press the Assign key... or Assign button... push button to
assign the program to a key or button, respectively. See Assign-
ing Programs to Keys or Buttons on page 5-9.
Pause Selecting this menu item displays a check mark and stops
recording your keystrokes and remote system responses. Select
this menu item again to remove the check mark and resume
recording.

Assigning Programs to Keys or Buttons

In addition to running a program whenever a Terminal panel connects to the remote


system, HyperACCESS lets you assign a learned sequence to a keyboard combination
and/or a custom button. This lets you execute that sequence at any time. Whether you
assign a program to a key combination or button is a matter of personal preference.
As youll see, its equally easy to do either.
5-10 Automation Tools

When you select Action/Stop Recording in the Recording in Progress window,


HyperACCESS displays the Stop Recording dialog shown in Figure 5-2 on page 5-6.
The File name edit field displays the last file used to save a program for this session,
and the drop-down history list has the previous six files that were used. If you want
to assign a new name, either type the path and filename in the edit field, or use the
Browse... button to find an existing file (for a complete description of browse dialogs,
see page 4-8).
Once youve entered a filename, press the Assign key... or Assign button... push
button. Then follow the steps below for either assigning a program to a key combina-
tion or button.

Assigning a Key Combination

The Assign key... push button displays the Key dialog shown in Figure 5-7.

Figure 5-7.
The Key dialog lets
you assign a gener-
ated program to any
key combination.

To assign a keyboard combination to a program, simply click in the Key edit field and
press the desired keys. For example:

2 displays <F2>

S+2 displays <SHIFT-F2>

C+S+2 displays <CTRL-SHIFT-F2>


You may enter any key combination. If the combination currently defines a standard
Windows 95 shortcut, the Windows key combination overrides HyperACCESSs.
Generating Programs 5-11

By default, the program filename you entered in the Stop Recording dialog appears
in the Program drop-down combo box with the radio button selected.

Assigning a Button

The Assign button... push button displays the Button dialog shown in Figure 5-8.

Figure 5-8.
The Button dialog
lets you assign a gen-
erated program to a
graphic button.

Note: When you assign a button from the Stop Recording dialog, the button appears
on the Terminal toolbar.
You can assign a bitmap button to any program. Select one of the predefined buttons
in the scrollable area.
You can enter a line of help information in the edit field, ToolTip. This line of help
information displays as the Toolbar ToolTip.
5-12 Automation Tools

Running Programs

There are five ways you can execute a program. Depending on how it was defined,
you can:
Have it The program will automatically execute upon initiation of a
automatically notebook entry. To define a program for automatic execution,
execute define it to execute before or after connection, or after discon-
necting using the File Usage properties sheet (see page 4-50).
Press a key Programs assigned to specific keys or key combinations exe-
combination cute when you type the correct keys.
Press a button Programs assigned to a button execute when you position the
mouse pointer over the button and click. You can define but-
tons for display on any toolbar.
Explicitly run You can explicitly run any program by selecting Automa-
tion/Run...; this displays the Select Program dialog, which is
simply a file browse dialog. Enter the path and filename, or
use the browse dialog to find the file you want to run and
either select it and click OK, or double-click on it (for a com-
plete description of browse dialogs, see page 4-8).
Command line To execute a program on initiation of HyperACCESS, list the
execution program name as a command line parameter (see Appendix F,
Command Line Parameters).

Terminating a Macro or Program

You can create programs that automatically terminate if the remote system fails to
respond. You can also manually terminate a running program by selecting
Automation/Abort.

Editing Programs

You can use any text editor to create or modify a program. From within
HyperACCESS you can launch Windows 95 Notepad or any other editor by selecting
Changing Assignment of a Program 5-13

the Automation/Edit Program... menu item. This displays a standard file browse
dialog. As soon as you select a file, HyperACCESS launches the editor. You can
specify your preferred editor using Options/Text Viewer (see page 4-21).

Changing Assignment of a Program

You can assign a program to a key combination and/or button. You can change this
assignment using the following procedures:

Changing a Key Combination

After assigning a program to a key combination, you can go back and change the
assignment at any time using Automation/Keys... from the Terminal panel. Making
this selection displays the Keys for dialog shown in Figure 5-9.

Figure 5-9.
The Keys for dialog
lets you add or mod-
ify macros or
programs.

The Existing keys list displays the key combination in the left-most column followed
by a program filename, command, or macro. You can assign the same program to both
a key combination and a button (see Changing a Button, below).
You can use this dialog to add a program to a key combination; modify the key
combination for a program; or delete a key assignment. Later sections describe these
options. The techniques are similar for assigning to a key combination or button.
5-14 Automation Tools

Changing a Button

After assigning a program to a button, you can go back and change the assignment at
any time using Automation/Buttons... from the Terminal panel or a notebook panel.
Making this selection displays the Buttons for dialog shown in Figure 5-10.

Figure 5-10.
The Buttons for dia-
log lets you add or
modify macros or
programs.

The Existing buttons list displays the buttons for the selected Toolbar in the left-most
column followed by a program filename, command, or macro. You can assign the
same program to both a button and a key combination (see Changing a Key Combi-
nation on page 5-13).
You can use this dialog to add new programs; modify the button for a program; or
delete an assigned program. Later sections describe these options. The techniques are
similar for assigning to a key combination or button.

Adding Programs

If you create a program using a text editor or compiler, you can assign it to a
HyperACCESS key combination and/or button using the dialogs described above.
Click the New... push button and follow the instructions in Assigning Programs to
Keys or Buttons on page 5-9.
Changing Assignment of a Program 5-15

Modifying a Program Assignment

To modify the key or button assigned to a program, follow these steps:


1. Select the entry in the list.
2. Click the Modify... push button. This displays either the Key or Button dialog
showing the name of the file and the current key combinations and/or the button
selected.
3. Make desired changes in the dialog (see Assigning Programs to Keys or Buttons
on page 5-9).

Editing a Program Assigned to a Key or Button

To edit a program assigned to a key or button, you can follow these steps if you dont
know (or remember) the program filename:
1. Select Automation/Keys or Automation/Buttons as appropriate. This displays
the Keys for (see Figure 5-9) or Buttons for (see Figure 5-10) dialog.
2. Note the filename of the entry you want to modify, and then Cancel the dialog.
3. Select Automation/Edit Program... to open Windows 95 Notepad (or other
application specified in Options/Text Viewer, see Phonebook Panel Options/
Text Viewer on page 4-21) with the program displayed.
4. Make edits as required, and then select Save or Save As before closing Windows
95 Notepad.

Deleting a Program
To delete a program assignment in HyperACCESS, follow these steps:
1. Select Automation/Keys or Automation/Buttons as appropriate. This displays
the Keys for (see Figure 5-9) or Buttons for (see Figure 5-10) dialog.
2. With the program selected, click the Delete push button. This deletes the
assignment of the key combination and/or removes the button from the current
Toolbar. It doesnt delete the program file.
5-16 Automation Tools
Chapter 6
HyperACCESS Host

What You Will Find in This Chapter

This chapter describes how to perform various host operations. Youll see how to:
Initiate host operations (that is, begin waiting for calls).
Establish security settings, and restrict access to predefined users if desired.
Define user privileges what individual users can do when they log on to your
PC.
Set default privileges for new callers.
Specify a greeting to display when your system answers a call.
HyperACCESS Host is a separate program that launches and displays a window
similar to the main HyperACCESS window. This chapter briefly describes the
differences between main features of HyperACCESS and HyperACCESS Host (just
Host for the remainder of this chapter)

Introduction to HyperACCESS Host

With Host, you can let other users access your PC. Host isnt just a bulletin board,
its a remote access host (or server) that lets you authorize who can log on, and what
they can do. After your PC answers a call, you can require callers to enter their name
and password. They can type commands that make your PC do various operations.
You can define, in advance, which of the following operations each caller can
perform:
Examine your disk (you can restrict callers to a given drive and folder).
Command your PC to send a file or batch of files.
Command your PC to receive a file or batch of files.
Perform file or disk management operations on your PC using COPY, DELETE,
RENAME, CD, MKDIR, or RMDIR.
6-2 HyperACCESS Host

After you initiate Host, you can minimize it. You can also use HyperACCESS to
initiate outgoing sessions, using the same communications port, while Host is waiting
for calls. In this case, the outgoing HyperACCESS borrows the communications
port from Host for the duration of the outbound call and returns it after youve
completed your outgoing communications session. Finally, you can start multiple
instances of Host, each using its own settings (provided that you have multiple
modems or other remote connections attached to your PC). These multiple host entries
can either share or have their own list of valid callers and access authorization.
Once youve started Host operation, you can leave your PC. Host will accept call after
call with no assistance from you. For example, you can start Host when you leave the
office, so you can access it later from your home PC, or from a laptop PC when youre
on the road.
There are minor differences between HyperACCESS and Host that this chapter
assumes you understand. Among them are:
Host has a Host panel instead of a Terminal panel, and a Host Entries panel
instead of a Phonebook panel.
The Host properties notebooks have Security and Passwords sheets, and are
missing Terminal Emulator, ASCII Sending, and ASCII Receiving sheets.
The Host File Transfer properties sheet has some significant differences docu-
mented in this chapter.
Host panels have different Toolbar buttons.
Host entries have a .HHW extension.

Preparing to Answer Calls

Initially, the Host Entries panel has entries for various


connection types plus one called New Entry Template. You You can modify the host
can use any of the host entries as is, or you can create new entrys communication
settings using the Commu-
host entries. You create new host entries just like any entry nications properties sheet
in HyperACCESS. For more information on creating prior to opening the entry.
entries, see Adding an Entry on page 3-11. The rest of this
chapter assumes that you will use an existing host entry.
Preparing to Answer Calls 6-3

The first time you use any host entry, you must define security settings and create a
password list. The easiest way to perform these operations is to follow these steps:
1. Right-click the host entry to display the pop-up menu. Then select Properties
to display the properties notebook.
2. With the properties notebook displayed, establish security settings (see Defining
Security Settings for Host on page 6-5).
3. Create a password list if necessary (see Assigning Passwords and Access
Privileges on page 6-8). The default password list file is PASSWORD.LST. You
can specify any path and filename in the File Usage properties sheet (see File
Usage Properties Sheet on page 4-50).
4. Verify that the communications properties are appropriate for this entry (see
Modifying Connections on page 3-59, Modifying Communications Settings on
page 3-56, and Modifying Dialing Details on page 3-60).
5. Optionally, define a greeting to display when callers connect (see Specifying a
Greeting on page 6-16).
6. Optionally, create a batch file called AUTO.BAT in the Host logon directory
(different users can have different logon directories). Host executes commands
in this file after callers log on. The file can contain any valid Host commands
(see Host Commands on page 6-20).
After youve established your security settings, default privileges, and any predefined
users, open the entry using one of the following actions:
With the mouse pointer over the host entry you want to open, right-click to
display the pop-up menu, and select Open.
Select the host entry you want to open, and then select File/Open.
Use the Open notebook entry button in the Toolbar.

Open Notebook
Entry Button
6-4 HyperACCESS Host

You can also begin host entries by double-clicking them. This opens the entry, displays
the host panel, and initializes the connection to answer incoming calls (see Figure 6-1).

Figure 6-1.
The Host panel with
Host waiting for a
call.

Start Waiting for Calls

This button initializes connection for autoanswer. It is the same as selecting File/Wait
for a Connection. If the entry is already connected, Host displays a warning dialog
Start Waiting for
Calls Button
asking if you want to disconnect the current session.

Stop Waiting for Calls


This button is the same as selecting File/Disconnect/Stop waiting. It performs one
of two functions:
Stop Waiting for If a caller is currently connected, this button disconnects the caller and resumes
Calls Button
waiting for other calls.
If no caller is connected, this button stops waiting for calls.
Preparing to Answer Calls 6-5

Settings

Performs the same function as Properties/Communications... (see page 4-29). If Host


is waiting for calls or connected to a caller, the Change... button in the Connect Via
Settings Button group box is grayed out (unavailable).

Modify Host Passwords

Click this button to display the Passwords properties sheet. This sheet lets you assign
default privileges, lock the sheet, and display caller names and privileges. Additional
Modify Host push buttons let you add, modify, and delete users and their privileges. For information
Passwords Button on how to use this sheet, see Assigning Passwords and Access Privileges on page 6-8.

Modify Host Security Settings

Click this button to display the Security properties sheet. This sheet lets you configure
the level of logon authorization you require. You can also use the Security properties
Modify Host sheet to limit the number of logon attempts, connect time, and amount of time a caller
Security Settings can be inactive before you want Host to disconnect the caller. For information on how
Button
to use this properties sheet, see Defining Security Settings for Host, below.

Defining Security Settings for Host

You use the Security properties sheet to define what type of logon security you want
to enforce, what actions you want Host to take for failed logons, and what time limits
you want to place on callers.
To define security settings, follow these steps:
1. Display the Security properties sheet (shown in Figure 6-2) using one of the
techniques described in Changing Property Sheet Settings on page 3-53, or click

Modify Host
Security Settings
Button
6-6 HyperACCESS Host

the Modify Host Security Settings button in the Toolbar of the Host Entries
panel.

Figure 6-2.
The Security proper-
ties sheet lets you
configure how Host
handles logons.

2. Define how you want users to log on using radio buttons in the Grant Access
To group box. The choices are:
All remote users without asking for passwords when you select this
radio button, Host doesnt ask for names or passwords when users log on.
Only users who enter default password select this radio button and
enter a password in the edit field to have Host prompt for a password
without a user Id. All callers get the default privileges defined on the
Passwords properties sheet (see Defining Default Privileges on
page 6-10).
Only users with passwords listed on Passwords sheet when you
select this radio button, Host wont let callers log on to your system unless
their name and password appear in the password file. Selecting this radio
button enables the Let new users define their own passwords check box,
defined next.
Let new users define their own passwords select this option when
you want to let new callers identify themselves and their passwords during
their first call. Such callers receive privileges defined in the Default
Privileges dialog (see Defining Default Privileges on page 6-10).
Preparing to Answer Calls 6-7

3. Define settings regarding number of incorrect logons, length of connection, and


inactive connections using:
Disconnect users who fail logon use this check box to disconnect users
who fail to successfully log on after the number of times specified. Use
the edit field or spin button to specify the number of attempts permitted.
Limit length of connection to use this check box to disconnect users
after the length of time specified. Use the edit field or spin button to specify
the time permitted.
Disconnect if user inactive for use this check box to disconnect users
who have been inactive for the length of time specified. Use the edit field
or spin button to specify the inactive time.
4. To protect your security settings, click the Lock this Page... push button and
define a password for the sheet.
Clicking this push button displays the dialog shown in Figure 6-3. Once you
lock a list, Host prevents others from displaying or modifying the Security
properties sheet. After you enter a Password and click on OK, Host closes the
dialog and locks the sheet. To display the contents of the Security properties
sheet, youll have to enter the password.
Caution: If you forget this password, you will have to reinstall Host.

Figure 6-3.
The Lock This Page
dialog lets you enter
a password that pre-
vents others from
viewing or changing
your Security proper-
ties sheet. If you for-
get this password,
you will have to rein-
stall Host.

When the Security properties sheet is locked, the only control visible on the sheet is
an Unlock this Page... button. Clicking this button displays a dialog that requires entry
of the sheet password. Once correctly entered, the Security properties sheet displays
the information described above. However, the Lock this Page... button is replaced
with a Remove Lock button, which removes the requirement to enter a password to
view or modify this sheet.
6-8 HyperACCESS Host

Note: The sheet remains unlocked until you display another sheet or close the
properties notebook.

Assigning Passwords and Access Privileges

You define user IDs, passwords, and access privileges using the Passwords properties
sheet (shown in Figure 6-4). Display the Passwords properties sheet using one of the
techniques described in Changing Property Sheet Settings on page 3-53, or click the
Modify Host passwords button in the Toolbar of the Host Entries panel.

Figure 6-4.
Modify Host The Passwords prop-
Passwords Button erties sheet displays
the password file-
name, lets you lock
the file, and displays
caller names. Push
buttons let you add
and modify users and
their privileges.

The default password file, PASSWORD.LST, includes two predefined sample users.
These users, John Doe and Jane Doe illustrate different levels of privileges. After
viewing the samples, you should delete them before adding your new callers.
The Passwords properties sheet has the following information, parameters, and
buttons:
Add... Clicking this push button displays the Add Callers dialog that
lets you add new callers and specify their access privileges.
See Adding Callers on page 6-11.
Modify... Clicking this push button, after you select an entry from the
password list, displays the Modify Callers dialog that lets you
Preparing to Answer Calls 6-9

modify existing callers and their access privileges. See Modi-


fying Callers on page 6-13.
Delete Clicking this push button, after you select an entry from the
password list, displays a warning dialog that requests confir-
mation before deleting the selected caller from the list.
Default Privileges... Clicking this push button displays the dialog shown in
Figure 6-5. Privileges entered in this dialog are the default for
callers added through the Add Caller dialog (Figure 6-7), and
for new callers that you allow to log on and define their own
user ID and password when permitted. For a description of
the default options you can specify in this dialog, see Adding
Callers on page 6-11.

Figure 6-5.
The Default Privi-
leges dialog lets you
establish defaults for
new callers.

Lock this Page... Clicking this push button displays the dialog shown in
Figure 6-6. Once you lock a sheet, Host lets you keep others
from displaying or modifying the caller list and access privi-
leges. After youve specified a Password, Host requires that
you enter the password before you can see the contents of the
Passwords properties sheet.
When the Security properties sheet is locked, the only control
visible on the sheet is an Unlock this Page... button. Clicking
this button displays a dialog that requires entry of the sheet
password. Once correctly entered, the Security properties sheet
displays the information described above. However, the Lock
this Page... button is replaced with a Remove Lock button,
which removes the requirement to enter a password to view or
modify this sheet.
6-10 HyperACCESS Host

Caution: If you forget this password, you will have to delete


the password file, and re-enter the entire caller list.

Figure 6-6.
The Lock This Page
dialog lets you enter
a master password
that prevents others
from viewing or
changing your pass-
word file.

