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Secondary Mathematics

Task 1: Planning Commentary

TASK 1: PLANNING COMMENTARY
Respond to the prompts below (no more than 9 single-spaced pages, including prompts) by typing your
responses within the brackets. Do not delete or alter the prompts. Pages exceeding the maximum will not be scored.

1. Central Focus
a. Describe the central focus and purpose of the content you will teach in the learning
segment.
[ The central focus is “Students will know and apply properties of geometric figures such as
angles and segments, setting the foundation and the basics of logical thinking in order to
prepare them for proofs using if-then statements and properties of congruency.” In this learning
segment students will be analyzing segments and angles and gaining an understanding for what
congruency means and how to make inferences in geometry. Students will be do a variety of
activities to help develop and solidify their understanding of logical thinking and congruency
when it comes to angles and segments. The purpose of this content is to get the students to
start analyzing and using the logical thinking process when it comes to breaking down problems
and gaining a deeper understanding for the content. Throughout the lessons students will be
making connections from previous sections in order to solidify their understanding. Lesson 2.1
discusses segment bisectors and midpoint, this information carries over from Chapter 1,
students will be asked to recall information in a KWL chart at the beginning of the section in
order to prepare them for the new material. Lesson 2.2 is angle bisectors, this lesson applies
the same information from lesson 2.1 to angles, at this point students should start to see how
the lessons build off of each other in a compare and contrast discussion. Moving on to lessons
2.3 and 2.4 students will be learning about different types of angles, the purpose of these two
lessons are to prepare them for lesson 2.5 where they will be discussion congruency
statements. In lesson 2.5 previous content will be combined and applied to more in depth
problems. This content is very important, students should understand why we are learning this
be expected to recall and reuse this information throughout the year. ]
b. Given the central focus, describe how the standards and learning objectives within your
learning segment address
 conceptual understanding,
 procedural fluency, AND
 mathematical reasoning and/or problem-solving skills.
[In this learning segment the standards and learning objectives address conceptual
understanding by asking students to know and apply properties of geometric figures. To create
examples themselves they need to develop a deep understanding of the content. The standards
ask students to compare and contrast in order to gain a deeper understanding, at the end of
Lesson 2.2 they will compare and contrast segments and angle bisectors. They also should
justify the procedures and steps taken as they encounter and construct logical arguments. While
they construct arguments they are asked to recall previous information. They need to reference
definitions, theorems, axioms, and prove them. In order to prove the statements they need to
have a conceptual understanding of the material and apply it. The standards help scaffold the
information and assist the students in reaching this point at the end of lesson 2.5. Students
reach a segment about mathematical reasoning and problem-solving skills. The standards
address how students should be able to address the validity of a logical argument and give
counter examples to disprove a statement. Through these statements students need to use their
mathematical reasoning and problem solving skills to disprove or prove statements. Many of
these problems need to be broken into pieces to understand and see alternative ways of

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Secondary Mathematics
Task 1: Planning Commentary

