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Bachelor of

Applied Science
Academic Session 2012/2013

USM Vision
Transforming Higher Education for a Sustainable Tomorrow

USM Mission
USM is a pioneering, transdisciplinary research intensive university
that empowers future talent and enables the bottom billions
to transform their socio-economic well being

i

STUDENT'S PERSONAL INFORMATION

Full Name

Identity Card (IC)/Passport No.

Current Address

Permanent Address

E-mail Address

Telephone No. (Residence)

Mobile Phone No.
(if applicable)

School

Programme of Study

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CONTENTS
SECTION A
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
VISION AND MISSION i
STUDENT’S PERSONAL INFORMATION ii
CONTENT iii
ACADEMIC CALENDAR iv
1.0 BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE
1.1 General Information 1
1.2 Areas of Specialization 1
1.3 Programme Structure 2
1.4 Courses Offering 2
* Core Courses 2
* Minor Courses 2
* Elective Courses 3
* Optional Courses 3
* Audit Courses 3
1.5 Course Codes 4
1.6 Classification of year equivalent 4
1.7 Graduation Requirements 4

2.0 ACADEMIC SYSTEM AND GENERAL INFORMATION
2.1 Information on Course Registration 5
2.2 Interpretation of Unit/Credit 12
2.3 Examination System 13
2.4 Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer 18
2.5 Academic Intergrity 22
2.6 USM Mentor Programme 27
2.7 Student Exchange Programme 28
3.0 UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS 29
3.1 Summary of University Requirements 29
3.2 Bahasa Malaysia 29
3.3 English Language 31
3.4 Local Students - Islamic and Asian Civilisation/Ethnic Relations/ 33
Core Entrepreneurship
3.5 International Students - Malaysian Studies/Option 34
3.6 Third Language/Co-Curriculum/Skill Courses/Options 35
SECTION B
DEGREE PROGRAMME INFORMATION
* School of Chemical Sciences 40
* School of Physics Sciences 84
* School of Biological Sciences 179
* School of Mathematical Sciences 229
* Students’ Feedback 283

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2012/2013 SESSION
[ 10 SEPTEMBER 2012 – 8 SEPTEMBER 2013 (52 WEEKS ]
FOR ALL PRGRAMMES [EXCEPT IN THE MEDICAL AND DENTAL SCIENCES PROGRAMMES
• New Student Registration = 1 – 2 September 2012
• Orientation Week = 3-9 September 2012
WEEK SEMESTER ACTIVITY DATE
1 Monday, 10/09/12 - Friday, 14/09/12
2 Monday, 17/09/12 - Friday, 21/09/12
3 Duration of Monday, 24/09/11 - Friday, 28/09/12
4 SEMESTER I Teaching and Monday, 01/10/12 - Friday, 05/10/12
5 Learning Monday, 08/10/12 - Friday, 12/10/12
6 Monday, 15/10/12 - Friday, 19/10/12
7 Monday, 22/10/12 - Friday, 26/10/12
8 Monday, 29/10/12 - Friday, 024/11/12
9 Monday, 05/11/12 – Friday, 09/11/12
10 Mid Semester Break Saturday, 10/11/12 - Sunday,18/11/12
11 Monday, 19/11/12 – Friday, 23/11/12
12 Duration of Monday, 26/11/12 - Friday, 30/11/12
13 Teaching and Monday, 03/12/12 - Friday, 07/12/12
14 SEMESTER I Learning Monday, 10/12/11 - Friday, 14/12/12
15 Monday, 17/12/12 – Friday, 21/12/12
16 Revision Week Saturday, 22/12/12 – Monday,01/01/13
17 Wednesday, 02/01/13 - Saturday,05/01/13
18 Examinations Monday, 07/01/13 - Saturday, 12/01/13
19 Monday, 14/01/13 - Friday, 18/01/13
20 - 23 INTER-SEMESTER BREAK I & II Saturday, 19/01/13 - Sunday, 17/02/13
24 Monday, 18/02/13 - Friday, 22/02/13
25 Monday, 25/02/13 - Friday, 01/03/13
Duration of
26 SEMESTER II Monday, 04/03/13 - Friday, 08/03/13
Teaching and
27 Monday, 11/03/13 - Friday, 15/03/13
Learning
28 Monday, 18/03/13 - Friday, 22/03/13
29 Monday, 25/03/13 – Friday, 29/03/13
30 Monday, 01/04/13 – Friday, 05/04/13
31 Mid Semester Break Saturday, 06/04/13 - Sunday, 14/04/13
32 Monday,15/04/13 - Friday 19/04/13
33 Monday, 22/04/13 - Friday, 26/04/13
Duration of
34 SEMESTER II Monday, 29/04/13 - Friday, 03/05/13
Teaching and
35 Monday, 06/05/13 - Friday, 10/05/13
Learning
36 Monday, 13/05/13 - Friday, 17/05/13
37 Monday, 20/05/13 - Friday, 24/05/13
38 Monday, 27/05/13 - Friday, 31/05/13
39 Revision Week Saturday, 01/06/13 - Sunday, 09/06/13
40 Monday, 10/06/13 - Friday, 14/06/13
41 Examinations Monday, 17/06/13 - Friday, 21/06/13
42 Monday, 24/06/13 - Friday, 28/06/13
Inter-Academic Session Break/
43-52 Saturday, 29/06/13 - Sunday, 08/09/13
Industrial Training/ KSCP

COURSES OFFERED DURING THE INTER-ACADEMIC SESSION BREAK (KSCP)

43 - 45 3 weeks Break Saturday, 29/06/13 - Sunday, 21/07/13
46 - 47 2 weeks Duration of Teaching Monday. 22/07/13 – Friday, 02/08/13
48 1 week Examinations Monday, 05/08/13 – Friday, 09/08/13
49-52 4 weeks Break Saturday, 10/8/13 – Sunday, 08/09/13

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1.2 Areas Of Specialization Type of Course School Applied Physics Physical Sciences Engineering Physics Physical Sciences Medical Physics Physical Sciences Geophysics Physical Sciences Aquatic Biology Biological Sciences Environmental Biology Biological Sciences Biotechnology Biological Sciences Agrobiology Biological Sciences Biology & Management of Vector & Biological Sciences Parasites Analytical Chemistry Chemical Sciences Industrial Chemistry Chemical Sciences Applied Statistics Mathematical Sciences Operations Research Mathematical Sciences Computer Modelling Mathematical Sciences Mathematical Modelling Mathematical Sciences Mathematics and Economy Mathematical Sciences 1 . a strong training in all fields of applied science and industrial technology is needed. 1. a Bachelor of Applied Science programme is offered by the School of Pure Sciences to produce graduates who are capable of carrying out research and development works in industries. In line with the government’s aspiration and emphasis to expand heavy industries and the transfer of technology. Due to increasing demand. Chemistry and Mathematics) to increase the intake of Applied Science students as well as to instill the aspects of Applied Science in the offered courses.1 General Information The Bachelor of Applied Science programme with Honours is offered by the School of Pure Sciences (Physics. Biology.0 BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE 1. All efforts are carried out to fulfil and to provide manpower needs at the degree level in all fields of applied science and industrial technology.

200 and 300. that is Semester 1 and Semester 2. The units requirement is divided into several parts as follows: Type of Course Code Type Credit Units Required Basic T 70 Core Minor M 0/16 Elective E 4/20 University U 15 . Computer Sciences. Courses offered are categorized into three levels. suitable to the requirements of a three-year study program. Core course. and Mathematical Sciences can choose a Major-Minor or a Major-Elective specialization programs. 2 .3 Proramme Structure Students from the School of Physics. In addition. University/Optional course and Audit course.4 Courses Offering Students are required to register for the undergraduate courses in two semesters. Chemical Sciences. Courses offered according to the needs of the degree program structure of the Pure Science Schools are grouped as Basic course. Courses are offered and examined in the same semester. Both specialization programs require a minimum total of 105 credit units for graduation. viz levels 100. Minor/Elective course. to be accumulated in the duration of 6 – 10 semesters. students are required to take 4 units from the Elective courses to corroborate the Major component. Minor Courses Students are allowed to take a Minor (16 units) in any of the area of Minors offered by the University. Core Courses Core course is a compulsory course package which aims at giving a deeper understanding of an area of specialization /major. Biological Sciences. English Language and Journalism.1. Students need to accumulate 70 units of the core courses which have been identified by each School. Please refer to the Minor Program Guide Book for a complete list and further details.18 Total Number of units 105 1. Examples of Minor packages include Management.

are not obligated to sit for any examinations pertaining to that course. The registration procedures for courses on an audit basis are as follows :- [a] Students can register for courses on an audit basis for the purpose of augmenting his/her knowledge in specific fields. and Skill/Analysis courses. [c] Courses registered for on an audit basis are designated as code ‘Y’ courses. 3 . [e] Students must fulfil all course requirements. [b] Only students of active status are allowed to register for courses on an audit basis. [d] Courses registered for on an audit basis will not be taken into consideration in determining the minimum and maximum units of courses registered for. For Science students. Registration for the said course must be done within the course registration week. A space at the bottom of the academic transcript will be reserved for listing the courses registered for on an audit basis. the units of any such audit courses will not be taken into consideration for graduation purposes. Students who register for courses on an audit basis. However.Elective Courses Students who do not choose a Minor area are required to take Elective courses. In this case. Optional Courses Optional Courses are courses chosen by students from among those that are outside their program of study. Audit Courses In principle. A grade ‘R’ will be awarded irrespective as to whether the student had or had not sat for the examination. the university allows students to register for any courses on an audit basis for the purpose of enhancing the students’ knowledge in specific fields during the duration of their study. The main objective of an Optional Course is as a substitute course for students who do not take Cocurriculum courses. This designation will be indicated on the relevant academic transcript. students need to accumulate no less than 20 units from other courses which are acknowledged by the School. an Optional course is a course that is outside those that are offered by the Pure Science Schools.

00 and above for Core Components. [c] Achieve a minimum grade C or a grade point of 2.00 for certain courses [if required] 4 . digits according to the course series in that level n .75 >76 1. Option and University Courses].7 Graduation Requirements Students must fulfil the following requirements to graduate: [a] Fulfil the minimum required residential requirements during the course of studies. Elective. represent classification of courses in each school k . Islamic and Asian Civilization and Ethnic Relations course. [b] Fulfil all the credit requirements of the course and required units for each component [Core.71 >72 Applied [105] 0 .37 38 .35 36 . digit that signify the course level l&m .71 >72 Professional [110] 0 . number of units for the course 1.00 for Bahasa Malaysia. second. [c] Obtain a CGPA of 2.35 36 . [d] Achieve a minimum grade C or a grade point of 2. as follows: - Program of Study Year equivalent based on [Total credits for graduation] Total Credits Accumulated First Second Third Pure [100] 0 .5 Course Codes Every course offered in USM is given a code in the form XYZ klm/n where X - represent each school of sciences as follows: B School of Biological Sciences K School of Chemical Sciences M School of Mathematics Z School of Physics Y&Z .6 Classification of year equivalent Students [according to their respective Programme of study] are classified by the year equivalent to first. or third year based on the number of credits accumulated. English Language. [d] Obtain a CGPA of 2.00 and above for the programme.1.

: 04-6574641 Website : registry.1. Further enquiries about course registration activities for the first degree and diploma can be made at any time at the office of the Student Data & Records Section. Chancellory Building) Tel. No.my).my/updr/ SDRP office is the secretariat / manager / coordinator of course registration for the Bachelor Degree and Diploma of the University. Sign up for the right courses each semester will help to facilitate the graduation of each student from the first semester till the final semester.0 ACADEMIC SYSTEM AND GENERAL INFORMATION 2.usm. Registration under E-Daftar for Semester 1 usually starts 1-2 days after the release of 'Official' examination result of the Semester 2 from the previous academic year. 2.1 Course Registration Registration is an important activity during the period of study at the University. : 04-6532925/3169/4195 Fax No. The system closes a day before Semester 1 begins (usually in September).1 Course Registration Secretariat for the Bachelor Degree and University’s Diploma Student Student Data & Records Section (SDRP) Academic Management Division Registry (Level 1. The actual timing of registration under E-Daftar will be announced by the Student Data & Records Section usually during the Revision Week of every semester and will be displayed on the schools/centres/hostels’ bulletin board and in the USM’s official website. 5 .1. E-Daftar registration for Semester 2 usually starts 1-2 days after Semester 1 ‘Provisional’ examination result is released until a day before Semester 2 begins (normally in February). 2. It is the first step for the students to sit for the examination at the end of each semester.usm. Only students with active account are allowed to register for courses in the E-Daftar. The registration is done directly through Campus Online portal (campusonline.2 Course Registration Platform i) E-Daftar (E-Registration) E-Daftar is a platform for course registration through website.2.

if their pre- registration application successful. the registration will be considered late. Official period for OCR normally starts on the first day of the semester (without the penalty charge of RM50. 6 . Under E-Daftar. Students. OCR will be conducted at each school.) During the non-penalty period. Each member will be given an ID and password. After Week Six. (The penalty of RM50. f) E-Daftar system can only be accessed for a certain period of time. ii) Access to E-Daftar System a)E-Daftar System can be accessed through Campus Online portal (campusonline. e) Students are advised to print the course registration confirmation slip upon completion of the registration process or after updating the course registration list (add/drop) within the E-Daftar period. Co-Curriculum courses will be included in the students’ course registration account prior to the E-Daftar activity. b) Students need to register in this portal to be a member. Registry). After this official period. g) Guidelines to register/access to E-Daftar portal are available at the Campus Online portal’s main page.usm. which includes the E-Daftar menu. d) Students need to click at the E-Daftar menu to access and register for the relevant courses. Registration of Co-curriculum courses is still placed under the administration of the Director of the Centre for Co-Curriculum Programme at the Main Campus or the Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme at the Engineering Campus and the Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme at the Health Campus.00). iii) Online Course Registration (OCR) OCR activities are conducted in the Schools/Centres and are applicable to students who are academically active and under Probation (P1/P2) status. c) Students need to use the ID and password to access to their profile page. except co-curriculum courses. all registration. students can register any courses offered by USM. Students must refer to the schedule at the notice board of their respective schools. including adding and dropping courses will be administered by the Examination & Graduation Section Office (Academic Management Division.00 will be imposed if no reasonable excuse is given.my). Each school is responsible for scheduling this activity. who face difficulties to register their courses in the E- Daftar can register their courses during the official period of OCR alternatively.

4 General Guidelines Before Students Register for Courses i) Matters / Information / Documents Required to be noted / considered / referred by students before course registration: . .99 & below = Probation Academic Status (P1/P2) . Students who meet the minimum period of residency (6 semesters for 3 years programme.1. . . ii) The number of maximum and minimum units that can be registered in every semester are stated as below: Academic Status Minimum Unit Maximum Unit Active 9 21 P1 9 12 P2 9 10 .List courses to be registered and number of units (unit value) for each course.Once per year .5 years programme or 8 semesters for 4 years programme) are allowed to register courses with total units below 9. .2 times per year (beginning of Semester 1 & Semester 2) ii) Long semester break (about one month after the final examination of Semester 2) . 7 .1.2. 2. Determination for an academic status in a semester is based on the academic performance of the students in the previous semester (Grade Point Average.Read and comprehend the reminders regarding policies/general requirements for the course registration. GPA):- o GPA 2.Refer to the respective school’s website to get updated information for courses offered or course registration. The semester in which the student is on leave is not considered for the residency period.Applicable for relevant students only.Decide courses to be registered according to the semester as stipulated in the Study Program Guide Book. .Construct Teaching and Learning Timetable for the registered courses (to avoid overlapping in timetable). 7 semesters for 3.Provide Cumulative Statement of Grades (Cangred).3 The Frequency of Course Registration in One Academic Session i) Normal Study Semester .00 & above = Active Academic Status o GPA 1.

v) Students are not allowed to register and to repeat any course that has achieved a grade 'C' and above. iv) List of courses offered from all schools/centres. vi) List of pre-registered courses which have been added into the students’ course registration record (if any).Approval from the Academic Advisor is not required for the students under Active Status to register courses through E-Daftar.1. vii) Reminders about the University course registration policies/general requisites. v) Teaching and Learning Timetable for all schools/centres/units from the three campuses. . . iii) Cangred and Course Registration Form. CGPA value and year of study.com. GPA value. 8 .5 Information/Document Given To All Students Through Campus Online Portal (www. 2. iii) Type of course codes during registration:- T = Core courses Grade and number of units E = Elective courses obtain from these courses M = Minor courses are considered for graduation U = University courses Two (2) other course codes are:- Y = audit courses Z = prerequisite courses Grade and number of units obtain from these courses are not considered for graduation iv) Advice and approval of the Academic Advisor. ii) Academic information such as academic status.my) i) The information of Academic Advisor.Approval from the Academic Advisor is required for the students under Probation status before being allowed to register during the OCR period. Probation students cannot assess E-Daftar for registration.campusonline.

b) Dropping of Language and Co-Curriculum courses. • All approval / registration / dropping / adding of the language courses are under the responsibility and administration of the School of Language. After the first week. Literacies & Translation. • However. if their pre-registration application successful.00 will be charged.1.6 Registration of Language and Co-Curriculum Courses a) Registration for Language courses through E-Daftar is allowed. 9 . • All approval / registration / dropping / adding of the Co-Curriculum courses are under the responsibility and administration of the Director of the Centre for Co- Curriculum Programme for Main Campus (04-6535243/45/48). Literacies & Translation. must be made within the first week. a fine of RM50. Literacies & Translation. if any problem occurs. Co- Curriculum courses will be included in the students’ course registration account prior to the E-Daftar activity.2. Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme for Health Campus (09- 7677547). registration for language courses can still be carried out / updated during the official period of OCR at the office of the School of Language. if necessary. • Registration for Co-Curriculum courses is either done through pre-registration before the semester begins or during the first/second week of the semester. Coordinator of the Co-Curriculum Programme for Engineering Campus (04-5995091). The contact details are as follow: General Office : 04-6534542 for Main Malay Language Programme Chairperson : 04-6533974 Campus English Language Programme Chairperson : 04-6533406 students Foreign Language Programme Chairperson : 04-6533396 Engineering Campus Programme Chairperson : 04-5995407 Health Campus Programme Chairperson : 09-7671252 a) Registration for Co-Curriculum courses through E-Daftar is not allowed. • Any problems related to the registration of language courses can be made to the School of Language.

students must meet the requirements set by the University as follows: - i) Dropping Course Form must be completed by the student and signed by the lecturer of the course involved and the Dean / Deputy Dean of their respective schools and submit it to the general office of the School/Centre which is responsible of offering the courses involved. ii) Application to add a course after the third week will not be considered. For this purpose. Approval from the lecturers of the course to be audited and the Dean / Deputy Dean (Academic) [signed and stamped] in the course registration form are required.10 Dropping Courses Dropping the course is allowed until the end of the sixth week. Students who are interested must complete the course registration form which can be printed from the Campus Online Portal or obtained it directly from the School.00 if the reasons given are not reasonable. Students will be fined RM50.1. 2. 2.7 Registration of ‘Audit’ Course (Y code) Registration for the ‘Audit’ course (Y code) is not allowed in the E- Daftar.1. Registration on ‘Audit’ courses (Y code) is not included in the calculation of the total registered workload units. Grades obtained from the Prerequisite courses are not considered in the calculation of CGPA and units for graduation. It can only be made during the official period of OCR in the School or Centre involved. 10 .2. General information on this matter is as follows: i) Late course registration and addition are only allowed in the first to the third week with the approval of the Dean.1. except for the special cases approved by the University. Grades obtained from ‘Audit’ course are not considered in the calculation of CGPA and total units for graduation.9 Late Course Registration / Late Course Addition Late course registration or addition is not allowed after the official period of the OCR ends without any reasonable excuses.8 Registration of Prerequisite Course (Z code) Registration of the Prerequisite courses (Z code) is included in the total registered workload (unit).1. 2.

1. The student will be denied to sit for the examination and will be given grade 'X' and is not allowed to repeat the course during the period of Courses during the Long Vacation (KSCP). iii) Students who wish to drop the Co-Curriculum courses must obtain the approval of the Centre for Co-Curriculum Programme and the signature and stamp of the Dean of their respective schools. especially the code type of the registered course codes.11 Course Registration Confirmation Slip Course registration confirmation slip that has been printed / obtained after registering the course should be checked carefully to ensure no errors. Literacies and Translation. as well as the signature and stamp of the Dean of their respective schools. 11 .12 Revising and Updating Data / Information / Students Personal and Academic Records Personal and academic information for each student can be checked through the Campus Online portal (campusonline. Any application / notification for correction of academic data such as information on Major.usm. Any application / notification for correction / updating of personal data such as the spelling of names (names must be spelled as shown on the Identification Card). ii) Students who wish to drop a language course must obtain the signature and stamp of the Dean of the School of Language. . iv) The option for dropping courses cannot be misused.my). Any data errors for course registration must be corrected immediately whether during the period of E-Daftar (for student with active status only) or during the period of OCR at the Schools. Identification Card number and address (permanent address and correspondence address) must be notified to the office of the Student Data & Records Section. Students are advised to always check all the information displayed on this website. Lecturers have the right not to certify the course that the student wish to drop if the student is not serious. 2. Minor. such as the record of attendance at lectures. 2. . MUET result and the course code should be reported to the office of the Student Data & Records Section. tutorials and practical is unsatisfactory.1. as well as poor performance in course work.

2.2 Interpretation of Unit/Credit a) Unit Each course is given a value.5 contact hours per week for 13 . confirmation from Academic Advisors will be made known to every student during the first semester in the first year of their studies. Practical/Laboratory 1 unit is equivalent to 1. Practice 12 . Final year students are advised to consult their respective academic advisors before registering via E-Daftar to ensure they fulfil the graduation requirements. 2.5 contact hours per week for 13 . . which is called a UNIT.14 weeks in one semester. Application / notification for correction of the examination/results data should be reported to the office of the Examination and Graduation Section. Academic Advisors will advice the students under their responsibility on the academic-related matters.13 Academic Advisor Each School will appoint an Academic Advisor for each student.14 hours in one semester Language Proficiency 1 unit is equivalent to 1. Academic Advisors are comprised of academic staff (lecturers). Among the important advice for the student is the registration planning for certain courses in each semester during the study period. a unit is defined as follows: Type of Course Definition of Unit Theory 1 unit is equivalent to 1 contact hour per week for 13 . students are advised to consult and discuss with their Academic Advisor to determine the courses to be registered in a semester. Normally. Students under the Probation status (P1/P2) should obtain the approval from the Academic Advisor before they register for courses in a semester through OCR at the School and they are not allowed to register through E-Daftar. Industrial Training/ Teaching 1 unit is equivalent to 2 weeks of training.14 weeks in one semester. Before registering the course.1. In general. The unit is determined by the scope of its syllabus and the workload for the students.

laboratory and field work. projects.3 Examination System Examination would be held at the end of every semester. seminar. 13 . such as absence from lectures and tutorials for at least 70%. Students will not be allowed repeating the course during Course during the Long Vacation (KSCP). c) Accumulated Credit Unit Units registered and passed are known as credits. Duration of Examination Evaluated Courses Examination Duration 2 units 1 hour for coursework of more than 40% 2 units 2 hours for coursework of 40% and below 3 units or more 2 hours for coursework of more than 40% 3 units or more 3 hours for coursework of 40% and below Barring from Examination Students will be barred from sitting the final examination if they do not satisfy the course requirements. A grade 'X' would be awarded for a course in which a student is barred. Course evaluation will be based on the two components of coursework and final examinations. tutorials. students must accumulate the total number of credits stipulated for the program concerned. b) Contact Contact is defined as formal face-to-face meeting between an academic staff and his/her students and it may take the form of lectures. 2. and have not completed/fulfilled the required components of coursework. essays. Students will also be barred from sitting the final examination if they have not settled the academic fees. Coursework evaluation includes tests. To graduate. assignments and participation in tutorials. Students are required to settle all due fees and fulfil the standing requirements for lectures/tutorials/practical and other requirements before being allowed to sit for the examination of courses they registered. Students have to sit for the examination of the courses they have registered.

67 3. The achievements of students in any semester are based on Grade Point Average (GPA) achieved from all the registered courses in a particular semester.00 1. Students awarded with grade 'C' and above for a particular course will not be allowed to repeat the course whether during KSCP or normal semester.00 0.67 0 Points Students awarded with grade 'C-' and below for a particular course would be given a chance to improve their grades by repeating the course during the KSCP (See below) or normal semester. D+ D D.33 1. B+ B B. The formula to compute GPA and CGPA is as follows: n ∑ Ui Mi Grade Point Average = i=1 __________ n ∑ Ui i=1 where n = Number of courses taken Ui = Course units for course i Mi = Grade point for course i 14 . C+ C C.Grade Point Average System Student academic achievement for registered courses will be graded as follows: Alphabetic A A.33 3. GPA is the indicator to determine the academic performance of students in any semester.00 3. CGPA is the Cumulative Grade Point Average accumulated by a student from one semester to another during the years of study.67 2.33 2.67 1. F Grade Grade 4.00 2.

28 18 CGPA = Total Accumulated GP 43.00 BCBX10 4 2.32 BBCXX9 4 2. 5.67 B.00 D 3.00 ABC XX2 4 2. 5.00 B 12.33 B+ 9.66 GPA = 43.65 Total Accumulated Unit = 20 + 18 = 38 = 2.33 C+ 9.33 D+ 3.66 + 40.00 C 8.01 CDEXX4 4 2. the CGPA is calculated as the total grade point accumulated for all the registered courses and divided by the total number of the registered units.32 BCDXX3 3 1.18 20 Course Unit Grade Point Grade Total (GP) (G ) GP Semester II ABCXX7 3 1.68 XYZXX1 3 3.00 C 8.99 84.67 C.00 ABBXX8 4 2.33 C+ 9.99 EFGXX6 2 2.23 From the above examples. 15 .99 = 2.Example of calculation for GPA and CGPA: Course Unit Grade Point Grade Total (GP) (G ) GP Semester I ABC XX1 4 3. 10.34 20 43.99 GPA = 40.67 B.66 = 2.99 18 40.00 EFGXX5 3 1.