Defining Default Privileges

To define default privileges for new users that you create or that you allow to log on
and define their own user Id and password, follow these steps:
1. Display the Passwords properties sheet using one of the techniques described in
Changing Property Sheet Settings on page 3-53, or click the Modify Host
passwords button in the Toolbar of the Host Entries panel.

Modify Host 2. Click the Default Privileges... push button. This displays the Default Privileges
Passwords Button dialog. This is similar to as the Add Caller dialog (see below).
3. Select the defaults that you want for all new users. You can modify these settings
when you create a new user (see Adding Callers, below), or at any later time
(see Modifying Callers on page 6-13).
4. Click OK in the Default Privileges dialog, and then in the properties notebook.
Preparing to Answer Calls 6-11

Adding Callers

The Add Caller dialog shown in Figure 6-7 lets you enter new callers and their
privileges.

Figure 6-7.
The Add Caller dialog
lets you add callers
and specify their
passwords and
privileges.

The information you enter in this dialog is:


First name The callers first name. Control characters and blanks arent
permitted, and upper and lowercase characters are equivalent.
Last name The callers last name. Control characters and blanks arent
permitted, and upper and lowercase characters are equivalent.
Password The callers password. Control characters and blanks arent
permitted, and upper and lowercase characters are equivalent.
Callback number This check box and edit field are only available for modem
connection types. For other connections, they are unavailable
(grayed out).
The check box and its associated edit field let you enter a
telephone number that Host will call after this user successfully
logs on. Upon successful logon, Host hangs up, waits a
moment, and then calls this telephone number. You can use
this capability to provide an additional level of security, or to
6-12 HyperACCESS Host

reverse telephone charges. Once reconnected, the caller can


use the privileges youve assigned.
Prompt remote This check box is only available for modem connection
user for roving types. For other connections, it is unavailable (grayed out).
callback number
Select this check box to indicate that Host should request a
callback number from the caller after successful logon. Host
then disconnects the caller and calls the number entered.
Since this option isnt for additional security (the caller can
enter any callback number), the caller can cancel the dialog
that asks for the callback number, and remain connected to
the Host PC. This feature lets you set up Host for roving call-
back to reverse telephone charges, but at the same time make
provision for situations where Host cant directly dial in to
the callers current location (for example, a hotel room with-
out a direct dial number).
If both this option and the Callback number are selected in
the callers password properties, the roving callback option
takes precedence.
User subject to Select this check box to indicate that the call is subject to
connection length time limits specified on the Security properties sheet. Unse-
and inactivity lecting this check box overrides time limits set on the Secu-
timeouts
rity properties sheet.

Privileges This group box lets you specify access privileges for this caller.
Note: You can change default values for these settings by clicking Default Privileges...
in the Passwords properties sheet (see page 6-10).

Select the check boxes corresponding to the privileges you want to grant.
Download files This check box lets callers send files from your computer to
from Host their computer. Its the callers responsibility to issue the cor-
rect command depending on protocol.

Upload files to Host This check box lets callers send files from their computer to
your computer. Its the callers responsibility to issue the
correct command depending on protocol.
File management Select this check box to let the caller use COPY, DELETE,
RENAME, MKDIR, and RMDIR. To prevent tampering with
your files and directories, leave this check box unselected.
Preparing to Answer Calls 6-13

Limit access to Select this check box to limit the callers access to a particular
drive or folder. Enter the path in the associated edit field, or
use the Browse... push button. For a complete description of
browse dialogs, see page 4-8.
This becomes the callers default location, and commands
issued affect only this drive and folder.
Note: The caller also has access to all subdirectories of the
specified drive and folder.
The Next and Previous push buttons are unavailable for adding users. See Modifying
Callers, below.

Modifying Callers

To modify a callers user name, password, or privileges, select a caller in the


Passwords properties sheet list and click the Modify... push button. This dialog is the
same as the one shown in Figure 6-7 on page 6-11 with the exception of the dialog
title. It has the same options and parameters described above in Adding Callers with
two additional push buttons.
The new push buttons in this dialog are:
Next This push button lets you display the next caller in the list
without returning to the Passwords dialog.
Previous This push button lets you display the previous caller in the list
without returning to the Passwords dialog.
Note: If you click on Next or Previous after youve made changes
to the current caller entry, Host pops up a dialog requesting that
you confirm those changes.
6-14 HyperACCESS Host

File Transfer Properties Sheet

The File Transfer properties sheet (shown in Figure 6-8) for Host lets you specify a
default protocol and other parameters that appear in the Receive dialog in
HyperACCESS. The following sections define the group boxes and their correspond-
ing options.

Figure 6-8.
The File Transfer
properties sheet lets
you define default
protocol and options
for receiving files.

Transfer Protocol
This group box has a drop-down list of supported protocols for receiving files. (The
associated display box doesnt permit manual entry. You must make a selection from
the drop-down list.) In addition, the dialog has a Settings... push button that displays
a dialog for each protocol.
Appendix E, File Transfer Protocols describes supported protocols and lists their
options and defaults.
Preparing to Answer Calls 6-15

Some option check boxes may be unavailable (grayed out or dimmed) for the selected
file transfer protocol. The options and parameters specified in this dialog are:
Use received file This check box is available if the selected protocol is capable
date and time of sending a files time and date attributes. If selected,
HyperACCESS uses the received files time and date when
saving the file. If not selected, HyperACCESS uses the cur-
rent time and date for the file.
Save partial files if This check box indicates that HyperACCESS is to save partly
interrupted completed file transfers. (This permits you to use Zmodem
and HyperProtocol crash recovery procedures.) If left
unchecked, HyperACCESS deletes partly transferred files.
Filter received This check box indicates that you want HyperACCESS to
files for known check received files for viruses using HyperGuard antivirus
viruses technology (US Patent 5,319,776).
HyperGuard instantly warns you if files you download con-
tain any of over 4,000 known viruses. Its X-ray Vision even
spots viruses hiding in compressed files and Word macros.
Upon detection of a virus, HyperACCESS displays a warning
message and aborts the file transfer. If you want to receive a
file that appears to have a virus, you must unselect this check
box and repeat the file transfer.

Note: You can download free updates to your virus protection


from the Hilgraeve BBS, (see Hilgraeve BBS on page xv).

If Received File Already Exists

This group box provides six radio buttons that determine how HyperACCESS handles
received files that have the same name as files that already exist. The options are:
Overwrite Deletes existing files and replaces them with incoming data.
Refuse HyperACCESS refuses the file transfer if the file already
exists.
Refuse unless HyperACCESS checks the date and time of incoming files to
newer see if they are newer. If a file is newer HyperACCESS will
overwrite the existing file; otherwise, HyperACCESS will
refuse the file transfer.
6-16 HyperACCESS Host

Append Adds incoming data to existing files.


Rename Use this drop-down list to select how you want
HyperACCESS to handle duplicate filenames. There are
options that let you elect to rename the Existing file or the
newly Received file. For each of these options, you can have
HyperACCESS rename files sequentially or using date (a
total of four choices). Definitions of sequentially and date
renaming are:
sequentially HyperACCESS appends a sequential
number, starting with zero, to the filename. If the path-
name is already at its maximum length (255), the
sequence number replaces characters at the end of the
name.
using date creates filenames by appending the date/
sequence to the original name. The date/sequence format
is MMDD999, where MM is the month (values 01 to 12),
DD is the day (values 01 to 31), and 999 is a sequence
number from 000 to 999 for the files created on that date.
If the pathname is already at its maximum length (255),
the date/sequence replaces characters at the end of the
name.

Specifying a Greeting

Host includes a file called WELCOME.TXT. You can edit this file using the
Windows Notepad or any text editor. Alternatively, you can specify a different file in
the File Usage properties sheet. To ensure compatibility with potential callers, its a
good idea to limit text lines to less than 80 characters. If youre uncertain as to the
type of terminal or emulator the caller may be using, its also good practice to limit
your welcoming text to standard ASCII characters. Extended ASCII, or graphics
characters, can create problems for some terminals. If all callers will be using an ANSI
terminal emulator, you may include extended ASCII characters in your welcome
message to add special graphics and colors.
Note: WELCOME.TXT contains only standard ASCII text characters. The file
WELCOME.ANS includes ANSI escape sequences to change colors displayed on the
callers terminal. Callers must use an ANSI terminal emulator to correctly display
this file.
How Callers Access HyperACCESS Host 6-17

Automatically Launching HyperACCESS Host

You can have Windows automatically launch HyperACCESS Host whenever you
reboot or restart Windows. (See Starting Communications Sessions From the Desktop
on page 3-37 for a related procedure.) To launch HyperACCESS Host on startup,
follow these steps:
1. Open an Explorer window and use the directory tree to display:
C:\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\StartUp
2. If necessary, start HyperACCESS Host.
3. Select the notebook panel tab for the notebook that has the entry you want
Windows to automatically launch.
4. Drag the entry icon to the StartUp directory (see Drag and Drop on page 3-1).
This creates a shortcut of the entry that automatically launches HyperACCESS
Host and begins waiting for a call whenever Windows starts. The shortcut shows
the same icon that appeared in the notebook along with the .HHW filename.

How Callers Access HyperACCESS Host

Callers using HyperACCESS dont need to worry about configuration settings


because they are automatically set for them. This section is for callers using ANSI
terminal emulation software. These callers should configure their communications
software as follows:
8 data bits
1 stop bit
No parity
Full duplex
Respond to XOFF/XON when sending
Do not send line feeds at line ends
Do not append line feeds to received lines
Do not echo received characters
For dial-in access, a caller may use any modem, and any baud rate that both modems
can support. When the caller connects with your PC, Host automatically determines
the proper baud rate and switches to that baud rate if necessary.
6-18 HyperACCESS Host

How Callers Connect and Log On

In addition to telling callers how to configure their computers, you must tell them how
to log on to your PC. Callers should follow these steps:
1. Configure their computer as described above.
2. Dial your modems telephone number (if applicable). Otherwise make a con-
nection using the technique required for the network or direct connection.
3. When callers connect, and the modems have matched baud rates, Host displays
a prompt that depends on the option selected in the Security properties sheet.
The prompt appears on both your screen and the callers screen. This usually
happens automatically, but some callers may need to press e (about once per
second) until it appears.
The options available on the Security properties sheet are:
All remote users without asking for passwords continue with Step 7.
Only users who enter default password continue with Step 6.
Only users with passwords on Passwords sheet continue with Step 4.
4. When Host displays Enter first name:, callers should type their first
name. If youre admitting only predefined callers, they must type their name as
youve entered them in the caller list. Otherwise, they should enter their name
as they want to type it in the future.
5. When Host displays Enter last name:, callers should type their last name.
If youre admitting only predefined callers, they must type their name as youve
entered them in the caller list. Otherwise, they should enter their name as they
want to type it in the future.
6. When Host displays Enter password:, callers should type their password.
If youre admitting only predefined callers, they must type their password as
youve entered them in the caller list. Otherwise, they should enter their own
password as they want to type it in the future. For security reasons, passwords
never display on either computer while callers are entering them.
7. Host then displays a prompt that includes the path of the current folder, and the
caller can begin interacting with Host.
There are three alternatives to steps 4-6 above. They are:
At the Enter first name: prompt, the caller types:
firstname lastname
How Callers Access HyperACCESS Host 6-19

Host then prompts for the callers password.


At the Enter first name: prompt, the caller types:
firstname lastname password
At the Enter first name: prompt, the caller types:
firstname
Host then prompts for the callers lastname, and the caller responds with:
lastname password
If Incorrect password or Invalid user displays, even when a caller enters
a valid name and password, line noise may be the cause. Its common for line noise
to affect data in one direction, but not the other. Noisy connections can be random;
calling again may help. If the problem persists, contact the phone company.
If your PC displays the initial prompt just once and then seems to ignore the callers
attempts to enter a name, the modems may have established an unworkable connec-
tion. Modems from different manufacturers sometimes seem to connect, but then are
able to pass data in only one direction. Have the caller try again, or use a different
baud rate.

How Callers Command Your PC

Although privileges you give each caller may vary, all callers use the same general
procedure to command your PC. Host displays the following prompt on both your
screen and the callers screen:
Type HELP for a list of commands
[Host]C:\pathname
To see a list of available commands, the caller types HELP followed by e. To see
a detailed explanation of a particular command, the caller types HELP followed by
that command and then e.
When a caller types HELP, the list of commands displayed depends on the callers
privileges. For a complete list of commands and their description, see section Host
Commands, below, or for any updates since publication, see the file HOSTHELP.TXT
in the HyperACCESS program folder.
6-20 HyperACCESS Host

To Avoid Confusion

When youre at the host PC, dont type commands at the command prompt, as this
may confuse the caller. When at the calling PC, remember that commands you enter
at the command prompt control the host PC only, not the calling PC.

Host Commands

This section contains a summary of commands that callers to Host can use. The host
operator can also use these commands (except those which upload or download files)
after pressing C+L to enter a local logon.
Note: Local logon is available when the host is not waiting for a call. This lets the
Host operator test user IDs, passwords, and authorization levels without calling in
from another PC.
The Host PC operator can assign different access privileges to callers. If you are a
caller, and you have questions about privileges that the Host PC operator has assigned
you, check with the Host PC operator.
The following sections group commands by user privileges. For more information on
available access privileges, see Assigning Passwords and Access Privileges on
page 6-8. The sections are:
Commands available to all callers
Commands for callers with download privileges
Commands for callers with upload privileges
Commands for callers with file management privileges
Commands used in batch files
Note: Options in brackets [] indicate optional parameters. Options separated by the
pipe symbol | are mutually exclusive; you may specify just one of the given choices.

Host Support of Long Filenames

Host supports Windows long file names (pathnames of up to 255 characters). In


Windows 95, 98, and NT, folder names or filenames can include spaces. If you
Host Commands 6-21

reference a path or filename with one or more embedded spaces, you must enclose the
entire path in double quotes. For example, you must enclose the following in quotes
because two folder names include a space:
c:\Program Files\HAWin32\My Files\welcome.txt
You dont need to use quotes on long names unless there are spaces involved. For
example, the following path doesnt require quotes:
c:\user\CompanyBudget1997.xls

Commands Available to All Users

This section includes commands that any authorized user can issue to Host, regardless
of access privileges.

CHAT

Puts the Host PC into chat mode, so the caller can type messages to the Host operator.
If the Host operator is present, the caller and operator can take turns typing. To return
to the host prompt, either may type C+C or E.

CHDIR path
CD path

Changes the current folder of the Host PC. (The current folder is shown as part of the
Host prompt). Callers who are restricted to a particular folder or drive can change to
its subdirectories, but cannot change to other directories.

CLS

Clears the Host PC screen and places the prompt in the upper left corner.
6-22 HyperACCESS Host

DIR [options] [pathname]

Displays directories (folders) of files on the Host PC. The pathname can contain a
drive or directory, and includes the filename, and may include * or ?. Callers who are
restricted to a particular directory or drive cannot examine files from other areas.

Options
/P Pause between screens
/N New (long name) format
/Ox Sort by order
Where x is one of the following:
N Sort by Name
E Sort by Extension
S Sort by Size
D Sort by Date
/S List files in subdirectories

HELP [topic]

Displays the list of commands the caller can enter to control the answering PC. For
more detailed help, enter HELP followed by any command shown in this section.

QUIT, BYE or DONE


Ends the call.

Commands for Callers With Download Privileges

These commands all perform essentially the same function they send one or more
files from the Host PC to the callers PC. The different commands provide for the
different file transfer protocols supported by Host.
Host Commands 6-23

To make the Host PC send files from a folder and its subdirectories, callers can enter
HSEND, ZSEND, YSEND, GYSEND or KSEND, followed by a space, /S, and a
filename. For example:
HSEND /S \DB\*.DAT
causes Host to send files with a .DAT extension from the \DB folder and its
subdirectories.

GYSEND [/S] filename

Callers can use this command to make the Host PC send with Ymodem-G protocol,
which is faster than Ymodem. However, instead of acknowledging each received
packet, it simply aborts a transfer if an error occurs. If both computers have Hyper-
Protocol, use it instead for the fastest, most reliable transfers.

HSEND [/S] filename

Sends a file or files from the Host PC to the callers PC using HyperProtocol. The
callers communications software must support HyperProtocol. For a single file, the
caller enters HSEND and a filename; the filename can include * or ? to specify file
groups; callers can enter multiple filenames separated by spaces. After entering this
command, the caller instructs the communications software on his/her PC to begin
receiving.

KSEND [/S] filename


Sends a file or files from the Host PC to the callers PC with Kermit protocol. For a
single file, the caller enters KSEND and a filename; the filename can include * or ? to
specify file groups; callers can enter multiple filenames separated by spaces. After
entering this command, the caller instructs the communications software on his/her
PC to begin receiving with Kermit protocol.

SEND filename

Sends a file from the Host PC to the callers PC using Text protocol. Callers can only
transfer ASCII files with Text protocol. After entering this command, the caller
6-24 HyperACCESS Host

instructs the communications software on his/her computer to capture text that


displays, then types e to make the Host PC begin sending. During the transfer,
callers can type C+S to suspend, C+Q to resume, and C+C to cancel.

TYPE filename [/C]

Displays contents of a text file stored on the Host PC. Callers can use the text capture
feature of HyperACCESS to capture the text to a file. During the display of the file,
HyperACCESS will display one screen at a time, then give the caller the option to
display another screen, display the file continuously, or quit. The caller can type C+S
to suspend display, C+Q to resume, and C+C to cancel.
If the caller specifies /C, Host displays the file without the More, Nonstop,
Quit (M/N/Q) [M]? prompt after each page.

XSEND filename

Sends a file from the Host PC to the callers PC using Xmodem protocol. Since
Xmodem cannot transfer multiple files, the caller must enter the name of a single file
without * or ?. After entering this command, the caller instructs the communications
software on his/her PC to begin receiving with Xmodem protocol.

YSEND [/S] filename

Sends a file or files from the Host PC to the callers PC using Ymodem protocol. For
a single file, the caller enters YSEND and the filename; the filename can include * or
? to specify file groups; callers can enter multiple filenames separated by spaces. After
entering this command, the caller instructs the communications software on his/her
PC to begin receiving with Ymodem protocol.