thinking about them. The central focus, standards, and learning objectives also encourage
students to build on previous information and find a unique way of looking at and understanding
it. When students are fluent in the lessons they will be able to describe in their own words
definitions and steps needed to create examples. Working backwards applies what they know if
a different way. This promotes understanding, fluency, and problem solving skills.]
c. Explain how your plans build on each other to help students make connections
between concepts, computations/procedures, AND mathematical reasoning or problem-
solving strategies to build understanding of mathematics.
[In these lesson plans it is important that the students have fluency in the current math topics
before moving to the next section. Since the class is only beginning the second chapter, much
of this information such as theorems, postulates, and statements will be used in every chapter
until the end of the year. If students struggle with these topics they will have a hard time making
connections in future concepts. Each lesson may take 2 days depending on how the students
are comprehending the information, breaking these lessons into 2 days allows extra time at the
beginning of each lesson to review the topics from the previous day, this helps the pertinent
information to be fresh in their minds which helps them recall it more quickly as it comes up in
the new lesson. As they work on the new material they always wrap up the homework with a
few problems from the previous sections to stay fresh in their minds. As the lesson progresses it
benefits the students to move up the pyramid of Bloom’s Taxonomy when it comes to their
understanding of the material. In each lesson it’s my hopes that they can make it through the
bottom two stages which are remember and understand, we cover several examples and repeat
the information so they can reach this level. As the class comes to the end I give them time to
work on an assignment alone or in groups, this moves them up a level to apply. Students are
able to apply the materials learned in class easily to homework assignments where they
examples reflect what we did in class. When we reach the basis of understanding and try to get
students to move into the top three levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy which are analyze, evaluate,
and create students struggle. This is the point where students work to help get their minds in the
mode of making connections with pervious material. In the first two lessons, we discuss
segment bisectors and angles bisectors, in order to get students to analyze this information at
the end of lesson two they are asked to make connections among the two lessons and compare
and contrast the information. As the chapter moves on students are asked to argue, defend and
support their conclusions when it comes to solving for angle measurements, this starts to
introduce the evaluation part of the pyramid and asks them to recall the theorems, statements,
and postulates. Explaining is always a struggle, so we break down the evaluation part of the
problems and discuss them by giving them step-by-step worksheets (example in Lesson 3) to
serve as an example on how they should be writing up their explanations. This also assists
students with problem solving techniques, many of these students see a word problem and
don’t attempt to solve it at all, we will teach the students to read sentence by sentence and
break apart the word problems in order to analyze the given information and understand what is
being asked. Once students can master this part of the pyramid we hope that by the time they
are assessed at the end of the test they will be able to scaffold all the information and steps that
they learned in order to produce and construct examples of their own when asked. Examples of
this will be seen in the final assessment of the chapter where students will be asked to construct
angles and segments that follow a set of given rules. If students are capable of doing this they
will have reached the top of Bloom’s Taxonomy and should have the deeper understanding of
the material in order to move on to the next sections.]
2. Knowledge of Students to Inform Teaching
For each of the prompts below (2a–c), describe what you know about your students with
respect to the central focus of the learning segment.

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Task 1: Planning Commentary

Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different strategies/support
(e.g., students with IEPs or 504 plans, English language learners, struggling readers,
underperforming students or those with gaps in academic knowledge, and/or gifted
students).
a. Prior academic learning and prerequisite skills related to the central focus—Cite
evidence of what students know, what they can do, and what they are still learning
to do.
[This class consists of students that have previous difficulty performing well in math classes and
need extra help and a slow paced class. Students have a background of middle school
mathematics and a basic understanding of what geometry is. The freshman students are placed
in this class based on their test scores and performance in 8th grade math. The sophomore and
junior students are selected for this class based on how well they do in their previous math
class. Many students who have IEP’s are trying to make the transition to the main stream math
class, in which this slower paced class will benefit them. Geometry is a new subject to most of
these students and they will continue to learn and develop their knowledge with the concepts
and ideas that are taught in this class. Learning to look at shapes, angles, and understanding
theorems are new concepts for these students. Several of the students have stated during
discussions, pre-class activities or on KWL sheet that they have heard vocabulary words but do
not have a deep understanding of the meaning of the words. Students who have been selected
in this class also have a hard time with the algebra topics that are needed for solving these
geometry problems, so although this is a geometry class, there will be review of algebra topics
in order to refresh memories and aid them in recalling information from previous years. ]
b. Personal, cultural, and community assets related to the central focus—What do you
know about your students’ everyday experiences, cultural and language
backgrounds and practices, and interests?
[This class consists of a variety of students who come from different backgrounds. Many of the
students have been in the school system for many years and need the additional help due to the
fact they don’t have support at home or have had a hard time with math in the past. As part of
this course we are trying to minimize their frustrations and have them develop a positive attitude
in math class. The students have fallen behind in their learning due to missing school and not
being held accountable for their performances. There are three kids in the class that have had
extremely rough pasts, one has been placed in a foster home, and one has been taken into care
by a grandfather, they both need additional support and help with organizing and being held
accountable for assignments. Staff was also recently made aware that the third student is living
alone with his brother who his a junior and that their parents have left, while this situation is
being addressed by administration and the county, assignment deadlines may be extended for
this student and he may be offered to come in after school for additional help. One of these
students also struggles with elementary topics. A couple of students are also on the Autism
spectrum, they work well if they are able to do homework with headphones and music, go to a
quiet room, or have additional time to complete assignments in study halls. These students also
do well sitting in the front of class in order to see the board more clearly, several have eye sight
problems. These students are very eager to learn and have high goals set for this year,
specifically the students that have never been in a main stream math class before are very
excited. Extra notes, review assignments, and support is offered to all students in the class to
give them what they need to be successful. The students have a wide range of interests.
Several students enjoy hunting and sports. At the start of each class it’s always fun to ask the
students their weekend, if they saw anything interesting on the news, how their sports team did,
or anything to allow them to share experiences on a more personal level. The students in this
class really enjoy sharing about an interesting book they read, a fun YouTube video they saw,