Priority is given to the final year students. However. i.99 or below. If the GPA during KSCP as calculated above is 2. 'D'. provided that the course is being offered. ii) Assist students who need to accumulate a few more credits for graduation.e. this opportunity is only given to students who are taking courses that they have attempted before and achieved a grade as stipulated above. 16 . iii) Assist "probationary" students to enhance their academic status. even though the academic status for the second semester was on probation status. iv) Assist students who need to repeat a prerequisite course. the academic status will remain as probation status for the second semester. 2 weeks of tutorial and 1 week of examination. and teaching is via tutorials. Students who have obtained 'X' or 'F*' grade are not allowed to take the course during KSCP. 'D+'. The Implementation KSCP a) Students are allowed to register a maximum of 3 courses and the total number of units registered must not exceed 10. The final overall grade is determined as follows: Final Grade = The best coursework marks or grade + Marks or grade for KSCP examination c) GPA calculation involves the LATEST grades (obtained in KSCP) and also involves courses taken in the second semester and those repeated in KSCP. the academic status will be active. if the GPA for KSCP (as calculated above) is 1. 'F' and 'DK' only. 'D-'. The purpose of KSCP is to: i) Give an opportunity to students who are facing time constraints for graduation.Courses During the Long Vacation (Kursus Semasa Cuti Panjang) (KSCP) KSCP is offered to students who have taken a course earlier and obtained a grade of 'C-'. However.00 or better. The duration of KSCP is 3 weeks. Usually. b) Marks/grades for coursework are taken from the highest marks/the best grades obtained in a particular course in the normal semester before KSCP. formal lectures are not held. which is not offered in the following semester. all held during the long vacation. The KSCP schedule is available in the University's Academic Calendar.

the University Examination Council has the absolute right to terminate any student's studies if his/her academic achievement do not satisfy and fulfil the accumulated minimum credit in line with the number of semesters completed by the student as given in the table below. FO) will not be allowed to pursue his/her studies at the university. Examination Result A provisional result (pass/fail) through the Tele-academic line: (600-83-7899). 17 .00 and above. as well as medical reasons can be disqualified from pursuing his/her studies.99 and below. On the other hand.00 and above for any examination in a semester will be recognised as ACTIVE and be allowed to pursue his/her studies for the following semester. the student concerned will be allowed to pursue his/her studies and will be maintained at P2 status. has not attended examination without valid reasons). P2. Probation Status: A probation status is given to any student who achieves a GPA of 1. Without any prejudice to the above regulations. if the CGPA is 2. Total Accumulated Minimum Number of Semesters Credit Units Pure Applied Professional nd End of 2 semester 15 15 16 th End of 4 semester 35 35 38 th End of 6 semester 55 55 60 th End of 8 semester 75 75 80 The University Examination Council has the right to terminate any student's studies due to certain reasons (a student who has not registered for the courses. Campus Online Portal and short message service (SMS) will usually be released and announced after the School Examination Council meeting and presumably one month after final examination. A student who is under probation status for three consecutive semesters (P1.d) Graduating students (those who have fulfilled the graduation requirements) in the second semester are not allowed to register for KSCP. Academic Status Active Status: Any student who achieves a GPA of 2.

ii) Courses for unit exemption may be combined (in two or more combinations) in order to obtain exemption of one course at degree level. However if the School would like to approve only one course at the diploma level for unit exemption of one course at degree level. Regulations and Implementation of Unit Exemption a) Diploma holders from recognised Public and Private Institutions of Higher Learning i) Unit exemption can only be given to courses taken at diploma level. Campus Online Portal and short message service (SMS) will be released and announced after the University Examination Council meeting and is usually two weeks after the provisional results are released. 2. Only passes or course grades accumulated or acquired in USM will be included in the calculation of the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) for graduation purpose. Full result (grade) can be enquired through the Tele-academic line: (600-83- 7899). The official semester results (SEMGRED) will be issued to students during the second week of the following semester. iv) The minimum achievement at diploma level that can be considered for unit exemption is at least 'C' grade or 2.0 or equivalent.4 Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer Definition of Unit Exemption Unit exemption is defined as the total number of units given to students who are pursuing their studies in USM that are exempted from the graduation requirements. v) The total number of semesters exempted should not exceed two semesters. 18 . Students only need to accumulate the remaining units for graduating purpose. the course at diploma level must be equivalent to the degree course and has the same or more units. iii) Courses taken during employment (in service) for diploma holders cannot be considered for unit exemption.

b) IPTS (Private Institution of Higher Learning) USM Supervised/External Diploma Graduates i) Students who are IPTS USM supervised/external diploma graduates are given unit exemption as stipulated by the specific programme of study. iii) The total maximum unit exemption allowed should not exceed one third of the total unit requirement for graduation. ii) Students taking courses at advanced diploma level in IPT that is recognised to be equivalent to the Bachelor Degree course at USM may be considered for unit exemption as in c) i). Islamic and Asian Civilisations and as well as co-curriculum. Normally. The students are also required to produce the report on the level and type of work performed. vii) Unit exemption for university and option courses can only be given for courses such as Bahasa Malaysia (LKM400). c) Students from recognised local or foreign IPTA (Public Institution of Higher Learning)/IPTS who are studying at the Bachelor Degree level may apply to study in this university and if successful. If the student has undergone industrial training during the diploma level study. unit exemption in this category is given as a block according to the agreement between USM (through School that offers the programme) with the IPTS. can be considered for unit exemptions subject to the following conditions: i) Courses taken in the previous IPT are equivalent (at least 50% of the course must be the same) with courses offered in USM. English Language. Industrial training unit exemption cannot be considered for semester exemption as the industrial training is carried out during the long vacation in USM. 19 . vi) In order to obtain unit exemption for industrial training. a student must have work experience for at least one year. a student must have work experience continuously for at least two years in the area.

Definition of Credit Transfer Credit transfer is defined as the recognition of a total number of credits obtained by USM students taking courses in other IPTA (Public Institution of Higher Learning) within the period of study at USM. and is combined with credits obtained at USM to fulfil units requirement for his/her programme of study. 20 . The form must to be approved by the Dean/Deputy Dean of the School prior to the submission to the Admission and Enrolments Unit for consideration. Category of Students Who Can Be Considered for Credit Transfer USM full-time Bachelor Degree level students who would like to attend specific Bachelor Degree level courses at other IPTA. The transferred examination result or grades obtained in courses taken at other IPTA will be combined in the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) calculation. Conditions a) Basic and Core Courses i) Credit transfer can only be considered for credits obtained from other courses in other IPTA that are equivalent (at least 50% of the content are the same) with the courses offered by the programme.Total Number of Exempted Semesters Semester exemption is based on the total unit exempted as below:- Total Unit Exempted Total Semester Exempted <9 - 9-32 1 >32 2 Application Procedure for Unit Exemption Any student who would like to apply for exemption unit is required to complete the Unit Exemption Form which can be obtained at the counter of Admission and Enrolments Unit or the respective schools. USM full-time diploma level students who would like to attend specific diploma level courses at other IPTA.

credit transfers can be approved by combining a few courses. the School should adhere to either conditions (a) or (b).g. h) Students are required to register courses at other IPTA with not less than the total minimum units as well as not exceeding the maximum units as stipulated in their programme of study. the CGPA calculation will be carried out as in KSCP. For equivalent courses but with less number of units. ii) Courses that can be transferred are only courses that have the same number of units or more. However. e) Credit exemption from other IPTA can be considered only once for each IPTA. Average grade of the combined course will be taken into account in CGPA calculation. i) USM students attending courses at other IPTA and if failed in any courses are allowed to resit the examination if there is such provision in that IPTA. f) The examination results obtained by a student taken at other IPTA will be taken into account for graduation purpose. b) Elective or Option Courses i) Students may attend any appropriate courses in other IPTA subject to permission from the School as well as the approval of other IPTA. g) Students who have applied and approved for credit transfer are not allowed to cancel the approval after the examination result is obtained. 21 . students on extended semester and only require a few units for graduation). No course equivalence condition is required. c) Minor Courses i) For credit transfer of minor courses. In this case. for specific cases (e. d) The total maximum units transferred should not exceed one third of the total number of units for the programme. Grade obtained for each course will be combined with the grades obtained at USM for CGPA calculation. the Dean may approve such students to register less than the minimum and the semester will not be counted in the residential requirement. and take into account of the programme requirement. Credits transferred are the same as the course units as offered in USM. ii) The transferred credits are credits obtained from courses at other IPTA.

pager. mobile phone. purpose and meaning of a university education. k) USM students who have registered courses at other IPTA and decided to return to study in USM. The following. Thus. must adhere to the existing course registration conditions in USM. Academic dishonesty violates the fundamental purpose of preserving and maintaining the integrity of university education and will not be tolerated. • Using unauthorised materials or devices (calculator.) during a test or an exam. j) If the method of calculation of examination marks in the other IPTA is not the same as in USM. etc. 22 . integrity. The most essential values in academia are rooted on the principles of truth seeking in knowledge and honesty with regards to the intellectual property of oneself and of others. a grade conversion method will be carried out according to the existing scales. are examples of practices or actions that are considered dishonest acts in academic pursuit. Knowledge without integrity is dangerous and weak" – Samuel Johnson Being a student of the University Sains Malaysia requires a firm adherence to the basic values. PDA. • Sharing answers or programmes for an assignment or project. although not exhaustive.5 Academic Integrity "Integrity without knowledge is weak and useless. students must bear the responsibility of maintaining these principles in all work done in their academic endeavour. The application form should be submitted for the Dean's approval for the programme of study within three months before the application is submitted to other IPTA for consideration. Application Procedure for Attending Courses/Credit Transfer USM students who would like to attend courses/credit transfer at other IPTAs should apply using Unit Exemption Form. (a) Cheating Cheating is the unauthorised use of information or other aids in any academic exercise. • Asking or allowing another student to take a test or an exam for you and vice-versa. 2. There are numerous "infamous" ways and methods of cheating including: • Copying from others during a test or an exam.

• Paraphrasing or summarising other's written or spoken words that are not common knowledge. of other's words or ideas and claiming it as yours without proper attribution to the original author. any information or to draw diagrams which can be related to the examination taken by the student. worksheets. graphics or media from the Internet into your work without citing the source. 23 . • Not putting quote marks around parts of the source that you copy exactly. Rule 1999 regarding conduct during examination (Part II. • Using someone else's work or acquiring papers. Provision 8): Conduct during examination 8. it is the use. project or research you did not do and turning it in as if you had done the work yourself. without referencing the source. in part or whole. worksheets. pictures or any other materials recommended by the examiner or the Board of Examiners. Universiti Sains Malaysia. (b) Plagiarism Plagiarism is "academic theft". programming. or on the clothing’s worn by the student. Students can receive any form of books. Discipline of Students. documents. It includes: • Copying and pasting information. or (d) cheat or try to cheat or act in any way that can be interpreted as cheating. No student can- (a) take any form of books. worksheets. • Submitting identical or similar work in more than one course without consulting or prior permission from the lecturers involved. writing. other than those authorised by the examiner. or have somebody else to write. documents. or receive any form of books. • Tampering with marked/graded work after it has been returned. Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971. or other types of assignment. on any parts of the body. and authorized by the Vice-Chancellor (b) write. pictures or any other materials. pictures or any other materials from outsiders when in examination room. documents. then resubmitting it for remarking/regrading. assignment. into or out of any examination room. It violates the intellectual property rights of the author. (c) contact with other students during an examination through any form of communication. • Allowing others to do the research. Simply put.

writing. data or invention belonging to another person. Discipline of Students. (c) forces another person to include his/her name in the list of co- researchers for a particular research project or in the list of co-authors for a publication when he/she has not made any contribution which may qualify him/her as a co-researcher or co-author. (2) For the purpose of this rule. (b) incorporates himself/herself or allows himself/herself to be incorporated as a co-author of an abstract. plagiarism includes: (a) the act of taking an idea. There are numerous sources in the Internet that describe plagiarism and explain acceptable ways for using borrowed words. Universiti Sains Malaysia. (d) extract academic data which are the result of research undertaken by some other person. writing. article. article. or book. scientific or academic paper. data or invention which has actually been taken from some other source. (1) A student shall not plagiarise any idea. scientific or academic paper. or book. • Not acknowledging collaborators in an assignment. article. scientific or academic paper. or book which is wholly or partly written by some other person. Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971. however. writing. Rule 1999 regarding prohibition against plagiarism (Part II. Students should explore the relevant materials. Provision 6): Prohibitions against plagiarism 6. an abstract. paper. project or research. writing. a student plagiarises when he/she: (a) publishes. data or invention of another person and claiming that the idea. data or invention is the result of one's own findings or creation. such as laboratory findings 24 . often misunderstood. (3) Without prejudice to the generality of sub rule (2). with himself/herself as the author. or (b) an attempt to make out or the act of making out. Plagiarism is. in such a way. that one is the original source or the creator of an idea. when he/she has not at all made any written contribution to the abstract. • Giving incorrect information about the source of reference.

assignment or research. whether written. (e) uses research data obtained through collaborative work with some other person. • Falsifying of academic records or documents to gain academic advantage. • Citing sources that are not actually used or referred to. and incorporate those data as part of his/her academic research without giving due acknowledgement to the actual source. as part of another distinct personal academic research of his/her. without obtaining the consent of his/her co-researchers prior to embarking on his/her personal research or prior to publishing the data. • Intentional listing of incorrect or fictitious references. (c) Fabrication Unauthorised invention. 25 . whether published or unpublished. or in any other form. (g) translates the writing or creation of another person from one language to another whether or not wholly or partly. Some examples are: • Making up or changing of data or result. in an experiment. information or citation in any academic work constitutes fabrication. or in slide form. or (h) extracts ideas from another person's writing or creation and makes certain modifications without due reference to the original source and rearranges them in such a way that it appears as if he/she is the creator of those ideas. and subsequently presents the translation in whatever form or manner as his/her own writing or creation. printed or available in electronic form. or in whatever form of teaching or research apparatus. falsification or misleading use of data. • Forging signatures of authorisation in any academic record or other university document. and claims whether directly or indirectly that he/she is the creator of that idea or creation. Fabricated information neither represent the student's own effort nor the truth concerning a particular investigation or study thus violates the principle of truth seeking in knowledge. or field work findings or data obtained through library research. alteration. whether or not that other person is a staff member or a student of the University. or using someone else's result. or for a publication In his/her own name as sole author. (f) transcribes the ideas or creations of others kept in whatever form.

depending on the extent of the violation. test/exam. • Altering or destroying work or computer files/programmes that belong to others or those that are meant for the whole class. (f) Consequences of Violating Academic Integrity Both students and academic staff must assume the responsibility of protecting and upholding the academic integrity of the university. test/exam. The lecturer is then responsible to substantiate the violation and is encouraged to confront the perpetrator(s) to discuss the facts surrounding the allegation. or lower grade or "F" for the whole course. In the event that a student encounters any incident that denotes academic dishonesty. bribing or allowing someone to do an assignment. project or research for something in return. test. an appropriate punitive grading may be applied. project or research for you. project. the matter will be brought to the attention of the University Disciplinary Authority where appropriate action will be taken. • Permitting your work to be submitted as the work of others. reproducing or circulating of test or exam material prior to its authorised time. or sources to others knowing that such aids could be used in any dishonest act. Examples of punitive grading are giving lower grade or "F" on the assignment. information. destroying or hiding it. If the lecturer found that the student is guilty.(d) Collusion The School does not differentiate between those who commit an act of academic dishonesty with those who knowingly allow or help others in performing those acts. the student is expected to report it to the relevant lecturer. If the violation is deemed serious by the lecturer. (e) Unfair Advantage A student may obtain an unfair advantage over another. the University 26 . in several ways including: • Gaining access to. defacing. stealing. and report the matter to the Deputy Deans or the Dean of the School. • Doing or assisting others in an assignment. • Intentionally interfering with other's effort to do their academic work. Some examples of collusion include: • Paying. which is also a breach of academic integrity. • Depriving others of the use of library material by stealing. • Providing material. If a student is caught in an examination.

(c) banned from entering any or certain premises of the University for a specified period. (b) To inculcate the spirit of unity and the concept of helping one another by appointing a well-trained mentor as a social agent who promotes caring society for USM (c) To produce more volunteers to assist those who need help (d) To prevent damages in any psychosocial aspects before they reach a critical stage. Examination Board will pursue the matter according to the university's procedure. psychosocial problems and many more in order to reinforce the well-being of the USM community. exclusion from any specific part or parts of the University for a specified period.6 USM Mentor Programme Mentor Programme acts as a support-aid that involves the staff undergoing special training as a consultant and guide to USM community who would like to share their feelings and any psychosocial aspects that could harm their social functions. Rule 1999 regarding Disciplinary Punishment (Part II. (a) warning. Provision 48): Disciplinary punishment 48. (b) fine not more than two hundred ringgit. fine not exceeding RM200. Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971.usm. Discipline of Students. or expulsion from the University (University and University College Act 1971. This programme manages psychosocial issues in a more effective manner and finally could improve the well-being of individuals in order to achieve life of better quality. suspension from being a student of the University for a specified period. A student who commits a disciplinary offense under these Rules and found guilty of the offense can be punished according to any one or any two or more of the following appropriate actions. please visit www. Objectives (a) As a co-operation and mutual assistance mechanism for dealing with stress. Universiti Sains Malaysia. (d) suspended from being a student of the University for a specified period. The consequence then may range from a warning. For more information. Rule 1999).my/mentor 27 . (e) dismissed from the University 2. Universiti Sains Malaysia. Discipline of Students.

usm. Students can choose any relevant courses and apply for credit transfers. International Office at +604 – 653 2775/2778. Ideally. (b) Student Exchange Programme between Local Higher Education Institutions (RPPIPT) This is a programme that allows students of public higher learning institutions to do an exchange programme for a semester between the public higher institutions itself. 28 .7 Student Exchange Programme (a) Study Abroad Scheme The student exchange programme is an opportunity for USM students to study one or two semesters abroad at any USM partners institutions. students are encouraged to participate in the exchange programme within their third to fifth semester (3 years degree programme) and within third to seventh semester (4 years degree programme). and with the International Office. Credits earned at an associate university are transferable as a part of credit accumulation for graduation. Studies abroad are planned beforehand with the Dean or Deputy Dean of the respective School.2.my/io or contact the Academic Collaboration Unit. please visit http://www. For more information.

Details of the University requirements are given in the following sections.0 UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS 3. Students from the School of Medical Sciences and School of Dentistry are required to register two (2) units of Co-Curriculum course in year Two. 3. ** Students from the School of Education are required to choose a uniformed body co- curriculum package. The units should be replaced by an option course.3. Students from the School of Health Sciences are required to register one (1) unit of Co-Curriculum course.1 Summary of University Requirements Students are required to take 15 .22 units of the following University/Option courses for University requirements: University Requirements Unit 1 Bahasa Malaysia 2 2 English Language 4 3 Local Students 6 • Islamic and Asian Civilisations (TITAS) (2 Units) • Ethnic Relations (2 Units) • Core Entrepreneurship* (2 Units) International Students • Malaysian Studies (4 Units) • Option/Bahasa Malaysia/English Language (2 Units) 4 Third Language/Co-Curriculum /Skill Course/Options 3 – 10 Students have to choose one of the followings: • Third Language Package • Co-Curriculum** (1-6 units) • Skill Course/Options Total 15 – 22 * Students from Schools which have a similar course as this are exempted from following this course.2 Bahasa Malaysia (a) Local Students The requirements are as follows: • LKM400/2 .Bahasa Malaysia IV 29 .

(b) International Students • International students pursuing Bachelor’s degrees in Science. Building and Planning. Accounting. Literacies and Translation if they have different Bahasa Malaysia qualification from the above. (a) SPM/MCE/SC 1-6 LKM400 U 2 Graduation (or equivalent requirement qualification) P/S (b) STPM/HSC (or equivalent qualification) Note: To obtain credit units for Bahasa Malaysia courses. a minimum grade of C is required. Education (TESL) and Housing. International students in this category are required to take and pass three Intensive Malay Language courses before they commence their Bachelor’s degree programmes. Arts (ELLS). Code Course Duration LKM101 Bahasa Malaysia Persediaan I 4 months LKM102 Bahasa Malaysia Persediaan II 4 months LKM201 Bahasa Malaysia Pertengahan 4 months 30 . All Malaysian students must take LKM400 and pass with the minimum of grade C in order to graduate. Students may obtain advice from the School of Languages. All international students in this category are required to take the following courses: Code Type Units LKM100 U 2 • International students (non-Indonesian) pursuing Bachelor’s degrees in Arts. Entry requirements for Bahasa Malaysia are as follows: No Qualification Grade Level of Type Units Status Entry 1.

179) (2 Units) * MUET: Malaysia University English Test. The Bahasa Malaysia graduation requirement for this category of students is as follows: Code Type Units LKM300 U 2 • International students (Indonesian) pursuing Bachelor’s degrees in Arts. (a) Entry Requirements for English Language Courses No English Language Grade Level of Status Qualification Entry 1. *MUET Band 4 LSP300 Compulsory/ LMT100 A-C Type U †Discretion of Dean (2 Units) 4. 3. 31 . Literacies and Translation if they have different English Language qualification from the above. *MUET Band 5 LSP Compulsory/ LSP300 A-C 401/402/403/ Type U †Discretion of Dean 404 (2 Units) 3. The Bahasa Malaysia graduation requirement for this category of students is as follows: Code Type Units LKM200 U 2 LKM300 U 2 Note: Students must pass with a minimum grade of C for type U courses. *MUET Band 6 LHP Compulsory/ LSP401/402/403/404 A-C 451/452/453/ Option/Type U †Discretion of Dean 454/455/456/ (2 Units) 457/458/459 2. *MUET Band 3/2/1 LMT100/ Pre-requisite/ †Discretion of Dean (Score Re-sit MUET Type Z 0 . † Students may obtain advice from the School of Languages.3 English Language All Bachelor’s degree students must take 4 units of English Language courses in fulfillment of the University requirement for graduation.

458 and 459 is 2. LMT100/2 Preparatory Students from all Schools English 2.] • Students with a score of 179 and below in MUET are required to resit MUET to improve their score to Band 4 or take LMT100 and pass with a minimum grade of C. • Students with a Score 260 . 455. • In order to obtain units in English Language courses. Literacies and Translation.300 (Band 6) in MUET must accumulate the 4 units of English from the courses in the post-advanced level (LHP451/452/453/454/455/456/457/ 458/459*). students have to pass with a minimum grade of C. 456. (Please use the form that can be obtained from the School of Languages. 452. Literacies and Translation. (b) English Language Courses (Compulsory English Language Units) The English Language courses offered as University courses are as follows: No Code/Unit Course Title School (If Applicable) 1.Note: • Students are required to accumulate four (4) units of English for graduation. LSP300/2 Academic Students from all Schools English 3. They can also take foreign language courses to replace their English language units but they must first obtain a written consent from the Dean of the School of Languages. LSP401/2 General English Students from: School of Education Studies (Arts) School of Fine Arts School of Humanities School of Social Sciences 4.) [*The number of units for LHP457 is 4 and for LHP451. 454. LSP402/2 Scientific and Students from: Medical English School of Biological Sciences School of Physics School of Chemical Sciences School of Mathematical Sciences School of Industrial Technology School of Education Studies (Science) School of Medical Sciences School of Health & Dental Sciences School of Pharmaceutical Sciences 32 . 453.

LDN 101/2 English For Students from School of Health Nursing I Sciences 8. LDN 201/2 English For Students from School of Health Nursing II Sciences 3.4 Local Students . Contemporary Challenges faced by the Islamic and Asian Civilization and Islamic Hadhari Principles. 5. LSP404/2 Technical and Students from: Engineering School of Computer Sciences English School of Housing. Malay Civilization. values.Islamic and Asian Civilisations/Ethnic Relations/Core Entrepreneurship (a) Islamic and Asian Civilisations (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): HTU 223 – Islamic and Asian Civilisation (TITAS) (2 units) This course aims to increase students’ knowledge on history. With the academic exposure to cultural issues and civilization in Malaysia. Building and Planning Schools of Engineering 7. it is hoped that students will be more aware of issues that can contribute to the cultivation of the culture of respect and harmony among the plural society of Malaysia. and (3) to 33 . LSP403/2 Business and Students from: Communication School of Management English School of Communication 6. (b) Ethnic Relations (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): SHE 101 – Ethnic Relations (2 units) This course is an introduction to ethnic relations in Malaysia. principles. Among the topics in this course are Interaction among Various Civilization. main aspect of Malay civilization. Islamic Civilization. This course is designed with 3 main objectives: (1) to introduce students to the basic concept and the practices of social accord in Malaysia. (2) to reinforce basic understanding of challenges and problems in a multi-ethnic society. Islamic civilization and its culture.

please refer to the Co-curriculum Program Reference Book. judiciary. By exposing entrepreneurial knowledge to all students. This initiative is made to open the minds and arouse the spirit of entrepreneurship among target groups that possess the potentials to become successful entrepreneurs. bureaucracy.5 International Students . provide an understanding and awareness in managing the complexity of ethnic relations in Malaysia. practical. An analysis of the formation and workings of the major institutions of government – parliament. and the electoral and party systems will follow this. The main learning outcome is the assimilation of culture and entrepreneurship work ethics in their everyday life. Practical experiences through hands-on participation of students in business projects management will generate interest and provide a clearer picture of entrepreneurship world. business plan proposal. with emphasis on the implementation of the learning aspects while experiencing the process of executing business projects in campus. it is hoped that students will be able to identify and apply the skills to issues associated with ethnic relations in Malaysia.Malaysian Studies (4 Units) This course investigates the structure of the Malaysian system of government and the major trends in contemporary Malaysia. Emphasis will be given both to current issues in Malaysian politics and the historical and economic developments and trends of the country. At the end of this course. execution of entrepreneurial projects and report presentations. The discussion begins with a review of the independence process. The mode of teaching is through interactive lectures. (c) Core Entrepreneurship (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): WUS 101 – Core Entrepreneurship (2 units) This course aims to provide basic exposure to students in the field of entrepreneurship and business. The scope and extent of Malaysian 34 . For more information. 3. it is hoped that it will accelerate the effort to increase the number of middle class entrepreneurs in the country.Malaysian Studies/Option (a) Malaysian Studies The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C) for all international students: SEA205E .

3. the role of religion in Malaysian politics. (b) Option/Bahasa Malaysia/English Language (2 Units) International students need to fulfill a further 2 units of option course or additional Bahasa Malaysia/English Language course. The total number of units per package is 6. politics and business. justice and order. The packages offered are as follows: Commn. 2 units per level. Commn. Commn. especially in light of current changes and developments in Malaysian politics. federal-state relations. civil society. The second part of the course focuses on specific issues: ethnic relations. Commn. Students are requested to complete all levels (3 semesters).6 Third Language/Co-Curriculum/Skill Courses/Options Students have to choose one of the followings (A/B/C): (A) Third Language Package (6 Units) Third Language Courses are offered as University courses. They are offered as a package of three (3) levels. national unity and the national ideology. and directions for the future. The co- curriculum packages offered are as follows: 35 .6 Units) Students who choose to take packaged co-curriculum courses are required to complete all levels of the package. Commn. Commn. democracy will be considered. Commn. Commn. French Spanish Tamil Thai LTP100/2 LTE100/2 LTT100/2 LTS100/2 LTP200/2 LTE200/2 LTT200/2 LTS200/2 LTP300/2 LTE300/2 LTT300/2 LTS300/2 (B) Uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak Co-Curriculum Package (4 . It is compulsory for students from the School of Education to choose a uniformed body co-curriculum package from the list below (excluding Seni Silat Cekak). development and political change. Arabic Chinese Japanese German Korean LTA100/2 LTC100/2 LTJ100/2 LTG100/2 LTK100/2 LTA200/2 LTC200/2 LTJ200/2 LTG200/2 LTK200/2 LTA300/2 LTC300/2 LTJ300/2 LTG300/2 LTK300/2 Commn. Malaysia in the modern world system. law.

Sports. Culture. Innovation & Initiatives and Leadership Co-Curriculum Courses 36 . John (Rover Training) (Red Crescent) (St. skill and option courses offered are as follows: (i) Community Service. • Armed Uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak Co-Curriculum Package (6 Units) (3 years) PALAPES PALAPES PALAPES SUKSIS Seni Silat Tentera Tentera Tentera (Student Cekak Darat Laut Udara Police (Army) (Navy) (Air Force) Volunteer) WTD102/2 WTL102/2 WTU102/2 WPD101/2 WCC123/2 WTD202/2 WTL202/2 WTU202/2 WPD201/2 WCC223/2 WTD302/2 WTL302/2 WTU302/2 WPD301/2 WCC323/2 • Unarmed Uniformed Co-Curriculum Package (4 Units) (2 Years) Kelana Siswa Bulan Sabit Merah Ambulans St. Sports. Culture. (Students from the School of Health Sciences must take at least one of the co-curriculum courses while those from the School of Education must take the uniformed co-curriculum package [excluding Seni Silat Cekak]). Students who do not enroll for any co-curriculum courses or who enroll for only a portion of the 3 units need to replace these units with skill/option courses. John Ambulance) WLK101/2 WBM101/2 WJA101/2 WLK201/2 WBM201/2 WJA201/2 • Unarmed Uniformed Co-Curriculum Package (2 Units) (1 Year) SISPA (Siswa Siswi Pertahanan Awam) (Public Defense) (offered in Health Campus only) WLK101/2 WLK201/2 (C) Co-Curriculum/Skill Course/Options (1 – 6 Units) All students are encouraged to follow the co-curriculum courses and are given a maximum total of 6 units for Community Service. The co-curriculum. Innovation & Initiatives and Leadership (Students from the School of Medical Sciences and School of Dentistry are required to register for two (2) units of Co-Curriculum course in Year Two).

Catan (Painting) WSC105/1 .Seni Memasak WSC 125/1 – Futsal (Culinary Art) WCC127/1 – Kesenian Muzik WSC 126/1 – Bola Jaring (Netball) Nasyid (Nasyid Musical Art) 37 .Selaman SCUBA (Basic Qigong Exercise) (SCUBA Diving) WCC219 – Senaman Qigong WSC123/1 .Kraftangan WSC112/1 .Kriket (Cricket) Pertengahan (Intermediate Qigong Exercise) WCC124/1 – Kompang Berlagu WCC124/1 – Sepak Takraw WCC122/1 .Senaman Qigong Asas WSC122/1 .Renang (Swimming) (Handcrafting) WCC115/1 .Gamelan WSC106/1 .Memanah (Archery) WCC109/1 .Tenis (Tennis) (Modern Theatre) WCC118/1 .Golf WCC107/1 .Tarian Tradisional WSC114/1 . Packaged (Students are required to complete all levels) Khidmat Masyarakat Jazz Band Karate Taekwondo (Community Service) (3 Years) (3 Semesters) (3 Semesters) (2 Years) WKM101/1 WCC108/1 WSC108/1 WSC115/1 WKM201/1 WCC208/1 WSC208/1 WSC215/1 WCC308/1 WSC308/1 WSC315/1 Non-Packaged (1 Semester) Culture Sports WCC103/1 .Teater Moden WSC116/1 .Bola Tampar (Volley Ball) WCC105/1 .Ping Pong (Table Tennis) WCC110/1 .Koir (Choir) WSC111/1 .Wayang Kulit Melayu WSC119/1 .Skuasy (Squash) (Traditional Dance) WCC117/1 .Aerobik (Aerobic) (Modern Dance) WCC116/1 .Tarian Moden WSC113/1 .Guitar WSC110/1 .Badminton (Malay Shadow Play) WCC119/1 .