ZSEND [/S] filename

Sends a file or files from the Host PC to the callers PC with Zmodem protocol. For
a single file, the caller enters ZSEND and the filename; the filename can include * or
? to specify file groups; callers can enter multiple filenames separated by spaces. After
entering this command, the caller instructs the communications software at his/her
end to begin receiving with Zmodem protocol.
Host Commands 6-25

Commands for Callers With Upload Privileges

These commands all perform essentially the same function they instruct the Host
PC to receive one or more files from the callers PC. The different commands provide
for the different file transfer protocols supported by Host.
To make the Host PC receive files into a folder and its subdirectories, callers can enter
HREC, ZREC, YREC, GYREC or KREC, followed by a space, /P, and a filename. For
example:
HREC /P \DB\*.DAT
causes Host to receive files with a .DAT extension and write them to the \DB folder
and its subdirectories.
The upload options are:
/O Causes Host to overwrite existing files when it receives files
with the same filenames.
/N Causes Host to overwrite existing files when it receives iden-
tically named files with a more recent time and date.
/R Causes Host to refuse files if they already exists.
/P Causes Host to store files using folder names included in
received filenames. (When sending files, the caller needs to
instruct the communications software on his/her PC to send the
filenames paths with the files.)

GYREC [/O] [/N] [/P] [/R] [path]

Through modems with error-correction, callers can use this command to make Host
receive with Ymodem G protocol, which is faster than Ymodem. However, instead
of acknowledging each received packet, it simply aborts a transfer if an error occurs.
If both computers have HyperProtocol, use it instead for the fastest, most reliable
transfers.

HREC [/O] [/N] [/P] [/R] [path]

Commands Host to receive a file or files from the callers PC using HyperProtocol
(this command can be used only by callers whose communications software supports
HyperProtocol). To have Host receive into the current drive and folder, the caller
6-26 HyperACCESS Host

simply enters HREC; to have it receive into a specific drive or folder, enter HREC and
that drive or folder; to have it receive a file and store it under a given name, the caller
enters HREC and the filename. After entering any of these, the caller instructs the
communications software on his/her PC to begin sending with HyperProtocol.

KREC [/O] [/N] [/P] [/R] [path]

Commands Host to receive a file from the callers PC using Kermit protocol. To have
Host receive into its current folder, the caller simply enters KREC; to have it receive
into another drive or folder, enter KREC and that drive or folder. After entering this,
the caller instructs the communications software on his/her PC to begin sending using
Kermit protocol.

REC filename

Commands Host to receive a file from the callers PC using Text protocol. Callers can
only transfer ASCII files with Text protocol. After entering this command, the caller
instructs the communications software on his/her PC to begin sending the file using
Text (or ASCII) protocol. To indicate the end of the file, the caller can either type
C+C or enter a period on a line by itself.

XREC filename

Commands Host to receive a file from the callers PC using Xmodem file transfer
protocol. XREC must be followed by a single filename, which cannot contain * or ?.
After entering this command, the caller instructs the communications software on his/
her PC to begin sending using Xmodem protocol.

YREC [/O] [/N] [/P] [/R] [path]

Commands Host to receive a file from the callers PC using Ymodem protocol. To
have Host receive into its current folder, the caller simply enters YREC; to have it
receive into a specific drive or folder, enter YREC and that drive or folder. After
entering this command, the caller instructs the communications software on his/her
PC to begin sending using Ymodem protocol.
Host Commands 6-27

ZREC [/O] [/N] [/P] [/R] [path]

Commands Host to receive a file from the callers PC using Zmodem protocol. To
have Host receive into its current folder, the caller simply enters ZREC; to have it
receive into another drive or folder, enter ZREC and that drive or folder. After entering
this command, the caller instructs the communications software at his/her PC to begin
sending using Zmodem protocol.

Commands for Callers With File Management Privileges

These commands perform standard file management actions they instruct the Host
PC to copy, move, delete, and rename files. In addition, there are commands to create
or delete directories (folders) on the Host PC.

COPY source [destination]

Copies source file(s) to the destination file, drive, or folder (similar to the Windows
COPY command). This command manages files on the Host PC, not for copying
between PCs (which is done with commands such as SEND or REC).

ERASE filename DEL filename

Deletes file(s) from the Host PC (similar to the Windows DEL command). The
filename can include * or ?.

MKDIR directory
MD directory

Makes a new directory (folder) on the Host PC (similar to the Windows MKDIR
command).

MOVE source [destination]

Moves one or more files from one folder to another folder on the same drive. The
filenames can include * or ?. Source and destination cannot be the same.
6-28 HyperACCESS Host

RENAME source destination


REN source destination

Changes the source filename to the destination filename. The destination filename
cannot already exist.

RMDIR directory
RD directory

Removes a directory (folder) from the Host PC (similar to the Windows RMDIR
command). Before a directory can be removed, any files and/or subdirectories that it
contains must first be deleted.

Commands Used in Batch Files

HyperACCESS has the ability to execute batch files (.BAT) from the host prompt. In
these batch files, you can use any of the commands listed above, plus the commands
in this section. Normally, it is the Host PC operator who creates and maintains batch
files that run on the Host PC. However, you can also create batch files on other PCs
and upload them to the Host PC for execution. Any caller can execute batch files
present in directories to which the caller has access authorization. Host ignores any
commands in the batch file that are beyond that callers privileges.
Host also supports automatic batch file execution upon
caller logon. The automatic batch file, AUTO.BAT, is like You can use an AUTO.BAT
file to present callers with
any other batch file, except that it runs automatically, and a menu of choices. This lets
must appear in the callers logon directory. The callers you customize Host ser-
logon directory is either the hostdata directory or the vices, and gives you a tech-
directory specified in the Limit access to edit field of the nique to hide the standard
Passwords properties sheet. For more information on setting command-type interface.
the logon directory, see Defining Default Privileges on
page 6-10, Adding Callers on page 6-11, and Modifying Callers on page 6-13.

CHOICE [/C[:]<keys>] [/N] [/S] [text]

The CHOICE command lets callers make a selection. It optionally displays a message
followed by a prompt for a response. The choice (response) simply returns an
errorlevel to the batch file. The batch program must include subsequent commands
Host Commands 6-29

that act on every possible errorlevel. An invalid response sends a BEL (07h) character
to the user without returning to the batch file. A break key or C+C returns an errorlevel
of zero (0).

Parameters
Text The text message displayed to the user before the prompt. If
the text includes the switch character (/), include your text in
quotes. If no text is specified in the command, CHOICE only
issues the prompt.

Switches
/C:<keys> Defines allowed keys in the prompt. The colon (:) is optional
to improve readability. The command encloses choices in
brackets separated by commas, and displays a question mark
at the end. Each choice returns an errorlevel based on its
position in the list. The first choice returns 1, the second returns
2, and so on.
If this switch is not specified, the command displays the default
choice of [Y,N?].
/N Displays a prompt without displaying available choices. The
text before the prompt is still displayed, and the choices defined
with /C are still valid.
/S Makes the available choices case sensitive. By default,
CHOICE assumes upper and lower case values are equivalent.

Example:
CHOICE /C:y,n Do you want to continue?
IF ERRORLEVEL 2 GOTO end
IF ERRORLEVEL 1 GOTO continue
:continue echo You chose to continue
:end
Displays to the caller:
Do you want to continue? [Y/N?]

Note: When checking the errorlevel returned by CHOICE, you must check the highest
errorlevel first in order for this command to work properly.
6-30 HyperACCESS Host

ECHO [ON | OFF | Text]

This command is similar to the normal batch echo command.

Parameters
ON Displays all commands to the screen as they execute.
OFF Stops the display of commands on the screen.
Text Displays text regardless of the current state of ECHO.

GOTO label

Transfers control of the batch program to the label. Label names begin with a colon.
Label names cannot contain periods.

IF [NOT] ERRORLEVEL x
IF [NOT] string1 == string2
IF [NOT] EXIST path

Allows conditional processing of batch commands. If the condition is true, the


command is executed, otherwise it is skipped.

Notes
NOT reverses the true and false value.
IF ERRORLEVEL is true if the previous program had an exit code greater than or
equal to the specified errorlevel number.
IF string1 == string2 is true if the first string matches the characters in the
second string.
IF EXIST is true if the filename is found in the specified folder.
Host Commands 6-31

PAUSE

Suspends processing of a batch program. When the batch interpreter encounters a


PAUSE command, the user sees the following message:
Press any key when ready...
The batch program continues after the user presses a key.

REM [comment]

Allows comments to appear in the batch program. The batch interpreter ignores any
line preceded by REM.
6-32 HyperACCESS Host
Appendix A
Glossary

This glossary provides brief definitions of common terms and abbreviations used throughout this manual.
Absolute path A complete listing of the disk drive and folders used to store or retrieve a file.
It often includes the filename. Sometimes referred to as a fully qualified
filename or full path.
Accelerator key See shortcut key.
Access To establish a connection and log on to a remote system.
Application icon A picture that is a graphical representation of an application. Same as icon.
ASCII An abbreviation for American Standard Code for Information Interchange.
This standard code consists of 7 data bits (or binary values) per character.
Letters, numbers, and special characters ($, #, %, etc.) are represented by
different ASCII codes. The ASCII character set represents 96 printable
characters and 32 nonprintable control characters.
Asynchronous A method of communicating characters between computers. With asynchro-
nous communication, characters can be sent without special coordination or
control characters. See Synchronous communication.
Asynchronous adapter See communications port.
Autodial A modem feature that allows users to dial telephone numbers without using
a telephone. Commands for dialing can be manually entered from the com-
puter keyboard or automatically issued by a communications program.
Backscroll Buffer A special area of your computers memory that contains a read-only image of
the data scrolled off the terminal screen. HyperACCESS displays the Back-
scroll Buffer above the terminal area in the session window.
Baud Although technically speaking, baud is the number of discrete signal changes
that occur per second on a data line, the term baud is now used interchangeably
with the term bits per second (bps). Hence, 1200 baud is the same as 1200 bps
and equates to a transmission rate of about 120 characters per second (a
character typically consists of 8 data bits, 1 start bit, and 1 stop bit).
Binary A numbering system that is used by computers for storage of data. Binary
numbers are stored as a series of 0s and 1s. Each 0 or 1 is referred to as a bit.
Bit The smallest unit of information used by computer systems. A bit is either on
or off representing values 1 or 0, respectively. A series of 8 bits is called a
byte. ASCII characters are represented as one byte.
A-2 Glossary

Boot The process of starting a computer and loading its operating system from a
storage device into the computers memory. Most computers boot automati-
cally when you turn them on.
bps An abbreviation for bits per second, which is a measure of data transmission
speed. See baud.
Byte Eight bits, which are treated as one unit of information. Within your computer,
numbers and characters are represented as bytes.
Carrier Detect signal See CD.
Cascade menu A menu that appears to the right of a menu item. Menu items that display
cascade menus have a right pointing arrow at the right edge of the pull-down
menu.
CD An abbreviation for Carrier Detect. CD is an RS-232 signal from a modem to
a computer indicating that the modem has made a connection with a remote
system. Also known as DCD.
Character Any alphabetic, numeric, or special character symbol. See also ASCII.
Character length Also called data bits or bits per character, this is the number of bits required
to represent a character. Standard ASCII characters have a character length of
7 bits.
Check box In a GUI, a square box next to a description of an option that you can turn on
and off. A check box contains an X if the option is selected (turned on).
Checksum A method of error checking that is sometimes used in Xmodem and other file
transfer protocols. A checksum is a calculated by both the sending and
receiving systems. The sending system transmits its calculated number. If the
checksum received differs from the receiving systems calculated number it,
requests retransmission of the block.
Choose To use a mouse or keyboard commands to pick an item that starts an action in
Windows.
Clear to Send signal See CTS.
Click To press and release a mouse button (normally the left one, or button 1) quickly.
See also double-click.
Client A computer on a network that requests and uses resources supplied by a server.
Workstations usually act as clients, but they may also provide some server
functions. See Workstation and Server.
Glossary A-3

COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, ..., COM8


Port names used to represent physical devices on your computer. COM1 and
COM2 usually have their own connector on your computer to which your
modem or other peripheral devices are connected. Internal modems often have
the ability to be configured as COM3 or COM4 in addition to COM1 or COM2.
Combo box A combination (combo) box is an edit field with an associated drop-down
arrow button. A drop-down combo box displays the current choice, which you
can change using either of two techniques:
Clicking on the drop-down arrow button. This displays a selection list.
Choose an option by clicking on it.
Click in the edit field, and type the desired option.
Command button Same as push button.
Communications port Also known as a port, serial port, or adapter. A port is the physical connection
through which data are transferred into and out of a computer.
Compiling The process of converting a human-readable version of a program into a
machine-readable version that a computer can execute.
Compression The process of reducing the total size of data by converting it to a more compact
format. HyperProtocol uses data compression whenever possible to transfer
files in the least amount of time.
Configuration The term used to describe your computer hardware or settings of options that
change how your hardware or software behaves.
Connect time The length of time that has elapsed between when you signed on to a remote
system and when you sign off. The connect time displays at the bottom of a
session window in the status bar.
Control characters Codes that are part of the ASCII character set. These codes arent usually
printable or displayable on your screen. Control characters include carriage
return, line feed, and others.
Control menu In a GUI, the control menu contains commands that you can use to restore,
resize, move, maximize, minimize, and close a window. You can click on the
control menu box, normally located in the upper left hand corner of a window,
to see the control menu. Sometimes called system menu.
CR A carriage return character. This character as an ASCII code of 13 (decimal).
Most computer systems send a CR character at the end of each line.
CRC An abbreviation for Cyclic Redundancy Check. CRC is the preferred method
of error checking used in Xmodem and other file transfer protocols. A CRC is
A-4 Glossary

calculated by both the sending and receiving systems. The sending system
transmits its calculated number. If the CRC received differs from the receiving
systems calculated number, it requests retransmission of the block.
CTS An abbreviation for clear to send, which is an RS-232 signal from a modem to
a computer that indicates the remote system is ready to receive data.
Cursor The indicator on your display that shows where characters you type will appear
on the screen. In a GUI, the cursor may be displayed in various ways such as
an insertion point, mouse pointer, or underline character.
Data bits The number of bits, usually 7 or 8, in a data word that contain data. See also
start bits, parity, and stop bits.
Data Carrier Detect signal See CD.
Data Terminal Ready signal See DTR.
Data word The combination of start bits, data bits, parity bits, and stop bits is called the
data word. One data word is used to represent each character of transmitted
data.
DCD See CD.
DCE An abbreviation for data communications equipment, which identifies the
specific type of RS-232 port that is commonly found on peripheral equipment
such as modems. Contrast with DTE.
Default drive The disk drive that is assumed unless you explicitly specify the letter of a
different drive.
Dialog In a GUI, a special window displayed by an application. A dialog may display
options you need to choose among (usually with OK and Cancel push buttons);
or it may display a warning (sometimes with Yes and No push buttons); or it
may explain why a command cant be completed as requested (usually with
an OK push button).
Directory See folder.
DOS An abbreviation for disk operating system. It is frequently used as a generic
description for MS-DOS, PC-DOS, and other equivalent disk operating sys-
tems.
Double-click To click a mouse button twice in rapid succession.
Download The process of receiving a file from another computer. (Upload means to send
a file to another computer.) Since some people find the terms download and
upload confusing, HyperACCESS and this manual use the terms send and
receive.
Glossary A-5

Drag To press and hold a mouse button (usually the left one) while moving the
mouse.
Drop-down combo box In a GUI, an edit field with the current choice displayed in the field. You can
change the choice by clicking (see click) on the underlined arrow in the square
box at the right (displaying the drop-down list) and choosing a different option,
or by typing in the edit field.
DSR An abbreviation for data set ready. DSR is an RS-232 signal from a modem to
a computer indicating that the data set (modem) is ready to communicate.
DTE An abbreviation for data terminal equipment, which identifies the specific type
of RS-232 port that is commonly found on personal computers and terminals.
Contrast with DCE.
DTR An abbreviation for data terminal ready. DTR is an RS-232 signal from a
computer to a modem indicating that the data terminal (computer) is ready to
receive data. It is used to force the modem to disconnect (hang up) from a
remote system.
Echo The process whereby a computer sends back a duplicate of each received
character to the computer that sent the character. In communications with most
remote, dial-up systems, characters you type on your keyboard will be echoed
back to you by the remote system.
Edit field A rectangular box in a GUI into which you type information, such as a phone
number.
EIA Electronic Industries Association.
Electronic mail Messages sent from one computer to another through telephone lines. Some-
times called E-mail for short.
Emulate To enable a computer to simulate the behavior of a terminal.
Filename The name of a file known to DOS and Windows. The filename must conform
to standard naming conventions.
Flow control A means by which a computer or device that is receiving data can command
the computer or device that is sending the data to suspend and resume sending.
Typical means of flow control are XON/XOFF and hardware handshaking.
Folder A grouping of files on a storage device (hard disk, CD-ROM, diskette, etc.)
Files in folders may be logically or physically co-located on the storage device.
Formatting The process performed by DOS or OS/2 FORMAT program, which prepares
(initializes) a disk to accept files. Also the process of arranging data or text, as
in an editor.
A-6 Glossary