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Secondary Mathematics
Task 1: Planning Commentary

how their sports team did, or about the deer they got while hunting. Students get excited to
share stories, it shows them the teacher cares and is interested in getting to know them.]
c. Mathematical dispositions—What do you know about the extent to which your students
 perceive mathematics as “sensible, useful, and worthwhile”1
 persist in applying mathematics to solve problems
 believe in their own ability to learn mathematics
[ Students in this class filled out a survey at the beginning of the year about previous math
knowledge and what they would like to learn. Many students made comments about how they
would like to know when the math will be used outside of math class. Each assignment we
assign math problems from the book that relate the topics to problems they may encounter in
future jobs after high school. These problems are usually word problems so they encourage the
students to use their problem solving skills as well as relate it to future jobs they may have.
There are also a few posters around the room that students can reference that describe
different jobs and how it uses this information. In the classroom it is always important to try to
use real-world examples so they can start making connections to their everyday lives. Most of
these students are doing quite well with the slower paced class, and applying mathematics to
solve problems, however they aren’t always using the right concepts to analyze and solve the
problems. These students know that they should be using some type of math but they need
clarification or a guide in choosing which method to use. Part of this is supporting their problem
solving skills. Students are starting to gain a deeper understanding of the topics that they can
find different ways to solve the same problem. It gets very exciting when students come up with
different ways to do a problem, it shows how every student thinks a different way and how
amazing math is that you can usually find a different way of thinking to solve a problem. Since
this is an integrated geometry class, the students have always struggled with math topics. So
the confidence in this group of students lacks. While the students seem eager to learn, they are
a rather quiet group and aren’t too open to answering or asking questions. Students need to be
asked to answer or they would sit there quiet. As the weeks have gone on there have been
other strategies implemented to get responses, such as writing on the board, individual
whiteboards, thumbs up/down if you know the answer, and comparing answers with a friend.
Most of the students are getting the answers correct, however they just need to be confident in
themselves. As the year progresses there will be conferences to discuss with students how they
are doing in class, hopefully the positive feedback will give them a confidence boost and they
will believe in their ability to learn concepts a little more.]
3. Supporting Students’ Mathematics Learning
Respond to prompts below (3a–c). To support your justifications, refer to the instructional
materials and lesson plans you have included as part of Planning
Task 1. In addition, use principles from research and/or theory to support your
justifications.

a. Justify how your understanding of your students’ prior academic learning; personal,
cultural, and community assets; and mathematical dispositions (from prompts 2a–c
above) guided your choice or adaptation of learning tasks and materials. Be explicit
about the connections between the learning tasks and students’ prior academic learning,
their assets, their mathematical dispositions, and research/theory.