Canting Batik (Batik WSC 127/1 – Pengurusan Acara 1 Painting) (Event Management 1) WCC121/1 . LHP456/2 Spoken English 7. LHP453/2 Creative Writing 4. LHP458/2 English for Translation (Offered only in Semester II) 9.Seni Khat WSC 227/1 – Pengurusan Acara 2 (Calligraphic Art) (Event Management 2) WCC125/1 – Seni Wau Tradisional (Traditional Kite Art) WCC128 – Seni Sulaman & Manik Labuci (Embroidery & Beads Sequins Art) WCC 130 – Seni Fotografi SLR Digital (Digital SLR Photography Art) (ii) HTV201/2 . LHP452/2 Business Writing 3. LHP459/2 English for Interpretation (Offered only in Semester I) 38 . Innovation & Initiative Leadership (Kepimpinan) WCC120/1 .Teknik Berfikir (Thinking Techniques) (iii) Other option/skill courses as recommended or required by the respective school (if any) (iv) English Language Courses The following courses may be taken as university courses to fulfill the compulsory English Language requirements (for Band 5 and Band 6 in MUET) or as skill/option courses: No Code/Unit Course Title 1. LHP451/2 Effective Reading 2. LHP457/4 Speech Writing and Public Speaking 8. LHP454/2 Academic Writing 5. LHP455/2 English Pronunciation Skills 6.

Students are not allowed to register for more than one foreign language course per semester. The foreign language courses offered are as follows: Arabic Chinese Japanese German Spanish LAA100/2 LAC100/2 LAJ100/2 LAG100/2 LAE100/2 LAA200/2 LAC200/2 LAJ200/2 LAG200/2 LAE200/2 LAA300/2 LAC300/2 LAJ300/2 LAG300/2 LAE300/2 LAA400/2 LAC400/2 LAJ400/2 LAG400/2 LAE400/2 French Thai Tamil Korean LAP100/2 LAS100/2 LAT100/2 LAK100/2 LAP200/2 LAS200/2 LAT200/2 LAK200/2 LAP300/2 LAS300/2 LAT300/2 LAK300/2 LAP400/2 LAS400/2 39 .(v) Foreign Language Courses The foreign language courses offered by the School of Languages. However. students are not required to complete all four levels of one particular foreign language course. They must complete at least two levels of a foreign language course before they are allowed to register for another foreign language course. Literacies and Translation can be taken by students as option or compulsory courses to fulfill the number of units required for graduation.

SCHOOL OF CHEMICAL SCIENCES 40 .

SCHOOL OF CHEMICAL SCIENCES

VISION

To realise the aspiration of Universiti Sains Malaysia in Transforming Higher Education
for a Sustainable Tomorrow.

MISSION

 To produce chemistry graduates who are knowledgeable, highly skilled, well-
mannered and possess excellent work ethics suited for the requirements of the
public and industrial sectors.
 To provide quality education and chemistry students.
 To instill awareness among chemistry students towards the welfare of society.
 To provide modern facilities for chemistry teaching and research.
 To attract excellent students from Malaysia and overseas to do chemistry.

OBJECTIVES

 To provide a broad, balanced and in depth education in chemistry and related
areas at the undergraduate level.
 To develop the students into graduates with theoretical and practical knowledge
and the ability to apply the knowledge to employment or further studies in
chemistry or other related post graduate programmes.
 To develop in students various skills including practical, social, communicative,
leadership and entrepreneurship skills.
 To develop in students the ability to assess and solve problems critically,
logically and creatively.

41

INTRODUCTION

The School of Chemical Sciences (SCS), established in 1969, is one of the pioneering
Schools of USM. With an academic staff of more than 30 and over 50 supporting staff,
the School has been entrusted to provide professional training in chemistry to meet the
demands of the industries and society.

The programme is designed not only to produce graduates with a solid knowledge of
Chemistry but also to equip them with attributes so that they can adapt readily to a
dynamic and rapidly developing working environment. The academic programme
[Bachelor of Science with Honours, B.Sc. (Hons) and Bachelor of Applied Science
B.App.Sc.(Hons)] from the School of Chemical Sciences, USM is planned to produce
graduates who are knowledgeable, highly skilled and well-mannered and possess
excellent work ethics suited for the requirements of the industrial and public sector.

In line with this aspiration, the School of Chemical Sciences has designed courses in such
a manner that they can be modified and adjusted from time to time to suit the requirement
of an unpredictable future. The School follows a system of studies which is liberal and
multi-disciplinary in nature.

PROGRAMMES OFFERED

The School offers two undergraduate programmes leading to:
 Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) with Honours degree
 Bachelor of Applied Science (B.App.Sc.) with Honours degree, majoring either in
Industrial or Analytical Chemistry.

These programmes which are recognised by the Malaysian Institute of Chemistry (Institut
Kimia Malaysia) also include 8 weeks of industrial training with industrial partners,
commercial and research laboratories. Students are also encouraged to register for the
final year research project (which covers 2 semesters) during their final year.

The postgraduate programmes offered, either by research mode leading to M.Sc. and
Ph.D. or mixed-mode M.Sc. (Chemical Instrumentation), have managed to attract fellow
Malaysian and many foreign nationals.

SPECIALISATION

The School has given priority in creating a healthy research environment with a total of
over 200 postgraduate students engaging in various areas of research including natural
products, organic synthesis, nanoscience, electrochemistry, liquid crystals,
organometallics, environmental chemistry, materials chemistry and chemical education.
Many of our academic staff have been well endowed with research grants and funding
from government bodies and industries to support these research activities.

42

MAIN ADMINISTRATIVE STAF

DEAN

Prof. Wan Ahmad Kamil Mahmood
DEPUTY DEAN

Assoc Prof. Afidah Abdul Rahim Prof. Norita Mohamed Prof. Mohd Jain Noordin Mohd Kassim
(Academic & Student Development) (Research & Postgraduates Studies) ( Industrial Linkages/ Training and Alumni)

PROGRAMME MANAGER

Assoc Prof. Rohana Adnan Prof. Sulaiman Ab. Ghani Assoc. Prof. Wan Saime Prof. Farook Adam
(Pure Science Programme) (Applied Science Programme) Wan Ngah (MUPA, Research Equipment
(Teaching & Learning for & Information Technology)
Level 100)

PRINCIPAL ASSISTANT REGISTRAR ASSISTANT REGISTRAR

Hjh. Zali Zaiton Hussin Ms. Sheilawanis Abdul Karim

43

ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

TELEPHONE
ADMINISTRATION E-MAIL
EXTENSION

Dean wakcm@usm.my
Prof. Wan Ahmad Kamil Mahmood 3262/3685 dean_chem@usm.my

Deputy Dean afidah@usm.my
(Academic & Student Development) 3913/3548 tdpp_ppskimia@usm.my
Assoc. Prof. Afidah Abdul Rahim

Deputy Dean mnorita@usm.my
(Postgraduate Studies & Research) 4049/3686 tdpsp_ppskimia@usm.my
Prof. Norita Mohamed

Deputy Dean
(Industrial Linkages/Training and
Alumni 4023 mjain@usm.my
Prof. Mohd Jain Noordin Mohd Kassim

PROGRAMME MANAGER

Pure Science Programme
Assoc. Prof. Rohana Adnan 3549 r_adnan@usm.my

Applied Science Programme
Prof. Sulaiman Ab Ghani 4030 sag@usm.my

Teaching & Learning for Level 100
Assoc. Prof. Wan Saime Wan Ngah 3569 wsaime@usm.my

MUPA, Research Equipment &
Information Technology 3567 farook@usm.my
Prof. Farook Adam

Principal Assistant Registrar
Hjh. Zali Zaiton Hj. Hussin 3540 zzh@usm.my

Assistant Registrar
Ms. Sheilawanis Binti Abdul Karim 3541 anisab@.usm.my

44

ACADEMIC STAFF
TELEPHONE
PROFESSOR EXTENSION E-MAIL

Bahruddin Saad, Dr. 4049 bahrud@usm.my
Farook Adam, Dr. 3567 farook@usm.my
Lim Poh Eng, Dr. 3550 pelim@usm.my
Mohd. Asri Mohd. Nawi, Dr. 4031 masri@usm.my
Dato’ Muhammad Idiris Saleh , Dr. 4027 midiris@usm.my
Mohd. Jain Noordin Mohd. Kassim, Dr. 4023 mjain@usm.my
Mohamad Abu Bakar, Dr. 4025 bmohamad@usm.my
Norita Mohamed, Dr. 3686 mnorita@usm.my
Sulaiman Ab Ghani, Dr. 4030 sag@usm.my
Teoh Siang Guan, Dr. 3565 sgteoh@usm.my
Wan Ahmad Kamil Mahmood, Dr. 3262 wakcm@usm.my
Yeap Guan Yeow, Dr. 3568 gyyeap@usm.my

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
Abdussalam Salhin Mohamed Ali, Dr. 3562 abdussalam@usm.my
(Contract Lecturer)
Afidah Abdul Rahim, Dr. 3913 afidah@usm.my
Hasnah Osman, Dr. 3558 ohasnah@usm.my
Mas Rosemal Hakim Mas Haris, Dr. 3563 mas1@usm.my
Mohamad Nasir Mohamad Ibrahim, Dr. 3554 mnm@usm.my
Rohana Adnan, Dr. 3549 r_adnan@usm.my
Seng Chye Eng, Dr. 3546 ceseng@usm.my
Wan Saime Wan Ngah, Dr. 3569 wsaime@usm.my

SENIOR LECTURER
Amat Ngilmi Ahmad Sujari, Dr. 3637 angilmi@usm.my
Che Su Endud, Pn. 4032 chesu@usm.my
Melati Khairuddean, Dr. 3560 melati@usm.my
Noor Hana Hanif Abu Bakar, Dr. 4025 hana_hanif@usm.my
Ng Eng Poh, Dr. 4021 epng@usm.my
Rosenani S.M. Anwarul Haque, Dr. 3578 rosenani@usm.my
Oo Chuan Wei, Dr. 3680 oocw@usm.my
Yam Wan Sinn, Dr. 3558 wansinn@usm.my

45

my Nurul Arlita Kushiar 4058 arlita@usm.my SUPPORT / TECHNICAL STAFF SCIENCE OFFICER Khairul Izwan Saruddin 4033 kizwan@usm.my Manoharan Veeran 3566 vmano@usm. 3547 limgk@usm. Dr.my Lim Gin Keat.my Organic Chemistry Section Wan Zulilawati Wan Zulkipli 3577 wanzulilawati@usm. 3547 limgk@usm. Dr.my Rabiah Bee Abdul Carrim 3561 rabiah@usm.LECTURER TELEPHONE E-MAIL EXTENSION Lee Hooi Ling.my Physical Chemistry Section Muhd Nizam Muhammad Isa 5177 muhd_nizam@usm.my Siti Mariam Suja 3548 smariam@usm.my Nordin Mohamed 3559 nordin@usm.my Yeoh Kar Kheng.my ASSISTANT SCIENCE OFFICER Industrial Chemistry Section Ami Mardiana Othman 4059 amimardiana@usm.my Kirupanithi A/P Pooranavelu 3680 kirupa@usm.my Analytical Chemistry Section Mohd Zamri Rosidi 5176 zamri5083@usm. Dr.my Inorganic Chemistry Section Azizo Bin Daud 3577 azizo@usm. 5179 kkyeoh@usm.my MUPA Lab Saripah Azizah Mansor 3577 saripahazizah@usm.my 46 .my RESEARCH OFFICER Che Sofiah Saidin 3549 csofiah@usm.

my Inorganic Chemistry Section Razly Effenly Khalid @ Khalib 3565 / 3577 och@usm.my Chemicals Store Mohamad Noor Abd Aziz 3570 monaz@usm.my Dean’s Stenographer Rohaina Shaik Jamaludin 3262 rohaina@usm.my 47 .my Laboratory for Level 100 Aw Yeong Choek Hoe 3565 awyeong@usm.my SUPPORT / TECHNICAL STAFF Electronic Workshop Zainal Abidin Othman 3544 zainalothman@usm.my Deputy Dean’s Stenographer Siti Hawa Hamdun 3576 hawahamdun@usm.my Administrative Assistant Yeoh Chooi Ling 3973 chooiling@usm.my Glass Blowing Workshop Jamal Mohamed Shah Hamid 2690/3542 jamalmohamed@usm.my Abd Razak Hashim 3544 abdulrazak@usm.my Mohd Fairoz Shahul Hamid 3544 mohdfairoz@usm.my Ong Ching Hin 3579 razly@usm. TELEPHONE SENIOR LAB ASSISTANT E-MAIL EXTENSION Organic Chemistry Section Chow Cheng Por 3571 cpchow@usm.my Ramlee Abdul Wahab 2690/3542 awramlee@usm.my Mohd Nazri Saed 3026 mnazri_saed@usm.my Analytical Chemistry Section Norhayati Abdul Kadir 4041 rozeyanti@usm.my Industrial Chemistry Section Burhanuddin Saad 3687 burhansaad@usm.my Abd Rahman Othman 3570 abdulrahmano@usm.

4059/2059 CHNS/O Ext. 3565 Electrochemical Workstation Room K316 Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer Ext.LABORATORY EQUIPMENTS SERVICES Atomic Absorption Spectrometer Ext. 4034 Colorimeter UV/VIS Ext. 4057 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer Room 032 [NMR 400 MHz/300Mz] Ext. 4059/4036/3572/ 3865 Gas Chromatograph Ext. 3589 Thermogravimetric Analyser / Differential Scanning Ext. 4036/3571/4059/ 4031 Gel Permeation Chromatograph Ext. 4038 GC-MS Ext. 4059 High Performance Liquid Chromatograph [HPLC] Ext. 4038/4040/3571/ 2061/ 4059 Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer Ext. 4057 [ICP-MS] MUPA Lab Room 270/017 MUPA LAB Ext. 3563 48 .

The School is staffed with experienced lecturers and equipped with modern instruments in both the teaching and research laboratories. As such. It is hoped that nostalgia and love towards the alma mater can be brought back through the Chemistry Alumni. Graduates can also work in marketing companies such as Perkin Elmer. there are opportunities for graduates to serve as chemists and engineers in the electronics industry. the Forestry Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM) and the Chemistry Department. (d) USM Gold Medal Award (awarded by Tun Dato’ Seri Dr. Mecomb.) For the best final year student in the Bachelor of Applied Science. (c) USM Gold Medal Award (awarded by Woman’s Association USM) For the best female final year student in all fields. Interscience etc.usm. Lim Chong Eu) For the best final year student in the Bachelor of Science. It is hoped that participation in activities organised by the Chemistry Alumni or the Alumni of the School of Chemical Sciences will foster better relationship and cooperation among members and also with the School for the benefits of all. Alumni of the School of Chemical Sciences All graduates of the School of Chemical Sciences automatically become members of the Chemistry Alumni. (e) USM Gold Medal Award (awarded by Nestle Products Sdn. the graduates can pursue careers in public and private companies such as the Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB). and Solectron. Bhd. In addition. the Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI).GENERAL INFORMATION Career The School of Chemical Sciences was established in 1969 and has produced quality graduates who possess experience and skills in line with the programmes offered. or PhD degrees in the School. (b) Tuanku Chancellor Gold Medal Award For the best final year student in all fields. 49 ./alumni. htm Awards and Dean’s Certificate (a) Royal Education Award by the Malaysian Rulers’ Council For the best final year students in all fields. such as Intel. All graduates of the School of Chemical Sciences can update their information or register as members by using the on-line form via htpp://www. Dynacraft. Graduates can also venture into other fields or pursue MSc.my/chem.

This is made possible through Persatuan Sains Kimia which functions to safeguard the students’ welfare and also provide a platform for them to cultivate their interests in various fields. Association of the School Persatuan Sains Kimia Students in the School of Chemical Sciences are encouraged not only to pursue academic excellence but also to be active in extra-curricular and self-development activities.) For the best final year student in the field of Industrial Chemistry.) For the best final year student in the field of Chemistry. The certificate will be awarded every semester. Higher Education Students who are interested to pursue higher degrees can choose any of the following programmes: (a) Full or part-time programme leading to degrees in Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy by research. (g) USM Book Award (awarded by Hoechst Malaysia Sdn. Further information can be obtained from the Deputy Dean’s office (Postgraduate Studies and Research) or the Institute of Postgraduate Studies.(f) USM Gold Medal Award (awarded by Chemical Company of Malaysia Bhd. Bhd. (b) Full or part-time mixed mode programme (a combination of course work and research) leading to a Master of Science degree. 50 . (h) Dean’s Certificate will be awarded to any student in the School of Chemical Sciences who has achieved academic excellence.

electroplating apparatus and other supporting equipment. The School is also equipped with Electronics and Glass-Blowing Workshops as well as other related instruments. DSC-TGA and GPC. porosimeter. various types of HPLC. ICP-MS. Guoy balance. In line with the desire to improve the consultancy services offered by the School. 51 . electroanalytical system. GC/MS. FTIR. CHN Analyser. the School of Chemical Sciences has taken a proactive step by setting up an Analytical Services Unit (MUPA) to offer more effective services for the industrial sector. Existing analytical and characterisation instruments include NMR 300 and 400 MHz. IR. UV. The expertise and facilities available in the School of Chemical Sciences are always tapped by the industries and government agencies to help in solving problems faced by them. GC. AAS and fluorescence spectrophotometers. sintering equipment.Facilities The School is equipped with teaching and research laboratories as well as modern equipment to ensure high quality teaching.

(Hons.Sc. For students who do not register for the final year project. they can fulfill the 6 units requirement by registering for other courses offered by the School. applications. This involves conducting research work for two semesters and submitting a thesis based on the specified conditions and format for evaluation. analytical and writing skills.COURSE STRUCTURE (i) Structure of Study Programme Course Component Credit Unit Requirements B. (iii) Final Year Project Students are encouraged to register for KUE 309/6 – Chemistry Project during their final year of studies. Skills which are not be assessed through examinations will be assessed through course work in the form of assignments or practical work. (iv) Assessment The assessment of a course will be done by:- (i) examination (ii) course work The assessment will cover knowledge. Students will be graded either PASS (P) or FAIL (F) after fulfilling all the requirements.App. 52 .) Basic/Core (T) 70 Minor/Elective (M/E) (a) Minor: 16 or (b) Elective: 16 and MAA 161/4 – (compulsory for all students) University (U) 15 Total 105 (ii) Industrial Training Second year students are encouraged to apply for undergoing Industrial Training (KIE 360/0) at the end of second year subjected to the conditions imposed by the School.

Weightage for the examination and course work components are as follows:- (a) Full theory course: Examination 70 % Coursework 30 % (b) Theory course with practical: Examination 60 % Coursework 15 % Practical report 25 % (c) Full practical course: Practical report 70 % Test 30 % 53 .

LIST OF COURSES OFFERED (a) B. KUT 205(c) KIT 252/3 Unit Operations KIT 253/3 Chemical Engineering KFT 131(s) Thermodynamics KIT 254/2 Polymers KOT 121(s) KIT 257/3 Material Chemistry KOT 222/3 Organic Chemistry II KOT 121(s) KTT 212/3 Inorganic Chemistry II KTT 111(s) KUT 205/2 Chemistry Practical V.Sc.App.Analytical KUT 101(s). (Hons) (Industrial Chemistry) (i) Core Courses* .70 units Prerequisites MAA 101/4 Calculus MAT 181/4 Programming For Scientific Applications ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) KTT 111/3 Inorganic Chemistry I KOT 121/3 Organic Chemistry I KFT 131/3 Physical Chemistry I KAT 141/3 Analytical Chemistry I KUT 101/2 Chemistry Practical I KUT 102/2 Chemistry Practical II KAT 241/3 Analytical Chemistry II KAT 141(s). KAT 241(c) KAT 341/3 Pollution and Environmental Chemistry KAT 241(s) KIT 355/2 Unit Operations Practical KIT 252(c) KIT 356/4 Chemical Processing KOT 121(s) KIT 357/2 Industrial Practical Select 6 units from elective courses (To fulfill the 70 units core courses) (ii) Compulsory (4 units) MAA 161/4 Statistics for Science Students (compulsory for students who choose minor or elective) 54 .

Sc.App.70 units Prerequisites MAA 101/4 Calculus MAT 181/4 Programming For Scientific Applications ZCT 103/3 Physics III (Vibrations. (Hons) (Analytical Chemistry) (i) Core Courses* . (iii) Elective Courses Select 16 units (to fullfill the elective component). KAT 243(c) KAT 243/2 Analytical Practical I KAT 242(c) KAT 244/3 Separations Methods KAT 141(s) KFT 232/3 Physical Chemistry II KFT 131(s) KIT 252/3 Unit Operations KOT 222/3 Organic Chemistry II KOT 121(s) KTT 212/3 Inorganic Chemistry II KTT 111(s) KUT 206/2 Chemistry Practical VI.Organic KUT 102(s) KAT 340/2 Analytical Chemistry Practical II KAT 243(s) KAT 341/3 Pollution and Environmental Chemistry KAT 242(s) KAT 347/3 Electroanalytical Methods KAT 242(s) KFT 331/3 Physical Chemistry III KFT 232(s) 55 . (s) = sequential (Course must be taken earlier) (c) = concurrent (Course can be taken earlier or concurrent) (b) B.* Prerequisites KIE 232/3 Colloids and Surface Science KIE 355/3 Industrial Colourants KIE 356/3 Food and Palm Oil Chemistry KIE 358/3 Current Topics in Industrial Chemistry KUE 309/6 Chemistry Project *Additional units to fulfill the elective component must be taken from Pure Chemistry or Analytical Chemistry courses. (iv) Industrial Training (Optional) KIE 360/0 Industrial Training * All the courses offered are subjected to changes when the need arises. Waves and Optics ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) KTT 111/3 Inorganic Chemistry I KOT 121/3 Organic Chemistry I KFT 131/3 Physical Chemistry I KAT 141/3 Analytical Chemistry I KUT 101/2 Chemistry Practical I KUT 102/2 Chemistry Practical II KAT 242/3 Spectroscopic Methods KAT 141(s).

Priority is given to the Minor Programmes in Management. * All the courses offered are subjected to changes when the need arises. Computer. Communication. English or other Sciences. (s) = sequential (Course must be taken earlier) (c) = concurrent (Course can be taken earlier or concurrent) 56 . Please refer to the book of minor programmes Guideline. Select 7 units from Analytical Chemistry Elective Components ( To fulfill 70 units core courses) (ii) Compulsory (4 units) MAA 161/4 Statistics for Science Students (compulsory for students who choose minor or elective) (iii) Elective Courses Select 16 units (to fulfill the elective component)* Prerequisites KAE 248/2 Advanced Practical .Analytical Chemistry KAT 242(c) or KAT 241(c) KAE 345/3 Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry KAT 242(c) or KAT 241(c) KAE 346/2 Pollution and Environmental Chemistry KAT 341(c) Practical KUE 309/6 Chemistry Project *Additional unit to fulfill the elective component must to be taken from Pure Chemistry or Industrial Chemistry Courses (iv) Industrial Training (Optional) KIE 360/0 Industrial Training (c) Minor Programme – 16 units All Minor Programmes offered by other Schools can be taken by Chemistry Students subject to requirements imposed by the School/Center which offers the Minor.

approval from Dean is required 57 .SUGGESTION FOR THE REGISTRATION OF COURSES (a) INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY : MAJOR / ELECTIVE SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COMPONENT COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course U 2 U 2 WUS 2 HTU223 2 Basic/Core Course KAT141 3 KFT131 3 KTT111 3 KOT121 3 KUT101 / KUT102 2 KUT102 / KUT101 2 MAA101 4 ZCA101 4 Elective Course MAA161 4 Total Credit Hour 16 20 SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COMPONENT COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course SHE 101 2 U 2 Basic/Core Course KIT253 3 KAT241 3 KIT257 3 KIT252 3 KOT222 3 KIT254 2 KTT212 3 KIT355 / KIT357 2 MAT181 4 KUT205 2 ZCT104 3 KIE360 0 Elective Course ELECTIVE 3 Total Credit Hour 18 20 COMPONENT SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course U 3 Basic/Core Course KIT356 4 KAT341 3 KIT355 / KIT357 2 KUE309 / KIE356 3 KUE309 / KIE355 3 Elective Course ELECTIVE 4 KIE358 3 ELECTIVE 6 Total Credit Hour 16 15 1 Distribution of credit for each semester (12-19 Credit) 2 > 20 credit.

(b) INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY : MAJOR / MINOR SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COMPONENT COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course U 2 U 2 WUS101 2 HTU223 2 Basic/Core Course KAT141 3 KFT131 3 KTT111 3 KOT121 3 KUT101 / KUT102 2 KUT102 / KUT101 2 MAA101 4 ZCA101 4 Minor Course MAA161 / MINOR 4 Total Credit Hour 16 20 SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COMPONENT COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course SHE101 2 U 3 Basic/Core Course KIT253 3 KAT241 3 KIT257 3 KIT252 3 KOT222 3 KIT254 2 KTT212 3 ZCT104 3 KUT205 2 KIE360 0 Minor Course MINOR 4 MINOR 4 Total Credit Hour 18 20 SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COMPONENT COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course U 2 Basic/Core Course KIT356 4 KAT341 3 KIT355 / KIT357 2 KIT355 / KIT357 2 MAT181 4 KUE309 / KIE356 3 KUE309 / KIE355 3 Minor Course MINOR 4 MINOR 4 Total Credit Hour 17 14 1 Distribution of credit for each semester (12-19 Credit) 2 > 20 credit. approval from Dean is required 58 .

approval from Dean is required 59 .(c) ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY : MAJOR / ELECTIVE COMPONENT SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course U 2 U 2 WUS 2 HTU223 2 Basic/Core Course KAT141 3 KFT131 3 KTT111 3 KOT121 3 KUT101 / KUT102 2 KUT102 / KUT101 2 MAA101 4 ZCT103 3 Elective Course MAA161 4 Total Credit Hour 16 19 COMPONENT SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course SHE 101 2 U 3 Basic/Core Course KAT242 3 KAT244 3 KAT243 2 KIT252 3 KOT222 3 KFT232 3 KTT212 3 ZCT104 3 KUT206 2 KIE360 0 Elective Course ELECTIVE 3 ELECTIVE 3 Total Credit Hour 16 20 COMPONENT SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course U 2 Basic/Core Course KAT340 2 KAT341 3 KAT347 3 MAT181 4 KFT331 3 KUE309 / KAE248 / KAE346 2/3 KUE309 / KAE345 3 KAE248 / KAE346 2 Elective Course ELECTIVE 6 ELECTIVE 3 Total Credit Hour 19 14 / 15 1 Distribution of credit for each semester (12-19 Credit) 2 > 20 credit.

approval from Dean is required 60 .(d) ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY : MAJOR / MINOR COMPONENT SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course U 2 U 2 WUS 2 HTU223 2 Basic/Core Course KAT141 3 KFT131 3 KTT111 3 KOT121 3 KUT101 / KUT102 2 KUT102 / KUT101 2 MAA101 4 ZCT103 3 Minor Course M AA161 / M 4 Total Credit Hour 16 19 COMPONENT SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course SHE 101 2 U 3 Basic/Core Course KAT242 3 KAT244 3 KAT243 2 KIT252 3 KOT222 3 KFT232 3 KTT212 3 ZCT104 3 KUT206 2 KIE360 0 Minor Course MINOR 4 MINOR 3 Total Credit Hour 19 18 COMPONENT SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR COURSE CODE CREDIT HOUR University Compulsory Course U 2 Basic/Core Course KAT340 2 KAT341 3 KAT347 3 MAT181 4 KFT331 3 KUE309 / KAE346 / KAE248 2/3 KUE309 / KAE345 3 KAE346 / KAE248 2 Minor Course MINOR 4 MINOR 4 Total Credit Hour 17 15/ 16 1 Distribution of credit for each semester (12-19 Credit) 2 > 20 credit.

analyse and solve problems in chemistry using systematic methods. PO3 Sceintific Methods. • Demonstrate the ability to work effectively in teams. and effective manner. Entrepreneurial Skills • Apply the concepts of applied chemistry to environmental and industrial communities. Ethics • Compile. articulate and develop a sustained argument. persistence. Humanities. and to properly record the results of their experiments. PO4 Communication Skills • Express ideas in an informed. • Perform laboratory techniques safely and accurately. PO7 Professionalism. both orally and in writing. students will be able to : PO1 Knowledge • Have firm foundations in the fundamentals of chemistry. • Use modern instrumentation and classical techniques. to design experiments. • Apply the chemistry principles appropriate for applied chemistry. Team working. eagerness and confidence as chemists. PO8 Managerial & • Apply the basic knowledge or principles of managerial and entrepreneurship related to chemical sciences.Upon completion of this programme. maintain and enhance knowledge in applied chemistry through life-long learning. Critical • Critically evaluate experiments in applied chemistry. curiosity. Information Management • Demonstrate the ability to use various retrieval methods to obtain information on issues relating to chemistry. Attitudes. • Interpret experiments and communicate the results of their work to chemists and non-chemists. analyse and interpret data honestly and ethically • Develop interest. Responsibility. PO5 Social Skills. 61 . coherent. Thinking & Problem Solving • Interpret experiments and express the results in clearly written laboratory reports and in oral or poster Skills presentations. PO6 Life Long Learning & • Use knowledge gained for self development and continuous improvement. • Demonstrate the ability to update. PO2 Practical Skills • Perform a wide range of laboratory procedures in applied chemistry. skills • Demonstrate the ability to lead / facilitate teams. • Identify. Leadership • Execute the tasks given responsibly. • Demonstrate commitment to ethical issues in their field of work Values.

Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. temperature effect.A. Analytical Chemistry. Apply the knowledge of statistical concepts in analytical chemistry to present the correct calculation and decision. Apply the knowledge of various chemical equilibria including acid-base. Thermochemistry. van der Waals equation. adiabatic and isothermal processes.J.R. First law of thermodynamics: work. Holler and S. principle of the corresponding states. KFT 131/3 Physical Chemistry I Properties of gases and liquids: gas laws. statistical data treatment. gravimetry and redox to explain the various titration methods. 3. heat. 4. Chemical kinetics: rate laws. John Wiley & Sons (2004). West F.Crouch.M. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. G. D. reversible and irreversible processes. respectively. 2. viscosity. 6th Edition. precipitation reactions and titrations. Skoog. complexometry. enthalpy change. Maxwell-Boltzman distribution. heat capacity. Demonstrate the ability to apply appropriate equations to solve problems in chemical equilibrium using systematic methods. Christian. Demonstrate how kinetic and thermodynamic principles can be used to determine the reaction rates and various thermodynamic parameters of reversible and irreversible processes. kinetic theory of gases. concepts of equilibrium. energy. complexometric titrations. 62 . Text Book and References 1. speeds and transport properties of gases. 2. 7th Edition. Analytical Chemistry: An Introduction Saunders College Publishing (2000). conduction and mobility. effusion. D. acid-base titrations. 2. Apply the knowledge of kinetic theory of gases to explain the various molecular collisions. Apply the knowledge of basic concepts of concentrations to calculate the various types of concentrations.. diffusion. thermal conductivity. acid-base equilibria.D. gravimetric analysis.SYNOPSIS OF COURSES KAT 141/3 Analytical Chemistry 1 Stoichiometry calculations. 3. Apply the van der Waals and other equation of states to distinguish between ideal and real gases. electrochemical cells and redox titrations. complex reactions. experimental methods.

4th Edition. Apply the knowledge of organic reactions to discuss and solve problems on various organic reactions. 6th Edition. Atkins and J. 2nd Edition.G. Paula Physical Chemistry. Demonstrate the ability to apply organic chemistry principles to explain the stereochemistry of organic reactions. nuclear chemistry. elimination reactions of alkyl halides and compounds with leaving groups other than halogen. Organic Chemistry. ethers and epoxides. Organic Chemistry. 2. Levine. alkynes.Y. alkenes.G. 4th Edition. John Wiley & Sons (2005). the stereochemistry of addition reactions. Bruice.J. (2006). 4. atomic structure. Stereochemistry: the arrangement of atoms in space. Organic Chemistry. Bawendi. Apply the correct chemical nomenclature in naming organic compounds. Smith. P. McGraw Hill (2008). T. McGraw Hill International Ed. Physical Chemistry. R. Demonstrate the ability to apply equations to discuss and solve problems on gas properties. alcohols. alkenes and alkynes.A. An introduction to organic compounds: and functional groups nomenclature and representation of structure. Reactions of alkanes. synthesis and reactions of alcohols. Physical Chemistry. 4. P. 3. Organic Chemistry. chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. Pearson Education Inc. Text Book and References 1. KOT 121/3 Organic Chemistry I Electronic structure and bonding. Delocalised electrons and resonance.de. L. Text Book and References 1. KTT 111/3 Inorganic Chemistry I This course will introduce topics in basic chemistry such as stoichiometry. Silbey.W. 6th Edition. (2009). Apply knowledge of structure and bonding to explain the properties of various classes of compounds such as alkanes. Wade. 3. 2. Oxford University Press (2007). 2.4. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. 8th Edition. periodic table.W. Acids and bases. Solomons and C. Fryhle.N. Reactions at a sp3 hybridized carbon: nucleophilic substitution reactions of alkyl halides. R. Wiley & Sons (2004). Structure. I. Alberty and M. chemical bonding and properties of matter. ethers and epoxides. 3. J. 63 .G. Prentice Hall (2004). 8th Edition.

Davis.Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. 11th Edition. properties of solids to explain the various types of materials. Apply the knowledge of stoichiometry to discuss and solve problems on stoichiometric problems. concisely and appropriately. McGraw-Hill Companies. Demonstrate competence in appropriate basic laboratory techniques in analytical and inorganic chemistry. F.C. John Wiley and Sons (2009). Laboratory Experiments for Chemistry: The Central Science. Kemp. Write reports clearly. Apply the knowledge of the atoms in the periodic table to discuss the relationship between the elements in the group and in a particular period. K. 5th Edition. Inc (2009). Pearson Prentice Hall (2009).L. 8th Edition. Chang. 3. Whitten. Apply the knowledge of structures. J. KUT 102/2 Chemistry Practical II The experiments were extracted from the book: J. R. R. Kemp. S. Text Book and References 1. Stanley. Interpret data from laboratory observation and measurement. 3.E. General Chemistry. 7th Edition. 2. Apply the Bohr Theory and wave mechanics to understand the electronic configuration and bonding theory in chemical bond formation. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. M. 3. 11th Edition. Jespersen. Laboratory Experiments for Chemistry: The Central Science.E. Nelson and K.H.S.The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change.W. 5. 4.C. Apply theoretical chemistry to solve problems in the practical area. 4. Nelson and K. 2. McGraw-Hill (2005) KUT 101/2 Chemistry Practical I The experiments were extracted from the book: J.Thomson Learning (2004).D. 64 . Brady. Peck and G. 2.G. Pearson Prentice Hall (2009). Display safe laboratory practices. Brooks /Cole . 5th Edition. Martin. Chemistry. Chemistry. 4.H. Chemistry . Apply the knowledge of nuclear chemistry to explain the radioactive decay and to understand the safe and unsafe uses of radioactive elements. Senese and N. 5.

Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Display safe laboratory practices. 3. separation methods and electrochemical methods. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. 4. 2. KUT 205(c) Basic principles. Demonstrate competence in appropriate basic laboratory techniques in organic and physical chemistry. Apply theoretical chemistry to solve problems in the practical area. Demonstrate understanding in the basic principles of atomic and molecular spectroscopic methods. KAT 241(c) Practical applications of analytical techniques in areas such as forensic sciences. References Practical Manual KAE 248 KAT 241/3 Analytical Chemistry II KAT 141(s). cooking oil and drinks. Apply methods of instrumental chemical analysis in tackling practical analytical chemical problems. Describe and discuss the instrumentation and techniques of the various analytical methods. Display safe laboratory practices. 2. Write reports clearly. toxic materials. 3. food and adulteration of milk. toxic metals. Write reports on the basis of experimental results and to draw correct conclusions. Interpret data from laboratory observation and measurement. concisely and appropriately. KAE 248/2 Advanced Practical : Analytical Chemistry KAT 242(c). 5. 3. Discuss the applications of the various methods for the analyses of samples. 65 . instrumentation and applications in qualitative and quantitative analyses of the following techniques: • Electroanalytical • Spectroscopic • Chromatographic Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. 2.

Text Book and References 1. Analytical Chemistry. KAT 243(c) Basic principles. Principles of Instrumental Analysis (6th Edition. flame emission spectrometry. atomic spectrometry. instrumentation and the applications in qualitative and quantitative analyses of the following techniques. Write reports on the basis of experimental results and to draw correct conclusions. Display safe laboratory practices. D. fluorescence spectrometry. John Wiley & Sons (2004). 4. Demonstrate awareness of the limitations of the various methods. X-ray fluorescence and mass spectrometry. Analytical Chemistry. Text Book and References Practical Manual KAT 243/2 66 . Crouch. flame photometry. F. 6th Edition.A.Text Book and References 1. fluorescence. D. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. atomic absorption spectrometry. spectrofluorometry. F.D. x-ray fluorescence and mass spectrometry. 3. KAT 243/2 Analytical Practical I KAT 242(c) Experiments based on the following methods: infrared spectrophotometry. 2. Thomson Brooks/Cole (2007). high performance liquid chromatography.D. electrochemistry and chromatography. atomic emission spectrometry with plasma and electrical discharge sources. 2. G. Crouch. infrared spectrometry. Identify main components of instrumentation used in spectroscopic methods.J. Skoog. 2. John Wiley & Son (2004). infrared absorption spectrometry. 3. Holler and S. gas chromatography. KAT 242/3 Spectroscopic Methods KAT 141(s). Christian.J. G. Select the appropriate spectroscopic technique for a particular analysis. Molecular ultraviolet and visible absorption spectrometry. ultraviolet- visible spectrophotometry. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Christian. 2. Principles of Instrumental Analysis.R. Thomson Brooks/Cole (2007).R. 6th Edition. 6th Edition.A. Demonstrate understanding of the basic principles of spectroscopic methods such as UV/Visible spectrophotometry. Apply methods of instrumental analysis based on spectrometry. Skoog. atomic absorption spectrometry (flame and non-flame methods). Holler and S.

Describe the partial molar quantities of a mixture. 2. Solid-phase extraction. Capillary electrophoresis. Gibbs and Helmholtz energies. Second and Third laws of Thermodynamics. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. General principles of chromatography. electrochemical cell. fugacity. D. liquid chromatographic and electrophoretic methods to separate analytes of interest. KFT 232/3 Physical Chemistry II KFT 131(s) First. Thomson Brooks/Cole (2007). work. Use the Debye-Huckel equation to calculate the thermodynamic equilibrium constant. thermodynamics of mixing. Describe and discuss the inter-play of parameters that governs retention and band broadening behavior. chemical potential. 4. Apply gas. adiabatic expansion.J. Gas chromatography. adsorption. Changes of State: physical transformation of pure substances and mixture.KAT 244/3 Separation Methods KAT 141(s) Solvent extraction. Debye Huckel theory. Use appropriate equations to calculate the chemical potential. stability of phases. heat and energy. 2.D. entropy. G. 67 . Relate the thermodynamic principles to electrochemical cells including the derivation of the Nernst equation. Christian. Analytical Chemistry. Phase diagram. Apply the first.R. electrode potential and thermodynamics of cell. John Wiley & Sons (2004). 3. second and third laws of thermodynamics to solve problems in physical chemistry.A. Skoog. activity. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. heat capacity. Comprehend the underlying principles in solvent extraction and sample preparation techniques. 6th Edition. phase diagram for systems with two and three components. Principles of Instrumental Analysis. Holler and S. Electrochemistry. 6th Edition. 2. 3. Planar chromatography: thin layer and paper chromatography. ion and size exclusion (gel) chromatography. Selected methods. 5. F. enthalpy change. Text Book and References 1. partial molar quantities. open system and composition change. Crouch. Clapeyron equation. properties of solution. High performance liquid chromatrography: partition.

Hunter. R. 4th Edition.Text Book and References 1. Oxford Science Publication (1993). 2. carbon molecular sieves. Brownian motion and diffusion. Rutiven. I. Surface Analysis: Morphology. 3. surface tension and dispersion. Physical Chemistry. D. 4. Porous and non-porous adsorbents. Differentiate among various types of signals emitted from an electron specimen interaction and the respective techniques of analysis. 68 .N. R. Levine. Physical adsorption and the characterisation of porous and non-porous adsorbents. 3. Surfactant and micelles. Role of porosity in Industrial applications: micropore diffusion in zeolites. 4. John Wiley & Sons (2005). Basic principles and instrumentation of the following techniques: Electron Microscopy (SEM. interface and surface. ESCA and EDX). Bawendi. Oxford University Press (2001). Dickinson. Foundation of Colloid Science. Atkins. Sanctuary.H. Comprehend the origin of attractive and repulsive forces governing colloidal stability. John Wiley & Sons (1984). E. elemental distribution. J. A. 6th Edition. Alberty and M. 4th Edition. Houghton Mifflin Co. Type of pores and isotherms. Physical Chemistry. (2002).J. Text Book and References 1. Surface tension and surface forces. 5th Edition. Comprehend the basic concepts of surface characterisation techniques.M. J. Principles of Adsorption and Adsorption Processes. KIE 232/3 Colloid and Surface Science Colloid state. 2. McGraw-Hill International Ed. Physical Chemistry. Structure and stability of various types of colloids. X-ray microanalysis (EPMA. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. TEM and Electron diffraction). Auger spectrometry (AES). Silbey. The Industrial importance of colloids. Physical Chemistry. adsorption. chemical composition. crystal structure and surface defects.C. Oxford University Press (1992). Thermodynamics of adsorption: correlation. State and differentiate physisorption & chemisorption and to determine the heat of adsorption and surface properties of solids. An Introduction to Food Colloids. Meiser and B.A. Laider. 2. Kinetic properties. secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and atomic force microscope (AFM). P. analysis and predicition of adsorption equilibria. 3. rate of settlement.G. (2003).J.W.

laminar flow and turbulent. heat capacity.M. J. extent of reactions. Transport Process and Unit Operations. D. reactive systems. process and cycles. 69 . Essentials of Fluid Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications. approximation of enthalpy changes and applications. speed. flow in pipes. recycles. Comprehend and write material balance equations and stoichiometric equations for the chemical reaction equilibria. Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical Engineering. technique in material balance. Newtonian and non- Newtonian. boundary layer. Himmelblau. enthalpy. 7th Edition. Work and heat through system boundary. phase equilibrium. Reynolds number. momentum equations. chemical reactions. balance equations and energy balance techniques. J. balance equation for materials and energy. Differentiate between steady and unsteady state heat transfer using temperature- distance relationship and to calculate heat transfer and heat flux in homogeneous and non-homogeneous systems. Distinguish between positive work and negative work and use the stoichiometric equation in solving problems of energy balance. Prentice Hall International Series (2004). Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. 4. Separation process.KIT 252/3 Unit Operations Unit conversion. discharge rate and other flow parameters using Bernoulli’s equation. Energy and Heat: Work and heat definition. Thermodynamic data of pure substances.M. stoichiometry. Text Book and References 1. Heat transfer: mechanism. Some examples of unit operations equipment. 2. Liquid flow: type of liquids. Properties of pure substances: Water phase diagrams. shell and tube heat exchangers. 3. Material balance: flowsheet prototype of chemical process. 2. general coefficient of heat transfer. KIT 253/3 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics KFT 131(s) Concept and definitions: Thermodynamic systems. Steam table and applications. characteristic of separation. Work. Cimbala. Geankoplis. various unit balances. basic equations. general balance equation. Work and heat units. McGraw-Hill (2006). compressible and incompressible. flow region. binary distillation. Energy balance: energy balance equations for closed systems. 3. C. Prentice Hall (2003). Comprehend and calculate mass flow rate.

Carothers’ equation. Differentiate between thermodynamic properties and systems and calculate work done using the ideal gas equation and polytropic process. rubbers (elastomers). internal energy heat capacity and entropy relationships. Apply First Law and Second Law of thermodynamics to calculate the thermodynamic properties. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. molecular weight control by chain transfer. Second Law Thermodynamics and Energy: Introduction to Second Law Entropy. R. Classification of polymers: Plastics (thermoplastic. 5.First Law Thermodynamics: First law equation. crystalline and semi-crystalline.E. 70 . kinetics. Second Law analysis for control volume. 3. Reversible and irreversible process. Sonntag and G. Write and calculate theoretical air demand and air-fuel ratio based on fuel or combustion product composition. Ionic polymerisation: Mechanisms for cationic and anionic polymerisation. Enthalpy. Air power cycles. Van Wylen.J. molecular structure. Heat Capacity. Ideal gas behaviour. 5th Edition. Free-radical chain polymerisation: Mechanism. polymer crystallinity. Thermodynamic relationships: (Thermochemical): Maxwell relationship. chemical bonds in polymer. chain transfer reaction. Enthalpy. cross-linking formation. 2. John Wiley & Sons (1998). Cycle analysis: Vapour power cycles. Properties of relationship. Morphology of polymer: Amorphous. First law analysis for control volume and applications. expansibility and fugacity. kinetics. thermoset). cross-linking. molecular weight control. First law and second law analysis for combustion. fibers. general properties and characteristics. Isentropic process. molecular configuration. Clapeyron equation. 4. Text Book and References 1. Polymer synthesis: General mechanism and characteristics of step-reaction and chain- reaction polymerisations. initiators. Apply First and Second Law of thermodynamics for cycles analysis. Combustion process of fuels: Fuel combustion. copolymer. Introduction to Thermodynamics. KIT 254/2 Polymers KOT 121(s) Introduction to polymer: Basic concepts and definitions. Entalphy formation. System efficiency. compressibility. adhesives and coatings. Step-reaction polymerisation: Kinetics of self-catalysed and acid-catalysed polyesterification . Explain the relationships between thermodynamical properties and their applications in the derivation of heat capacity. distinguishing features. Gas mixtures: mixtures of ideal gas. Internal energy. Humidity. polymer recycling. Cycle process and Carnot cycle. Fugacity and state equations. glass transition temperature. Gas and Vapour.

Bonding in metals. 3rd Edition Oxford University Press (1999). Phase diagram of metal (iron) 71 . Polymer Chemistry. R. 2. Types of chemical bonding. Differentiate between step reaction and chain reaction polymerisation. Factors that influence diffusion. yields criteria.Polymer characterisation: Molar mass and viscosity. Introduction to Physical Polymer Science. Relation between structure. Crystallographic directions and planes. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Characterization of defects Diffusion in Solids: Types of diffusion. J. Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding: Atomic structure. processing and properties. L. Identify the methods used to determine the structure. Defects in alloys. 3. Introduction to Polymers. Construct kinetic equations for radical chain polymerisation and chain transfer reactions. mechanical behaviour. degree of polymerization and degree of crystallization. Effects of diffusion to the structure and properties of materials Ceramics: Basic categories of ceramics. Synthesis of polymer. Textbooks and references 1. Cowie.P. Comprehend the importance. An Introduction. Molecular weight. International Textbook (1973). polymer crystals. equipments and techniques of determination. structure of ceramics. Properties from bonding.H.G. melting behaviour. determination techniques. M. 4. Types of polymers. 4th Edition Wiley Interscience (2006). Metallic structure. Chapman and Hall (1983). Metals and Alloys: Classification of metals and alloys. Physical and mechanical behaviour of polymer: Glass transition temperature. Unit cell. 2.J. Young. Determination of crystal structure Imperfection in Solids: Types of imperfections/defects. silicates and glasses. 5. New and modern ceramics. physical and mechanical properties of polymers. Crystal structure of solids. Stevens. 4. Polymers: Chemistry and Physics of Modern Materials. properties of polymers. Write polymerisation reaction mechanism and crosslinking reaction mechanism involved in ionic polymerisation. Biodegradable and bioactive ceramics. Phase transition of polymer. Applications of ceramic materials Polymers: Polymer molecules. classification. KIT 257/3 Materials Chemistry Introduction: Classification of materials. 3. Structure of polymer. General properties of ceramic materials. Sperling.M. Diffusion mechanisms. Defects in ceramic structures.

Comprehend the mechanism and factors that influence diffusion on the structure and properties of materials.P. Development of microstructure.Composites: General requirements for composite. ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy. Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction . Lever Rule. factors that influence the corrosion. Callister. strength. Brooks/Cole-Thomson (2006). 3. absorption and transmission. ductility and toughness. 2. Classification of phase diagrams. thermal expansion and thermal stress/shock. Types of composites. 5th Edition. 7th Edition. semiconductors and dielectric materials. infrared spectroscopy. Analyse the mechanical. Oxidation. hardness. reductionand redical reactions. metals. Printed lecture notes KIT 257. color and fiber optic. Optical Properties: Reflection. electron energy bands. Phule. Concrete and hybrid composites. reactions of benzene and substituted benzenes. Analyse the corrosion reaction. 5. Magnetic properties: Magnetic force. Electrical properties: Conductivity. Text Book and References 1. Introduction to carboxylic acids: nomenclature. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. corrosion protections.Materials Chemistry. Benefits and application of composite materials Phase Diagrams: Basic concept of phase equilibrium. W. preparation and 72 . Degradation of Polymer: Swelling. 2. 4. refraction. electron mobility. bond rupture and weathering. thermal and optical properties of materials. Mohd Jain Noordin Mohd Kassim. thermal conductivity. polymers. alloys and composites. Aromatic compounds: aromaticity. 3. Form of matrices and reinforcement phases. dissolution. structure. Interpretation of phase diagram. D.R. The Science and Engineering of Materials. electrical. Corrosion and Degradation of Materials: Corrosion of metals: Corrosion reaction and corrosion rate. classification of magnetic materials and its magnetic properties. magnetic field. magnetic. elastic and plastic behavior. Phase transformations. Properties of Materials: Mechanical properties: Stress. Thermal Properties: Heat capacity. Askeland and P.D. KOT 222/3 Organic Chemistry II KOT 121(s) Identification of organic compounds: mass spectrometry. John Wiley & Sons (2006). forms of corrosion. strain. Describe the types of bonds and planes within a unit cell and to distinguish between single crystals and polycrystalline materials. the factors that influence the corrosion and methods of corrosion prevention. Factors that influence the phase transformation. Explain the types of bonding and structures in ceramics.

3. McGraw (2008).Y. 2nd Edition. isomerism and nomenclature. Apply the knowledge of coordination compounds to explain the formation of metal- ligand complexes. Organic Chemistry. reduction and radical reactions. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Predict the products and propose appropriate mechanisms for the reactions of the above compounds. nucleophilic acyl substitution and the use of protecting groups. Describe all the fundamental properties and characteristics related to transition metals and their complexes. 73 . 2. John Wiley & Sons (2000). organometallics and bioinorganics. Discuss the concept of resonance to account for the stabilities of conjugated dienes. Identify and determine the structure of an unknown compound with different spectroscopic techniques 4.W. 4. bonding theory in the formation of transition metal complexes. 3. J. preparation of coordination compounds and spectroscopy. L. 4th Edition. 6th Edition. Pearson Education Inc.Fryhle. 3.reactions and acidity. Apply the knowledge of coordination chemistry in reaction mechanisms. T. formation constant for transition metal complexes. Text Book and References 1. 4. Structure. Solomons and C. introduction on the reaction mechanism and application of transition metal complexes in organometallic and bioinorganics chemistry. Bruice. Organic Chemistry. Prentice Hall (2004). Wade.G.G. Organic Chemistry. (2006). Predict the products and propose the appropriate mechanisms for oxidation. Smith. Describe and name carbonyl and aromatic compounds and propose the synthesis of these compounds. 5. KTT 212/3 Inorganic Chemistry II KTT 111(s) Introduction on transition metal complexes and coordination chemistry. 2. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Introduction to carbonyl chemistry: organometallic reagents. 7th Edition. P. allylic radicals and cations. 2. Apply various chemical bond theories to explain the compounds containing metal- ligand and metal-metal bonding. Organic Chemistry.

Apply methods of instrumental analysis based on separation methods such as gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. Edition. fluoride ion selective electrode. infrared spectrophotometry. This is followed by several experiments which expose the student to a selection of techniques in physical organic chemistry (such as the investigation of resonance energy related to unsaturated α. F. 3.C. flame emission and atomic absorption spectroscopy. column and gas-liquid). extraction and isolation techniques. Apply methods of instrumental analysis based on electrochemical methods. Cotton and G. ion exchange resin. 5. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 4. F.A. Sharpe. Wilkinson. 4. Inc. β carbonyl system) and preparative organic chemistry involving some distinct reactions e. Pearson Education Limited (2005). 3.W. P. high performance liquid chromatography. Langford. Cotton. John Wiley (1999). Demonstrate competence in the methods of instrumental analysis based on spectroscopic methods such as UV/Visible spectrophotometry. Wilkinson. (1995) KUT 205/2 Chemistry Practical V . Basic Inorganic Chemistry.L. Write reports on the basis of experimental results and to draw correct conclusions. the Diels-Alder.Text Book and References 1. 3rd Edition.Gaus. 5. Shriver. Housecroft and A. G. A. Inorganic Chemistry. Atkins and C. C.g. spectroscopy (NMR.H. 2nd Edition. 2. fractional distillation. and P.A. KAT 241(c) Experiments involving ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectroscopy.G. gas chromatography and electrogravimetry. Oxford University Press pages 192-226 and pages 434-494 (1990). Bochmann. Murillo and M. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 74 . Coordination Chemistry. atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. 6th. F.E.H. IR. Basic Inorganic Chemistry. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. G. John Wiley (1976).A. Wilkinson. 2. C. Cotton. pinacol-pinacolone rearrangement and the Michael conjugate addition). References Practical Manual KUT 205 KUT 206/2 Chemistry Practical VI – Organic KUT 102(s) Basic organic techniques in chromatography (thin-layer. UV & MS) and classical qualitative analysis are introduced through a series of compulsory experiments.Analytical KUT 101(s). Display safe laboratory practices. John Wiley & Sons.

3. Cole Publishing Company (1993). 5. 75 . Display safe laboratory practices. 4. 2. Write reports clearly and appropriately for all the experimental reactions conducted. determination of chlorine in water. phosphates and nitrogen species via conventional methods involving titration and colorimetry. Identify and determine water pollution parameters such as BOD. 4. COD. phosphate analysis. adsorption and precipitation. Landgrebe. 2. high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. kinetics of iron(II) oxidations in water. Analyze some major water pollutants using instrumental techniques such as atomic absorption spectroscopy. analysis of hydrocarbon pollution. Text Book and References 1. Display the ability to discuss the current issues orally and in writing. J. 5.1. 3. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Demonstrate competence when conducting and applying various separation techniques 2. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Display safe laboratory practices. COD analysis. Theory and Practice in the Organic Laboratory. Perform various multi-step small scale syntheses including purification of the end products. 3. Write reports on the basis of experimental results and to draw correct conclusions.A. KAE 345/3 Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry KAT 242(s) or KAT 241(s) The current trends and advances in various aspects of analytical chemistry will be discussed. nitrogen analysis. Apply fundamentals of chemistry in solving current analytical chemistry problems. Deduce the structures of simple organic compounds from their chemical and physical characteristics and IR and NMR spectra. nitrate analysis in ground water and jar test for coagulation studies. KAE 346/2 Pollution and Environmental Chemistry Practical KAT 341(c) Analysis of lead pollution. Apply the process of water and wastewater treatment through coagulation. Demonstrate understanding in the current issues related to analytical chemistry. BOD analysis.

Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. concisely and appropriately. 3. S.References Practical Manual KAE 346 KAT 340/2 Analytical Chemistry Practical II KAT 243(s) Experiments based on ion chromatography. M. oxygen- sag in river pollution. References Practical Manual KAT 340 KAT 341/3 Pollution and Environmental Chemistry KAT 242(s) Water pollution: Hydrological cycle. causes and effects of man-made pollution. 4. 4. CRC Press (1991). Text Book and References 1. 5. atmospheric dispersion. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. 4. analytical methods and monitoring of atmospheric pollutants. high performance liquid chromatography. sustainable development and guidelines and to predict the fate of pollutants in aquatic environments. atomic absorption spectroscopy (GAAS). Chapman & Hall (1986). Display safe laboratory practices. de Nevers. Comprehend the basic concepts of pollution. Environmental Chemistry. Write reports clearly. 3. 2. control of emissions to the atmosphere. 5. McGraw-Hill (1995). basic chemistry of the formation of combustion-generated pollutants. Interpret data from laboratory observation and measurement. Hammer. 3. Air pollution: Origins of air pollutants. basic chemistry of the formation of combustion- generated pollutants. 2. UV/Vis spectrophotometry. Water and Wastewater Technology. ICPMS. 76 . Describe the meteorology and chemistry of air pollutants.E. atmospheric chemistry. graphite furnace (AAS). Comprehend and discuss the aquatic chemistry of water pollutants and their impact on aquatic ecology and environment. Harrison and Perry (Edition) Handbook of Air Pollution Analysis. gas chromatography. Prentice Hall (1986). N. 2nd Edition. monitoring of pollution strength. 2. 5th Edition. Demonstrate competence in appropriate laboratory techniques. Air Pollution Control Engineering. Construct the model of concentration of air pollutants via a simple Gaussian model. electroanalytical methods. Literature search. 2nd Edition.J. Apply the analytical process of monitoring environmental pollutants. treatment processes. Manahan. Apply chemistry principles to solve problems in the practical area.

Schroedinger equation. J. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. ensemble. 5.N. The solid state type ISE. fuel cell. 2.G. Demonstrate awareness of the limitations of the various methods. State and calculate the thermodynamic quantities from partition functions. Kinetics: transition state theory. partition functions. rate of charge transfer. J. calculation of thermodynamic functions. oscillating reactions. P. Silbey. Levine. Analytical Electrochemistry. signal generation. 4th Edition. Dynamic electrochemistry: electric double layer. 2. Sanctuary. Meiser and B. Physical Chemistry. Identify their applications in chemical analysis. 4th Edition. Principles of amperometry (C and Pt electrodes) and analyses of complexes and organics. Apply the postulates to formulate the modern quantum theory. R. (2003). Na. Statistical thermodynamics: Boltzmann distribution. I. Alberty and M. double layer.A.W. The potentiometric methods: Principles of ion selective electrodes (ISE) and analyses of H⊕. Laider. uncertainty principle. Text Book and References 1. 3. (2002). Voltammetric methods: Principles of polarography (Hg electrode) and analyses of metals and non-metals. 5th Edition. Oxford University Press (2002). Wiley-VCH (2006). Bawendi. 4. corrosion. polarization and over voltage. Text Book and References 1. Atkins. 4. KFT 331/3 Physical Chemistry III KFT 232(s) Quantum theory: Wave-particle duality. 3.J. reaction in solution. thermodynamics of reactions. 3. Wang. Ca and F ions. Houghton Mifflin Co.C. R.KAT 347/3 Electroanalytical Methods KAT 242(s) The principles of electrochemistry. McGraw-Hill International Edition. Select the appropriate electrochemical technique for a particular analysis. photochemistry. J. 4. Physical Chemistry. Physical Chemistry. Solve the Schroedinger equation for the particle-in-a-box problems.H. 7th Edition. K. 77 . Apply the Michaelis-Menten mechanism to explain an enzyme-catalysed reaction. postulates. John Wiley (2005). reactive species. polarisation. Comprehend the physico-chemical principles of electroanalytical methods. Demonstrate competence in applying the collision and transition-state theories. harmonic oscillator and rigid rotor. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Physical Chemistry. particle in a one dimensional box. 2.

Recognise the various unit operations used in industries. Nitrogen fertilizer. Phosphates and phosphorous based Industries. distillation and treatmenrts. Interpret and evaluate data obtained from laboratory measurements. distillation. 4. Hydrochloric acid: Production and Industrial applications of hydrochloric acid. Related products such as hypochloric soda and bicarbonate. Waste water trearment environment. Production and utilisation of phosphorous and phosphoric acid. Water quality. drying and filtration. 78 . Demonstrate skills in operating the various laboratory-scale unit operations. Types of local raw materials.KIT 355/2 Unit Operations Practical KIT 252(c) Laboratory experiments on the basic theory and practice of unit operations. Analyse and present reports in clearly written forms. 3. Separation of gas component through liquefaction and distillation. Reference Practical Manual KIT 355. Industrial gases: Gas component in air. Nitrogen based Industries: Production and utilisation of ammonia. utilisations and products. 2. 5. conduction and radiation. Uses of Industrial gases. Applications. Uses of water in Industries. Sulfur and sulphuric acid: Sulfur extraction and production of sulphuric acid by Contact Process. Fluid flow. Inorganic phosphates. Economics of raw materials. mixing process. Raw materials for Inorganic Industriles: Source of raw materials used in Inorganic Industries. Chloro-alkali and related Industries: Production of chlorine and caustic soda by electrolysis. KIT 356/4 Chemical Processing KOT 121(s) Introduction of Industries in Malaysia: Introduction of several aspects and characteristics of Malaysian Industries. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Design aspects on electrolytic cell. urea. extraction. Phosphate fertilizers. process of evaporation. Water and treatment: Source of water. humidification. nitric acid and nitrate derivation. Display good laboratory practices. absorption. rheology.

4. Industrial Organic Chemistry in Perspective (Vol. Identify and apply the various sources of feedstocks used in the nitrogen-. R. McGraw-Hill (1977). Reuben. R. 2.A. and phosphate-based industries. Industrial explosive materials: Physical and chemical proporties of explosive materials and usefulness. Benzene derivates. The Modern Inorganic Chemicals Industry (Special Publication. Production of several inorganic pigments. Thompson Eds.Fine and special chemicals: Defination and classification. Component for polyamides. Products of propene transformation. Chener. sulphur-.G. 3. H. 4. Welsermel and W. 2 Wiley (1980). Brink. 2. Inorganic pigments and their usefullness. Describe the production of Inorganic and organic raw materials from chemical industries.3-diolefins. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. KIT 357/2 Industrial Chemistry Practical Industrial related practical: Preparation and application of dyes. Springer Verlag (1993).A. 1 & Vol. Shreve and J. Describe the purification methods and uses of these specialty chemicals and the related compounds. Wittcoff and B. Aromatic production and transformation. VCH (1992). wood analysis. Text Book and References 1. 5. Arpe. Describe and explain the properties and utilisation of these raw materials. Energy Source and Raw Materials. Survey of Industrial Chemistry. Edition. State the origin and production of specialty chemicals. No. Products of oxidation: ethylene. alcohols.3) Chemical Society (1977) 3. food chemistry. metal extraction and electroplating. acetylene 1.N. Oxidation products of xylenes and napthalene.J. Industrial Organic Chemistry. halogenated vinyl and oxygenated vinyl substances. Boron and lithium compounds and other metallic salts. K. ceramics and polymers. syntheses that involve carbon monoxides. R. 4th. Synthesis of Industrial Products: Olefins. Chemical Process Industries. 79 . metal corrosion. 5.

colour matching and colour difference. Interpret and evaluate data obtained from laboratory measurements. laser. 3.M. Describe the general structure of colourant molecules and relate it with the colour- producing properties. Colour and constitution of organic molecules: General structure of colorants. disperse. 2. metal-complex. azoic. Reference Practical Manual KIT 357. chemichromisme. polyene. Light absorption and electronic transitions. Christie. Society of Dyers and Colourists (1987).L. arylcarbonium ion. Recognise the structural features of synthetic dyes and their interaction with filores.Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. mechanism of interactions with textile fibres. 4. Textbooks and references 1. Relate chemical principles in laboratory experimental work. mordant. colour specifications. VCH Verlag (1987) 3. colour vision and colour perception. sulfur. basic. vat.M. 2. Royal Society of Chemistry (2001). 4. Describe industrial applications of dyes and pigments. 5. application classes. types of textile fibres. 2. Chemical classes of dyes and pigments: Azo. Color Physics for Industry. McDonald. R. Demonstrate skills in several chemical techniques related to industrial processes. carbonyl. Identify the main chemical classes of colourants and discuss their properties. 3. Zollinger. Functional colorants: Dyes for special applications (LCD. Thomas Nelson & Son Ltd. reactive. Colour Chemistry. Allen. 4. R. Color Chemistry. colour measurement. absorption and reflectance of light by colorants. Colour Chemistry. Analyse and present reports in clearly written forms. phthalocyanine. polymethine. application methods. Chemistry and application of synthetic dyes: Direct. Pigments: Organic and inorganic pigments. Display good laboratory practices. Classification of colorants: Chemical classes. acid. colour mixing. KIE 355/3 Industrial Colourants KOT 121/3 (p) Basic concepts of colour: Electromagnetic spectrum and visible light. fluorescence in organic molecules. R. Discuss the special functions of colourants in specific applications. solar cell). 5. (1971) 80 . resonance. structural effects on λmax. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. H.

AVI (1975). Discuss the roles and functions of food additives and flavours. dehydration and thermal degradation and browning. 2. N. 6. AVI (1976). F. Describe the factors affecting the chemical deterioration of oils and fats during storage. Describe the chemical changes of the major food components during processing. Perform analyses of quality parameters in assessing quality of oils and fats. Gerard. 7. Inc. Woods. transportation and frying. reaction-hydrolysis. General properties: chemical reaction and interaction of amino acid and protein. Food Chemistry. Fundamentals of Food Chemistry. Introductory Food Chemistry. 5. Chemical properties and non-fatty components. Proteins: Physicochemical properties. Structures and composition of palm oil. physical and chemical properties. antimicrobes and types of sweeteners. Edited by Owen R. functional properties of proteins. PORIM Palm Oil Technical Bulletin. Potter. processing and technology edible oils. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Stabilisers and texturisers. quality control. Basic Food Chemistry. Practical experiments on quality controls of palm oil. Lee. Food Science. AVI (1980). production of typical flavor substances (vanilin. Oil and fats: Type. Fennma Marcel Dekker. Food additives: Role of acids. proteins and oils and their physico-chemical properties. Technology of palm oil. Flavours: Analysis and identification.D. 2. PORIM Palm Oil Research Bulletin 8. Aurang and A.W.KIE 356/4 Food and Palm Oil Chemistry Carbohydrates: Classification of structures.A. Physical properties of palm oil. 4. Text Book and References 1. dietary utilisation as food component. salt. Identify the classification and structures of carbohydrates. 3.N. Research trends in chemistry and technology of palm oil. functions in foods. 81 . L. Kluwer Academic Publishing (1978). 4. Food Chemistry. structures and organoleptic quality. chelating agents. (1985). 5. W. oxidation and anti-oxidant. composition. I. stability. bases. Heimann. 3. 2nd Edition. AVI (1973). E. Denaturation. saccharin etc). 3rd Edition.

KIE 358/3 Current Topics in Industrial Chemistry This course will discuss several topics or current issues in Industrial chemistry. 82 . 3. Food Industry. 3. Polymer based Industry. Demonstrate the ability to use various retrieval methods to obtain information. KUE 309/6 Chemistry Project Research projects on various chemistry topics. Corrosion Science. write concise reports and discuss the results orally. It will cover the following areas. 4. At the end of the training. Apply fundamentals of chemistry in solving current industrial chemistry problems. Demonstrate competence in various measurement techniques. KIE 360/0 Industrial Training The duration of Industrial Training in between 8-10 weeks at the local Industries identified by the school. 1. 2. students must submit a report and present a seminar at the school. Books and journal articles related to topics taught. 4. Analyse and interpret the data. 2. Text Book and References 1. Unit operations and processing. 5. Display the ability to discuss the current issues orally and in writing. 3. Display safe laboratory practices. Identify problems and demonstrate the problem solving skills. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1. Industrial colours and textiles. 2. Demonstrate understanding in the current issues related to industrial chemistry. 5. Learning Outcomes Students are able to: 1.

Index of Courses Advanced Practical – Analytical Chemistry (KAE 248) 65 Analytical Chemistry I (KAT 141) 62 Analytical Chemistry II (KAT 241) 65 Analytical Chemistry Practical II (KAT 340) 76 Analytical Practical I (KAT 243) 66 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (KIT 253) 69 Chemical Processing (KIT 356) 78 Chemistry Practical I (KUT 101) 64 Chemistry Practical II (KUT 102) 64 Chemistry Practical V – Analytical (KUT 205) 74 Chemistry Practical VI – Organic (KUT 206) 74 Chemistry Project (KUE 309) 82 Colloids and Surface Science (KIE 232) 68 Current Topics in Industrial Chemistry (KIE 358) 82 Electroanalytical Methods (KAT 347) 77 Food and Palm Oil Chemistry (KIE 356) 81 Industrial Colourants (KIE 355) 80 Industrial Practical (KIT 357) 79 Inorganic Chemistry I (KTT 111) 63 Inorganic Chemistry II (KTT 212) 73 Material Chemistry (KIT 257) 71 Organic Chemistry I (KOT 121) 63 Organic Chemistry II (KOT 222) 72 Physical Chemistry I (KFT 131) 62 Physical Chemistry II (KFT 232) 67 Physical Chemistry III (KFT 331) 77 Pollution and Environmental Chemistry (KAT 341) 76 Pollution and Environmental Chemistry Practical (KAE 346) 75 Polymer (KIT 254) 70 Separations Methods (KAT 244) 67 Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (KAE 345) 75 Spectroscopic Methods (KAT 242) 66 Unit Operations (KIT 252) 69 Unit Operations Practical (KIT 355) 78 83 .

SCHOOL OF PHYSICS 84 .

The School of Physics has the following undergraduate disciplines: Pure Physics Applied Physics Engineering Physics Medical Physics Geophysics VISION Towards global excellence in transdisciplinary research and education in Physics MISSION To provide academic. research. The main objective of the School of Physics is to produce Physics and Applied Physics graduates who are high achievers and possess knowledge suitable to national needs. knowledge. the School of Physics has provided facilities for the study of Physics and its related disciplines. educational and social programs for development of human capital. To achieve this objective. and technology for a sustainable nation 85 . G06A and G05 was one of the three Schools that was set up when the University was established in the year 1969. SCHOOL OF PHYSICS INTRODUCTION The School of Physics which occupies Building G06.

MAIN ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 86 .

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Email: nasir. Datuk Fong Swee Kiang Director of Intel Penang Phase 3. Fax: 04 .com Company Tel: 03 . Bhd.com Advanced Micro Devices Tel: 04 .253 1861 Medical Physics 1.com (M) Sdn. 11900 Penang Assembly & Subcon Adi-Anuar. Senior Physicist Selangor Darul Ehsan Sime Darby Medical Email : Centre Subang Jaya khoo.com Tel: 03 – 5639 1212 Fax: 03 – 5639 1675 Applied Physics Phase 3.2143 4228 (O) Fax: 03 .2142 4229 Engineering Physics Bayan Lepas Free Industrial Zone. Adi Anuar Basarudin Bayan Lepas. Industry and Community Advisory Panel (ICAP) School of Physics has established an Industry and Community Advisory Panel (ICAP) for the purpose of strengthening the relationship and communication with industries as a win- win strategy for moving toward sustainability. Lintang Bayan Mr. Bhd. Mohamad Nasir Lepas 6. Khoo Boo Huat 47500 Subang Jaya.huat@simedarby.253 3322 Fax: 04 . Menara Promet. Tuan Haji Ahmad Ziyad Jalan Sultan Ismail.Basarudin@amd.osman@oryxadv. Tel: 04 . Free Industrial Zone Director of AMD C4 Mr. Sdn. changing needs of the industry and employment of graduates Industry and Community Position/Organization Contact Advisory Panel Pure Physics Plot 69 (d) & (e). (DJN) Design Center 11900 Bayan Lepas. Mr. Bayan Lepas. Bhd.252 3016 91 . Jalan SS 12 / 1A.252 2369 Export Sdn.com Tel: 604-6402348 ext 108 (O) Fax: 04-6421357 Geophysics 7th floor.fong@intel. Halaman Kampung Jawa. The key role of ICAP is to • provide guidance and advice on programme curricular as well as the establishment of new courses to produce graduates that meet the industry’s needs • exploring the potential collaboration opportunities for promoting synergy in research and industry based projects • constantly update the fresh perspectives on issues of new and emerging technology.boo. Bayan Lepad Industrial Osman Director Manufacturing Zone Phase 4. Penang Intel Microelectronics Email: sk. CEO Elias 50250 Kuala Lumpur OROGENIC Group of Email: ziyad@orogenicgroup. 11900 Oryx Advanced Material Penang.

present and defend applied physics ideas effectively in written and oral form. research and higher education institutions to fulfill the market demands and needs. to produce graduates who appreciate various culture and able to contribute and lead effectively PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the course. 7. develop and administer sources of knowledge. 2. 92 . 5. 4. analyze and solve applied and industrial problems. work collaboratively as part of a team. to produce knowledgeable and skilled graduates in this field required by the industries including electronic industries. 4. identify. become professional. pursue independent study and continuous personal and professional development. responsible and ethical in work and in dealing with others. understand and assimilate the fundamental concepts and theories of physics. to develop skilled human resource in various aspects of Physics fields. to provide human capital who are able to use logical and critical considerations in their decision making and capable to gain. students are able to: 1. 6. apply analytical skills and is competent in a variety of physics techniques to solve problems. be a skilled and innovative leader. 3. 3. 8. 2. formulate.BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH HONOURS – APPLIED PHYSICS PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES The objectives of the programme are : 1.

be competent in the basic concepts and theories of geophysical methods. work in a team. 4. be resourceful. responsible and ethical. to produce graduates who can appreciate cultural diversity. 6. 3.BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE WITH HONOURS – GEOPHYSICS PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES The objectives of the programme are : 1. conduct independent study. PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the course. identify and solve various geophysical problems. develop and manage the knowledge-based resources. critical and analytical concepts/ideas/thinking to exploit. communicate ideas in geophysics clearly and effectively. 2. 93 . be professional. 7. professionalism and are able to contribute and lead effectively. dynamics and innovative. be a skilled and innovative leader. 3. 5. to produce trained manpower in various aspects in the field of geophysics. to provide human resources that are able to apply logical. students are able to: 1. to produce skillful and knowledgeable graduates in the industrial fields. 2. including oil and gas industries as well as higher institutions to fulfill the needs of the country. 4. 8.

2. to produce knowledgeable and skilled graduates in this field required by the industries including electronic industries. conduct independent study. 4. identify and solve various problems related to engineering physics. 4. to produce graduates who appreciate various culture and able to contribute and lead effectively PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the course. 3. dynamics and innovative. 8. 6. communicate ideas in engineering physics clearly and effectively. 5. to provide human capital who are able to use logical and critical considerations in their decision making and capable to gain. be resourceful. develop and administer sources of knowledge. 94 . 7.BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE WITH HONOURS – ENGINEERING PHYSICS PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES The objectives of the programme are : 1. work in a team. 2. 3. be professional. be a skilled and innovative leader. research and higher education institutions to fulfill the market demands and needs. to develop skilled human resource in various aspects of Physics fields. be competent in the basic concepts and theories of engineering physics. students are able to: 1. responsible and ethical.

team working and other related skills. 7. problem solving. ability to apply logical reasoning and critical thinking in scientific matters and issues. leadership. to produce graduates who appreciate various culture and able to contribute and lead effectively PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of the course. ability to perform experiments. 3. adherence to professionalism. 2. 3. ethics and observe accountability in execution of tasks. in particular on radiation physics and dosimetry. 95 . values. 6. to develop skilled human resource in various aspects of Physics fields. research and higher education institutions to fulfill the market demands and needs. 4. understand physical principles and updating information know-how of latest medical imaging modalities. diversified skills related to technological literacy. 8. 5. magnetic resonance and ultrasound. students are able to: 1. acquire and analyze construe data. communicative. 2. develop and administer sources of knowledge. and social responsibilities. critical thinking. to produce knowledgeable and skilled graduates in this field required by the industries including electronic industries. including nuclear medicine. ability to keep track. medical instrumentations and diagnostic imaging modalities. 4.BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE WITH HONOURS – MEDICAL PHYSICS PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES The objectives of the programme are : 1. self-reliance and able to manage and guide effectively in matters related to scientific tasks. to provide human capital who are able to use logical and critical considerations in their decision making and capable to gain. fundamental and broad principles of physics. ability in communication.

0 CGPA ('C' average) for the whole programme and combined basic and core component. Programme Stucture for Bachelor of Applied Science with Honours Degree Programme – Applied Physics Core Courses ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics) ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) *ZCA 110/4 Calculus and Linear Algebra ZCT 103/3 Physics III (Vibrations. Students can only register either ZCA 110/4 or MAA 101/4 and MAA 111/4 . if failed. Waves and Optics) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) ZCT 106/3 Electronics I ZCT 191/2 Physics Practical I ZCT 192/2 Physics Practical II ZCT 205/3 Quantum Mechanics ZCT 206/3 Electronics II ZCT 207/2 Statistical Mechanics ZCT 210/4 Complex Analysis and Differential Equations ZCT 211/2 Vector Analysis ZCT 212/2 Thermodynamics ZAT 281/4 Introduction to Microprocessors ZAT 283/3 Instrumentation ZCT 293/2 Physics Practical III ZCT 307/3 Solid State Physics I ZAT 386/4 Physics of Semiconductor Devices ZAT 387/4 Semiconductor Fabrication Processes ZAT 389/3 Low Dimensional Semiconductor Structures ZAT 394/6 Applied Physics Project and Seminar Total: 70 units (22 courses) * The course content of ZCA 110/4 overlaps with Mathematics courses MAA 101/4 Calculus and MAA 111/4 Linear Algebra. As regards to the basic and core courses. ENGINEERING PHYSICS AND MEDICAL PHYSICS (THREE YEAR) Major-Elective or Major-Minor Applied Physics/Geophysics/Engineering Physics/Medical Physics Programme A student must attain a minimum of 2. 96 . a student is allowed to replace a maximum of 8 units of the courses failed with courses of at least similar level offered under the Degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours Programme of Study in Physics.PROGRAMME STRUCTURE FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE WITH HONOURS – APPLIED PHYSICS. GEOPHYSICS.

---/2* 12 3 ZAT 394/6@ II ZAT 387/4 ZAT 389/3 --. 97 .---/4* --.Elective Course Students must select 20 units. of Units ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I ZCA 101/4 ZCA 102/4 ZCA 110/4 ZCT 191/2 14 1 II ZCT 103/3 ZCT 104/3 ZCT 106/3 ZGT 192/2 11 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I ZCT 206/3 ZCT 210/4 ZCT 211/2 ZCT 212/2 --. ZAE 282/3 Materials Science ZAE 376/4 Astronomy Principles and Practices ZAE 384/4 Laser and Its Applications ZAE 385/4 Applied Spectroscopy ZAE 388/4 Non-Destructive Testing ZKT 222/3 Electronic and Photonic Materials I ZCE 111/4 Computational Physics ZCE 275/4 Introduction to Astronomy ZKE 327/3 Solid State Lighting I ZCE 341/4 Energy Studies ZCE 351/3 X-Ray Analysis MAT 181/4 Programming for Science Applications Industrial Training Industrial training which is optional is encouraged and the training is usually in the long vacation after Year II. at least 16 units from the group of courses below and the remaining units from either the Science or Applied Science programmes.---3* ZCT 293/2 16 2 II ZCT205/2 ZCT207/2 ZAT 281/4 ZAT 283/3 --.---/4* --. Students are encouraged to take MAT181/4 Programming for Science Application.---/4* 22 90 Note: * Elective Course (according to choice) @ Course conducted over two semesters (each semester contribute 3 units). ZCE 299 Industrial Training Progress Schedule for Course Registration of Bachelor of Applied Science with Honours Degree Programme – Applied Physics Year Semester Courses No.---/4* 15 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I ZCT 307/3 ZAT 386/4 --.

Chemistry 3. Programme Stucture for Bachelor of Applied Science with Honours Degree Programme – Geophysics Core Courses ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics) ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) *ZCA 110/4 Calculus and Linear Algebra ZCT 103/3 Physics III (Vibrations.Electives Select at least 16 units from the group of elective courses plus 4 units from other Sciences : Field Semester I Semester II Total Units Applied Physics ZAE 282/3 ZAE 384/4 ZAE 385/4 ZAE 388/4 ZAE 376/4 ZCE 275/4 ZKT 222/3 40 Engineering Physics +ZKE 327/3 ZCE 341/4 Pure Physics ZCE 351/3 ZCE 111/4 ZCE111/4 Other Sciences : Mathematics MAT 181/4* 4 44 *Recommended as Other Science + Only for Applied and Engineering Physics programmes Minor Area of Specialisation The recommended Minor areas of specialisation are as follows:- 1. Student must also pass 4 units of elective courses selected from any group of electives listed in Elective Courses above. Astronomy 2. Please refer to the School concerned to obtain further information. Computer Science 5. Waves and Optics) 98 . Mathematics 4. English Language Students must pass 16 units from the Minor area of specialisation. Management 6. Islamic Studies 7.

at least 16 units from the group of courses below and the remaining units from either the Science or Applied Science programmes. ZCE 299 Industrial Training 99 . Elective Courses Students must select 20 units. Students can only register either ZCA 110/4 or MAA 101/4 and MAA 111/4 . Students are encouraged to take MAT181/4 Programming for Science Application. ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) ZGT 161/3 Geology I ZGT 162/3 Geology II ZGT 190/2 Geology Practical ZCT 191/2 Physics Practical I ZCT 210/4 Complex Analysis and Differential Equations ZCT 211/2 Vector Analysis ZGT 264/2 Geophysical Data Analysis ZGT 265/3 Meteorology I ZGT 266/3 Solid Earth Geophysics I ZGT 267/3 Solid Earth Geophysics II ZGT 268/3 Exploration Geophysics I ZGT 269/3 Exploration Geophysics II ZGT 270/3 Meteorology II ZGT 272/3 Introduction to Oceanography ZGT 295/4 Geophysics Practical ZGT 374/3 Remote Sensing ZGT 395/6 Geophysics Project Total: 70 units (22 courses) * The course content of ZCA 110/4 overlaps with Mathematics courses MAA 101/4 Calculus and MAA 111/4 Linear Algebra. ZGE 277/4 Structure of the Universe ZGE 360/3 Synoptic Meteorology ZGE 361/2 Advanced Geology ZGE 364/3 Tropical Meteorology and Forecasting ZGE 371/3 Potential Field Interpretation ZGE 373/3 Seismic Data Processing ZGE 375/2 Engineering and Environmental Geophysics ZGE 379/3 Geological Oceanography ZCE 111/4 Computational Physics MAT 181/4 Programming for Science Applications Industrial Training Industrial training which is optional is encouraged and the training is usually in the long vacation after Year II.

Computer Science 4. Management 5. Chemistry 6. of Units I ZCA 101/4 ZCA 102/4 ZCA 110/4 ZGT 161/3 ZCT 191/2 17 1 II ZCT 103/3 ZCT 104/3 ZGT 162/3 ZGT 190/2 11 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I ZCT 210/4 ZCT 211/2 ZGT 265/3+ ZGT 266/3 ZGT 268/3 17 2 ZGT 295/4@ II ZGT 264/2 ZGT 267/3 ZGT 269/3 ZGT 270/3+ --.---/4* 17 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I ZGT 272/3 ZGE ---/3* ZGE ---/3* ZGE ---/2* 14 3 ZGT 395/6@ II ZGT 374/3 ZGT ---/3* ZGE ---/3* ZGE ---/2* 14 90 Note: * Elective Courses (according to choice) + For students who are also taking a Minor. these courses can be taken in their Third Year of studies @ Course conducted over two semesters Electives Select at least 16 units from the group of Elective courses below: Field Semester I Semester II Total Units Geophysics ZGE 277/4 ZGE 364/3 ZGE 360/3 ZGE 375/2 27 ZGE 361/2 ZGE 379/3 ZGE 371/3 ZCE 111/4 ZGE 373/3 Mathematics MAT 181/4 4 31 Minor Area of Specialisation The recommended Minor areas of specialisation are as follows:- 1. English Language 100 . Astronomy 2. Islamic Studies 7. Mathematics 3.Progress Schedule for Course Registration of Bachelor of Applied Science with Honours Degree Programme – Geophysics Year Semester Courses No.