Full duplex A mode of communications whereby characters you type are sent directly to
the remote computer without first being displayed on your screen. The char-
acters display on your screen only after the remote system has sent an echo of
the characters back to you.
Full path A complete listing of the disk drive and folders used to store or retrieve a file.
It often includes the filename. Sometimes referred to as a fully qualified
filename or absolute path.
GND An abbreviation for ground. GND is an RS-232 signal that serves as a signal
ground between a computer and a modem.
Ground signal See GND.
GUI Abbreviation for graphical user interface, such as Windows or OS/2 Presenta-
tion Manager.
Half duplex A mode of communications whereby characters you type are displayed on your
screen as they are being sent. The remote computer does not echo characters
you type when you are using half duplex.
Hardware handshaking A process by which a computer uses lines in the RS-232 cable, in addition to
those that carry serial data, to indicate to another computer when it is ready to
accept data.
Host system A computer or computer service (other than the one on which youre running
HyperACCESS) with which you can establish a connection and exchange data.
It accepts calls and responds to commands that the caller types on a terminal
or on a computer that is acting as a terminal. Same as Remote system.
HyperProtocol An error-free, streaming file transfer protocol developed by Hilgraeve. Hyper-
Protocol is very fast over noisy or noise-free connections despite propagation
delays common with long-distance calls, high-speed modems, X.25, and
packet-switching networks.
Icon A picture that is a graphical representation of various Windows elements.
Short for application icon.
Insertion point In a GUI, the flashing vertical bar usually displayed in a text box to indicate
the place where you can type or edit information.
Int 14h Int 14h refers to the standard interrupt vector used to support communications
hardware/software. HyperACCESS supports Int 14h redirection in conjunction
with special redirection software provided by other vendors.
ISDN An abbreviation for Integrated Services Digital Network, a digital transmission
technology that enables voice and high-speed data communications to be
multiplexed on a single telephone line.
Glossary A-7

Kermit protocol Kermit is a widely supported error-correcting protocol that is capable of


sending file groups. While it is versatile and handles noisy connections well,
it tends to be slower than other protocols.
LAN Local Area Network.
LF A line feed character. This character has an ASCII code of 10 (decimal). Most
computer systems send a LF character after the CR character at the end of each
line.
List box In a GUI, a rectangular box that displays a column of available choices. If there
are additional choices available that are not displayed, the list box will have a
scroll bar.
Log on (or logon) Log on is a verb, meaning to type a user identification and password as
necessary to gain access to a computer system. Logon is a noun, describing the
activity of logging on or the information you type when logging on.
Macro An automatic sequence that issues multiple keystrokes or characters when you
enter a single keystroke or key combination.
Maximize button In Windows 95, this is a button with a large square graphic. It is in the upper
right-hand corner of a window. Its used to enlarge the window to fill the entire
screen. To use it, move the mouse pointer to the maximize button and click.
See also minimize button and restore button.
Memory A computer has many kinds of memory. The term by itself usually refers to a
storage area inside the computer where programs execute and data can be
copied, held, and retrieved.
Menu In a GUI, a list of items, which are usually commands.
Menu bar In a GUI, the menu bar displays the name of each menu for the application,
such as File and View.
Message Pad A special window that can be used to create and manipulate text. See Message
Pad on page 4-98 for additional information on the Message Pad.
Minimize button In Windows 95, this is a button with a small square graphic. It is in the upper
right-hand corner of a window, and its used to shrink the window to an icon.
To use it, move the mouse pointer to the minimize button and click. See also
maximize button and restore button.
Modem A device that allows communications between two computers through tele-
phone lines. This term is derived from MOdulator/DEModulator. A modulator
converts digital signals from the computer into audio signals that can be
transmitted over telephone lines. A demodulator converts audio signals back
A-8 Glossary

to digital signals. HyperACCESS and this manual occasionally use the term
modem to refer to communications devices in general.
Mouse pointer In a GUI, this is usually an arrow (but may have other shapes like an I-beam)
that is controlled by a mouse and is displayed if you have installed a mouse in
Windows.
NASI Network Asynchronous Services Interface provided by Novell for accessing
shared communications ports.
NCSI Network Communications Services Interface provided by Network Products,
Inc. for accessing shared communications ports.
Notebook A notebook is a general term used to describe a special tabbed window (or area
within a window) provided by Windows 95. Each tab selects an independent
panel that may have its own edit fields, buttons, and other controls. In
HyperACCESS, the main window is a notebook with panels, and the Phone-
book panel is itself a notebook with tabbed panels that provide alphabetic
selections of entries. You can create additional notebooks to organize entries
by other criteria. Each new notebook you create has alphabetically tabbed
panels. Another example of a notebook in HyperACCESS is the properties
notebook. Each sheet of the properties notebook is one of the tabbed panels.
Null modem cable An RS-232 cable that allows the DTE ports of two computers to be directly
connected to each other.
Offline A term describing a computer that is not connected to another for the purpose
of communications. Contrast with online.
Online A term for being connected with a remote computer for purposes of commu-
nications. Contrast with offline.
Option button Same as radio button.
OS/2 A multitasking operating system developed jointly by Microsoft and IBM for
80286 and later computers. It is an alternative to the DOS, PC-DOS, MSDOS,
and Windows.
Parity A bit having a value of 0 or 1 that is added to a character as the character is
sent. The receiving system can use the parity bit as a means of detecting errors
in the character. The parity bit added makes the sum of bits in a data word
either an odd number (for odd parity) or an even number (for even parity).
Pathname A listing of folders used to store or retrieve a file. See also absolute path and
relative path, and for details your OS/2 or DOS manual.
Peripheral device A device that is connected to a computer for supplying input and/or accepting
output from the computer.
Glossary A-9

Point To move a mouse until the mouse pointer is located on an item. See also choose.
Port See communications port.
Push button In a GUI, a button in a dialog that performs a command, such as OK or Cancel.
Same as command button.
Radio button In a GUI, a circular button that selects an option from a list of mutually
exclusive items. The selected option contains a black dot. You click on an
option button to select a different option.
RD An abbreviation for receive data. RD is an RS-232 signal that carries data from
a modem to a computer.
Reboot To reboot is to restart a computer or to reload its operating system from a
storage device, such as a disk, into a computers memory. With microcomput-
ers, you reboot by pressing C+A+D, by pushing a reset button on the
computer, or by turning the power off and back on.
Receive The process of receiving a file from another computer. Since some people find
the term download confusing, HyperACCESS and this manual use the term
receive.
Receive data signal See RD.
Relative path A listing of folders used to store or retrieve a file. A relative path assumes that
the current drive and folder are the starting point for the path. It often includes
the filename.
Remote system A computer or computer service (other than the one on which youre running
HyperACCESS) with which you can establish a connection and exchange data.
It accepts calls and responds to commands that the caller types on a terminal
or on a computer that is acting as a terminal. Same as host system.
Request To Send signal See RTS.
Restore button In a Windows 95, this button shows a square with two vertical bars. It appears
in the upper right-hand corner of a window. The restore button replaces the
maximize button after the window has been enlarged and will restore a window
to its previous size. To use it, move the mouse pointer to the restore button and
click.
Ring indicator signal See RNG.
RNG An abbreviation for ring indicator. RNG is an RS-232 signal from a modem to
a computer indicating that the telephone is ringing. Sometimes called ring
detect.
A-10 Glossary

RS-232 cable A standard type of cable adopted by EIA to ensure uniformity of interfacing
signals between two computers and/or peripherals. RS-232 cables typically
plug into male or female 9-pin or 25-pin D sockets on your computer, modem,
or other peripheral devices.
RTS An abbreviation for request to send. RTS is an RS-232 signal from a computer
to a modem that indicates the computer has data to send to a remote system.
Scroll bar In a GUI, a vertical scroll bar appears on the right-hand side of a window and
the horizontal scroll bar appears at the bottom of a window. Each scroll bar
contains a scroll box, which may be moved by dragging (see drag) it to see
different areas of a window. You can also click on the bar or the arrow buttons
on either end.
Select To select is to mark an item by clicking (see click) on it or by highlighting it
using keyboard commands. See also choose.
Send The process of sending a file to another computer. Since some people find the
term upload confusing, HyperACCESS and this manual use the term send.
Serial port See communications port.
Server A computer on a network that provides specialized services to other computers
on the network. Among services provided by servers are: shared printers,
databases, and communications. Some servers are dedicated to providing their
specialized service, others provide multiple services or are also used as
workstations. See Workstation and Client.
Shortcut key A key combination or sequence that can be used in place of selecting a menu
item. For example, you can use the shortcut key C+X instead of selecting the
Edit/Cut menu item.
Sign-on (or sign on) HyperACCESS and this manual use the terms log on and logon, in place of
sign on and sign-on.
Software handshaking A method by which a system that is receiving data can send control characters
to the computer that is sending, to indicate when it is ready to receive data.
Start bits Bits that are added to the beginning of a data character (see data bits) during
asynchronous communications.
Stop bits Bits that are added to the end of a data character (see data bits) during
asynchronous communications.
Streaming A method of data transmission that lets the sending system transmit data until
all are sent or it receives a negative acknowledgment from the receiving system.
Upon receipt of a negative acknowledgment, the sender retransmits the failed
block and all subsequent blocks.
Glossary A-11

Synchronous A method of communicating characters between modems. With synchronous


communication, the two modems coordinate transmission using special
sequences of control characters. See asynchronous communication.
Syntax The rules governing the use of a programming language.
System In HyperACCESS, a computer with which you can communicate via modem,
cable, or other communications device.
System menu Same as control menu.
TAPI The Windows 95 telephony application programming interface (TAPI) arbi-
trates among applications that want to share the same communications ports
and devices. For example, while HyperACCESS Host waits for an incoming
call, you can send and receive faxes or have HyperACCESS make a normal
outgoing call without disconnecting Host.
TCP/IP A network protocol primarily used by UNIX workstations, servers, and some
mainframe computers. Other vendors provide software to interface PCs to
these networks. HyperACCESS provides a telnet interface to UNIX worksta-
tions via TCP/IP.
TD An abbreviation for transmit data. TD is an RS-232 signal that carries data
from a computer to a modem.
Telnet A communications interface between two computers. Telnet is typically used
to access UNIX workstations and some mainframe computers.
Terminal A device consisting of keyboard and screen that can be connected to a host
computer to allow you to operate the host computer. Typically, the function of
communications software is to make your computer act like, or emulate, a
terminal.
Terminal emulation A feature that allows a computer to mimic the behavior of different types of
terminals.
Text box See Edit field.
Text editor A program that allows you to create and edit files that contain printable or
displayable text. For example, Windows Notepad is a text editor.
Text file A file containing ASCII characters. These characters are normally printable.
For certain applications, control codes are embedded in the text to inform the
program that is processing the text to take some action.
Title bar In a GUI, the title bar appears at the top of the window to identify that window
with a window title, such as HyperACCESS for Windows. The title bar of an
A-12 Glossary

active window is displayed with a different color or intensity than inactive


windows.
Tool palette A floating window of buttons (see Toolbar). In HyperACCESS, you can dock
the tool palette along any window border by dragging the palette to the location
where you to dock it.
Toolbar A detachable row of buttons that provide shortcuts to commonly used menu
selections. When detached, the Toolbar is often called a tool palette.
ToolTip A single line of help for Toolbar buttons that appears when the mouse pointer
lingers over the button.
Transmit data signal See TD.
TTY TTY stands for Teletype. A Teletype terminal is the simplest type and is
compatible with more remote systems than any other type. Its distinguishing
feature is that data come onto its screen one line at a time, similar to the way
the data would print on a printer.
UNIX A multitasking/multiuser operating system originally developed by AT&T.
UNIX primarily appears on engineering workstations and scientific computers.
Upload To upload is to send a file to another computer (contrast with download). Since
some users find the terms upload and download confusing, this manual uses
the terms send and receive.
Wildcard characters Wildcard characters, also known as global filename characters, are the symbols
* and ?, which represent unknown or unspecified characters in filenames. See
your DOS or OS/2 manual for details.
Window title In a GUI, this appears in the title bar at the top of the window to identify the
name of the window, such as HyperACCESS for Windows.
Windowed transmission A method of data transmission that sends one or more packets and then waits
for acknowledgment from the receiving system. The opposite of streaming.
Workspace In a GUI, the workspace is the window area youll use to work with and display
information.
Workstation A computer on a network that is used by a person.
Xmodem protocol Xmodem is a commonly used error-free file transfer protocol. In this protocol,
files are transferred as blocks of data along with error-checking codes. ASCII
control characters are used to synchronize the transfer.
XOFF/XON A method of flow control or software handshaking used primarily during
transfer of text or text-like data.
Glossary A-13

Ymodem protocol Ymodem (also known as Ymodem Batch) is a 1024-byte packet, error-
correcting protocol capable of transferring single files or groups of files.
Ymodem is generally faster than Xmodem over noise-free lines, but slower
over noisy lines, as it must retransmit 1024-byte packets rather than 128 bytes
as with Xmodem. (Ymodem is similar to 1K Xmodem, except that 1K
Xmodem transfers only one file at a time without a filename.)
Ymodem-G protocol Ymodem G is a variant of Ymodem that does away
A common misconception
with packet-by-packet acknowledgments and sim- is that Ymodem G is the
ply aborts the transfer if an error is detected. Ymo- best protocol to use with
dem G should be used only with error-correcting MNP or other error-
modems or inherently error-free connections. Ymo- correcting modems.
dem G is clearly faster than Ymodem, Xmodem, and
Kermit, but there is a common misconception that Ymodem G is the best
protocol to use with error-correcting modems. In reality, HyperProtocol and
Zmodem are much better because they can correct errors the modems cannot
sense (such as those introduced by the computers or serial ports) with no
penalty in performance.
Zmodem protocol Zmodem is an error-correcting, streaming protocol that has become popular
on bulletin boards. Next to HyperProtocol, it is the fastest, most desirable
protocol. Like HyperProtocol, it maintains its speed despite propagation
delays, though its efficiency is slightly less (98% versus 99%), and it lacks
compression. Zmodem can send single files or file groups.
A-14 Glossary
Appendix B
Modems, Communications Ports, and Cables

HyperACCESS supports Windows 95 Telephony Application Interface (TAPI). This


gives you access to hundreds of specific modem brands and models, generic modem
types, ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) Terminal adapters, and RS-232
direct-cable connections. HyperACCESSs ability to operate such a wide variety of
devices makes it surprisingly easy to get started. All you do is set up your commu-
nications hardware and software using Windows Add New Hardware wizard, install
HyperACCESS as described in Chapter 2, and youre ready to go. To help you get
your hardware set up properly, this appendix provides general information on
installing modems (including cables for external modems), defining and configuring
a modem, communications port selection for HyperACCESS, and direct (computer-
to-computer) connection cables.

Installing an External Modem

Most computers are configured with at least one serial port (identified as COM1),
and some have a second serial port, usually identified as COM2. Check your computer
manual to locate and identify a serial port connector. If your computer does not have
an available serial port and youre planning on using an external modem, you will
need to buy and install an adapter card with a serial port.
An external modem is connected to a computers serial port with a standard RS-232
cable. A standard cable, sometimes called a modem cable or straight-through cable,
has one of two types of connectors. The first type called a DB-25 connector
can have as many as 25 pins. The second type called a DB-9 connector, which is
much smaller can have up to 9 pins. You will need to be sure that each connector
on your cable matches the modem and computers serial port. The following listings
describe the pin connections and signals (see Appendix A, Glossary, for definitions
of acronyms following each pin number) for each type of cable.
B-2 Modems, Communications Ports, and Cables

Standard Modem Cable 25-pin (DB-25)


to 9-pin (DB-9) Connectors

Pin # on 25-pin Pin # on 9-pin


cable end cable end
2 (TD) Connects to 3 (TD)

3 (RD) Connects to 2 (RD)

4 (RTS) Connects to 7 (RTS)

5 (CTS) Connects to 8 (CTS)

7 (GND) Connects to 5 (GND)

8 (CD) Connects to 1 (CD)

20 (DTR) Connects to 4 (DTR)

22 (RNG) Connects to 9 (RNG)

Standard Modem Cable 25-pin (DB-25)


to 25-pin (DB-25) Connectors

Pin # on 25-pin Pin # on 25-pin


cable end cable end
2 (TD) Connects to 2 (TD)

3 (RD) Connects to 3 (RD)

4 (RTS) Connects to 4 (RTS)

5 (CTS) Connects to 5 (CTS)

7 (GND) Connects to 7 (GND)

8 (CD) Connects to 8 (CD)

20 (DTR) Connects to 20 (DTR)

22 (RNG) Connects to 22 (RNG)


Installing an Internal Modem B-3

Standard Modem Cable 9-pin (DB-9)


to 9-pin (DB-9) Connectors

Pin # on 9-pin Pin # on 9-pin


cable end cable end
2 (RD) Connects to 2 (RD)

3 (TD) Connects to 3 (TD)

7 (RTS) Connects to 7 (RTS)

8 (CTS) Connects to 8 (CTS)

5 (GND) Connects to 5 (GND)

1 (CD) Connects to 1 (CD)

4 (DTR) Connects to 4 (DTR)

9 (RNG) Connects to 9 (RNG)

The correct type of cable can be easily identified with an ohmmeter or other continuity
tester by checking pins 2 and/or 3 at each end based on the connector type as shown
in the above listings. If the TD (transmit data) pin on one end is connected to the TD
pin on the other end, it is a standard modem cable used to connect data terminal
equipment (DTE) devices, such as your computer, to data communications equipment
(DCE), such as a modem. If the TD pin is connected to the RD (receive data) pin, it
is a null modem cable used for direct computer-to-computer connections described
later in this appendix. Now you are ready to define and configure the modem.

Installing an Internal Modem

Install your internal modem according to instructions in your modem manual. Win-
dows works with modems configured as COM1, COM2, COM3, and COM4. When
you set your modems switches or jumpers, be sure to avoid port address and IRQ
(interrupt request) settings that are already in use. Using the same address or IRQ as
an existing device (e.g., serial port or mouse) can prevent both from working. If you
use an address or IRQ other than the common COM1 or COM2 settings you must
B-4 Modems, Communications Ports, and Cables

configure Windows 95 to recognize the port. This happens automatically when you
use the Add New Hardware wizard.

Defining and Configuring the Modem

For trouble-free operation with Windows, modems with mechanical switches should
be configured as described here. Few of todays modems have such switches, because
they rely on commands issued by Windows and HyperACCESS to establish their
configuration. Modems that do have switches should be configured according to the
following general guidelines:
CD switch the modem switch that affects the CD (carrier detect) signal
should be set so that CD turns on only when a connection exists, rather than
being held constantly on.
DTR switch the modem switch that affects the DTR (data terminal ready)
signal should be set so that the modem disconnects in response to DTR, rather
than ignoring DTR.
Other switches other switches should generally be set so that the modem
responds to Hayes commands, echoes modem commands, and gives visible,
verbal responses.
If your modem isnt listed by name in Windows Add New Hardware wizard, you can
still get excellent results by selecting one of the following:
Standard Modem Types
For modems that use basic or extended AT commands. Older
modems typically have mechanical configuration switches that
should be set as described above. Select an entry from the
Models list based on the speed of your modem.
VoiceView Modem Types
For modems that support concurrent voice and data operation.

