You are on page 1of 1

Map 5

:
72°55'0"W 72°50'0"W 72°45'0"W

OX
B

Fine Scale
OW
RD

RD
PR IC KL

IL L
OX BO W RD

WH
PLU N K
WARREN

Wildlife Resources

Y M TN
TO N R

RD
D
Granville, VT Bear

D
LR

Note: Datasets at this scale are often incomplete and may contain some inaccuracies
H IL
Mast Sites

ON
6
!
ROXBURY

ST
UR
Bear Crossings

TH
LINCOLN
?
D Bear Collisions (Specific)

PLU CK TON RD
D Bear Collisions (Unspecific)

\ Bear Wetland Feeding Locations

C R AM H
Bobcat

IL L R D
*
# Sighting

Moose

S
" Collisions
12A
«
¬
Reptiles & Amphibians

confirmed

potential

Rare Species & Communities

Animal

Community

Plant

Other

Deer Wintering Areas

Town Boundaries

Lakes

Streams

Wetlands

Roads

Interstate

HA
ND
LY
RD
Primary

Secondary

100
«
¬
Priority Clayplain Fragments

GRANVILLE
high

medium-high

RIPTON medium

44°0'0"N

LEM ER Y

W
44°0'0"N

IL
S
Wildlife Road Wildlife Suitability

O
N
RD
Crossing Value Analysis

RD

THRESHE R RD

Increasing chance of good habitat---->
1 (less important)

2

W OO
W H IL
L RD

DCHU
3
W
HI
LL

CK H
4
EX
T

O L LO
M A S TO N

5 (more important)

RD W
S H IL L
L
IL
EH
F IC
OF
ST
PO

Data Sources; Vermont Center for
Geographic Information, Vermont
Fish and Wildlife Department

«
Vermont State Plane Projection
NAD1983 Datum
Map by Jens Hilke
BU TZ R D

RD
R TH
NO

BRAINTREE January, 2014

0 0.45 0.9 1.8 Kilometers

0 0.45 0.9 1.8 Miles

This map shows a variety of datasets developed to be more spatially explicit and
accurate at a very local scale. What is shown can generally be used effectively
on the scale of an individual parcel with a couple caveats. First, the background
for this map is the Wildlife Habitat Suitability Analysis which is a computer
TH

model created at a statewide scale. This is a generalized model more
RD
24

W

appropriate for Map 3 or Map 4 but was included here to provide statewide
LO
OL

perspective. It is NOT accurate at a parcel scale. Second, the rest of the
NH

coverages are appropriate for a local scale, but aren't comprehensive. If, for
TOW N L
IN E R D example, we look at the Rare, Threatened and Endangered (RTE) species
coverage, we'll see that each place that is marked is accurate spatially. But we
haven't inventoried every place in Vermont, so it isn't an exhaustive list. A mark
for an RTE species on the map is definitely accurate, but the absence of an RTE
mark is NOT a definite sign that there are not rare species present since that
BU
FF
AL
O
spot might not have been inventoried. The point here is to know exactly what
HI
LL

RD each map and each dataset is actually showing you before using the data for
site-specific planning.
E
RS
MO

HANCOCK
RD
L
AL
KE
ND Data at this scale can help round out the patterns seen in Map 3 and Map 4.
Start with those two maps in working to understand the patterns across your
ROCHESTER town or region, then move to this one to get a sense of what else might be
known about the areas you're interested in. As noted in Map 4, the pattern of
where our largest areas of contiguous habitat are found is biased towards the
FAS
SE

uplands and away from lower elevation wetlands and riparian habitats. This
R IF O R D
TT
H IL

map, with coverages showing wetland feeding locations, can help you to
LR

B R OO K

understand other areas of biological interest. Within an area identified as a
1
D

TH 2

habitat block, additional data from this map can reinforce the assumption of
RD

greater biological diversity and give you a sense of what species use these areas.
72°55'0"W 72°50'0"W 72°45'0"W