1 From The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

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Task 1: Planning Commentary

[From learning about my students in the first few weeks I realized that the pace of this class
needs to be extremely slow compared to that of a regular math class. This stems from their prior
knowledge in mathematics and how capable they are of processing and understanding
information. Many students are on IEPs and struggle with processing, so many of the problems
and examples that we work through will be broken down into parts in order to analyze and
understand what is being asked. As the students work through the materials we like to break
down the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge. Each lesson that is
taught we try to build off of previous knowledge and make it up another level on the two
pyramids. We try to get to the top of the pyramid by the end of the chapter which shows they
have a deep understanding of the material. In the learning tasks for each of the lessons there is
always a new task that needs to be taught, however the much of this information is built from
previous knowledge. In Lesson 2.3 students are asked to take a vocabulary quiz that gets the
definitions that have been learned so far in the chapter fresh in their mind, later in the class they
are asked to use these definitions on a worksheet in order to complete the given problems. It’s
very important that students have a lot of practice on one topic before moving on, they need to
master topics, not just gain a general understanding of them. For some students it may seem
really slow paced due to the constant review of material from previous days, however I always
express to them how important it is to use the extra practice when they get it and understand
how to apply it to new concepts. I have also gotten to know my students on a more personal
level, so I also understand that many of these students don’t have the support and help at home
that other students have. Since the whole class benefits from in class help, I have decided to
teach shorter lessons in order to give students time to get homework done in class, or be able to
ask questions before they leave. It amazes me how much these students will work in class
when I give them time and complete their assignments, when there is problems assigned over
night that are expected to be completed usually it comes back incomplete. This is why it is in the
students best interest to be given work time and complete what they can in class.]
b. Describe and justify why your instructional strategies and planned supports are
appropriate for the whole class, individuals, and/or groups of students with specific
learning needs.

Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different
strategies/support (e.g., students with IEPs or 504 plans, English language learners,
struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic
knowledge, and/or gifted students).
[ Due to the many kids in this class that are on IEP or 504 plans there are many supports for this
class. Several of these supports will be given to the entire class to benefit everyone. In lesson
2.1 a few of the students were given a list of all key terms, definitions, and formulas that they will
encounter in chapter 2. These were handed out to students who have a hard time with writing,
this helps them have the definitions in front of them in class so when they are being discussed
they don’t have to spend time writing them down, they just follow along and make clarification
notes on the side. Throughout all of the lessons (2.1-2.5) there will also be photocopies made of
the paraprofessional notes after class that will also be handed to a few of the students that have
writing difficulties, if these students are not taking notes in class they are expected to be alert
and active learners. In addition to these handouts to specific students all of the students were
given handouts in lesson 2.5, these were charts that the students just needed to fill out and
follow along on. While these benefit those students that have a hard time with note taking they
also benefit the whole class in helping them keep these charts organized with pre-drawn lines,
rows, and columns. Another support offered to a group of students is to have tests and quizzes
read to them in a different room on a testing day, these students may choose to stay, or go with
the paraprofessional during the testing time. This benefits those who have a hard time reading

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Task 1: Planning Commentary

the problems on their own, so instead of taking time to read the problem they will have it read to
them, allowing for more time solving the math problem then struggling to read the problem.
Memorization is also a huge part in these sections. Depending on quiz results and how students
comprehend the properties of congruency some of them may be written on the top of the test
and students will just have to pick which ones to use, this will be a support given to the whole
class due to how many theorems, properties, and statements are expected to be known.
Shortened assignments will also be given to certain individuals who can demonstrate an
understanding for the content but just aren’t capable of getting the assignment done that night.
The majority of these students have been given a study hall that they should be able to
complete most of their homework in if it isn’t completed in class. Lastly, any student who has a
hard time completing a test will be allowed time to come in and finish it, students should not feel
rushed. Each of these supports can be specifically designed to benefit a certain group of
students, however if they benefit other students who are not on IEP or 504 plans they will just
be given to the whole class.]
c. Describe common mathematical preconceptions, errors, or misunderstandings within
your central focus and how you will address them.
[In the central focus of all the lessons students are attempting to understand the properties and
types of angles, and understand equality and congruency statements. Students from all different
learning levels have a hard time when it comes to properties and types of angles because there
are so many of them. Thus, each type will be broken down and discussed individually. Students
who often mix up the types of angles will be asked to create ways to remember them, such as
complementary angles are 90˚ like the corner of your paper, so complementary and corner both
start with a ‘c’; supplementary angles are 180˚ like the side of your paper, so supplementary and
side both start with a ‘s’. Students will also be asked to make connections among all they types
of angles and compare and contrast them. When students do this they will find relationships
among them and be able to recognize commonalities when they appear, assisting them in
recalling information when asked a specific question about an angle. When it comes to the
equality and congruency statements students often have a hard time remembering these, they
will be given a chart to fill out and follow along with that will help them when it comes to studying
these. I will also emphasize the common errors that students often make in hopes that the
students will become aware of the error before they have the chance to make it. I also think it’s
important to analyze an incorrect answer given by a student as well and see why they came up
with the answer they did and think about how they came up with the answer that they did.]
4. Supporting Mathematics Development Through Language