Changing Your Modem Selection

You may want to change modem selection for any of the following reasons:
To fix an incorrect selection that you made earlier.
Defining and Configuring the Modem B-5

Because youve moved your modem from one port to another.


Because youve bought a new modem.
You can change modems using the Communications properties sheet. When you
change modems, all entries using that port are affected.

Customizing Modem Support

Most users find Windows TAPI predefined modem support ideal and never encounter
a need for customizing their modem definition. But when the need arises, or if you
simply want to do things your own way, TAPI provides some customization support.
Here are a few instances where customizing your modem might be required:
Calls are going well for the most part, but you need to make minor changes to
handle calls to specific systems. (For entry-specific changes, see Modifying
Connections on page 3-59.)
Youve selected a specific or generic modem name that matches or closely
approximates your modem, but you conclude that you need to change the
modems definition to achieve desired performance. (Follow instructions in the
following section, Custom Modem Specification, to make global changes.)

Custom Modem Specification

HyperACCESS lets you modify predefined modem definitions through TAPI. To


modify a modem definition, you must access the Advanced Connection Settings
dialog (see Figure B-1). To do this:
1. Access the Communications properties sheet by performing one of the actions
described in Changing Property Sheet Settings on page 3-53, and select the
Communications properties sheet tab.
2. In the Communications properties sheet, click the Communications Settings...
push button.
3. This displays the TAPI modem properties dialog. Select the Connection tab and
then click the Advanced... button to displays the Advanced Connection Set-
tings dialog shown in Figure B-1.
The Advanced Connection Settings dialog lets you make changes to the listed
modem for the current connection.
B-6 Modems, Communications Ports, and Cables

Figure B-1.
The Advanced Con-
nection Settings dia-
log lets you define
custom modem
setup strings.

The text boxes and options in this dialog are:


Use error control If your modem supports it, this check box lets you enable or
disable error control. Selecting this check box enables the
additional check boxes in this group. They let you enable or
disable error control during connection, compression of data,
and cellular transmission protocol (required for cellular
modems).
Use flow control This check box lets you enable or disable transmission flow
control. Selecting this check box enables the additional radio
buttons in this group. They let you enable or disable Hard-
ware (RTS/CTS) provided by your modem, or Software
(XON/XOFF) flow control if your modem or cable cant sup-
port hardware control.
Modulation type This drop-down list lets you select the type of modulation
used by your modem. Most modems use Standard.
Extra Settings You can add initialization strings (see About Modem Initial-
ization Strings, below) in this edit field.
Record a log file Selecting this check box creates the file Modemlog.txt in
your Windows folder. This file may help diagnose connection
problems.
Communications Port Selection for HyperACCESS B-7

About Modem Initialization Strings


Modem initialization strings are a series of modem commands that software uses to
configure your modem. Windows has predefined initialization strings for hundreds of
todays most popular modems. You can add to these predefined strings as described
in sections above. This section provides some guidelines that should help you as you
work with these strings.
Each time you place a call, Windowss predefined modem initialization strings begin
by returning the modem to its factory default settings. Next, the strings set every detail
necessary to ensure compatibility with the broadest possible range of remote systems.
This configuration procedure is recommended as the most reliable and well-behaved
approach in todays multitasking and networked environments, where the modems
configuration can be changed by other users or other applications without notice.

Communications Port Selection for HyperACCESS

You can select the appropriate communications port as you install the modem with
the Add New Hardware wizard, when you install HyperACCESS, or by using the
Communications properties sheet. HyperACCESS automatically takes care of making
port settings (that is, setting number of data bits, number of stop bits, and parity).
Which port you can use depends on the type of computer you have and how you have
defined and configured the modem. To customize port settings, follow these steps to
display the Settings dialog:
1. Access the Communications properties sheet by performing one of the tech-
niques described in Changing Property Sheet Settings on page 3-53.
2. In the Communications properties sheet, click the Change... push button in the
Connect Via group box.
3. Select the connection you want to modify, and click the Modify Connection...
button. What happens next depends on the type of connection you select, but is
similar to the procedure for new connections. For modem or modem pool type
connections, see Modem or Modem Pool Connections on page 3-20. For direct
cable connections, see Direct Cable Connections on page 3-22.
B-8 Modems, Communications Ports, and Cables

Shared Ports and Modems on Networks

Before you can use shared communications devices (ports or modems) on Microsoft
LAN Manager, and other LAN Manager-based networks, you must install modem
sharing software from a third party vendor. Once youve installed this software, you
can create a TAPI modem using network device names. HyperACCESS can use any
TAPI-defined modem.

Direct Computer-to-Computer (Null Modem) Connections

There are two basic types of RS-232 cables: standard cables, which are used to connect
a PC to a modem, and null modem cables, which are used to connect one PC to another.
The following listings describe pin connections and signals (see Appendix A, Glos-
sary, for definitions of acronyms) used by HyperACCESS for each type of null modem
cable.

Null Modem Cable for connecting a 9-pin COM port


to a 25-pin COM port

Pin # on 25-pin Pin # on 9-pin


cable end cable end
2 (TD) Connects to 2 (RD)

3 (RD) Connects to 3 (TD)

4 (RTS) Connects to 8 (CTS)

5 (CTS) Connects to 7 (RTS)

7 (GND) Connects to 5 (GND)

6 (DSR) and Connects to 4 (DTR)


8 (CD)

20 (DTR) Connects to 1 (CD) and


6 (DSR)
Communications Port Selection for HyperACCESS B-9

Null Modem Cable for connecting a 25-pin COM port


to a 25-pin COM port

Pin # on 25-pin Pin # on 25-pin


cable end cable end
2 (TD) Connects to 3 (RD)

3 (RD) Connects to 2 (TD)

4 (RTS) Connects to 5 (CTS)

5 (CTS) Connects to 4 (RTS)

6 (DSR) and Connects to 20 (DTR)


8 (CD)

7 (GND) Connects to 7 (GND)

20 (DTR) Connects to 6 (DSR) and


8 (CD)

Null Modem Cable 9-pin (DB-9) to


9-pin (DB-9) Connectors

Pin # on one Pin # on other


cable end cable end
1 (CD) and Connects to 4 (DTR)
6 (DSR)

2 (RD) Connects to 3 (TD)

3 (TD) Connects to 2 (RD)

4 (DTR) Connects to 1 (CD) and


6 (DSR)

5 (GND) Connects to 5 (GND)

7 (RTS) Connects to 8 (CTS)

8 (CTS) Connects to 7 (RTS)


B-10 Modems, Communications Ports, and Cables
Appendix C
ASCII Characters

The following table shows the standard ASCII character codes and extended ASCII
character codes. The first 32 are called control characters and are not displayed in an
application, such as HyperACCESS. To type them, press and hold C and type the
character indicated below, such as C+A. The next 96 are the standard ASCII character
codes for letters, numbers, punctuation, and symbols, which you type using the regular
keys on your keyboard. The last 128, called extended ASCII characters, are graphics
characters and other special characters used in ANSI terminal emulation. To obtain an
extended ASCII character, press and hold A, type the decimal value shown in the Key
column (including the leading zero) on the numeric keypad, then release A.
Click the following hypertext link to see the ASCII character table.
C-2
Appendix D
Terminal Emulator Characteristics

Introduction

HyperACCESS emulates a wide variety of computer terminals so that you can call
and communicate with different systems. Each emulator allows you to see text and
respond to screen control codes in a way that closely resembles that type of terminal.
If the terminal has keys that your computer lacks, the emulator defines other keys
you can use in their place. HyperACCESS includes emulators for the following:
ADDS Viewpoint.
ADM 3A (Lear Siegler).
ANSI (American National Standards Institute).
CompuServe (CompuServe Information System).
DG210 and DG211.
IBM 3101 (IBM 3101 series terminals).
IBM 3278 (IBM 3278 series terminals).
SCO ANSI
TTY (Teletype).
TV910, TV912, TV920, TV925, and TV950 (Televideo terminals).
VT52, VT100, VT102, VT220, and VT320 (DEC terminals).
Wyse 50 and Wyse 60.
Most people find the keys defined by HyperACCESSs emulators to be quite
satisfactory. But you can easily define new keys to replace or supplement the original
keys by creating macros and assigning them to keys as described in Creating
Keyboard Macros on page 3-71.

Terminal Emulators and Their Settings

This appendix provides information about each terminal emulator and its optional
settings (or parameters). Settings common to all emulators appear on the Terminal
Emulator properties sheet (see Terminal Emulator Properties Sheet on page 4-43).
Since HyperACCESS supports additional settings for each emulator, each terminal
emulator also has its own Terminal Settings dialog. Settings you specify on the
Terminal Emulator properties sheet and the Terminal Settings dialog are unique
for each phonebook entry. Even if phonebook entries share the same emulator, they
still have their own settings and macros.
D-2 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

There are several ways to access an emulators Terminal Settings dialog. For
detailed instruction see Changing Terminal Emulator Settings on page 3-55.

Common Emulator Characteristics

All terminal emulators supported by HyperACCESS have a set of common config-


urable characteristics. This section defines the common settings on the Terminal
Emulator properties sheet, see Figure D-1.

Figure D-1.
The Terminal
Emulator properties
sheet defines which
emulator you want to
use and how you
want the emulator to
behave.

Function, Arrow, and Ctrl Key Act as

This group box has two radio buttons that let you specify whether these keys should
perform as Terminal keys or as System keys.
Common Emulator Characteristics D-3

Backspace Key Sends

This group box has three radio buttons that let you determine what HyperACCESS
sends the remote system each time you press B. Your choices are:
Ctrl+H Send the value associated with C+H ASCII backspace
(08H).
Del Send the value associated with Del (7FH).
Ctrl+H, Space, Send an ASCII backspace, replace the character at that posi-
Ctrl+H tion with a space character, and backspace again. This pro-
vides a destructive backspace for systems that only provide a
nondestructive backspace.

Cursor

This group box has two radio buttons that select between an Underline and Block
cursor. In addition, the Blink check box causes HyperACCESS to display a blinking
cursor when selected, and a nonblinking cursor when unselected.

Number of Rows and Columns

These two spin buttons and their associated edit fields let you specify the terminal
screen height (Rows) and width (Columns). You can specify a minimum of 2 and a
maximum of 64 rows, and a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 132 columns. The
Default push button returns the number of rows and columns to appropriate settings
for the selected terminal.
This feature lets you display wide (or long) screens of data without issuing scroll
commands to the host. Check with your systems administrator before using this feature
to verify that your host computer supports terminals with more rows or columns.
D-4 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

Emulator-Unique Characteristics

ADDS Viewpoint

The emulator supports ADDS Viewpoint terminals. The following keys are supported:

Instead of this key Use this key


F1 through F3 1 through 3
Shft-F1 through Shft-F3 S+1 through S+3
Return e
Shft-up, down, right, or left u, d, l, or r
arrows
Shft-Home H
Tab T

Terminal Settings

There are no emulator-unique settings for the ADDS Viewpoint emulator.

ADM 3A Emulator

The ADM 3A emulator supports the Lear Siegler ADM 3A terminal. A+I performs
the same function as the ADM 3A terminals Here Is key, which sends the answerback
message entered on the ASCII Sending menu. You can use the keys listed below:

Instead of this key Use this key


Here Is A+I
Clear A+C
Rubout D
Emulator-Unique Characteristics D-5

Instead of this key Use this key


Linefeed C+e
Break C+k

Terminal Settings

There are no emulator-unique settings for the ADM 3A emulator.

ANSI Emulator

The ANSI emulator supports American National Standards


Institute displays. HyperACCESS completely supports the Not all fonts contain the
ANSI display standard. This emulator is most often used ANSI graphics characters
needed for proper terminal
with computerized bulletin boards and other remote systems emulation. Using a font
that send graphics characters or ANSI color codes. without graphics charac-
ters may produce unusual
results.

Terminal Settings

Figure D-2 shows the ANSI Terminal Settings dialog.

Figure D-2.
The ANSI Terminal
Settings dialog.

The settings in this box are:


IBM PC scan codes Selecting this check box causes the ANSI emulator to send
(Doorway) PC scan codes (generated by your keyboard) when you press
keys, rather than the ASCII values normally associated with
the keys. This facilitates remote execution of programs or
BBSs that support Doorway modes.
D-6 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

Use Windows Select this check box to have HyperACCESS use the Win-
drivers for host- dows default printer driver for host initiated printing. Leave
controlled printing the box unchecked to have data pass directly to the printer in
host-controlled printing.

CompuServe

This emulator simplifies file transfers with CompuServe B+ protocol and is used
solely with CompuServe Information Service. With this emulator, you can initiate file
transfers just by commanding CompuServe to send or receive files (you dont need to
select Transfer/Send or Transfer/Receive). When using this emulator, you should config-
ure CompuServe to treat your computer as an ANSI terminal (to begin the configuration
process, enter GO TERMINAL at the CompuServe prompt).

Terminal Settings

There are no emulator-unique settings for the CompuServe emulator.

DG210 & DG211

The Data General DG210 and DG211 emulators support the following keyboard
mapping:

Instead of this key Use this key


Cmd+Shift+Print C+A+P
Shift+Mode+Home C+A+H
Home Keypad 5 (NumLock off)
Erase Page C+L
Erase EOL C+K
F1 through F10 1 through 0
F11 through F15 A+1 through A+5
Shift+F1 through Shift+F10 S+1 through S+0
Emulator-Unique Characteristics D-7

Instead of this key Use this key


Shift+F11 through S+A+1 through S+A+5
Shift+F15
Ctrl+Shift+F1 through C+S+1 through C+S+0
Ctrl+Shift+F10
Ctrl+Shift+F11 through C+S+A+1 through C+S+A+5
Ctrl+Shift+F15
C1 H
C2 U
C3 n
C4 N
Shift+C1 S+H
Shift+C2 S+U
Shift+C3 S+n
Shift+C4 S+N

Terminal Settings

There are no emulator-unique settings for Data General DG210 and DG211 emulation.

IBM 3101
The IBM 3101 emulator supports both character mode and block mode of IBM 3101
series terminals. You can use the following keys:

Instead of this key Use this key


PF1 through PF8 1 through 8
Alt-alphanumeric key C+alphanumeric key
Break C+k
Cancel C+0
Clear C+U
D-8 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

Instead of this key Use this key


Del C+B
Del Char D
Del Line C+l
Erase EOS C+N
Erase EOL/EOF C+n
Erase Input C+H
Ins Char I
Ins Line C+r
Newline e
Print S+1
Print Line S+2
Print Msg S+3
Reset A+0
Send C+1
Send Line C+2
Send Msg C+3
Tab and ShiftTab T and S+T

Details that you would set with dip switches on an IBM 3101 terminal are set on menus
in HyperACCESS.
Emulator-Unique Characteristics D-9

Terminal Settings

Figure D-3 shows the IBM3101 Terminal Settings dialog.

Figure D-3.
The IBM3101
Terminal Settings
dialog.

The settings in this box are:


Turnaround This group box provides four radio buttons that let you
Character choose the character used to designate ends of data blocks
exchanged with the remote system.
Transmission This group box has two radio buttons that select whether data
Mode is transmitted as individual characters or blocks. Select
Character to send each character as soon as it is typed. Select
Block to have characters that you type sent only when you
press the Send key.
Remote Screen Select this check box (the default) to let the remote system
Clearing clear your screen.
Uppercase only When selected, this check box forces all incoming text to
uppercase letters.
Overtype mode When selected (the default), this check box places the Termi-
nal panel in overtype mode. When unselected, typed charac-
ters are inserted at the cursor position.
D-10 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

IBM 3278

Use this asynchronous terminal emulator for communicat-


ing with IBM minicomputers or mainframes that: When using IBM 3278,
identify yourself to the IBM
Are equipped with an IBM 7171, IBM 3708, or similar mainframe as a VT100 ter-
protocol converter, or minal. The IBM 3278 emu-
lator supports screen
Are running the Yale ASCII protocol conversion pro- control codes of a VT100,
gram, or while providing keys simi-
lar to an IBM 3270 or 3278
Have equivalent, built-in protocol conversion capabil- series terminal.
ities, as with the IBM 9370 or AS/400 computers.
You can use the following keys:

Instead of this key Use this key


PF1 through PF10 1 through 0
PF11 through PF20 C+1 through C+0
PF21 through PF30 S+1 through
S+0
PF31 through PF36 A+1 through A+6
PA1 through PA3 A+7, A+8, A+9
Break C+k
Character error reset C+R
Clear A+C
Column Tab T
Column Backtab S+T
Delete character D
Erase EOF A+E
Field Tab C+r
Field Backtab C+l
Indent A+I
Insert mode I
Master reset C+G
Emulator-Unique Characteristics D-11

Instead of this key Use this key


Newline C+e or C+J
Redisplay A+D
Type-ahead purge C+X
Undent A+U

If the mainframe operator has redefined the protocol converters VT100 conversion
table, keys may not work as shown. You may need to define new keys as described
in Creating Keyboard Macros on page 3-71.

Terminal Settings

There are no emulator-unique settings for IBM 3278 emulation.


D-12 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

SCO ANSI

The SCO ANSI emulator uses ANSI character sequences with minor modifications
to act like an SCO UNIX operating system console on a PC.

Terminal Settings

Figure D-4 shows the ANSI Terminal Settings dialog.

Figure D-4.
The ANSI Terminal
Settings dialog.

The settings in this box are:


IBM PC scan codes Selecting this check box causes the ANSI emulator to send
(Doorway) PC scan codes (generated by your keyboard) when you press
keys, rather than the ASCII values normally associated with
the keys. This facilitates remote execution of programs or
BBSs that support Doorway modes.
Use Windows Select this check box to have HyperACCESS use the Win-
drivers for host- dows default printer driver for host initiated printing. Leave
controlled printing the box unchecked to have data pass directly to the printer in
host-controlled printing.