Students can only register either ZCA 110/4 or MAA 101/4 and MAA 111/4 . Waves and Optics) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) ZCT 106/3 Electronics I ZCT 191/2 Physics Practical I ZCT 192/2 Physics Practical Il ZCT 205/3 Quantum Mechanics ZCT 206/3 Electronics II ZCT 207/2 Statistical Mechanics ZCT 210/4 Complex Analysis and Differential Equations ZCT 211/2 Vector Analysis ZCT 212/2 Thermodynamics ZCT 213/2 Optics ZKT 221/2 Engineering Design ZKT 222/3 Electronic and Photonic Materials I ZCT 293/2 Physics Practical III ZKT 296/2 Photonics Laboratory ZKT 297/3 Practical Training ZCT 304/3 Electricity and Magnetism ZCT 307/3 Solid State Physics I ZKT 321/3 The Engineer in Society ZKT 396/6 Engineering Physics Projects Total : 70 units (24 courses) * The course content of ZCA 110/4 overlaps with Mathematics courses MAA 101/4 Calculus and MAA 111/4 Linear Algebra. Programme Stucture for Bachelor of Applied Science with Honours Degree Programme – Engineering Physics Core Courses ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics) ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) *ZCA 110/4 Calculus and Linear Algebra ZCT 103/3 Physics III (Vibrations.Students must pass 16 units from the Minor area of specialisation followed. Refer to the School concerned for further information. Students must pass 4 units of one Elective course selected from group of the Elective courses from the above list. 101 .

ZAE 384/4 Laser and Its Applications ZCE 111/4 Computational Physics ZCT 218/3 Mathematical Methods ZKE 322/3 Electronic and Photonic Materials II ZKE 323/3 Electronic and Photonic Devices and Systems ZKE 324/2 Photonic Display and Storage Technology ZKE 325/4 Optical Fiber Technology and Optical Communication ZKE 326/4 Signal and Image Processing ZKE 327/3 Solid State Lighting I ZKE 328/3 Solid State Lighting II ZKE 378/4 Introduction to Radio Astronomy MAT 181/4 Programming for Science Applications Or CMP 101/4 Industrial Training Industrial training which is optional is encouraged and the training is usually during the long vacation after Year II. at least 16 units from the group of courses below and the remaining units from either the Science or Applied Science programmes. of Units -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I ZCA 101/4 ZCA 102/4 ZCA 110/4 ZCT 191/2 14 1 II ZCT 103/3 ZCT 104/3 ZCT 106/3 ZCT 192/2 MAT 181/4 15 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I ZCT 206/3 ZCT 210/4 ZCT 211/2 ZCT 212/2 ZCT 213/2 ZCT 293/2 ZKT 297/3 17 2 II ZCT 205/3 ZCT 207/2 ZKT 221/2 ZKT 222/3 ZKT 296/2 --.Elective Courses Students must select 20 units.---/6* 12 90 102 .---/6* 15 3 II ZCT 304/3 ZKT 396/6@ . Students are encouraged to take MAT181/4 Programming for Science Application. ZCE 299 Industrial Training Progress Schedule for Course Registration of Bachelor of Applied Science with Honours Degree Programme – Engineering Physics Year Semester Courses No.---/4* 17 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- @ I ZKT 321/3 ZCT 307/3 ZKT 396/6 --.

Chemistry 3. 103 . Students must pass 4 units of Elective courses selected from any group of Elective courses listed above.Electives Select at least 16 units from the group of elective courses below: Field Semester I Semester II Total Units Engineering Physics ZKE 322/3 ZAE 384/4 ZKE 323/3 ZCT 218/3 ZKE 327/3 ZKE 324/2 ZCE111/4 ZKE 325/4 37 ZKE 326/4 ZKE 328/3 ZKE 378/4 ZCE 111/4 Mathematics/ MAT 181/4 Computer Science or MAT 181/4 CMP 101/4 or 4 CMP 101/4 41 Minor Area of Specialisation The recommended Minor areas of specialisation are as follows:- 1. Mathematics 4. Astronomy 2. Islamic Studies 7. Computer Science 5. Refer to the School concerned for further information. English Language Students must pass 16 units from the Minor area of specialisation followed. Management 6.

Programme Stucture for Bachelor of Applied Science with Honours Degree Programme – Medical Physics Core Courses ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics) ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) *ZCA 110/4 Calculus and Linear Algebra ZCT 103/3 Physics III (Vibrations. Waves and Optics) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) ZCT 106/3 Electronics I ZCT 191/2 Physics Practical I ZCT 192/2 Physics Practical II ZCT 205/3 Quantum Mechanics ZCT 206/3 Electronics II ZCT 207/2 Statistics Mechanics ZCT 210/4 Complex Analysis and Differential Equations ZCT 211/2 Vector Analysis ZCT 212/2 Thermodynamics ZCT 213/2 Optics ZCT 293/2 Physics Practical III ZCT 307/3 Solid State Physics I ZMT 298/2 Medical Physics Practical ZMT 231/4 Human Anatomy and Physiology ZMT 334/3 Physics of Diagnostic Radiology ZCE 331/4 Radiation Biophysics ZMT 335/3 Physics of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine ZMT 397/6 Medical Physics Project Total: 70 units (23 courses) * The course content of ZCA 110/4 overlaps with Mathematics courses MAA 101/4 Calculus and MAA 111/4 Linear Algebra. Students can only register either ZCA 110/4 or MAA 101/4 and MAA 111/4 . 104 .

ZCE 299 Industrial Training Progress Schedule for Course Registration of Bachelor of Applied Science with Honours Degree Programme – Medical Physics Year Semester Courses . Students are encouraged to take MAT181/4 Programming for Science Application.Electives Courses Students must select 20 units.No of Units I ZCA 101/4 ZCA 102/4 ZCA 110/4 ZCT 191/2 14 1 II ZCT 103/3 ZCT 104/3 ZCT 106/3 MAT 181/4* ZCT 192/2 15 I ZCT 206/3 ZCT 210/4 ZCT 211/2 ZCT 212/2 ZCT 213/2 ZCT 293/2 15 2 II ZCT 205/3 ZCT 207/2 ZMT 231/4 --. ZME 336/4 Medical Instrumentations ZME 338/4 Physics of Medical Imaging ZAE 384/4 Laser and Its Applications ZCE 111/4 Computational Physics ZCE 305/3 Atomic and Nuclear Physics MAT 181/4 Programming for Science Applications Industrial Training Industrial training which is optional is encouraged and the training is usually during the long vacation after Year II.---/4* ZMT 298/2 15 I ZCE 331/4 ZCT 307/3 --.---/4* 18 3 ZMT 397/6@ II ZMT 335/3 ZMT 334/3 ZAE 384/4* 13 90 Note: * Elective Courses (according to choice) @ Course conducted over two semesters 105 .---/4* --. at least 16 units from the group of courses below and the remaining units from either the Science or Applied Science programmes.

---/4* 4 27 * Other Science Electives (4 units) that are offered in Semester II can be chosen from the following courses: ZAE 388/4 Non-Destructive Testing MAA161/4 Statistics for Science Students BOI109/4 Biostatistics ZCE341/4 Energy Studies IEK102/3 Treatment.Electives Select at least 16 units from the group of Elective courses below: Field Semester I Semester II Total Units Medical Physics ZCE 305/3 ZAE 384/4 ZME 336/4 ZCE 111/4 ZME 338/4 19 ZCE 111/4 Mathematics MAT 181/4 4 Other Sciences --. Mathematics 4. Chemistry 3. Computer Science 5. Astronomy 2. Islamic Studies 7. 106 . Disposal and Management of Solid Waste and Schedule Waste Minor Area of Specialisation The recommended Minor areas of specialisation are as follows:- 1. Refer to the School concern for further information. English Language Students must pass 16 units from the Minor area of specialisation followed. Students must pass 4 units of Elective courses selected from any group of Elective courses listed above. Management 6.

ENGINEERING PHYSICS AND MEDICAL PHYSICS Semester I Level of Course Code/ Prerequisite Course Title 100 ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics) - ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) - ZCA 110/4 Calculus and Linear Algebra - ZCE 111/4 Computational Physics - ZGT 161/3 Geology I (C) ZCA101/4 ZCT 191/2 Physics Practical I - 200 ZCT 206/3 Electronics II (S) ZCT 106/3 ZCT 210/4 Complex Analysis and Differential (S) ZCA 110/4 Equations ZCT 211/2 Vector Analysis (S) ZCA110/4 or (S) MAA101/4 ZCT 212/2 Thermodynamics (S) ZCA 102/4 ZCT 213/2 Optics (S) ZCT 103/3 ZGT 265/3 Meteorology I (C) ZGT 266/3 ZGT 266/3 Solid Earth Geophysics I (S) ZGT 162/3 ZGT 268/3 Exploration Geophysics I (C) ZGT 266/3 ZGT 272/3 Introduction to Oceanography (P) ZCA 101/4 (S) ZGT 162/3 ZAE 282/3 Material Science - ZGE 277/4 Structure of The Universe - ZCT 293/2 Physics Practical III (S) ZCT 192/2 ZGT 295/4 Geophysics Practical (two semesters) (S) ZGT 190/2 ZGT 297/3 Practical Training (S) ZCT 192/2 300 ZCE 305/3 Atomic and Nuclear Physics (S) ZCT 205/3 ZCT 307/3 Solid State Physics I (C) ZCT 207/2 ZKT 321/3 The Engineer in Society - ZKE 322/3 Electronic and Photonic Materials II (S) ZKT 222/3 ZKE 323/3 Electronic and Photonic Devices and (S) ZCT 106/3 Systems (S) ZCT 213/2 ZKE 327/3 Solid State Lighting I (C) ZCT307/3 ZCE 331/4 Radiation Biophysics (P) ZCT 104/3 ZME 336/4 Medical Instrumentations (S) ZCT 106/3 ZME 338/4 Physics of Medical Imaging (S) ZCT 106/3 ZCE 351/3 X-Ray Analysis (C) ZCT 307/3 ZGE 360/3 Synoptic Meteorology (S) ZGT 270/3 ZGE 371/3 Potential Field Interpretation (S) ZGT 269/3 ZGT 374/3 Remote Sensing (P) ZCA 102/4 (S) ZCT 103/3 107 . GEOPHYSICS.LIST OF COURSES OFFERED FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE WITH HONOURS PROGRAMME – APPLIED PHYSICS.

Waves and - Optics) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) - ZCT 106/3 Electronics I (S) ZCA 102/4 ZCE 111/4 Computational Physics - ZGT 162/3 Geology II (S) ZGT 161/3 ZGT 190/2 Geology Practical (C) ZGT 161/3 ZCT 192/2 Physics Practical II (S) ZCT 191/2 200 ZCT 205/3 Quantum Mechanics (S) ZCT 104/3 ZCT 207/2 Statistical Mechanics (S) ZCT 212/2 ZCE 208/2 Classical Mechanics (P) ZCA 101/4 (S) ZCT 210/4 (S) ZCT 211/2 ZCT 218/3 Mathematical Methods (S) ZCT 210/4 (S) ZCT 211/2 (S) ZCT 211/2 ZKT 221/2 Engineering Design (S) MAT 181/4 ZKT 222/3 Electronic and Photonic Materials I (S) ZCT 106/3 (C) ZCT 212/2 ZMT 231/4 Human Anatomy and Physiology - ZGT 264/2 Geophysical Data Analysis (S) ZCT 210/4 ZGT 267/3 Solid Earth Geophysics II (S) ZGT 162/3 108 . ZGE 375/2 Engineering and Environmental (S) ZGT 268/3 Geophysics ZAE 376/4 Astronomy Principles and Practices (S) ZGE 277/4 ZAE 385/4 Applied Spectroscopy (S) ZAT 283/3 ZAT 386/4 Physics of Semiconductors Devices (S) ZCT 106/3 (C) ZCT 307/3 ZCT 390/6 Pure Physics Project (two semesters) (S) ZCT 294/2 ZAT 394/6 Applied Physics Project and Seminar (P) ZCT 293/2 (two semesters) ZMT 397/6 Medical Physics Project (S) MAT 181/4 (two semesters) (S) MAT 181/4 (S) ZMT 298/2 ZGT 395/6 Geophysics Project (two semesters) (S) ZGT 295/4 ZKT 396/6 Engineering Physics Project (S) ZKT 296/2 (two semesters) Semester II Level of Course Code/ Prerequisite Course Title 100 *ZCU 100/2 Energy and The Environment - ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics) - ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) - ZCT 103/3 Physics III (Vibrations.

P = Pass S = Sequential C = Concurrent 109 . ZGT 269/3 Exploration Geophysics II (C) ZGT 267/3 ZGT 270/3 Meteorology II (C) ZGT 264/2 (S) ZGT 265/3 ZCE 275/4 Introduction to Astronomy - ZAT 281/4 Introduction to Microprocessors (P) ZCT 206/3 ZAT 283/3 Instrumentation (S) ZCT 293/2 (C)ZCT 206/3 ZCT 294/2 Physics Practical IV (S) ZCT 293/2 ZGT 295/4 Geophysics Practical (two semesters) (S) ZGT 190/2 ZKT 296/2 Photonics Lab (S) ZCT 293/2 ZMT 298/2 Medical Physics Practical (S) ZCT 293/2 300 ZCT 304/3 Electricity and Magnetism (S) ZCA 102/4 (S) ZCT 210/4 (S) ZCT 211/2 ZCT 317/3 Solid State Physics II (S) ZCT 307/3 ZKE 324/4 Display and Storage Technology (S) ZCT 213/2 ZKE 325/4 Optical Fiber Technology and Optical (S) ZCT 213/2 Communications (C) ZCT 304/3 ZKE 326/4 Signal and Image Processing - ZKE 328/3 Solid State Lighting II (S) ZKE 327/3 ZMT 334/3 Physics of Diagnostic Radiology (S) ZCT 104/3 ZMT 335/3 Physics of Radiotherapy and Nuclear (S) ZCT 104/3 Medicine ZCE 341/4 Energy Studies (S) ZCT 106/3 ZGE 361/2 Advanced Geology (S) ZGT 162/3 ZGE 364/3 Tropical Meteorology and Forecasting (S) ZGT 270/3 ZGE 373/3 Seismic Data Processing (S) ZGT 268/3 ZKE 378/4 Introduction to Radio Astronomy (S) ZAE 376/4 ZGE 379/3 Geology Oceanography (C) ZGT 272/3 ZAE 384/4 Laser and Its Applications (S) ZCT 104/3 ZAT 387/4 Semiconductor Fabrication Processes (S) ZAT 386/3 ZAE 388/4 Non – Destructive Testing (S) ZCT 104/3 ZAT 389/3 Low Dimensional Semiconductor (S) ZCT 307/3 Structures ZCT 390/6 Pure Physics Projects (two semesters) (S) ZCT 294/2 ZAT 394/6 Applied Physics Project and Seminar (P) ZCT 293/2 (two semesters) ZMT 397/6 Medical Physics Project (S) MAT 181/4 (two semesters) (S) ZMT 298/2 ZGT 395/6 Geophysics Project (two semesters) (S) ZGT 295/4 ZKT 396/6 Engineering Physics Project (S) ZKT 296/2 (two semesters) Note: *This course is not offered to physics students.

110 . CONTENT-OVERLAP COURSES The list of content-overlap courses will be announced in due course. Universiti Sains Malaysia Gold Medal (Ladies Association) is awarded to a female graduate who is the best in all fields (academic and co-curriculum activities).PHYSICS COURSES AS BASIC. Universiti Sains Malaysia Gold Medal is awarded to the best graduate of the Degree of Bachelor in the field of Medical Physics sponsored by Staff School of Physics. CORE. The Educational Award (Gold Medal. ELECTIVE. RM1000) given by the Council of Rulers is awarded to a Malay and a Non-Malay who is the best in all fields in each University. please refer to your Academic Adviser. OPTION AND AUDIT FOR STUDENTS WHO DO NOT MAJOR IN PHYSICS Courses offered by the School of Physics can be followed as Basic. Other than the prizes stated above. The Chancellor’s Gold Medal for the Universiti Sains Malaysia Best All-Round Student is awarded to the graduate who has achieved distinction academic results and possess a record of active involvement in extra-curricular activities. Ranjeet Singh Memorial Gold Medal is awarded to the best graduate in the field of Geophysics. Lim Koon Ong. Core. PRIZES AND DEAN’S LIST There are five prizes in the field of Physics that can be won by students in each academic session: Honourable Dato’ Professor Chatar Singh Gold Medal is awarded to the best graduate in the field of Physics. Certificate. the Universiti Sains Malaysia Gold Medal is awarded to the best graduate of the Degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours. Option and Audit courses by students who do not major in Physics if basically they have fulfilled the prerequisite of the courses selected. Tan Kok Hin Book Prize is awarded to the best graduate of the Degree of Bachelor of Applied Science with Honours in the field of Applied Physics. Elective. Regarding courses concerned from other Schools. Universiti Sains Malaysia Gold Medal is awarded to the best graduate of the Degree of Bachelor in the field of Engineering Physics sponsored by Prof.

Resource Centre and seminar/tutorial rooms for Physics student usage in Building G05. 111 . FACILITIES Teaching laboratories for practical classes. the students would be required to submit to the University a report regarding their experiences.The Dean’s List is awarded to physics students who have achieved a certain level of excellence in their academic performance. This Committee meets from time to time and it functions as an open forum to discuss matters concerning academic. Students in the second year are qualified to apply to serve as trainees with various employers for six to eight weeks during the long vacation of the academic session. microprocessor laboratory. it is the hope that they will observe the research and management opportunities in the industrial. postgraduate rooms. and note the problems and work situations. The Chairman of this Committee is the Deputy Dean. During this period. Student Centre. SCHEME FOR STUDYING ABROAD The objective of this scheme is to create students’ awareness at the international level by allowing them to register for one semester at a chosen university abroad. STUDENTS OPTIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME The Students Optional Training Programme was formed to strengthen the relationship between the University and the private and public sectors and provide exposure to working-life for students. business and public sectors. Students will be guided so that they will be able to face academic challenges independently. The student representatives to this Committee are elected by Physics students at the beginning of each academic session. computer laboratories. STAFF AND STUDENT COMMITTEE The Staff and Student Committee was formed in the School to strengthen the relationship between students and staff. and study the opportunities to implement theories of science. After completion of training. G06 and G06A. workshop. THE MENTOR SYSTEM This system was made available to assist students overcome problems especially with regards to academic matters. The Dean’s List is awarded every semester. research laboratories. CAI laboratory. welfare and non-academic activities.

Kinematics in 1 and 2 dimension. rotational dynamics. Material resistivity. John Wiley & Sons. Bernoulli equation. Maxwell displacement current. electric intensity. Resnick. students are able to: 1. Poiseuille equation. Books: 1. stress. surface tension. sedimentation and drag. static. & Jewett. Force on current and moving charge. Lorentz equation. apply the basic principles of mechanics and fundamental laws of physics 2. Principles of Physics (7th Ed. J. R. Walker. Maxwell equations. equilibrium. Magnetic field and electric field vectors. Kirchhoff’s law. analyze problems and search alternative solution for solving simple problems Ref. strain and torsion. Biot- Savart law. 112 . Electric potential and electric intensity of point charges.C. D.. Universal gravitation. Young’s modulus.). Faraday’s law. 2008 2. electric flux. hydrostatics. bending moment. Inductance. Ohm’s law. Compression of fluids. electromagnetic spectrum. Halliday. Electromagnetic waves. Lenz’s law. Ampere’s law. Vectors in physics. RCL circuit. Bending of beams. 2008. A. Extended systems. shear modulus and bulk modulus. dielectrics.SYNOPSES OF BASIC COURSES – PHYSICS ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics) Unit and dimension. gravitational force. Work and energy. D. viscosity. Serway. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. stored energy. Turbulent flow. dipole moment. current. ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) Coulomb’s law. D. Angular momentum. Hall’s effect.A. Simple harmonic motion. stored energy. Fundamentals of Physics Extended (8th Ed. Microscopic view of current. temperature effect. moment of inertia. Capacitance. electric power.W. Hydrodynamics. Collision in 1 and 2 dimension. study and solve simple problems related to basic principles of mechanics and fundamental laws of physics 3. RC circuit. compound pendulum. LR circuit. Magnetic fields. Elasticity. Dielectric materials.. Conservation of energy and momentum. Motion of planets.. Electric current. J. resistance. Newton’s Laws and applications. Rigid body.) Brooks/Cole.C. Gauss’s law. R. dipole and charge distributions.C. continuity equation. electric polarization.

Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning. minimum and maximum values (theory and application). Principles of Physics. function limits and properties of limit. J. improper integrals. 9th Edition. continuity. Books: 2. applications of derivatives. implicit differentiation. Addison Wesley. Trigonometric functions and their inverses. 3. R. exponential and logarithmic functions. Sequences and series.A. demonstrate mathematical skills necessary to carry an argument from the “given” to the “to find” alluded in (4) above Text Books: 1. rational and complex numbers.Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. higher order differentiation. ZCA 110/4 Calculus and Linear Algebra Calculus: Sets. hyperbolic functions and their inverses. Rolle’s theorem. when presented with problem situations 5. Ref. Walker (2001). R. Integration techniques. Freedman (1996).Serway & John W. L’ Hopital’s rule. display basic physical principles and analyze the procedural knowledge to arrive at a solution for some desired unknown.D. John Wiley & Sons. students are able to: 1. Raymond A. Differentation techniques. University Physics. real numbers. 113 . explain the basic fundamental physical laws and principles of electricity and magnetism which govern and give meaning to our universe 2. lengths of curves. and the mean value theorem. Functions and graphs. explain and solve problems related to electricity and magnetism 4. Jewett (2003). Young. 6th edition. fundamental theorem. 6th Edition. D. Halliday. Fundamentals of Physics. convergence tests. demonstrate an understanding of scientific methods and the evolution of scientific thought 3. H. Resnick.

Irl Bivens. Frank Ayres. (SI Metric Edition) McGraw-Hill (1974). Weir. and Stephen Davis. (5th Edition) Thomson Brooks/Cole (2003) 114 . Schaum’s Outline of Linear Algebra. James Stewart. Giordano. Ref. Joel Hass and Frank R. students are able to: 1. Basis and dimension.Matrices and Determinants: Matrix algebra. Howard Anton. explain the basic concepts about series 4. Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Matrices. inverse of a matrix. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. determinant. explain the basic concepts in linear algebra and vector spaces Text Books: 1. analyse and identify suitable differentiation law(s) or techniques of integration to be applied in different situations 3. Books: 1. linear transformations. (3rd International Edition) McGraw-Hill (2001). Calculus. properties of determinant. (7th Edition) John Wiley and Sons (2002) 2. Seymour Lipschutz and Marc Lipson. Calculus. systems of equations. Thomas Calculus. George B. Thomas. vector spaces. explain the basic concepts in differentiation and integration 2. (11th Edition) Addison-Wesley Publishing (2005) 2. Maurice D. 3.

USM. forced oscillator. diffraction pattern and polarization 3.A.W. Doppler effect.). Dispersion. J. Waves and Optics) Equation of motion for simple harmonic motion. & Jewett. H. F. 3. McGraw-Hill. Thomson. Reflection and transmission of waves at boundaries. relaxation time. Brewster angle. Propagation of light waves. Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics (6th Ed.J. Polarization.SYNOPSES OF CORE COURSES – PHYSICS ZCT 103/3 Physics III (Vibrations. 2. longitudinal and transverse waves. Light sources and light detectors. Young’s double slits. Chatar Singh. Cauchy formula. analyze and solve problems related to vibrations. Multiple reflections. Interference. The wave equation and its solutions. 6. Superposition of waves. 4. B.). Logarithmic decrement. 115 . Phase velocity and group velocity. Optik . amplitude and intensity. Diffraction grating. Addison-Wesley. John Wiley & Sons. waves and optics Ref. Getaran dan Gelombang. resonance and Q factor. Fundamentals of Optics (4th Ed. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. 2006. Stationary waves. Jenkins. Ed. & White. explain the basic concepts of simple harmonic motion. Transverse waves and longitudinal waves. Lee.). 2001 5. H. Pain. 1991. R.S. Hecht E. 2005. Optics. 2001. The Physics of Vibration and Waves (6th. interference of light. Dispersion of waves. Michelson interferometer. nature of electromagnetic waves. 1989. damped oscillator. Serway. explain the basic principles related to vibrations. USM. forced oscillator. Electromagnetic wave spectrum. Newtons rings and Fabry-Perot interferometer. waves and optics 2. Coupled oscillations.E. thin films. Plane electromagnetic waves in vacuum. students are able to: 1. Books: 1.A.

distortion and frequency response. Theory of positive and negative feedback. by Serway. Postulates of special relativity.. Modern Physics. Energy levels of the atom and atomic spectra. explain the conceptual differences between classical physics and modern physics in framing the law of physics 3.. Power amplifier. Moses and Moyer. 2nd ed. Modern Physics. solve problems related to special theory of relativity and quantum theory Ref. Old quantum theory and the Bohr model of the atom. Small signal amplifiers and hybrid parameters. describe the basic ideas in special theory of relativity and quantum theory 2. Excitation and the Franck-Hertz experiment. Characteristics of diodes and their uses in circuits. Alpha-scattering. Signal processing circuits. By Athur Beiser. rectifying circuits. 6th ed. Photoelectric effect. ZCT 106/3 Electronics I Analysis of circuits.ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) Special Relativity: Reference frames. Prerequisite: (S) ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) 116 . de Broglie waves. invariance for other laws. by Kenneth Krane. Concepts of Modern Physics. Wave-particle duality. Thevenin’s Theorem and Norton’s Theorem. Thomson (2005). Michelson-Morley experiment. 3rd ed. Old atomic models. Relativistic kinematics and dynamics. X-rays. Bohr’s Correspondence Principle. John Wiley & Sons (1995) 3. invariance of Newton’s dynamics. Planck’s law. Einstein formula. Large signal amplifiers. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Rutherford model. Galilean transformation.. input characteristics and output characteristics. Bipolar junction transistors and Field effect transistors. Introduction to modern ideas in Physics: Blackbody radiation. 2. students are able to: 1. Lorentz transformation. Alternating current circuits. Books: 1. amplification. McGraw- Hill (2002). Operational amplifiers and their applications. Compton effect.

J. Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory ( 8th ed. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. principles and theory. ) McGraw-Hill ( Terjemahan oleh Chong Chon Sing. display the mature learning skills to study more advanced courses in electronic plus relating it for application in the industry Ref. show the ability to design simple electronic circuits with the basic electronic knowledge to solve an operation or problem 3. ) John Wiley & Sons ( 1992 ) 2. ) Prentice-Hall ( 2002) 4. Basic Electronics for Scientists ( 5th ed ) McGraw-Hill (1990) 3. use the basic concepts of Physics during laboratory session 2. students are able to: 1. Penerbit USM. students are able to: 1.Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Smith R. Books: 1. discuss the experimental data 4. and apply them to solve electronic circuits 2. 1990 ) ZCT 191/2 Physics Practicals I Consist of a selection of experiments. Boylestad R. explain the characteristics and operation of components and devices. Elektronik Asas untuk Ahli Sains ( 4th ed. & Dorf R. Brophy J.C. & Nashelsky L. assemble various equipments in the Physics laboratory 3. write a laboratory formal report based on the proposed format 117 .J.L. Brophy J.J. Circuits Devices and Systems ( 5th ed.