As you respond to prompts 4a–d, consider the range of students’ language assets and
needs—what do students already know, what are they struggling with, and/or what is new to
them?
a. Language Function. Using information about your students’ language assets and
needs, identify one language function essential for students to develop conceptual
understanding, procedural fluency, and mathematical reasoning or problem-solving skills
within your central focus. Listed below are some sample language functions. You may
choose one of these or another language function more appropriate for your learning
segment.

Compare/Contrast Justify Describe Explain Prove

Please see additional examples and non-examples of language functions in the
glossary.

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Task 1: Planning Commentary

[For this learning segment students will be asked to describe the variety of terms that they
encounter in lessons 2.1-2.4. In each lesson students will be asked to discuss with partners or
perform a certain task that involves describing that days new vocabulary words. Each of these
tasks will encourage the students to describe and understand the words on a deeper level than
just writing them down. When students are asked to describe a vocabulary word in their own
words they are forced to understand it enough to switch it to their own words.]
b. Identify a key learning task from your plans that provides students with opportunities to
practice using the language function identified above. Identify the lesson in which the
learning task occurs. (Give lesson day/number.)
[While students will be asked to practice language functions every day in class students will
specifically be asked to do this in day 1 of lesson 2.1. Students are going to be given the
definition of a midpoint at the beginning of the lesson and be asked to write it down. At the end
of the lesson students will be asked to discuss with their partners the definition of a midpoint
without looking back to the earlier definition. They will be expected to write down the definition of
midpoint in their own words using at least 2 of the following words: midpoint, bisector,
segments, coordinates, or formula. Once students have their definition written down the
partners will be asked to share with the class.]
c. Additional Language Demands. Given the language function and learning task
identified above, describe the following associated language demands (written or oral)
students need to understand and/or use:
 Vocabulary and/or symbols
 Mathematical precision2 (e.g., using clear definitions, labeling axes, specifying units
of measure, stating meaning of symbols), appropriate to your students’ mathematical
and language development
 Plus at least one of the following:
 Discourse
 Syntax
[In this math course vocabulary and symbols are very important, students need to understand
the vocabulary words and be able to describe them back in their own way. Many of the words
that are learned in this course are so closely related it’s important that when they develop an
understanding and can make connections by comparing and contrasting. In order to promote
this in class students do a lot of discussing of vocabulary words and come up with their own
ways to remember them. Mathematical precision is also a huge part of this geometry class.
Students need to be able to read a problem and understand what is being asked, from this,
students need to be able to use the proper labeling when it comes to axis, units, or symbols. In
this chapter specifically they have to be able to label rays, lines, angles, segments, and the
measures of all the above in specific ways. With these labels they also need to understand how
to say them in a sentence. The math specific discourse consists of being able to take a
mathematical equation that is full of symbols and letters and put it into a sentence that anyone
could understand if they read it. This is also practiced daily as the students move through the
notes. An example of this can be seen in Lesson 2.2 while taking the notes, when examples are
put on the board in symbols, students will be asked to read the equation in a sentence. ]

2 For an elaboration of “precision,” refer to the “Standards for Mathematical Practice” from The Common Core State Standards
for Mathematics (June 2010), which can be found at http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_Math%20Standards.pdf.