TTY
Use the TTY (Teletype) emulator with any system that calls for a TTY terminal, a
Teletype, a glass terminal, or no terminal. This class of terminal, with its simplicity
and wide availability, has become a de facto standard in communications, and you
can access more systems with this emulator than any other. Even systems designed
for use with more sophisticated terminals often provide rudimentary support for TTY
terminals as well. TTY terminals use only regular, alphanumeric keys.
Emulator-Unique Characteristics D-13

Terminal Settings

There are no emulator-unique settings for TTY emulation.

TV910, TV912, TV920, TV925 and TV950

Use TV910, TV912, TV920, TV925, or TV950 to emulate the respective Televideo
terminals. They provide full emulation of conversational (or character) mode, block
mode, local edit mode, protected fields, and selective clear.
You can use the following keys:

Instead of this key Use this key


F1 through F10 1 through 0
F11 and SHIFT-F11 C+1 and A+1
Back tab S+T
Break C+k
Clear space and Shft-Clear C+2 and A+2
space
Char insert and Shft-Char C+3 and A+3
insert
Char delete and Shft-Char C+4 and A+4
delete
Funct <character> C+<character>
and then e
Line insert and Shft-Line in- C+5 and A+5
sert
Line delete and Shft-Line C+6 and A+6
Delete
Line erase and Shft-Line C+7 and A+7
erase
Linefeed C+e or C+J
Page erase and Shft-Page C+8 and A+8
erase
Send and Shft-Send C+9 and A+9
D-14 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

Instead of this key Use this key


Print and Shft-Print C+0 and A+0
Shft-up arrow
U
Shft-down arrow
N
Tab
T

Terminal Settings

Figure D-5 shows the TV910 Terminal Settings dialog.

Figure D-5.
The Televideo 910
Terminal Settings
dialog. The other
Televideo terminal
settings dialogs look
the same.

The settings in this box are:


Edit Mode This group box provides two radio buttons that let you select
between Normal and Block mode.
Overtype mode This check box switches between insert (unselected) and
overtype modes (selected).
Use Windows Select this check box to have HyperACCESS use the Win-
drivers for host- dows default printer driver for host initiated printing. Leave
controlled the box unchecked to have data pass directly to the printer in
printing
host-controlled printing.
Emulator-Unique Characteristics D-15

VT52, VT100, VT102, VT220, and VT320

These DEC emulators support virtually all features of


VT52, VT100, VT102, VT220, and VT320 terminals. Each Application keypad is a
emulator fully supports cursor-control (both ANSI and mode which lets you use
your numeric keypad to
VT52), cursor-memory, cursor-reporting, tab stops, scroll- perform functions. It may
ing regions, half and full-duplex operation, origin mode, and be activated by escape
host-controlled printer operations. sequences received from a
host computer, or you may
The VT220 and VT320 emulators support multinational, activate it yourself using
British, French, French Canadian, German, and ASCII char- the VTxxx Terminal Set-
tings dialog.
acter sets. Double-high characters display as two lines of
identical characters.
Note: HyperACCESS supports mapping of PF1-PF4 to the PCs 1-4 or the row of
keys above the keypad (Num Lock, /, *, and -). Make your selection using the PF1-PF4
mapped to top row of keypad check box. For an example of custom keyboard
mapping see Macro to Remap Keyboard on page 3-73.
The following keys are supported:

Instead of this key Use this key


PF1 (Gold key) through PF4 1 through 4
F1 Hold Screen L
F2 Print Screen S+s or s
F5 Break C+k
F6 through F10 6 through 0
F11-F20 C+1 through C+0
SHIFT-F6 through SHIFT-F10 S+6 through
S+0
SHIFT-F11 through SHIFT-F20 A+1 through A+0
CTRL-2 or CTRL-Space C+@
CTRL-3 E or C+[
CTRL-4 or CTRL-/ C+\
CTRL-5 C+]
CTRL-6 or CTRL-~ C+^
D-16 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

Instead of this key Use this key


CTRL-7 or CTRL-? C+
CTRL-8 D
Backspace B
Break C+k
Delete (labeled <X on VT220/320) D or C+B
Do (or F16) C+6
Find H
Help (or F15) C+5
Insert here I
Keypad Enter + (near keypad)
Keypad comma * (near keypad)
Linefeed C+ e or C+J
Next screen N
Prev screen U
Remove D
Select n

Details that you would define with setup screens on true DEC terminals are set on
menus in HyperACCESS.
Emulator-Unique Characteristics D-17

VT52 Terminal Settings

Figure D-6 shows the VT52 Terminal Settings dialog.

Figure D-6.
The VT52 Terminal
Settings dialog.

The settings in this box are:


PF1-PF4 mapped When selected, this check box maps PF1 - PF4 keys to
to top row of NUM LOCK, /, *, and - on the keypad instead of F1 - F4.
keypad
Alternate Keypad When selected, this check box specifies that the keypad sends
mode application codes that control programs running on the host.
Restore Default Clicking this push button replaces tab settings the host has
Tab Settings sent with tab settings from the ASCII Receiving and ASCII
Sending properties sheets.
D-18 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

VT100 & VT102 Terminal Settings

Figure D-7 shows the VT100 Terminal Settings dialog.

Figure D-7.
The VT100 Terminal
Settings dialog. The
VT102 Terminal Set-
tings dialog looks the
same.

The settings in this box are:


PF1-PF4 mapped When selected, this check box maps PF1 - PF4 keys to
to top row of NUM LOCK, /, *, and - on the keypad instead of F1 - F4.
keypad
Keypad When selected, this check box specifies that the keypad sends
application mode application codes that control programs running on the host.
Cursor keypad When selected, cursor keys (arrow keys) send Normal codes,
mode which move the cursor. When unselected, the cursor keys
send application codes, which control remote applications.
132 column mode When selected, this check box displays 132 characters hori-
zontally in the Terminal panel.
Use Windows Select this check box to have HyperACCESS use the Win-
drivers for host- dows default printer driver for host initiated printing. Leave
controlled the box unchecked to have data pass directly to the printer in
printing
host-controlled printing.
Restore Default Clicking this push button replaces tab settings the host has
Tab Settings sent with tab settings from the ASCII Receiving and ASCII
Sending properties sheets.
Character set This drop-down list lets you specify the national character set
used.
Emulator-Unique Characteristics D-19

VT220 & VT320 Terminal Settings

Figure D-8 shows the VT220 Terminal Settings dialog.

Figure D-8.
The VT220 Terminal
Settings dialog. The
VT320 Terminal Set-
tings dialog looks the
same.

The settings in this box are:


PF1-PF4 mapped When selected, this check box maps PF1 - PF4 keys to
to top row of NUM LOCK, /, *, and - on the keypad instead of F1 - F4.
keypad
Keypad When selected, this check box specifies that the keypad sends
application mode application codes that control programs running on the host.
Cursor keypad When selected, cursor keys (arrow keys) send Normal codes,
mode which move the cursor. When unselected, the cursor keys
send application codes, which control remote applications.
8 bit control codes When this is selected, your PC sends 8-bit control sequences.
When unselected, your PC sends the earlier 7-bit sequences.
User-defined keys When selected, allows user-defined outputs to be sent to your
allowed terminal by the host for SHIFT-F6 thru SHIFT-F20.
Use Windows Select this check box to have HyperACCESS use the Win-
drivers for host- dows default printer driver for host initiated printing. Leave
controlled the box unchecked to have data pass directly to the printer in
printing
host-controlled printing.
Restore Default Clicking this push button replaces tab settings the host has
Tab Settings sent with tab settings from the ASCII Receiving and ASCII
Sending properties sheets.
D-20 Terminal Emulator Characteristics

Character set This drop-down list lets you specify the national character set
used.

Wyse 50 and Wyse 60

Use Wyse 50 or Wyse 60 to emulate the respective Wyse terminals. They provide full
emulation of conversational (or character) mode, block mode, local edit mode,
protected fields, and selective clear.
The following keys are supported:

Instead of this key Use this key


NEXT PAGE N
PREV PAGE U
INS Char C+I
INS Line A+I
DEL Char C+D
DEL Line A+D
CLR Line n or C+n
CLR Screen S+n or A+n
Ins S+I
Repl I
Print s
Send A+s
F11 through F16 A+1 through A+6
S+F11 through S+F16 A+S+1 through
A+S+6
C+F11 through C+F16 A+C+1 through A+C+6
C+S+F11 through A+C+S+1 through
C+ S+F16 A+C+S+6
Emulator-Unique Characteristics D-21

Wyse 50 and Wyse 60 Terminal Settings

Figure D-9 shows the Wyse Terminal Settings dialog.

Figure D-9.
The Wyse Terminal
Settings dialog.

The Terminal Status Line group box lets you select from among three radio button
choices. The choices are:
Standard This radio button displays a status line with the current time
and cursor location.
Extended This radio button displays a status line with editing messages.
Selecting this check box replaces the time and cursor location
with editing status messages.
Invisible Selecting this radio button hides the terminal status line.
The Corner Key (Scroll Lock) group box lets you select from among two radio button
choices. The choices are:
Hold Select this radio button to have the L key behave like the
Wyse Hold key.
Funct Select this radio button to have the L key behave like the
Wyse Funct key.
Use Windows Select this check box to have HyperACCESS use the Win-
drivers for host- dows default printer driver for host initiated printing. Leave
controlled the box unchecked to have data pass directly to the printer in
printing
host-controlled printing.
D-22 Terminal Emulator Characteristics
Appendix E
File Transfer Protocols

HyperACCESS offers a wide variety of protocols: HyperProtocol (our own state-of-


the-art protocol), Zmodem, Ymodem, Ymodem G, 1K-Xmodem, Xmodem CRC,
Xmodem Checksum, CompuServe B+, and Kermit protocols. Having many protocols
gives you the ability to transfer files with most systems. If a system has more than
one file transfer protocol in common with HyperACCESS, you have a choice.
This appendix describes each protocol and gives guidelines on when to use each. Use
the File Transfer properties sheet (see page 4-49) to set protocol details.

Protocols and Their Settings

This appendix provides information about each protocol and its optional settings.
Since HyperACCESS supports different settings for each protocol, each protocol has
its own, unique Settings dialog.
There are several ways to access a protocols Settings dialog. For detailed instruc-
tions see Changing File Transfer Protocol Settings on page 3-53.

ASCII (Text) Transfer

When you use Paste from File (to remote computer), Cut to Remote Computer, Copy
to Remote Computer, or Capture to File, HyperACCESS performs ASCII transfers.
E-2 File Transfer Protocols

1K Xmodem

1K Xmodem is a 1024-byte packet, error-correcting protocol similar to Ymodem,


except that it can transfer only one file at a time. Unlike Ymodem, 1K Xmodem doesnt
transfer filenames. Some remote systems that support 1K Xmodem refer to it as
Ymodem. 1K Xmodem settings are:
Error-checking This group box provides three radio buttons to specify the
error-checking method. The default is Auto, which adapts
automatically to the error-checking method of the remote
system. CRC and Checksum are the two alternative error-
checking methods available with this protocol. Certain systems
will require that you set this parameter to Checksum.
Seconds to wait to Use the spin button or edit field to set the number of seconds
receive each your PC waits for each packet to begin. This is normally set to
packet 10. With slower systems such as CompuServe, you may need
to set this as high as 30.
Seconds to wait to Use the spin button or edit field to set the number of seconds
receive each byte your PC waits for each byte in the packet. This is normally set
to 5. With slower systems such as CompuServe, you may
need to set this as high as 10.
Attempts to send Use the spin button or edit field to set how many times your
each packet PC retransmits (or requests retransmission of) each packet.
Normally this is 4. You may want to increase this value for
particularly noisy telephone lines.
Protocols and Their Settings E-3

CompuServe B+

This protocol is for use with CompuServe B+ protocol on


the CompuServe Information Service. The CompuServe B+ If you use the Send or
protocol supports both single- and multiple-file transfers, Receive dialog to select
the Settings... button, use
and is an error-correcting protocol. All you need to do is the Close push button in
command CompuServe to send or receive the desired files. the dialog because this
HyperACCESS automatically transfers the files. To use protocol automatically
this protocol, you must be using the CompuServe emu- starts when commanded
by CompuServe.
lator. CompuServe B+ settings are:
Protocol Type Select either CompuServe B+ (the
default) or Old B by clicking on the appropriate radio button.
Packet size Use drop-down list to enter the packet size used for transmis-
sion. The list has potential packet sizes in 128-byte increments.
The default packet size is 512. The minimum is 128 and
maximum is 1024.
Quoting level This drop-down list has four choices:
Standard quoting
Minimal quoting (the default)
Extended quoting
Maximum quoting
E-4 File Transfer Protocols

HyperProtocol

Use HyperProtocol whenever the remote system also has


this protocol. (HyperProtocol is available in all versions of HyperProtocol features
on-the-fly file compres-
HyperACCESS, and on many bulletin board systems.) sion to cut transfer time.
HyperProtocol is the fastest, most reliable protocol, surpass-
ing any other type. Unlike most protocols, its speed is
unaffected by propagation delays common in long-distance
calls or packet-switching networks. HyperProtocol can send single files or file groups.
When sending filenames that contain a semicolon (;), HyperProtocol truncates the
filename at the last character before the semicolon. HyperProtocol also has a maxi-
mum filename length of 170 characters for the first file sent and approximately 270
characters for subsequent files (depending on file size and other attributes). If filena-
mes exceed these limits, HyperACCESS displays an error message.
HyperProtocol settings are:
Respond to Select this check box (the default) to have HyperProtocol
HyperProtocol automatically start sending or receiving when requested by
autostart the remote system. This lets you issue a command to the
remote system to receive or send without worrying about
clicking a button in HyperACCESS.
Compress on the This check box lets you turn data compression on or off. On-
fly the-fly compression is most effective when youre transfer-
ring files that are not already compressed.

Crash Recovery This group box has three option buttons each for receiving and
sending. In both cases, the default is Negotiate. For crash
recovery to work for partially received files, you must have
had the following settings in your Receive dialog when the
transfer failed:
In the If file already exists group box, you must have
had Rename set to either Existing file sequentially or
Existing file using date.
You must have had the Save partial files if transfer is
interrupted check box selected.
Protocols and Their Settings E-5

Note: You can use crash recovery when communicating with


PCs that have a version of HyperProtocol that also supports
this feature.
The available crash recovery options for Receiving are:
Negotiate this selection allows recovery when the
remote system has file recovery enabled.
Never prevents recovery from occurring, even if the
remote system has file recovery enabled.
Always file recovery will occur if the remote system
has recovery set to enable or negotiate.
The available options for Sending are:
Negotiate this selection allows recovery when the
remote system has file recovery enabled.
One time allows recovery during the next file transfer
only, after which the setting reverts to Negotiate. This
prevents inadvertent file recovery, which can damage
files.
Always file recovery occurs if the remote system has
recovery set to enable or negotiate.
Error-checking This group box provides two radio buttons to specify the error-
checking method. The default is CRC. CRC and Checksum are
the two alternative error-checking methods available with this
protocol. Use Checksum for maximum speed, CRC for maxi-
mum reliability.
HyperProtocol Use the spin button or edit field to enter the packet size used
block size for transmission. The spin button increases (or decreases)
packet size in 1- byte increments. The default packet size is
2048 bytes. The maximum is 32767.
Resynchroniza- Use this spin button or edit field to enter a timeout used for
tion timeout wireless links and other slow transfer media when you get no
response errors. The spin button increases (or decreases) the
timeout in 1-second increments. The default timeout is 5 sec-
onds. The minimum is 2 and maximum is 60 seconds.
E-6 File Transfer Protocols

Kermit

Kermit is a widely supported error-correcting protocol that is capable of sending file


groups. While it is versatile and handles noisy connections well, it tends to be slower
than other protocols.
Kermit has a maximum filename length of 90 characters. HyperACCESS displays an
error message if you attempt to send a file with a longer name.
Kermit settings are:
Maximum number Use the spin buttons or edit field to set the packet size you
of bytes per prefer. The actual size is the smaller of your preference and
packet that of the remote system. Normally this should be set to 96.
Smaller settings are desirable only with noisy lines or with
networks that demand smaller packets.
Seconds remote Use the spin buttons or edit field to set the length of time a
system must wait remote system is told to wait for your PC to begin each
for each packet packet. Normally this is set to 5. Use a larger setting if your
PC is very slow.
Error-checking size Use the spin button or edit field to set the error-checking you
prefer. The normal setting is 1 (1-byte checksum). Setting to
2 (2-byte checksum) or 3 (3-byte CRC) is slower, but more
resistant to line errors.
Attempts to send Use the spin button or edit field to set the number of times
each packet your PC retransmits packets damaged by line errors. This
may be valuable for particularly noisy telephone lines.
Packet start char- Use the spin button or edit field to define the character that
acter marks each packets beginning. The most common setting is
1 (01h). With remote systems that require different charac-
ters, enter the decimal ASCII value from Appendix C.
Packet end Use the spin button or edit field to define the character that
character marks each packets end. The most common setting is 13
(0Dh). With remote systems that require different characters,
enter the decimal ASCII value from Appendix C.
Number of pad Use the spin button or edit field to set the number pad charac-
characters ters your PC sends before each packet. The most common
entry is 0, which uses none. With remote systems that need
pad characters, a common setting is 10, which sends 10
characters.
Protocols and Their Settings E-7

Pad character Use the spin button or edit field to set the pad character your
PC sends before each packet. The most common entry is 0,
which is the null character. With remote systems that require
different characters, enter the decimal ASCII value from
Appendix C.

Xmodem

Xmodem is a relatively simple, 128-byte packet, error-correcting protocol, which


transfers only one file at a time without a filename. Xmodem is generally faster than
Ymodem if the line is noisy, but slower if it is clean, as it transmits 128-byte packets
rather than 1024 bytes as with Ymodem. Xmodem settings are:
Error-checking This group box provides three radio buttons to specify the
error-checking method. The default is Auto, which adapts
automatically to the error-checking method of the remote
system. CRC and Checksum are the two alternative error-
checking methods available with this protocol. Certain systems
will require that you set this parameter to Checksum.
Seconds to wait to Use the spin button or edit field to set the number of seconds
receive each your PC waits for each packet to begin. This is normally set to
packet 10. With slower systems such as CompuServe, you may need
to set this as high as 30.
Seconds to wait to Use the spin button or edit field to set the number of seconds
receive each byte your PC waits for each byte in the packet. This is normally set
to 5. With slower systems such as CompuServe, you may
need to set this as high as 10.
Attempts to send Use the spin button or edit field to set how many times your
each packet PC retransmits (or requests retransmission of) each packet.
Normally this is 4.