Warren H. 3. 2. 1983. St. 2005 Physics Laboratory Experiments. 1978 Safety and Laboratory Practice. Measureable quantities. Probability. Wilson. Schrödinger equation. Charles A. St. students are able to: 1. Newman-Hemisphere. Jerry D. Houghton Mifflin. UK. Jerry D. Green. discuss the experimental data 4. Newman-Hemisphere. 4. John G. Houghton Mifflin. Green. Books: 1. Ellis. Boston. Radiation Safety for Laboratory Technicians. Wave functions.Ref. 2. use the basic concepts of Physics during laboratory session 2. Ellis. Isenberg C. ZCT 205/3 Quantum Mechanics Development of Quantum Mechanics: Schrödinger picture and Heisenberg picture. assemble various equipments in the Physics laboratory 3. 1985 Physics Experiments and Projects for Students. ZCT 192/2 Physics Practicals II Consist of a selection of experiments. 1985 Physics Experiments and Projects for Students. Books: 1. UK. Louis. 2005 Physics Laboratory Experiments. London.. 4. Macmillan. Boston. Louis.. John G. 3. Kelsey. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 191/2 Physics Practicals I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. 1978 Safety and Laboratory Practice. 1983. Isenberg C. Operators 118 . London. Macmillan. write a laboratory formal report based on the proposed format Ref. Charles A. Radiation Safety for Laboratory Technicians. Wilson. Warren H. Kelsey.

flip-flop SR. Arithmetic’s unit: adder 119 . N. 2002 3. JK. Kementerian Pendidikan Malaysia. Beiser. Anderson. encoder.L. Elmer E. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. and logic circuit analysis. pure and mixed states in quantum mechanics and how quantum mechanics can be used to describe entity in a box. Sequential logic: different types of transform and counters. John Wiley. Saunders Co. Terjemahan BM oleh Abdul Latiff Awang.B. Barrier penetration. Design of combinational logic circuits. JIF 414 – Modul 1 dan Modul 2 Pengenalan Ilmu Kuantum Mekanik. Basic logic. students are able to: 1. 2001 2. Boolean algebra. hexadecimal. 1986. harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom Ref. barrier penetration. 5. arithmetic of binary. and 2’s complement numbers. Addison Wesley. Hydrogen atom. Clocked flip-flops. eigenvalue equation. Stationary state. 1992. show an understanding of the basic concepts of non-relativistic quantum mechanics through wave approach 2. Books: 1. Combinational logic elements: basic flip-flop. and T. solve moderate quantum mechanics problems mathematically 3. Harmonic oscillator. Sequential timing. Particle in a box. Zettili. de Morgan theorem. 2002 Edition (Paperback). decoder. and demiltiplexer. Terbitan Pertama PPLK. Kuala Lumpur. Introductory Quantum Mechanics. multiplexer. ZCT 206/3 Electronics II Numbers and code system. demonstrate an understanding of the significance of operators. don’t care state. Karnaugh map. McGraw-Hill.and expectation values. Penerbitan Universiti Sains Malaysia dan Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. W. Unit Percetakan Pusat Universiti Sains Malaysia. Yap Ber Chin dan Kang Chin Seng. synchronous and asynchronous counters and their applications. Quantum Mechanics: Concepts and Applications. step potential. Concepts of Modern Physics. Modern Physics and Quantum Mechanics. A. Central field problem. 4. Liboff R. minimization. Eigen function and Eigen value. D.

counter shift register 3. and timing diagram. Printice Hall. truth table. Probability concepts and counting of states. students are able to: 1. Karnaugh map. Extension from exited table. conducting electrons in solids. 2003.). Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 106/3 Electronics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. This course exposes students to practical experiences on various experiments to enhance theories such as: Experiments on logic gates. circuit design from truth table and timing diagram. Definition of absolute temperature and entropy. Canonical Ensemble. Marcovitz Introduction to Logic Design. ZCT 207/2 Statistical Mechanics Characteristics of macroscopic and microscopic systems. memory decoding. timer. ROM. solve problems related to fundamental digital electronics Ref. Books: 1. Applications of quantum statistics: specific heat of solids. 2. Thomas L. RAM. Design of sequential logic systems: state diagram. Microcanonical Ensemble. Fermi-Dirac statistics. and basic architecture of microprocessor system. Bose-Einstein statistics. Ed. Postulate of equal a priori probabilities. International Edition. arithmetic unit. 2002. flip-flop. explain the basic concepts of fundamental digital electronics 2. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 212/2 Thermodynamics Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. black body radiation. explain and analyze the logic circuit.and substracter. McGraw-Hill. demonstrate the understanding of basic statistical physics methodology in describing the behavior of macroscopic physical systems 120 . International Edition. Alan B. Statistics of ideal quantum gases. design of registers and counters. combinational logic functions flip-flop. students are able to: 1. Examples of logic circuit applications: memory system. Flyod Digital Fundamentals (8th.

). A Modern Course in Statistical Physics (2nd Ed. list the procedural knowledge to arrive at a solution for different simple systems 4. 2.E.). differential. Books: 1. students are able to: 1. Reichl L. Differentiation of complex functions. Laurent series. John Wiley. Differential Equations: Ordinary linear differential equations of first order and methods of solutions. and Sanchez M..). integration and contour integration 2. 1988. display the skills of solving any normal first order and linear second order differential equations 121 . Zeroes and singularities.. Cauchy integral formula. Statistical Physics (2nd Ed. Ordinary linear differential equations of second order – homogeneons and non-homogeneous equations and methods of solution. power series of analytic functions. analyze any complex integration in physics problems using suitable techniques discussed in lectures 3.2. Mandl. 1999. singular points. explain macroscopic thermodynamical phenomena in proper and clear statistical mechanics terms 3. Prerequisite: (S) MAA 101/4 Calculus or (S) ZCA 110/4 Calculus and Linear Algebra Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. analytic functions. Taylor series. demonstrate mathematical know-how necessary to solve problems as in (3) above Text Books: 1. Cauchy-Riemann conditions. Differential Equations: Series solution – power series and Frobenius methods. Residue theorem. John Wiley. F. Oxford Science Publications. Bowley R. 1998. Complex Integration: Cauchy integral theorem. Introductory Statistical Mechanics (2nd Ed. perform complex number arithmetic. ZCT 210/4 Complex Analysis and Differential Equations Complex Analysis: Funtions of a complex variable – complex functions. Ref.

and Weber H. divergence and Green’s theorems 122 . John Wiley. Laplacean. Mathematical Methods for Physicists (4th. definitions. surface and volume integrals. 1999.J. wave equation for E and H in electricity and magnetism. G. scalar and vector fields. velocity and acceleration. R. divergence and curl of a vector. Gradient.). cylindrical. E. 1996. Cartesian. Arfken. 3. 2.B. Application in Physics. Books: 1. Nagle. show a sound knowledge and understanding of differentiation and line.. addditon. divergence and curl operator as well as Stokes’s. D’Alembertian. Differentiation and integration. Consecutive differentiation. scalar potential. Stokes Theorem. reproduce the basic vector concepts and further understand main operations of vector calculus and geometric quantities in curvilinear coordinates and its usage in other subjects related to vector 2. surface and volume integrals. transformation. position. potential theory. Application in Physics.B. 2000. John Wiley. geometric representation. dot products and cross products of vectors. Mathematical Methods in Physical Science (2nd Ed. Vector integration. Gauss Theorem. and Saff E. line. algebraic representation.L. ZCT 211/2 Vector Analysis Vector algebra. Ed. Addison-Wiley Publishing Company. differentiation with respect to time. Academic Press.). Physical examples. vector potential. Boas M. Text Book: 1. Vector calculus. scalar differentiation. Kreyszig. students are able to: 1. Advanced Engineering Mathematics (8th Ed.). Physical examples. unit vectors. ~ ~ Prerequisite: (S) MAA 101/4 Calculus or (S) ZCA 110/4 Calculus and Linear Algebra Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Coordinate Systems. Ref. 1983. .. spherical. Fundamentals of Differential Egns of Boundary Value Problems. subtraction of vectors. perform calculation using gradient. curvilinear systems.K.

physics and mathematics Ref.. heat. Advanced Engineering Mathematics (7th Ed. work. Inc.). Prerequisite: (S) ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. ideal gas. entropy.B. Arfken.).W. John Wiley 1993. 1981. Zemansky. McGraw-Hill. ZCT 212/2 Thermodynamics Simple thermodynamic systems.R. Addison Wesley Longman. R. T-S diagram and thermodynamic relationships. Spiegel. Academic Press. Books: 1. McGraw-Hill. 2. Combination of first and second laws. internal energy. result from second law.D. Greenberg. Prentice Hall. equation of state. Books: 1. results of first law. E. Heat & Thermodynamics. M. 1997.. 3. An Introduction to Thermal Physics. Second law of thermodynamics. relate the vector framework learned for the understanding and study of the advanced engineering. G. Ed. list the procedural knowledge to arrive at a solution for different problem situations 4. D. M. M. Kreyszig. 123 .H. Theory and Problems of Vector Analysis and an Introduction to Tensor Analysis. Carnot cycle and heat engine. explain the principles of thermodynamics and show how they apply to an arbitrary system 2. irreversible process. Advanced Engineering Mathematics. & Dittman. 1988. 2.Clapeyron equation and Tds equation. Clausius.J.V. Maxwell equation.3. Schroeder. explain thermodynamics phenomena in proper and clear scientific terms 3. 4. relate and demonstrate mathematical skills necessary to solve problems as in (3) above Ref. first law. and Weber H. 2000. Mathematical Methods for Physicists (4th. 1999. students are able to: 1.

Kinetic Theory and Statistical Thermodynamics. Carter.. Dispersion theory. G. Chand & Company Ltd. Fresnel diffraction for circular aperture. Hecht. Avadhanulu.. Waves and Optics) Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Fresnel diffraction for straight edges and rectangular aperture. 1993 2. 2001. . Addison-Wesley.). Prentica Hall. Zone plates. Bessel. optical activity. Special functions/equations: Gamma. Prerequisite: (P) ZCT 103/3 Physics III (Vibration. Diffraction gratings and their characteristics. Reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves at boundaries. Subrahmanyam. Fraunhofer diffraction of a single slit. 4. dispersion and diffraction of light 3. M. Optical activity. Diffraction.).. students are able to: 1. Addison-Wesley. A textbook of Optics. Pedrotti. ZCT 213/2 Optic Polarization. optical activity. & Salinger.H. A.L. 1986. Brij Lal. explain the basic concepts related to wave optics 2. Books: 1. E. F. explain the principles of polarization. Prentice Hall. solve problems related to polarized light.S. Optics (4th. Legendre and Associated Legendere. Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics. Plane and circular polarization.. Sears. N. Kerr effect and Faraday effect. Pedrotti.. Fresnel-Kirchhoff equations.. dispersion and diffraction of light Ref. F. Thermodynamics. Ed.W.N. 3. applications in physical problems. 3. square and circular aperture. S. 124 . Introduction to Optics (2nd Ed. Laplace transform: general properties. 2006 ZCT 218/3 Mathematical Methods Integral transforms: general properties. L. Cornu spiral and Fresnel Integrals. 2001. Fourier transform: general properties.L. applications in physical problems.

G. Arfken.) John Wiley. Mathematical Methods for Physicists (3rd Ed. identify the Bessel. properties. Laplace equation – solution by separation of variables. Fourier and Laplace transforms 2. solve heat. demonstrate experimental and analytical skills 2. students are able to: 1. explain the data and discuss the result 3. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 192/2 Physics Practicals II Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. 2. Wave equation. 2003.).Fourier Analysis: expansion of functions in terms of sine and cosine. E. show the understanding of the two integral transforms i. Advanced Engineering Mathematics (9th Ed. Books: 1. Legendre and associated Legendre functions as the solutions of the Bessel. 2000. initiate new ideas through independent learning 125 .e. 5th edition. physical examples. 3. students are able to: 1. O’Neil. including expressing the solution in terms of Fourier series Ref. wave and Laplace equations (finite case only) using the separation of variables technique. respectively 3. 2006. Advanced Engineering Mathematics. Peter V. Kreyszig. Academic Press. Brooks/Cole. Partial differential equations: Sturm – Lionrille boundary value problems. Heat equation. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 210/4 Complex Analysis and Differential Equations (S) ZCT 211E/2 Vector Analysis Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. ZCT 293/2 Physics Practicals III Consist of a selection of experiments. Legendre and associated Legendre equations.

. 1999. explain the basic concepts involving electricity and magnetism 2. Curl of E. Electric fields. Lorrain.J. Magnetic potential vector. Magnetic fields. Magnetic materials.ZCT 304 /3 Electricity and Magnetism Revision of vector analysis. identify suitable mathematical methods for different configurations 3. Electrostatics field in dielectric medium. The Gauss’ law for dielectric. P. The Maxwell’s equations.R. basic theorems. Gradient of E and electrical potential. Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (2nd Ed. 2003. J. Polarization of electric fields. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in material medium. V. Reitz. 1992 2. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in free space. Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.. The Poynting theorem. Magnetic dipoles. Polarization. Ref. Divergence of E. Electric susceptibility and dielectric constant.). Prentice Hall. Electromagnetic boundary conditions. The Ampere’s circuit law. W. The Coulomb Law. Freeman Co. Electrical boundary conditions. A.H. analyze and solve advanced problems related to electricity and magnetism Text Books: 1. E. Curl of B. The Bio-Savart’s law. Prerequisite: (S) ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) (S) ZCT 210/4 Complex Analysis and Differential Equations (S) ZCT 211/2 Vector Analysis Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Introduction to Electrodynamics. Electrical dipoles. and Dirac-delta function. New Jersey U. Griffith. David J..A. Divergence of B. vector calculus. The Faraday’s induction laws. & Christy R. curvilinear coordinates. The Gauss’Law. Foundations of Electromagnetic Theory (4th Ed. Electrical potential energy for dielectric medium.S.). Milford. Books: 1. Displacement vectors. The Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations. 126 .W. Third Edition. students are able to: 1. Electromagnetic induction. F.

students are able to: 1. Solid State Physics. Brillion zone. holes. Empty lattice approximation. Blakemore. Rinehart and Winston. Omar. Kronig-Penney model. Ashcroft. Hall effect. dispersion curves for phonons. C. 2. differentiate the crystal structures of various solids 2. Holt.S. and Merimim. Semiconductor – intrinsic and extrinsic. exciton. effective mass. 1993. Addison Wesley. John Wiley & Sons.W. Elementary Solid State Physics. 127 . free electron theory of metals. carrier density. 2005. display an understanding how the properties of a crystal are related to its structure 3. crystal diffraction. N. Introduction to Solid State Physics (8th Ed. lattice vibrations. Optical Properties: reflection. heat capacity of electron gas. impurity conductivity. Prerequisite: (C) ZCT 207/2 Statistical Mechanics Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. 2.A. 3. Cambridge University Press. band theory of solids. 1987. explain problems that are related to crystals Text Books: 1. electrical conductivity. M. specific heat models of Debye and Einstein.ZCT 307/3 Solid State Physics I Crystal structure types. Solid State Physics. N. Sohail A. J. D. Khan Essentials of Solid State Physics (Under process) Ref. Books: 1. reciprocal lattice. absorption and transmission processes.). photoconductivity. Kittel.

SYNOPSES OF CORE COURSES – APPLIED PHYSICS ZAT 281/4 Introduction to Microprocessors Design of microcomputer systems: history and development. explore and manipulate the 68000 microprocessor system 3. students are able to: 1. UART/DUART. Microprocessor instructions. decoder. Functions of CPU: ALU. buffer. and instructions flow in CPU. The 68000 Microprocessor Hardware & Software Principles & Applications. 3. and temperature sensor. 1995. 1998. and organization. The 68000 Microprocesor. address data and control registers. Data transfer and timing diagrams. write and interpret assembly language programming 4. Prequisite: (P) ZCT 206/3 Electronics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. correlate the 68000 microprocessor system with other systems Ref. architecture. sequential design. Alan Clements. program counter. input and output port ADC. DAC. ADC. Antonakos. 128 . and assembly language programming. Books: 1. DAC. I. instruction and machine cycles. Assemblers and cross assemblers. Series and parallel ports: RS232. Prentice Hall. explain and interpret the architecture of microprocessor system 2. Interrupts: software and hardware. delay subroutine. Wiley. 2004. Introduction to current microprocessor systems. Advanced Microprocessor Interfacing & the 68000 Peripherals & Systems. IR sensor. James L. Prentice-Hall. Controller: DC motor. and other peripheral devices. Mackenzie. 2. Signal generation and transmittance via optical fibres. Fifth Edition. PIT.. S. motor speed. Design of microprocessor systems: internal bus structure. Seven segments or LCD display interface. Laboratory: Data Input and output. instructions register. Interface: memory.

differential.ZAT 283/3 Instrumentation Process Control – systems. describe the key elements of instrumentation control process system that include measurement. solve accuracy problems relating to transducer calibration and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various type of transducer Ref. stepper motors. integrator. comparator. hysteresis & statistics Sensors & Transducers – types of sensors. Mechatronics: Electronic Control Systems in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (4th Ed. England.). thermal. summing.. mechanical. modulation Actuation Power Systems – pneumatic. inductive. magnetic. gears. symbols. measurements. thermocouples. control and actuation 2. conversion. Prentice Hall. Englewood Cliffs. comparison. inverting. students are able to: 1. Harlow. resistive. Analog Signal Conditioning – Operational Amplifiers. Bolton. 2008. valves. Analog – Digital Signals – theory. torque-speed curve. 2006. explain the design and operation of various types of transducers. 129 . follower. sensor response. DC motors. C.J. resolution. 2. sequencing. capacitive.). CMMR. N. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 293/2 Physics Practicals III (C) ZCT 206/3 Electronics II Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. electrical. piezoelectric. optical. Johnson. Prentice-Hall. operational amplifiers and actuators. hydraulic. Process Control Instrumentation Technology (8th Ed. noninverting. Book: 1. and select the best device for a certain function relating to control process system 3. etc. accuracy.D. W. mechanical.

semiconductor-metal contact. tunnel diod. preparation and characterization of wafer.M. impurity level. oxidation and lithography process. Semiconductor Devices. Zambuto. density of states. variator. Characterization of junction. p-n junction devices inclusive of Zener diode. Books: 1. explain. track and understand the design and integration of semiconductor devices 3. Streetman. Metallization. B. intrinsic semiconductor. 1989. ZAT 387/4 Semiconductor Fabrication Processes Growth of semiconductor ingot. solar cell and semiconductor laser. Electrons and holes conduction. discuss and evaluate the characteristics of semiconductor devices Ref. Si and III-IV compound. recombination process. Shockly diode and phototransistor. carrier concentration. Physics and Technology. Sze.G. 2007. M. Field effect transistor inclusive of junction FET and metal oxide semiconductor FET (MOSFET). Prerequisite: (S) ZAT 386/4 Physics of Semiconductor Devices 130 . 2001. minority carrier life time. bonding and packaging. 3. varactor. John Wiley & Sons. differentiate and relate the theory and properties of semiconductor 2. Thin film techniques. Semiconductor Devices. example junction depth. etc. McGraw-Hill. impurity motion. S. explain.ZAT 386/4 Physics of Semiconductor Devices Energy band. explain. Solid State Electronic Devices. impurities. students are able to: 1. semiconductor surface. identify. Ge. semiconductor insulator contact. extrinsic semiconductor. Fermi level. single junction transistor. Diffusion of dopant and creation of junction. 2. diffusion length. silicon controlled switch (SCS). integrated circuit development.6e Prentice- Hall. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 106/4 Electronics I (C) ZCT 307/3 Solid State Physics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Hall effect.

P. One dimensional band structure. 1986. Growth of heterostructures. R. Low dimensional systems. Band engineering. Quantum wells and barriers. 2004. 2002. R. Conduction band characteristics. Metal-Semiconductor Interface Introduction. Stressed layers. Gise.C. Band structure in two dimensions. Semiconductor crystal structure. S. Prentice Hall. Energy band gap.S. Ohmic contact. students are able to: 1. fabricate a device and explain its parameters. starting from bare silicon wafers. Parabolic well. Motions of an electron in a band structure. Electron in Quantum Structures Square well with infinite depth. all processing steps from beginning to end and wafer characterization during the process 3. Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) structures. Schottky barrier. Jaeger. ZAT 389/3 Low Dimensional Semiconductor Structures Basic Introduction. G. describe and relate all processes used in semiconductor wafer and device fabrication to the physics concepts of these processes 2. 2.Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Alloy semiconductors band structure. Doped heterostructures. Square well with finite depth. Heterostructures General characteristics of heterostructures. Point defects in semiconductor crystals. Fundamentals of Semiconductor Fabrication. John Wiley & Sons. Introduction to Microelectronic Fabrication. 3.. Inc. 131 . demonstrate the completed devices and create a report based on results obtained 4.. & Sze. Prentice Hall. Books: 1. Quantum wells in heterostructures.M. & Blanchard.. understand and participate in the role rotation as group leader and group member in laboratory work Ref. Triangular well. Confinement in lower dimensions. Modern Semiconductor Fabrication Technology. May.

Prerequisite : (S)ZCT 307/3 Solid State Physics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course.Optical Properties of Quantum Wells Golden Rule.. The Physics of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors: An Introduction. Adam Hilger (1989).R. use Fermi’s Golden Rule to explain optical absorption for quantum wells of various shapes 5. John Wiley and Sons (1991). Jarods. Mitin. Oxford Science Publication (1990). and Stroscio. Optoelectronic Semiconductor Devices. Cambridge University Press (1998). Quantum Heterostructures. Optical absorption. Books: 1. 4.V.A. M. H. Physics and Applications of Semiconductor Microstructures.. 3.. Cambridge University Press (1999)..E. Transition between bands in a quantum well. J.. and Hall. D.R. appreciate the role of electron trapping in creating electrons with two dimensional behaviour 4. Hook. Solid State Physics. students are able to: 1. 5.A. explain. Absorption between bands. Kochelap. solve and identify simple quantum well problems and conclude the results for different wells 3. C. Prentice Hall (1994). Absorption in a quantum well. J.. Microelectronics Materials.H. Davies. 2. Grovenor. 132 . 6. V.M. differentiate and relate the properties of semiconductor heterostructures and their related low dimensional systems 2. V. explain optical properties of quantum wells related to different optical devices Ref. Wood. Transition between subbands in a quantum well.. M.

describe crystalline planes using Miller indices and compute density 133 . steel and ferrous alloys. draw unit cells for crystal structures.SYNOPSES OF ELECTIVE COURSES – APPLIED PHYSICS ZAT 394/6 Applied Physics Project and Seminar (two semesters) A course which involves projects and seminars. define the properties. present and defend project findings ZAE 282/3 Materials Science Introduction. students are able to: 1. phase transformations. deformation of materials. diffusion. polymers. Prerequisite: (P) ZCT 293/2 Physics Practicals III Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Properties: Physical properties of materials. Structure: Crystal structure and imperfections. participate and report knowledge derived from scientific seminars and industrial visits 4. Materials: Iron. phase diagrams. strengthening mechanisms and microstructures. non-ferrous metals and alloys. corrosion and oxidation. Prerequisite: - Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. structures and uses of engineering materials and also evaluate the impact of material selection. ceramics. students are able to: 1. material performance of a structure or mechanism due to the relationship between macroscopic properties and microscopic causes 2. utilise theories for practical work 2. composites. The use of computers would be encouraged where possible. report research results through scientific writing 3.

A. describe types of point defects and dislocation defects in crystalline solids and able to distinguish between steady state and non-steady state diffusion in solids and apply Fick’s laws to solve simple diffusion problems 4.A. explain how astronomical measurements are carried out and perform simple calculations Ref. Ostlie. and interpret a stress-strain diagram Ref. John Wiley & Sons. Elements of Materials Science and Engineering (6th Ed.R & Phule. Observation and measurement system.. Prerequisite: (S) ZGE 277/4 Structure of the Universe Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Van Vlack. D. Reckoning time.D. Thomson. W.H. students are able to: 1. P. Clarke. Solving Kepler’s Equation Over Three Centuries (1998) Colwell. Jr. Celestial coordinate system. Spherical trigonometry. 2006. J. Celestial sphere. Callister. A Introduction to Modern Astrophysics (1996)..). Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. ZAE 376/4 Astronomy Principles and Practices The universe at a glance. 134 . explain the principles of measurements in astronomy 2.. Reading MA. Astronomy : Principles and Practices (2003) Roy. 3. Textbook on Spherical Astronomy (1977). demonstrate and explain a few main astronomical instruments 3. D.M. Willmann – Bell. Carroll. A. 2. W. Calendrical systems. Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction (6th Ed.). L. 4. 3. Celestial mechanics. 2003. D. The Science and Engineering of Materials (5th Ed. Askeland. Astrometry.E. Fundamentals of celestial Mechanics (1988) Danby. 1989. 2. P. W.3.M..P. Willmann – Bell 5.. Smart. handle. Radiation laws. B. define engineering stress and strain.). Books: 1. Books: 1.

John Hawkes. Laser output. determination of structural from rotational constant. Books: 1. Holography and applications. millimeter waves and microwave spectra. 1997 4. Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with atoms and molecules: Electromagnetic radiation.al. nonsymmetric rotor molecules. Raman rotational spectroscopy. Stimulated emission. Ready. Addison-Wesley. infrared rotation. absorption. Industrial uses of lasers. et. Oscillator. 135 .. Industrial Applications of Lasers. LIDAR and pollution control. Principles of Lasers. 3. emission and bandwidth. spherical rotor. general equipments for an absorption experiment. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Several common units in spectroscopy. Lasers: Theory and Practice. explain the properties of laser beam and its uses for different applications and infer the impact of laser selection and laser performance due to the quality and design of the resonator 2. Callen & Rhodes. explain the nature of light. Symmetry of molecules: point symmetry and dipole moment. 1995. draw the structure of optical cavity and the laser action processing 3.ZAE 384/4 Laser and Its Applications Introduction to properties of lasers. Laser expositions. Orazio Svelto (Editor) David C Hanna (Translator). Laser pumping. An Introduction to Lasers and Their Applications. Optical communications Laser induced fluorescence. O’shea. students are able to: 1. mechanism of emission. General instrumentation: Electromagnetic spectrum. John F. Basic principle of laser. population density as well as the quantum of laser emission Ref. ZAE 385/4 Applied Spectroscopy Introduction. Medical applications. Rotational spectroscopy: linear. equipments for scattering experiment. components for absorption experiment. Laser classifications and safety. Molecule symmetry: symmetrical point and dielectric moment. Modifying laser output. describe the types of lasers according to the active medium and appreciate the requirements for safety 4. 1978. symmetry of rotor. 1998. 2.

J. relate and solve simple spectral patterns 3. appreciate. Electromagnetic methods (examples: magnetic-particle. spot tests. Hollas. students are able to: 1. electron probe. Thickness measurements. Jerry Workman Jr. Ultrasonics. EDX. Prerequisite: (S) ZAT 283/3 Instrumentation Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. activation analysis. Other techniques: e. select. use and interpret NDT methods for inspection and evaluation of engineering materials 2. differentiate and evaluate different spectra Ref. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics) Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Liquid penetrant inspection. ZAE 388/4 Non-Destructive Testing Introduction. explain. interpretation of spectra. 2004. Industrial radiography (example: X-ray radiography). X-ray photoelectron for a solid. Pressure and leak testing. surface analysis. Modern Spectroscopy. Books: 1.K. USA. Wiley and Sons. differentiate and relate the theories of spectroscopy 2. Applied Spectroscopy: A Compact Reference for Practitioners. Auger electron spectroscopy. identify. 1998. electric-particle and eddy current methods). 2. diatomic and polyatomic molecules spectroscopy. J. atomic spectroscopy. sulphur printing. electrographic printing.Electronic spectroscopy. spectro-chemical analysis. present detailed information about NDT methods and be able to decide. Academic Press. Thermal methods. X-ray photoelectron for a gas. students are able to: 1. define the calibration standards. Photoelectron spectroscopy: experimental methods. Chichester U. X-ray ransformer spectroscopy. Dynamic testing.g. explain scope and limitation of NDT methods and select appropriate equipment for a given problem specifications 136 . Visual testing.M. spark testing. and Art W Springsteen (editors).

use computer software to solve fairly complex physics problems 4. London. Solving ordinary differential equations numerically. Publisher: Princeton University Press. solve problems related to x-ray.J. Gordon & Breach. Non-destructive Testing (2nd Ed. 1991. Small projects. Numerical integration. 4. use computer software to visualise physics formulae 3. McGonnagle. A First Course in Scientific Computing: Symbolic. Published:07/21/2005. New York. Monte Carlo applications. ISBN-13: 9780131469907. ultrasonics. New York. Graphic. and interpret and report the results obtained ( ransformer analysis) Ref. ISBN-10: 0691121834. Published: April 11. Hisao Nakanishi. 3. Solving eigen value problem numerically. 2006) 3. J. Java. Publisher: Addison-Wesley. 2. Kandau. Rubin H. Eddy current methods of NDT. Computional Physics : Problem Solving with Computers by Rubin H. Visualizing of data.3. E. 1975 ZCE 111/4 Computational Physics Root finding and optimization. Introduction to Electromagnetic Non-destructive Methods.). and Cristian C. Computational Physics. and Fortran90. Mathematica. Cambridge University Press. 2005. 2. Arnold. Non-destructive Testing (2nd Ed. Landau. Books: 1. Books: 1. and Numeric Modeling Using Maple. Páez. Halmshaw. R. students are able to: 2. Manuel J. 137 . write codes to solve numerical problems Ref. 2/E. Wiley-Interscience. 1971. Giordano. by Tao Pang. 2 edition (February 13. Finite difference method. ISBN-13: 9780691121833. At the end of the course. ISBN-10: 0131469908. Matrix operation and manipulation. Fitting data to a function. Nicholas J. An Introduction to Computational Physics. show proficiency in programming and using mathematical packages 2.).