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Task 1: Planning Commentary

d. Language Supports. Refer to your lesson plans and instructional materials as needed
in your response to the prompt.
 Identify and describe the planned instructional supports (during and/or prior to the
learning task) to help students understand, develop, and use the identified language
demands (function, vocabulary and/or symbols, mathematical precision, discourse,
or syntax).
[ As stated above vocabulary is a very important part of understanding mathematics and being
able to respond to questions when asked. In each lesson that will be taught there is specific
times that the vocabulary will be taught in an activity, verbal discussion or on their own in their
notes. In Lesson 2.1 Part 2 assessment students will be asked to discuss the definition of a
midpoint in their own words with a partner, they will also be given a list of other vocabulary
words that they should try to fit into their definition. Part of understanding a word is being able
to restate the definition in your own words so you can understand it. In Lesson 2.2 students will
be given examples that are entirely mathematical symbols and they will be asked to read the
math sentence in words and describe what the example is asking. Looking at symbols and
being able to put into words what the problem is asking is a great way to practice the
mathematical discourse. Moving on to lesson 2.3 Students will be asked to take a short
vocabulary quiz, they will be given the definitions and a word bank and be expected to match
the words with their proper definition. If there are any common misconceptions on vocabulary
words after they are corrected then the definitions will be gone over again and clarified for those
students. Depending on how the quizzes went as the class moves into lesson 2.4 students will
be asked come up with vocabulary tricks to help them remember their words that they struggle
with. Many students have a hard time with complementary and supplementary angles, so in
lesson 2.4 part 1 they will be asked to come up with ways to understand the two and not
confuse them. An example of this would be: the corner of your paper is 90˚, so are
complementary angles, and the side of your paper is 180˚, so are supplementary angles. The
students will be encouraged to come up with their own examples. Finally in lesson 2.5 students
are asked to create tables that contain all the new vocabulary words and new syntax. For this
section the students will work slowly to create their tables and understand the congruency
statements. Throughout this lesson students will be asked to work on their mathematical
precision, the congruency statements are so specific that one error could mess up the
statement and make it false. Using charts and breaking each statement down with the students
will help them analyze each one and hopefully gain an understanding for them all.]
5. Monitoring Student Learning
In response to the prompts below, refer to the assessments you will submit as part of the
materials for Planning Task 1.

a. Describe how your planned formal and informal assessments will provide direct
evidence of students’ conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, AND mathematical
reasoning and/or problem-solving skills throughout the learning segment.
[Formal and informal assessments are great ways to monitor student learning through the
learning segment. In lesson 2.1 students will be asked to fill out a KWL chart that asks them to
recall any previous knowledge on segments and angles. With this chart the teacher will be able
to see how much they may already know about the topic and plan a more in depth review or just
jump right in to the chapter. Later in lesson 2.1 students will be given a quick check to see how
their understanding is so far, this isn’t graded, just a short assessment to see how they are
understanding the material so far and so see if another day needs to be spent on this lesson.
Lesson 2.2 has an exit ticket the students will fill out at the end of class that gets them thinking
about everything they learned that day. If students have a hard time coming up with responses