Ymodem

Ymodem (also known as Ymodem Batch) is a 1024-byte packet, error-correcting


protocol capable of transferring single files or groups of files. Ymodem is generally
faster than Xmodem over noise-free lines, but slower over noisy lines, as it must
retransmit 1024-byte packets rather than 128 bytes as with Xmodem. (Ymodem is
E-8 File Transfer Protocols

similar to 1K Xmodem, except that 1K Xmodem transfers only one file at a time
without a filename.) Ymodem settings are:
Seconds to wait to Use the spin button or edit field to set the number of seconds
receive each your PC waits for each packet to begin. This is normally set to
packet 10. With slower systems such as CompuServe, you may need
to set this as high as 30.
Seconds to wait to Use the spin button or edit field to set the number of seconds
receive each byte your PC waits for each byte in the packet. This is normally set
to 5. With slower systems such as CompuServe, you may
need to set this as high as 10.
Attempts to send Use the spin button or edit field to set how many times your
each packet PC retransmits (or requests retransmission of) each packet.
Normally this is 4. You may want to increase this value for
particularly noisy telephone lines.

Ymodem G

Ymodem G is a variant of Ymodem that does away with


packet-by-packet acknowledgments and simply aborts the A common misconception
transfer if an error is detected. Ymodem G should be used is that Ymodem G is the
only with error-correcting modems or inherently error-free best protocol to use with
MNP or other error-
connections. Ymodem G is clearly faster than Ymodem, correcting modems.
Xmodem, and Kermit, but there is a common misconception
that Ymodem G is the best protocol to use with error-
correcting modems. In reality, HyperProtocol and Zmodem are much better because
they can correct errors the modems cannot sense (such as those introduced by the
computers or serial ports) with no penalty in performance. Ymodem G settings are:
Seconds to wait to Use the spin button or edit field to set the number of seconds
receive each your PC waits for each packet to begin. This is normally set to
packet 10. With slower systems such as CompuServe, you may need
to set this as high as 30.
Seconds to wait to Use the spin button or edit field to set the number of seconds
receive each byte your PC waits for each byte in the packet. This is normally set
to 5. With slower systems such as CompuServe, you may
need to set this as high as 10.
Protocols and Their Settings E-9

Attempts to send Use the spin button or edit field to set how many times your
each packet PC retransmits (or requests retransmission of) each packet.
Normally this is 4. You may want to increase this value for
particularly noisy telephone lines.

Zmodem

Zmodem is an error-correcting, streaming protocol that has become popular on


bulletin boards. Next to HyperProtocol, it is the fastest, most desirable protocol. Like
HyperProtocol, it maintains its speed despite propagation delays, though its efficiency
is slightly less (98% versus 99%), and it lacks compression. Zmodem can send single
files or file groups.
The Zmodem Settings dialog has three group boxes Receiving, Sending, and
Transmission. Parameters in each group are defined in the following sections.

Receiving Parameters
Respond to Select this check box to have HyperACCESS automatically
Zmodem autostart begin receiving as soon as you command the remote system
to send. If this check box is left unselected, you must click the
Receive push button in the Receive dialog to begin receiving.
The default is selected.
If the file already This group consists of two radio buttons. Select either:
exists Follow senders Append/Overwrite option to use
the option specified by the receiving system. This can be
dangerous to your files.
Follow options in Transfer Receive dialog the
default. To use your options specified in the Receive
dialog. You have somewhat more control.
Crash recovery This group consists of three radio buttons. Select either:
Negotiate the default. This lets recovery occur when
file recovery is enabled at the remote system.
Never prevents recovery from occurring, even if the
remote system has file recovery enabled.
Always file recovery will occur if the remote system
has recovery set to enable or negotiate.
E-10 File Transfer Protocols

For crash recovery to work for partially received files, you


must have had the following settings in your Receive dialog
when the transfer failed:
In the If file already exists group box, you must have
had Rename set to either Existing file sequentially or
Existing file using date.
You must have had the Save partial files if transfer is
interrupted check box selected.

Sending Parameters
Append/ This drop-down list has eight options:
Overwrite options None the default. Use this with systems that dont
support Zmodem Management options.
Newer or longer overwrites if file sent has newer time/
date or larger size.
CRC differs overwrites if file sent has different contents.
Append to file adds file sent to end of existing file.
Overwrite overwrites any file having same name as file
sent.
Newer overwrites if file sent has a more recent time/
date.
Length or date differs overwrites if file sent has
different size or time/date.
Refuse rejects file sent if its name matches any existing
file.

Crash recovery This group consists of three radio buttons. Select either:
Negotiate the default. This lets recovery occur when
file recovery is enabled at the remote system.
One-time allows recovery during the next file transfer
only, after which the setting reverts to Negotiate. This
prevents inadvertent file recovery, which can damage
files.
Always file recovery will occur if the remote system
has recovery set to enable or negotiate.
Protocols and Their Settings E-11

Transmission Parameters
Method This group lets you specify error detection and recovery pro-
cedures when youre sending files. The Zmodem protocol lets
the sending system choose whether or not to wait for positive
acknowledgment from the receiving system before sending
additional blocks. If the sending system chooses to wait for
acknowledgment, it can also choose how often it waits. Alter-
natively, the sending system can stream data until transmission
is complete or it receives a negative acknowledgment from the
receiving system. Upon receipt of a negative acknowledgment,
the sender retransmits the failed block and all subsequent
blocks.
Streaming this radio button indicates that
HyperACCESS Zmodem should send in streaming mode
(the default).
Windowed this radio button, with its associated drop-
down list box, indicates that you want Zmodem to stop
and wait for acknowledgment when necessary. The drop-
down list provides options of 2K and 4K bytes.
Packet Use the spin button to set the number of bytes in each packet.
Larger packets mean faster transfers but slower recovery from
errors. Available packet sizes are: 32, 64, 128, 256, and 1024
(the default). Packet size reduces automatically if necessary.
CRC Lets you set the size of error-checking codes used; 16 (the
default) bits is usually adequate. Setting to 32 bits further
enhances reliability, at the expense of speed.
Wait This spin button sets how long Zmodem waits between
attempts to resend packets. Through networks, where the
receiver may lag far behind the sender, you may need to
increase this setting. The default setting is 15 seconds, with a
range of 1 to 99 seconds.
End-of-line Select this check box if youre transferring text files with a
conversion system that requires a line feed character after each carriage
return, which is typical of UNIX systems. The default is
unselected.
E-12 File Transfer Protocols

Control sequences Select this check box if you want Zmodem to replace all con-
use escape codes trol codes with an equivalent series of noncontrol codes. This
may be necessary with networks or remote systems that have
problems transmitting control codes, such as UNIX systems
through TCP/IP.
Appendix F
Command Line Parameters

HyperACCESS Command Line Parameters

When you launch HyperACCESS, you can provide command line parameters that
let you automate common procedures or define options and settings. You can enter
these parameters when you execute HyperACCESS from a command line (hence the
name), or in the HyperACCESS settings notebook.
The available command line parameters are:
/R <program_file> Use this command line parameter to run a script when
HyperACCESS starts. If your program path or filename con-
tains one or more spaces, enclose the entire pathname in
quotes.
/T <Telnet address> Use this command line parameter to connect to a Telnet server
when HyperACCESS starts.
<notebook_entry_file>
Enter the filename (and path if necessary) of an entry that you
want HyperACCESS to open and connect to. Entry files
generally have an .HAW extension. For example, to have
HyperACCESS automatically start with a connection to the
Hilgraeve BBS, you might perform the following steps:
1. Open the HyperACCESS folder (generally,
c:\Program Files\HAWin32\HyperACCESS), and right-click the
HyperACCESS icon.
2. Select Create Shortcut from the pop-up menu. Windows creates a new shortcut
labeled HyperACCESS (2).
3. Right-click on this new icon, and select Properties from the pop-up menu.
4. Select the Shortcut tab in the Properties dialog.
5. In the Target edit field, after the program name, type a space and then the
following text exactly as shown:
"Hilgraeve BBS.haw"
6. Click the OK button.
F-2 Command Line Parameters

7. Right-click the icon again, and select Rename.


8. Modify the name of the shortcut to something like:
Hilgraeve BBS
When you double-click this new icon (it will now have the title Hilgraeve BBS),
Windows starts HyperACCESS, and HyperACCESS starts the Hilgraeve BBS entry.
Index

Symbols Asynchronous adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1


Asynchronous communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
* tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 Auto-answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-36 to 3-39, 6-17
.HHW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-37, 6-17 Autodial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Automatic font sizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-78
A Automatic startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-36 to 3-39, 6-17
Automation menu
Absolute path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1, A-6, A-8
Abort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-86, 5-12
Accelerator key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1 Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17, 4-90, 5-14 to 5-15
Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1 Call Log panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-103
Access privileges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12 Edit Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-88, 5-13
Action menu Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-71, 3-74, 4-88, 5-2, 5-13, 5-15
Insert Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Lists panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-112
Insert Text Query . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Phonebook panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-24
Insert User Id . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-86, 5-6
Insert User Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Recording Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-87
Recording in Progress window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Run. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-86, 5-12
Active window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-12 Runtime Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-87
ActiveDesktop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Terminal panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-85, 5-5
Add Caller dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10 to 6-11 Automation tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-1
Add Passwords dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
ADDS Viewpoint emulator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-1
ADDS VIEWPOINT terminals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-4
B
ADM 3A emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1, D-4 to D-5 Backscroll buffer . . 1-3, 3-45, 3-68, 4-55, 4-58 to 4-59, 4-93,
Advanced Connection Settings dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Alt Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 Backspace key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-3
American National Standards Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-1 Baud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
ANSI BBS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4, 3-62
Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-77, C-1, D-5 Hilgraeve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv, xvii, 2-19
Emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-46, C-1, D-1, D-5 Binary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Answer mode Bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Host. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-36 to 3-38, 6-1 to 6-2 Bitmap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-11
Incoming calls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4 Bits per second
Answering Details dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 See bps
API Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
See HAPI bps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Application Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1 Baud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
AS/400. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-10 Browse Dialogs
ASCII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1 Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8
Character codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8
Transfer (Text) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1 Browse for Folder dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8
ASCII Receiving properties sheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-46 Bulletin Board System
ASCII Sending properties sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-47 See BBS
Assign button push button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 to 5-11 Button
Assign key push button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Capture to file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-46
2 Index

Capture to printer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-49 Call log file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-51


Change notebook view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-27 Call Log panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-99
Connect and record logon . . . . . . . . . . 3-27 to 3-28, 4-27 Automation menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-103
Connect notebook entry. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26, 3-36, 4-27 Edit menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-101
Connect phonebook entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25, 3-28 Edit/Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-102
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-97, 4-104, 4-113, 4-115 Edit/Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-102
Copy to Notebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-113 Edit/Select All. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-102
Copy to Phonebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-15 File menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-100
Create. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1, 5-11 File/Exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-101
Create new notebook entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26, 4-96 File/Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-100
Cut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-97, 4-113 File/Page Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-101
Disconnect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-95 File/Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-101
Establish connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-95, 5-5 File/Print Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-101
Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18, 4-98, 4-104, 4-114, 4-116 File/Save As . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-100
Launch Browser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-40, 4-96 Help menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-104
Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-70, 4-96, 4-98 View/Status Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-103
Modify Host passwords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 View/Toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-103
Modify Host security settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 Window menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-103
New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3, 3-11 Callback number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
Notebook entry settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-53, 4-27 Caller
Open . . . . . . . . . . 3-14, 3-28, 3-73 to 3-74, 4-112, 4-115 Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
Open notebook entry . . . . . . 3-74, 4-26, 4-96, 4-104, 6-3 Default Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12
Paste. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-97 Log on. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
Place trial call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3, 3-65, 4-113 Calling Cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-77
Print . . 3-48, 3-50, 3-70, 4-26, 4-97, 4-104, 4-113, 4-115 Calling multiple systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29
Print Preview . . . . . . . . . 4-26, 4-97, 4-104, 4-113, 4-115 Calling Telnet Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29
Receive files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43, 4-96 Capture Mode group box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-47, 3-49, 4-65
Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-96, 4-113 Capture to File cascade menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-46
Send . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-70, 4-58
Capture to File dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-46, 4-66
Send files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51, 4-96
Capture to Printer cascade menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-50
Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-95, 6-5
Capture to Printer dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-49, 4-64
Size to window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-116
Spelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-97 Capture to Printer dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-49
Start recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-95, 5-6 Carrier Detect signal
Start waiting for calls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4 See CD Signal
Stop waiting for calls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4 Cascade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
Toggle capture to file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-95 CD
Toggle capture to printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-95 Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-97, 4-113 Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Zoom in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-115 Change Calling Card dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-75 to 3-76
Zoom out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-116 Character length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
Button dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-92, 5-11 Chat Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9, 3-71
Buttons for <...> dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18, 4-90 to 4-91 Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-98
Buttons, Rearranging . . . . . 4-26, 4-94, 4-103 to 4-104, 4-112 Check Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
Byte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2 Checksum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
Choose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
Clear to Send signal
C CTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
C language interpreter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 Click . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
Index 3

Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2 HyperProtocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-4


Clipboard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8, 3-68 Zmodem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-9
Colors properties sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-56 CRC error-checking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
COM port Create New Location dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-75
Communications port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1 Ctrl Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Greater than COM4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23 CTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
COM1, COM2,.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3, B-3 Cursor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4, D-3
Combo box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3 Host position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-54
Command button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3 Mouse pointer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Command line execution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12 Customer Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi, 1-4, 2-10
Command line parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-1 BBS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
CommSense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xi, 1-3 Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Communications dialog . 3-19, 3-21 to 3-23, 3-58, 3-60, 3-75, Hilgraeve BBS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xvi
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-78 Internet address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Communications port . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-55, A-3, B-1, B-3, B-7 World Wide Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Multiple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Cyclic Redundancy Check
Communications properties sheet . .3-21 to 3-23, 3-58 to 3-61, CRC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16, 4-29, 4-31, B-7
Direct cable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-41 D
Modem connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31
TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-43 Data bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Communications Settings dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21 Data Carrier Detect signal
Compiling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3 CD or DCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3 Data Communications Equipment
CompuServe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xvi, 3-25, E-3 DCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Data General Dasher emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-6
B+ protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi, E-3
Emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-1, D-6 Data Set Ready
Phone Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25 DSR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3 Data Terminal Equipment
Confirm Phone Numbers dialog . 2-20, 3-65, 3-77, 4-13, 4-40 DTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
Connect dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13 Data Terminal Ready signal
Connect dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21 DTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
DB-25 connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Connect time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3
DB-9 connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Connect Via. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30, 4-43, B-7
DCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Connection dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22 to 3-23
DCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4, B-3
Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19, 4-29
DEC emulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1, D-15
Direct Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22
Modem or modem pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20 Default capture file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-52
WinSock (TCP/IP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22 Default directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-50
Control characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3, C-1 Default Privileges dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-10
Control Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3 Default Privileges dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-9
Copy Delete notebook entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4
Shortcut key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68, 4-102 Delete Notebook Entry dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-17
Copy to File dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45 to 3-46, 4-71 Description dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4, 4-6
Copy to Phonebook dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-108 Description properties sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-28
CR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-3 Details phonebook view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16
Crash recovery DG210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-6
4 Index

DG210 and DG211 emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1 Undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-111


DG211 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-6 EIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-5
Dialing Details dialog . . . 3-34, 3-77, 4-13 to 4-14, 4-31, 4-39 Electronic mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-5
Dialing directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 E-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Dialing Properties dialog . . . . . . . . . . 3-61, 3-75, 3-77 to 3-78 Electronic mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-5
Dialing Rules dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-75 to 3-76 Embedding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4 Emulate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-5
Direct cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20, 3-22, 4-30, 4-41 Emulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-1
COM port greater than COM4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-23 ADM 3A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4 to D-5
Dockable toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-59 to 4-60 ANSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-5
Dockable window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-59 CompuServe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-6
Docked window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-65 DEC VT100, VT220, and VT320. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-15
Docking IBM 3101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-7
Toolbars and windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-59 IBM 3278 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-10
Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-66 TTY (Teletype). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-12
Double-click. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4 TV925 and TV950 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-13
Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-79, A-4, A-12 VIEWPNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-4
Downloading files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-43 Enter Password dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26
Drag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 Enter User ID dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
Drag and drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4, 3-1 to 3-3 Entry-specific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-59
Drop-down combo box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 Error checking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
DSR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 Even parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-8
DTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5, B-3 Existing Connections dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19, 3-24, 3-60
DTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 Extended ASCII characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
DTR signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4 External modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
DTR switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
F
E Fidonet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Echo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 File menu
Edit field. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 Call Log panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-100
Capture to File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45 to 3-47, 4-66
Edit menu
Capture to Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48 to 3-49, 4-64
Call Log panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-101
Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26, 3-36, 4-12, 4-63
Clear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-111
Connect and Record Logon . 3-27, 3-36, 4-14, 4-63, 5-6
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68, 4-70, 4-102, 4-111
Connect but Skip Logon . . . . . . . . 3-27, 3-36, 4-15, 4-63
Copy to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-69, 4-70
Copy to Phonebook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-107
Copy to File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45, 4-71
Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17, 4-9
Copy to Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-70 to 4-71
Disconnect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-63
Copy to Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68, 4-72
Exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15, 4-69, 4-101, 4-110
Copy to Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-50, 4-72
File list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15, 4-69
Cut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68, 4-69 to 4-70, 4-111
Import . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29, 4-7
Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-74, 4-102, 4-111
Lists panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-107
Lists panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-110
New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3, 4-4, 4-61
Paste. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68 to 3-69, 4-72
Open . . . . . . . . 3-14, 3-28, 3-64, 4-6, 4-61, 4-100, 4-107
Paste from File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-73
Page Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9, 4-63, 4-101, 4-110
Recording in Progress window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Phonebook panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Select All . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-69, 4-73, 4-102
Place Trial Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3, 3-65, 4-108
Terminal panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-69
Index 5

Print . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48, 3-50, 3-70, 4-64, 4-101, 4-110 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26, 4-104, 4-112
Print Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10, 4-64, 4-101, 4-110 Using help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xiv
Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16, 3-53, 4-27 Help menu
Redisplay File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-68 Call Log panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-104
Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-62, 4-107 Lists panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-112
Save As . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14, 4-62, 4-100, 4-107 Phonebook panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-26
Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-108 Terminal panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-94
Terminal panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-61 Hilgraeve
File menu/Capture to Printer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-50 BBS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
File Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51 Horizontal scroll bar
File Transfer properties sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-49 Scroll bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10
File transfer protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43, 4-49 Host
Default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54 See also, HyperACCESS Host
File Usage properties sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-50 Host Entries panel
Find dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6, 3-10, 4-74 File/Connect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-12
Find dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 to 3-8 File/Connect and Record Logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-14
Flow control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-57, 3-59, A-5 File/Connect but Skip Logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-15
Font File/Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-27
Automatic sizing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-78 Window/Host Entries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-25
Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-78 Host system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6
Font dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 HOSTHELP.TXT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-19
Full duplex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6 .HTW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-7
Full path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6 HyperACCESS Application Programming Interface
Function, Arrow, and Ctrl Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-2 See also HAPI
HyperAccess Convert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
HyperACCESS Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 to 6-2
G Auto-answer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-17
.GIF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-82 Automatic startup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-17
GND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6 Caller commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-19
Graphical User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Caller configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-17
GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6 Caller logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-18 to 6-19
Graphics characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-77, C-1, D-5 Default Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9, 6-12
Graphics Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-82, 4-114 HyperACCESS/5
Zoom In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-115 Upgrading from . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
Graphics Viewer Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-114 HyperGuard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-2, 3-44, 4-80, 6-15
Ground signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6 HyperProtocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xi, A-6, E-4
GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1, A-6
I
H I-beam
Half duplex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6 Insertion point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
.HAO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Mouse pointer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
HAPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3, 3-18, 3-71, 4-86, 5-1 IBM 3101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1, D-7
Hard disk requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 IBM 3270 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-10
Hardware handshaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6 IBM 3278 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1, D-10
.HAW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18, 3-2, 3-14, 3-29, 3-37, 4-63 IBM 3708 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-10
Help IBM 7171 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-10
IBM 9370 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-10
6 Index

Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16, A-6 Edit menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-110


Import File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Edit/Clear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-111
Import Files dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8 Edit/Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-111
In-place activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Edit/Cut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-111
Insert Response Box dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 to 5-9 Edit/Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-111
Insertion point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 Edit/Undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-111
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 File menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-107
Int 14h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 File/Copy to Phonebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-107
Integrated Services Digital Network File/Exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-110
File/Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-64, 4-107
See ISDN
File/Page Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-110
Internet
File/Place Trial Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-65, 4-108
Access numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
File/Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-110
Hilgraeve address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
File/Print Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-110
Service providers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
File/Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-107
Interrupt request
File/Save As . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-107
See IRQ
File/Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-108
IRQ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Help menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-112
ISDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6, B-1 View menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-112
View/Toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-112
J Window menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-112
Local logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20
JavaScript. . . 1-3, 3-18, 4-85 to 4-86, 4-90, 4-92, 5-1, 5-3, 5-7 Lock This Page dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
jToolbar Lock This Page dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Standard Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-59 Lock this Sheet dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
Logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-7
K
Kermit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi, A-7, E-6 M
Key combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Macro edit field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-74
Key dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-71, 5-10
Macro text box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-73
Key sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Macros
Keyboard commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Keyboard macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-88
Keyboard macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-71, 4-88, 5-1 to 5-2, A-7 Main Phonebook
Keyboard remapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-73, 4-88, 5-1 to 5-2 Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Keys dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-71, 4-88 to 4-89 Maximize button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-7
Keys for <...> dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-72 to 3-74, 4-88, 5-13 MCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Memory requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
L Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-7
Menu bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-7
LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-66 to 3-68, 4-58, 4-98, A-7
Lear Siegler ADM 3A terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4
Chat mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-98
LF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
Docking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-59
Linking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Edit/Copy to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-69
List box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 Edit/Cut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68
List File Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-62 Edit/Paste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68 to 3-69
Lists panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-105 Edit/Select All. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-69
Automation menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-112 Editing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-67
Index 7

File/Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-70 Non-modal dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-79


Pop-up menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 Notebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
View menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-41 to 3-42, 3-67, 3-70 Notebook menu
Minimize button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-7 Copy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-24
Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2, A-7, B-4 New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-24
Customizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5 Phonebook panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-19
Initialization Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7 Notebook Name dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24, 4-20
Networks, on. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8 Notebook panel
Modem Cable Notebook/Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-24
DB-25 to DB-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2 Notebook/New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-24
DB-25 to DB-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2 Pop-up menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4
DB-9 to DB-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3 Notepad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-67, 5-12, 5-15
Modem Cable, Null Null modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8, B-8
DB-25 to DB-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-9 Number of Rows and Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-3
DB-9 to DB-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8
DB-9 to DB-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-9
Modem initialization strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7 O
Modem LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58 Odd parity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
Docking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-59 Office 97. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-2
Modem or modem pool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20, 4-30 Offline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
Modem switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4 Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
Modify Callers dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Online registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-22
Modular Communications Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 On-the-fly file compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-4
Mouse button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2 Options dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21, 4-23
Button 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-53 Options menu
Button 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-54 External Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-13
Mouse pointer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-8 Phonebook panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-21
Cursor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-8 Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-22
Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-23
N Text Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-21

NASI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-8
NCSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-8 P
Network Page Setup dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-48, 4-9, 4-101, 4-110
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 Palette window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-60
Network Asynchronous Services Interface Panel Tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-58
NASI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-8 Panel tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-19
Network Communications Services Interface Parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-42, A-8
NCSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-8 Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-55
New Entry Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Password dialog box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-22
New Entry Connection dialog. . . . . . 3-12, 3-19, 3-21 to 3-23, Passwords properties sheet. . . . . . . . . . . 6-5, 6-8, 6-12 to 6-13
. . . . . 3-30 to 3-34, 3-56, 3-58 to 3-59, 3-61, 3-75, 3-78 Paste from File dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-73
New Entry Description dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11, 4-4, 4-6 Paste to Message Pad
New Entry Destination dialog. . 3-13, 3-56, 3-58 to 3-59, 3-61 Shortcut key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-69
New Entry Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 to 4-7, 4-20 Path name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
New Entry wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Phone number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26, 4-31
New Notebook Entry Template . . . . .3-13 to 3-14, 3-16, 3-24 Phonebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24, 4-25
No Template Found warning dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-63
8 Index

Phonebook menu Pkunzip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2


Copy Phonebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20 Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9
Delete Phonebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20 Pop-up menu
New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20 Capture to File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Phonebook Name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20 Capture to Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Phonebook Name dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20 Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Phonebook panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-26 Connect and Record Logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Automation menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-24 Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7, 3-11
Automation/Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14 to 5-15 Copy to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Automation/Keys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-13 Copy to File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6, 3-69
File menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Copy to Host with <ENTER> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
File/Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26, 4-12 Copy to Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
File/Connect and Record Logon . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27, 4-14 Copy to Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
File/Connect but Skip Logon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27, 4-15 Copy to Remote Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
File/Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17, 4-9 Copy to Remote Computer with . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
File/Exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-15 Cut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
File/File list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-15 Cut to Remote Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
File/Import. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29, 4-7 Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4, 3-11
File/New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3, 4-4 Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
File/Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14, 3-28, 4-6 Entry Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
File/Page Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6 to 3-8
File/Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-12 Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
File/Print Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-10 Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
File/Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16, 3-53, 4-9, 4-27 Anywhere else . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Help menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-26 Over Selected Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Notebook menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-19 Modify . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Options menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-21 New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Options/External Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-13 Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Options/Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-22 Page Setup... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6, 3-8, 3-10
Options/Startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-23 Paste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Options/Text Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-21 Paste from File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 to 3-8
Phonebook/Copy Phonebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20 Paste to Remote Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Phonebook/Delete Phonebook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20 Phonebook panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Phonebook/New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20 Anywhere Else . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Phonebook/Phonebook Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20 Over a phonebook entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-26 Print. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6, 3-8, 3-10
View menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-15 Print Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6, 3-8, 3-10
View/Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16 Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
View/Entry Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16 Receive Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
View/Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16 Refresh Now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
View/Refresh Now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16 Rename . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
View/Status Bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-18 Select All . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
View/Tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-19 Select Terminal Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
View/Toolbars . . . . . . . . . 4-16, 4-26, 4-94, 4-104, 4-112 Send Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Window menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-25 Status Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Window/Call Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-25 Terminal panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-5, 3-43, 3-50 to 3-51
Window/Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-26 Anywhere else . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Window/Phonebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-25 Over selected text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Window/Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-25 Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5, 3-10
Index 9

Undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 to 3-8 Receive dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43, 4-79


Using. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 Receive progress dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45, 4-82
Pop-up menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Receiving files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43, 4-79
Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-55, B-1, B-3 Recording a Logon Sequence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-5
Communications port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9 Recording in Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-6
Shared . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8 Recording in Progress window. . . . . . . . .4-14, 4-86, 5-7, 5-10
Port Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-43 Action menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Preferences properties sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-52 Action/Insert Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Prefix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-76 Action/Insert Text Query . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Print dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48, 4-12, 4-101 Action/Insert User Id . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Print Method group box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-49, 4-65 Action/Insert User Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Print preview window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48 Edit menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-7
Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-47 Stop! menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9 to 5-10
By page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-65 Recording Options dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-87
By session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-65 Redisplay file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-68
Procomm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18 Registration
Properties cascade menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27 Using Hilgraeve BBS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-22
Properties menu Registration dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-7
ASCII Sending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-70 Relative path. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8 to A-9
Phonebook panel File/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 Remote IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-43
Terminal panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27, 4-78 Remote system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6, A-9
Properties notebook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27 Host system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6, A-9
Properties sheet Remove notebook entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4
ASCII Receiving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-46 Rename dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-20
ASCII Sending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-47 Rename notebook entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4
Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-56 Request To Send signal
Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29 RTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28 Restore button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
File Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-49 REXX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xi
File Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-50 Ring Detect
Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-52 RNG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
Terminal Emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-43 Ring Indicator signal
Protocol converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-10 RNG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1 RNG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
Push button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9 RS-232 cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10, B-1
RTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10
Q Runtime Values dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Queued Calling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-34
S
R Save As dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-7, 4-62, 4-100, 4-107
SCO ANSI emulator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Radio button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9
Script to run after disconnecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-52
RD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9
Script to run before connecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-52
README.TXT file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Script to run upon connecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-52
Receive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-79
Scroll bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58, A-10
Receive Data signal
Scroll Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-75
RD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9
10 Index

Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 Technical support


Self-extracting EXE files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44, 4-81 See also Customer support
Self-extracting files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Telephony application programming interface
Send . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-79 See TAPI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
Upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4 Teletype. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-12
Send dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-51 Teletype emulator
Send progress dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-52, 4-84 See also TTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-1
Sending files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-50, 4-83 Televideo TV925 and TV950 terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-13
Serial number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-19 Telnet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29, A-11
Serial port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10, B-1 Dial-up IP account access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-31
Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 Dial-up shell account access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-33
Settings dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44, 3-53, B-7, E-1 Multiple sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30, 4-24
Settings push button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54, 4-49, 6-14 TCP/IP network access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Terminal ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-44
Setup.ini . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 to 2-14 Template dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-109
Shared port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8 Terminal area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45, 3-68, 4-58
Shortcut key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-72, A-10 Terminal drop-down list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-55
Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68, 4-102 Terminal emulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-11
Paste to Message Pad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-69 Terminal emulator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-73, D-1
Sign-on. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 Number of Rows and Columns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-3
Software handshaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 See also Emulators
Sound Terminal Emulator properties sheet . . . . . . . . 3-55, 4-43, D-2
Custom sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-22 Terminal panel
System beeps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-22 Automation menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-85, 5-5
Special characters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 Automation/Abort. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-86, 5-12
Standard ASCII character codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 Automation/Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-90, 5-14 to 5-15
Standard Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-96 Automation/Edit Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-88, 5-13
Automation/Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-88, 5-2, 5-13, 5-15
Start bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10
Automation/Record. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-86, 5-6
Startup dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-22
Automation/Recording Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-87
Status bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18, 4-58, 4-103
Automation/Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-86, 5-12
Stop bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-42, A-10 Automation/Runtime Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-87
Stop Recording dialog box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6, 5-9 to 5-11 Backscroll buffer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58
Stop! menu Edit menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-69
Recording in Progress window . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9 to 5-10 Edit/Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68, 4-70
Streaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 Edit/Copy to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-70
Suffix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-74 Edit/Copy to File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45, 4-71
Switches, modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4 Edit/Copy to Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68, 4-72
Synchronous communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11 Edit/Copy to Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-50, 4-72
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11 Edit/Copy to Remote Computer . . . . . . . . . . 4-70 to 4-71
System menu Edit/Cut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-70
Control menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11 Edit/Find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-74
Edit/Paste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-72
Edit/Paste from File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-73
T Edit/Select All. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-73
TAPI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19, 4-31, 4-35, A-11 Edit/Undo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-69
TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-20, 3-22, 4-30, 4-43, A-11 Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58
TD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11 File menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-61
Index 11

File/Capture to File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45 to 3-47, 4-66 Tool tips


File/Capture to Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48 to 3-50, 4-64 Button help text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-18
File/Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-36 Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28, 4-59, 4-90, A-12
File/Connect and Record Logon. . . . . . . . 3-36, 4-63, 5-6 <Terminal> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-95
File/Connect but Skip Logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-36, 4-63 Buttons, Rearranging . 4-26, 4-94, 4-103 to 4-104, 4-112
File/Disconnect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-63 Docking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-59
File/Exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-69 Lists panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-112
File/File list. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-69 Phonebook panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-26
File/New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-61 Pop-up menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-10
File/Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-61 Running programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-12
File/Page Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-63 Separator line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11, 4-92
File/Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48, 3-50, 4-64 Standard Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-96
File/Print Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-64 ToolTip. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18, A-12
File/Redisplay File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-68 Transfer menu
File/Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-62 Receive (download) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-54
File/Save As . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14, 4-62 Receive File(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-79
Help menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-94 Send . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-51
Menu bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-60 Send (upload) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-54
Pop-up menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5 Send File(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-83
Properties menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27, 4-78 Terminal panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-79
Properties/ASCII Sending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-70 Transfer protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-80, E-1
Terminal area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58 Transfer protocol drop-down list . . . . . . . . . . 3-44, 3-51, 3-54
Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-58, 4-94 Transferring files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43, 3-50
Transfer menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-79 Transmit Data signal
Transfer/Receive (download) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54 TD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
Transfer/Receive File(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-79 tREX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-85 to 4-86, 4-90, 4-92
Transfer/Send . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51
TTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12, D-12
Transfer/Send (upload) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54
TTY emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Transfer/Send File(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-83
TV910, TV912, TV920, TV925, and TV950 emulators . .D-1,
View menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-75
View/Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-77 D-13
View/Hide Backscroll. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-76 Type of New Connection dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-19
View/Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-76
View/Scroll Bar(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-76 U
View/Scroll Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-75
View/Status Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-76 Uncompressing
View/Tabs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-77 On-the-fly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-2
View/Toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-76 Uncompressing files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44, 4-81
Window menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-93 Undocking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-66, 4-60
Window/Clear Backscroll. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-93 Uninstall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-23
Window/Clear Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-94 UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11 to A-12
Window/Reset Terminal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-94 Upgrading from . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-18
Terminal Settings dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-55, D-2 Upgrading HyperACCESS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
Terminal Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-95 Upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-83, A-4, A-12
Text box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-11 Uploading files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-50
Text editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-67 User ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-55
Text Viewer dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-88 User Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-55
Title bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-11 Using List Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-62
12 Index

V Phonebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25
Phonebook panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25
VBScript . . 3-18, 4-85 to 4-86, 4-89 to 4-90, 4-92, 5-1 to 5-3, Reset Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-94
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25
Version number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-19 Terminal panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-93
Vertical scroll bar Window title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-12
Scroll bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 Windowed transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-12
View menu Windows
Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16 Docking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-59
Entry Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16 WinSock (TCP/IP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22
Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-77 WinZip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Hide Backscroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-76 Word Wrap dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16 Workspace. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-12
Lists panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-112 Workstation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-12
Message Pad . . . . . . . . . . 3-41 to 3-42, 3-67, 3-70, 4-76 WWW
Phonebook panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-15 See Cutomer Support
Refresh Now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-16 World Wide Web
Scroll Bar(s). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-76 Wyse 50 and Wyse 60 emulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-1
Scroll Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-75
Wyse 50 and Wyse 60 terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-20
Status Bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18, 4-76, 4-103
Tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19, 4-77
Terminal panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-75 X
Toolbars. . 4-16, 4-26, 4-76, 4-94, 4-103 to 4-104, 4-112
Xmodem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2, A-12 to A-13, E-7 to E-8
VIEWPNT emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4
1K Xmodem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi, A-13, E-2, E-8
Virus filtering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2, 4-80, 6-15
Xon/Xoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-12
Visual Basic scripting language. . . 4-85, 4-89, 5-1 to 5-3, 5-7
VT52, VT100, VT102, VT220, VT320 emulators . 3-73, D-1,
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-15 Y
Yale ASCII protocol conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D-10
W Ymodem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi, A-13, E-2, E-7 to E-8
Ymodem Batch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-13, E-7
Wildcard characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
Ymodem G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi, A-13, E-8
Window menu
Call Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-25
Call Log panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-103 Z
Clear Backscroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-93
Zip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Clear Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-94
ZIP files
Host Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-25
Expanding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44, 4-81
Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-26
Zmodem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi, A-13, E-9
Lists panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-112