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Task 1: Planning Commentary

to this exit ticket they will more than likely need an extra day to go over the information and have
it memorized to the point they can recall it when asked. Moving on to lesson 2.3 the students
will be given a vocabulary quiz and worksheets that encourages students to use the vocabulary
words and theorems they have learned so far. These words they are expected to understand
are part of the procedure that they go through to solve and prove angle problems. This
encourages them to understand the mathematical reasoning they need to fully understand what
is being asked in each lesson. Many students don’t understand how important vocabulary is in
math, giving them these assessments will give them a place to start when they are given a test.
A more formal assessment will be given at the end of lesson 2.4 in order to check the
understanding in the first 4 lessons. Quizzes are a great way of getting the students to combine
all the information they have taken in so far and make the connections to be able to solve
problems. These quizzes are much like mini-tests in that they give them a good idea of what will
be coming up at the end of the chapter and how problems may be asked that combine all the
information they have received. Lastly, at the end of the chapter students will have a formal test
that will cover everything they learned. This will have vocabulary words, short problems, more in
depth proofs, and some multiple choice, this will test their knowledge on the whole chapter and
give the teacher an idea of what may need to be gone over again in order to move on to the
next chapter. Due to the fact mathematics builds off of itself so much if the tests don’t go well
the teacher will know that there needs to be an emphasis on some of the material before
moving on. While these are all material that can be handed in and looked at there are various
times throughout the lessons that students are asked how they are understanding a specific
topic by doing a thumbs up/down, hold up 3 fingers to check for understanding, or raise their
hands if they understand. These are quicker ways of checking for understanding in the middle
of a lesson and gives the teacher an idea of which students are struggling and offer them
immediate help or ask them which part of the lesson stumped them. All assessments aren’t
graded, but they all give very good feedback to the teacher and students on how to change the
pace of the class or what material needs to be covered again.]
b. Explain how the design or adaptation of your planned assessments allows students with
specific needs to demonstrate their learning.

Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different
strategies/support (e.g., students with IEPs or 504 plans, English language learners,
struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic
knowledge, and/or gifted students).
[In this class several students need adaptions or extra assistance in being successful there has
been many supports added in order to reach this goal. Many of the students are expected to
complete the same amount of assessments as the other students, however if they struggle with
reading or writing they will be given extra help or time to complete the task and not be
penalized. As stated earlier any student that wishes to test or take quizzes in a different
environment may do so, and can have extra time. Many of these students also processing
difficulty, so if they can demonstrate they know a task on homework or quick check quizzes they
will be allowed a definition sheet on the tests so they don’t lose points for forgetting the correct
word. Students who come to class with incomplete work, who have difficulty writing will be
allowed to talk through assignments with the teacher or paraprofessional. As long as they can
demonstrate knowledge and learning of the material they will then be able to get shortened
assignments and not be penalized for their inability to write. Based on the schoolwork and short
assessments if a test is turned in that doesn’t follow how hard a student works or reflect their
overall grade a conference will be set up with the student to discuss why they tested so poorly.
Many of these students with anxiety when it comes to tests will be allowed to retake tests if they
feel something stood in their way of doing their best.]

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Secondary Mathematics
Task 1: Planning Commentary

Citations:
Lesson 2.1:
K-W-L Cart:
K-W-L Chart Archives - Why So Special. (13, February 14). Retrieved October 01, 2016,
from http://whysospecial.com/tag/k-w-l-chart/

Lesson 2.2:
Exit ticket:
Exit Ticket. (n.d.). Retrieved October 03, 2016, from https://www.formsatlas.com/exit-
ticket-template.html

Lesson 2.3:
2.3 worksheet:
Mcdougal, H. (2003). Geometry, grade 10 notetaking skills: Mcdougal concepts & skills
geometry. S.l.: Mcdougal Littell Houghton.

Lesson 2.4:
2.4 worksheet:
Mcdougal, H. (2003). Geometry, grade 10 notetaking skills: Mcdougal concepts & skills
geometry. S.l.: Mcdougal Littell Houghton.

Compare and Contrast chart:
Compare and Contrast Graphic Organizer. (2013). Tim's Printables | Free Printables for
Kids. Retrieved October 05, 2016, from http://www.timvandevall.com

Lessons 2.1-2.5:
Examples used in notes:
Larson, R., Boswell, L., & Stiff, L. (2005). Geometry: Concepts and skills. Evanston, IL:
McDougal Littell.

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. 10 of 10 | 9 pages maximum
All rights reserved. V5_0916
The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is
permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.