Sunlight concentration. Carl W. Biomass as fuel. Hagen. Principles of solar cell operation. identify the alternative sources of renewable energy and explain the need for renewable energy 2. . Biomass Conversion and Technology. Introduction to geothermal power. Photovoltaic power economy. Solar cells array. Types of geothermal source. Array protection and failure sensor. 1982. Government Institutes. Charles Y. Energy from solar. How does wind machine work. explain and discuss about energy efficiency from renewable energy. Types of biomass. alcohol and bio-oil.W.ZCE 341/4 Energy Studies Renewable energy and types of renewable energy. Production of wind power. Material and response of silicon solar cell. 2000. John Wiley. Understanding wind power. Twidell J. Sources of renewable energy. 4. Hall. 2. Analyse and solve problems related to renewable energy Ref. An Introduction to Solar Energy for Scientists and Engineers. Biomass A An Alternative Fuel. Wereko-Brobby and Essel B. electricity generation from geothermal power. 5. Introduction to bioenergy. Power conditioning. Martin A.. Production evolution and solar energy availability. students are able to: 1. 3. John Woleh & Sons. Main product of each conversion process: heat. explain the main processes for power generation and be able to use relevant and clear scientific terms 4. Spon Press. Reading.S. Types of solar power technology. Books: 1.). gasification. 1981. bio-gas. Weider. Renewable Energy Resources. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 106/3 Electronics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Energy storage and connection to grid. 2000.Green.. Advantage and disadvantage of hydro power . Solar Cells-Operating Principles Technology. fermentation and pyrolysis. Understanding hydro power. Prentice Hall. Conversion proses: direct combustion. 138 . How does hydro power work. 1996.

R. CRC Press. Buerger.A.. generation and properties of X-ray. London.J. University of York. D. New York.). L. X-ray diffraction. M. Books: 1. sketch. apply and analyse the X-ray fluoroscence and the powder methods 4. Structure Determination by X- ray Crystallography. M. X-ray micro-analysis with electron microscope. label and elaborate X-ray analysis instruments 5. Practical X-Ray Spectrometry (2nd Ed. R. R.C. 1978. Gould.. M. detectors. powder methods and single crystal methods. Azaroff. students are able to: 1. 1970. relate how the structure of a molecule is derived through the x-ray crystallography method 2. An Introduction to X-ray Crystallography. Plenum Press. spectrometer EDX. interpretation and quantitative analysis. Ladd. 139 . 2. Note: Exposure to equipment and practical in the X-ray laboratory Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 307/3 Solid State Physics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. L. explain and justify the role of each X-ray analysis method Ref. Palmer.W. 1997.V.. 4. Cambridge. Woolfson.. Jenkins. The Powder Method in X-Ray Crystallography. Elementary Crystallography: An Introduction to the Fundamental Geometrical Features of Crystals. X-ray fluorescence. McGraw-Hill. R.D. 3.F. 1995.ZCE 351/3 X-ray Analysis Physics of X-ray. Jenkins.. 1958.. & Vries. 5. Mass.. MIT Press. 6. 1993. Gedcke. Quantitative X-Ray Spectrometry. Macmillan. M.

Problem solving and program design. “C++ Programming: From Problem Analysis To Program Design”. 140 . selection and repetition. “Understanding Programming: An Introduction Using C++”. pointers) which add values to the computer programs Ref. (2002). Classes and object oriented programming. Cannon Scott (2001). (2006) “A First Book of C++: From Here to There”. apply appropriate programming techniques/structures and strategies in transforming the description of a problem into executable computer codes 3. understand fundamental computer programming concepts and algorithm development in problem-solving 2. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. solve problems in mathematics and scientific applications using a computer programming language 4. Pointers. Bronson Gary J. File processing. Course Technology. Program control structures: sequence.S.SYNOPSES OF ELECTIVE COURSES – NON BASIC APPLIED PHYSICS MAT 181/4 Programming for Science Applications Introduction to basic computer concepts: computer hardware and software. 3. 3rd edition. 2. students are able to: 1. Books: 1. Introduction to C++ language: writing simple C++ programs but comprehensive. Output formatting. Modular programming: functions. Malik D. A brief introduction to programming concepts. Strings. Thomson Learning. files manipulation. Advanced data types: arrays. Enumerations and structures. Basic C++ operators. Thomson Learning. Course Technology. Australia. develop programs using advanced programming structures (modular programming. 2nd edition. Strategies in solving complex problems. Brooks Cole.

Prentice Hall. Judson. S. mountain ranges. Internal structure of the earth from seismology. Physical Geology. valleys. Origin of the earth. Basic stratigraphy: unconformities. formation and classification of sedimentary.. Marshak. & Woodford. peneplanation.O. facies. faulting. Crustal and isostatic structure of continental margins. S. & Richardson. S. tectonic plate and rocks deformation 3. R. topography of folded and faulted structures. Prinsip-prinsip Geologi. Introduction to principles of isostasy. plateau uplifts (hot spots). Norton. Geological time scale. J. composition and structure of minerals. Rock-forming minerals. geological correlation. igneous and metamorphic rocks. Wicander. Earth. R. passive margins. soil profile. A. textures. Rock deformation: folding.SYNOPSES OF CORE COURSES – GEOPHYSICS ZGT 161/3 Geology I Introduction to geology. explain the concept. S. generalize the basic earth origin and internal structure 2. Jilid 1 dan 2. ZGT 162/3 Geology II External geological processes: mechanical and chemical weathering. justify the concept of geological time scale and describe the fossil generation Ref. Introduction to continental drift. diastems. joints. 141 . erosion and deposition by streams. plate tectonics. J.. 2007. Prerequisite: (C) ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics) Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. (6th Book: Edition) Thomson Brooks/Cole. Waters. 3. Gilluly. sea-floor spreading. Forms of igneous bodies. 2. characteristics and type of minerals and rocks 4. A. M. 1. Monroe. 1989. & Hazlett. 4. Essentials of Geology. 2004. extensional sedimentary basins (McKenzie mechanism). sea and wind. Fossils. 1995. DBP. oceanic ridges. students are able to: 1. subduction zones and active margins. structures. drainage patterns.C. explain the theory of continental drift. Composition. Basic mineralogy: properties. Geomorphology: landforms. basic principles and concepts.

4. Gilluly. J. (6th Edition) Thomson Brooks/Cole. Geology of Malaysia: general. hydrology and petroleum geology 4. 2004. 1995. & Hazlett. Marshak. sedimentary. hydrothermal. students are able to: 1. identify the mineral type and their properties 2. J. & Woodford. S. DBP. Essentials of Geology. Wicander. Physical Geology. S. 2007. R. Ore deposits: magmatic differentiation. Waters. aquifers. structural and economic geology. Judson. 3. A. Jilid 1 dan 2. supergene. lateritic. ZGT 190/2 Geology Practical Experiments in geology.Hydrology: Darcy’s law. students are able to: 1. artesian wells. identify the rock type and their features 3. Prinsip-prinsip Geologi. Monroe. explain the concept of geomorphology. S. A. Petroleum geology: formation and migration of petroleum. R. sketch and justify the geological maps 142 . explain the weathering concept and describe the soil development 3. generalize the basic earth origin and external structure 2.. alluvial. Norton. 1989.C. & Richardson. Prentice Hall. Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 161/3 Geology I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Earth. Prerequisite: (C) ZGT 161/3 Geology I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. structural and stratigraphic traps. justify the general geology of Malaysia Ref. M. 2. S. groundwater.. Book: 1.O.

E. 3. noise.. P. 2. single and three cell models. S. discrete and fast Fourier transforms. composition. geopotential. meteorological and oceanographic data and special requirements for their analysis. Atmospheric thermodynamics: dry adiabatic lapse rate. 1980. tepigram. Schoenberg. Correlation. Basic filters. 2004. F. select a suitable operator for each application 3. Prerequisite: (C) ZCT 212/2 Thermodynamics 143 .R. Brillinger D. E. greenhouse effect. Digital Signal Analysis. A. Parcel method. humidity. Springer ZGT 265/3 Meteorology I Introduction: Structure. Local storms.A. convolution and deconvolution. Radiation: radiative transfer. Sampling. Time Series Analysis and Applications to Geophysical Systems. layering. global radiation budget. Cloud dynamics. Fourier series. Prentice Hall.. Geophysical Signal Analysis. 1990. Stearns.D. ransformer equation. thermodynamic laws. hydrostatic balance. Robinson. Power spectra. Dirac delta function. Books: 1. Holden-Day. growth of raindrops by condensation. rain and snow. students are able to: 1. Pressure gradient force. adiabatic process.ZGT 264/2 Geophysical Data Analysis Characteristics of geophysical. General circulation. effective temperature. explain the basic concepts related to mathematical operators used in geophysical data analysis 2. Applications in geophysics. density and temperature-height profile of the atmosphere. static energy. Basic statistical analysis. collision. local wind systems. Continuous. Robinson. Thermal stability. Laplace. Clouds: Development of cloud droplets. coalescence. answer problems related to the applications of these operators in signal analysis Ref. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 210/4 – Complex Analysis & Differential Equations Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. pressure. meteorology and oceanography. Hilbert and Hankel transforms.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the basic concepts of meteorology

2. apply and identify the meteorology phenomena such as air temperature and seasons

3. explain and analyse the weather data and the weather maps

Text Book: 1. Edward Aguado, James Burt, Understanding Weather and
Climate, Prentice Hall; 4 edition (May 13, 2006).

2. C. Donald Ahrens, Meteorology Today: An Introduction to
Weather, Climate, and the Environment, Brooks Cole; 8 edition
(February 16, 2006).

3. Roland B. Stull, Meteorology for Scientists and Engineers,
Brooks Cole; 2 edition (December 30, 1999).

Ref. Books: 1. Steven Ackerman, John A. Knox, Meteorology: Understanding
the Atmosphere, Brooks Cole; 2 edition (March 8, 2006).

2. C. Donald Ahrens, Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to
the Atmosphere, Brooks Cole; 5 edition (January 31, 2007)

3. John D. Cox, Weather for Dummies, For Dummies; 1 edition
(October 9, 2000).

4. Frederick K. Lutgens, Edward J. Tarbuck, Dennis Tasa, The
Atmosphere: An Introduction to Meteorology, Prentice Hall; 8th
edition (July 24, 2000).

ZGT 266/3 Solid Earth Geophysics I

Earthquakes, what and where. Properties of elastic wave propagation. Knott’s and
Zoeppritz’s equations. Seismic waves at distances of 0-10o, 10-103o, > 103o. Travel
time tables and the IASPEI 91 velocity model. Recording systems, instrument frequency
properties and seismometry. Strong motion analysis.

Structure and composition of the crust, mantle and core: crust, Mohorovicic discontinuity,
mantle, transition zone and core. Earth rheology: effect of stress, mantle viscosity, shock
wave experiments. Thermal history of the earth: submarine and terrestrial heat flow,
temperature distribution. Geochronology: radioactivity, age determination methods such
as the Rb-Sr, K-Ar, U, Th-Pb, Pb and Carbon-14 methods.

Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 162/3 Geology II

144

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the basic concepts related to the earthquakes and earth interior

2. explain the principles of elastic wave propagation and seismic wave

3. analyse the models related to the plate tectonics movements

Ref. Books: 1. Bullen, K.E. & Bolt, B.A. An Introduction to the Theory of
Seismology (4th Ed.), Cambridge University Press, 1985.

2. Kulhanek, O. Anatomy of Seismograms, Elsevier, 1990.

3. Jacobs, J.A. Deep Interior of the Earth, Chapman & Hall, 1992.

4. Faure, G. Principles of Isotope Geology, Wiley, 1977.

5. Jacobs, J.A. A Textbook on Geonomy, Adam Hilger, 1974.

ZGT 267/3 Solid Earth Geophysics II

The earth and the solar system, Kepler’s laws, sunspots, solar flares, prominences,
photosphere, ransformer i, corona. Fundamentals of potential field theory. Rotation,
gravity field and shape of the earth. Principles of isostasy. Earth tides. Geomagnetism,
secular and diurnal variations, dynamo theory, paleomagnetism, rock magnetism.

Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 162/3 Geology II

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the basic aspects related to the earth and the solar system

2. explain the theory of potential field

3. classify the principles of isostasy and geomagnetism

Ref. Book: 1. Garland, G.D. Introduction to Geophysics (Mantle, Core and
Crust), Saunders, 1981.

2. Lowrie, W. Fundamentals of Geophysics, Cambridge University
Press, 1997.

145

ZGT 268/3 Exploration Geophysics I

Introduction to seismic methods: seismic waves, reflection, refraction, diffraction.
Geophones, hydrophones, energy sources, recording equipment. Position-fixing methods.
Seismic reflection method: data acquisition on land and offshore, data reduction,
processing, velocity determination, interpretation, applications. Seismic refraction
method: data acquisition, reduction, processing, interpretation, applications.

Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 266/3 Solid Earth Geophysics I

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the basic aspects related to the seismic methods in exploration geophysics

2. explain the theory of seismic methods

3. classify the field procedure and interpretation techniques in seismic methods

Ref. Books: 1. Dobrin, M.B. & Savit, C.H. Introduction to Geophysical
Prospecting (4th Ed.), McGraw-Hill, 1988.

2. Telford, W.M., Geldart, L.P. & Sheriff, R.E. Applied
Geophysics (2nd Ed.), Cambridge University Press, 1990.

3. Sheriff, R.E. Geophysicalf Methods, Prentice-Hall, 1989.

ZGT 269/3 Exploration Geophysics II

Theory and practice of potential field methods for geophysical exploration, including the
gravity method, the magnetic method and electrical methods. For each method details
covered include a description of equipment used, field procedures, nature of data
acquired, methods of data processing and interpretation and applications.

Prerequisite: (C) ZGT 267/3 Solid Earth Geophysics II

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the basic aspects related to the potential field methods in exploration
geophysics

2. explain the theory of potential field methods

3. classify the field procedure and interpretation techniques in potential field methods

146

Ref. Books: 1. Dobrin, M.B. & Savit, C.H. Introduction to Geophysical
Prospecting (4th Ed.), McGraw-Hill, 1988.

2. Griffiths, D.H. & King, R.F., Applied Geophysics for Geologists
and Engineers, Oxford, Pergamon Press, 1981.

3. Nettleton, L.L. Gravity and Magnetics in Oil Prospecting,
McGraw-Hill, 1976.

4. Keary, P. & Brooks, M., An Introduction to Gephysical
Exploration, Oxford, Blackwell Scientific Publications.

5. Milson, J., Field Gephysics, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester,
1989.

6. Parasnis, D.S., Principles of Applied Geophysics, 4th Edition,
London, Chapman and Hall, 1986.

7. Telford, W.M., Geldart, L.P., Sheriff, R.E. and Keys, D.A.,
Applied Geophysics, Cambridge University Press, London, 1976.

ZGT 270/3 Meteorology II

Air motion: Coriolis force, gravity effect, pressure gradient, friction, equations of motion,
scale analysis. Horizontal flow: geostrophic, thermal, gradient winds, continuity
equation. Weather and climate, weather modification, boundary layer. Air pollution
meteorology, ozone layer, air-sea interaction. Introduction to numerical ransfor.
Lightning and biometeorology. Meteorological instrumentation and data acquisition
techniques. Weather systems, climatological variability due to winds.

Prerequisite: (C) ZCT 218/4 Mathematical Methods
(S) ZGT 265/3 Meteorology I

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the advanced concepts related to the meteorology phenomena

2. analyse and identify the meteorological features such as air masses, tornadoes and
hurricanes

3. analyse the weather forecasting models

147

Text Book: 1. Steven Ackerman, John A. Knox, Meteorology: Understanding
the Atmosphere, Brooks Cole; 2 edition (March 8, 2006).

2. C. Donald Ahrens, Meteorology Today: An Introduction to
Weather, Climate, and the Environment, Brooks Cole; 8 edition
(February 16, 2006).

Ref. Books: 1. Edward Aguado, James Burt, Understanding Weather and
Climate, Thomson 4th ed – 2006.

2. C. Donald Ahrens, Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to
the Atmosphere, Brooks Cole; 5 edition (January 31, 2007).

3. Grant R. Bigg, The Oceans and Climate, Cambridge University
Press; 2 ed, 2004.

4. John Norbury and Ian Roulstone, Large-Scale Atmosphere-Ocean
Dynamics I, Cambridge University Press; 1 ed, 2002.

5. James R. Holton, An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology,
Academic Press; 4 edition (March 31, 2004).

ZGT 272/3 Introduction to Oceanography

Shape of ocean basins, continental margins, morphology of the ocean floor. Temperature,
salinity and density distributions in oceans. Light and sound in sea water. Composition
of sea water, chemical and biological reactions in sea water. Air-sea interaction, heat and
water cycles. Causes of instability in oceans. Ocean circulation, current measurement.
Causes of currents; pressure gradient, Coriolis forces, geostrophic flow, wind-driven
circulation. Waves and tides. Marine biology.

Prerequisite: (P) ZCA 101/4 Physics I (Mechanics)
(S) ZGT 162/3 Geology II

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. describe the basic principles of oceanic structure and movement

2. describe the fundamental laws governing the ocean

3. explain some basic oceanic phenomena

148

colour science. 1982. Prentice Hall. measure and study the subsurface properties by using various geophysical equipments 2. & Trujilo A. & Pickard. Photogrammetry. G. Properties and Behaviour. Sensors for environmental monitoring and platforms. study the advantages and limitations of each geophysical method ZGT 374/3 Remote Sensing Fundamental theory of remote sensing: units of measurement. Descriptive Physical Oceanography: An Introduction (4th Ed. 149 . (2nd Ed. The Ocean Basins: Their Structure and Evolution. Ref. The Open University. Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 190/2 Geology Practicals Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Essential of Oceanography (7th Ed. Pergamon Press. & Emery. spectral reflectance. students are able to: 1. 2002. Pergamon Press. W.P. Pergamon Press. 2. infra-red colour photography. 1989. Thurman H. characteristics of aerial photographs. 1989. G. The Open University.).J.L. 1983. Introductory Dynamical Oceanography. 4. Digitial image processing. ZGT 295/4 Geophysics Practical (two semesters) Experiments in geophysics and Geophysical Field Camp. multispectral photography. Pergamon Press. Seawater: Its Composition. interactions between light and matter. image characteristics. electromagnetic spectrum. electromagnetic energy. Microwave and Lidar sensing.V. S. sources of remote sensing information.). 5. Books: 1. black-and- white photography.L. 3. Pond. organize the geophysical field survey 3. Pickard. thermal and hyperspectral sensing.). Aerial photography: film technology. Multispectral.

atmospheric moisture distribution. W. Remote sensing of soils and landforms by photography.F.B. Chapman and Hall. water pollution. Guilford. Campbell. Introduction to Remote Sensing (3rd Edition). & Curtis. hydrology. hydrogeology and oceanography.. etc. Barret. water in the environment. Remote Sensing Prinsiples and Interpretation. E.H. 2004. T. Applications in geological mapping. W. J. ZGT 395/6 Geophysics Project (two semesters) Project in geophysics or related fields.F.. Sabins. 1982. analyze remote sensing images using basic image processing analysis Ref. 1997. Waves and Optics) Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course.. Freeman. Global climatology. Rees. Cambdridge University Press. Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 295/4 Geophysics Practical 150 .M. John Wiley & Sons. 3..W.. students are able to: 1.. Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation (Fifth Edition). 2. L.G. 5.W. resource exploration. Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing (2nd Ed. 2002. Kiefer. F. 2001.Remote applications in meteorology: weather analysis and forecasting. Books: 1. and Chapman. hydrometeorology. explain the basic concepts used in remote sensing related to spectral regions and data acquisition techniques 2. J.). Prerequisite: (P) ZCA 102/4 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) (S) ZCT 103/3 Physics III (Vibrations. Lillesand. 4. synoptic climatology of weather systems. apply remote sensing techniques to retrieve information from remotely sensed data 3.C. remote sensing of the atmosphere. R. surface hydrology. Physical Principles of Remote Sensing (2nd Edition).

students are able to: 1. Air mass: features. Non-frontal low pressure systems e. potential vorticity and absolute 151 . Galaxies.. evaluate and appreciate the structure and beauty of the universe 2. organize. The Astronomy Encyclopaedia (2002). its structure and theory (classical Bergeron theory and current theory). General features of the anticyclone: warm and cold anticyclones.E. Books: 1. present and defend the findings of the study SYNOPSES OF ELECTIVE COURSES – GEOPHYSICS ZGE 277/4 Structure of the Universe Size of the Universe. Stellar evolution.. Moore. Cosmology. trace and determine the physical processes operating within it Ref. classification. Development of the cyclonic system. P. S. Electromagnetic waves as carriers of information. shearing and curvature for cyclonic and anticyclonic flow. 2.Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. E. typhoons and tornadoes. modification. understand. 3rd edition) Roy. Clarke. Probability of extraterrestrial lifeforms. Ed. Understanding the Solar System. measure basic parameters related to geophysical investigation 2.g. Phillips (an Octupus Publ Grp) ZGE 360/3 Synoptic Meteorology Instroduction to surface weather charts. Relative vorticity. Divergence. Chaisson. A. Astronomy : A Beginner’s Guide to the Universe (2006). justify geophysical anomaly from the acquired data set 3.. Gen. Horizontal advection theory and the continuity equation. McMillan. Astronomy : Structure of the Universe (1989. Features of the frontal system. students are able to: 1. convergence and vertical motion. relate the components that make up the universe 3. 3. D. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Stars and the H-R diagram. the plotting meteorological codes.

Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 270/3 Meteorology II Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Basin analysis. Methuen. Wallace. sandy desert. 2. justify and analyse the model used for the weather forecasting Ref. explain the reservoir rocks and sedimentary basin 3. & Hobbs.M. glacier. Features of long waves: structure and theory. Observations and analysis at the surface and upper levels.W. B. ZGE 361/2 Advanced Geology Depositional environments. continental slope. diagenesis and stratigraphy 4. 1977.R. Atmospheric Science – An Introductory Survey. Academic Press. justify on related aspect of hydrocarbon production and development 152 . P. sedimentary facies and facies models 2. generalize the depositional environments. terrigenous shelf. oceanic ridge and oceanic basin. Holton. Books: 1. continental rise. carbonate shelf. Weather forcasting: numerical modeling. 3. basin plain. Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 162/3 Geology II Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. analyse and identify the large-scale weather system 3. sedimentary facies.V. lake. 1979. delta. An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology. students are able to: 1. J. 1981. Dynamical Meteorology – An Introductory Selection. subducting plate margin. permeability. coast.vorticity and their relation to divergence and convergence. Atkinson. Stratigraphic framework and structural styles in petroleum exploration. describe the rock porosity. J. Facies models: alluvial fan. explain the concepts related to the large-scale weather system 2. students are able to: 1. Academic Press. fluvial plain.

Monsoon Meteorology. Facies and Sediment Budget. ZGE 364/3 Tropical Meteorology and Forecasting Introduction. students are able to: 1. 2. Academic Press. explain the concepts of tropical circulations 2. tornado. Sedimentary Basins: Evolution. parcel and slice methods. C. Disturbances over peninsular Malaysia. trade-wind inversion. Lowell. 1985. Geological Association of Canada. Books: 1. squalls. Equatorial atmospheric features: equatorial waves. (Ed. Springer- Verlag. 3. the ITCZ.P. Theory: barotropic instability. A. warm low pressure. Books: 1. 1992. Hadley circulation.D. The flow features. Oil & Gas Consultants International Inc. Springer-Verlag. Fein. J. Tropical disturbances. Einsele. Miall. second kinds. their structures and theories according to different regions: the tropical cyclone. & Stephens.). & Chang. P.D. R. Tropical scalar analysis (continuity equation). Short and long range forecasting (statistics and numerical ransfor). Circulation in the tropics. Analysis of synoptic charts in the tropics (streamlines. isotach and satellite images). Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 270 Meteorology II Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. G. 4.. 1984. Principles of Sedimentary Basin Analysis. Kelvin waves. 153 . barotropic-baroclinic instability. Clarendon Press. 1984. CISK. Walker. mixed Rossby-gravity waves. 2. cumulus convection. the easterly waves. Structural Styles in Petroleum Exploration. 1987.G. Interaction and variability of the monsoon and its relationship with the higher latitudes (north and south). structure of the monsoon waves. instability of the first. J. 1987. Ref. radiation processes in the tropics (the input and energy received at the earth’s surface). T.N.) Facies Models (2nd Ed.L. Monsoons. analyse and identify the equatorial atmospheric features 3. justify and analyse the model used for the short and long range forecasting Ref.S. Krihnamurti.

North-Holland. Velocity spectrum. Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 269/3 Exploration Geophysics II Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. ZGE 373/4 Seismic Data Processing Basic mathematics for Fourier Transform. in Alders. 2. An Introduction to Numerical Methods and Optimization Techniques. Operations in the time domain and frequency domain. Computer Usage in the Computation of Gravity Anomalies. Daniels. Elsevier. 1973. NMO. Velocity analysis. Talwani. 154 . Aliasing and phase considerations. Deconvolution. Convolution model. ransfor. explain the interpretation techniques of potential field methods using two and three dimesion 3. Main processing sequence. finite- difference and frequency-wavenumber. v. generalized inverse method. Geosounding Principles. 1973. Academic Press. 1978. students are able to: 1.). inversion and interpretation.ZGE 371/3 Potential Field Interpretation Interpretation of gravity and magnetic data: 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional models. Dipping cases. classify the nonlinear optimization methods in the interpretation techniques of potential field methods Ref. Kernel function in resistivity sounding. explain the basic aspects related to the potential field methods 2. Inverse filtering. Koefoed. Introduction to partial migration before stack. I – Resistivity Sounding Measurements. R. 3. O.linear optimization methods. linear inversion. Minimum phase. Methods in Computational Physics. B. Predictive deconvolution.13 – Geophysics. Optimum- Wiener filters. Introduction to non. (Ed. 1979. Books: 1.W. least squares and steepest descent. Migration in space and time: Kirchhoff. M. Other optimization methods: simplex. Preprocessing. DMO. Factors that influence velocity.

engineering and hydrogeology. Hilbert transform and complex trace analysis. Books: 1. seismic reflection: Optimum window and optimum offset techniques. Electrical Images: 2D Resistivity Modelling. Seismic Data Processing. 2001. Data correction and interpretation. 2. understand the overview of seismic data processing 2. techniques and instrumentation. ZGE 375/2 Engineering and Environmental Geophysics Introduction to environmental and engineering problems as well as geophysicals technique. velocity analysis. 1993. Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 268/3 Exploration Geophysics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Field procedure.g. Prentice-Hall. Finite difference method. explain the geophysics theory and concept related to the engineering and environment. Yilmaz. Relevant topics such as GPR and others. Introduction to 3D electrical imaging.Land and sea acquisition geometry. Radon transform and tau-p processing. deconvolution. O. 2D electrical imaging exploration and multi electrods. Data collection and interpretation. migration etc 4. explain the geophysical techniques application in engineering and environmental problems 155 . Prerequisite: (S) ZGT 268/3 Exploration Geophysics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Relevant physical properties of rocks and soil. Field examples for environmental. familiar with few advanced techniques used in seismic data processing Ref. explain the steps involved in seismic data processing 3. AVO. snalyze various techniques in different steps e. common signal processing operations. including their ethics 2. students are able to: 1. Mayeda. Seismic refraction: Interpretation techniques such as GRM and others. students are able to: 1. 3-D seismic data processing. Digital Signal Processing. Society of Exploration Geophysicists. W.

Books: 1. grain size. E. 3. An Introduction to Applied and Environmental Geophysics. students are able to: 1. 2. grain size analysis and environmental interpretation of grain size. S.M. The Open University.3. 1982.E. salt marsh and estuarine sedimentation. The Open University. classify the geophysical field procedure and interpretation techniques related to the engineering and environment Ref. 1990. W. & Berger. Ward. Effects of sea-level changes. Pergamon Press. J. sediment movement. Prerequisite: (C) ZGT 272/3 Introduction to Oceanography Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. 3. sediment transport rate. 2. Pergamon Press.. Reynolds. 4. Books: 1. Geotechnical and Environmental Geophysics. Edward Arnold. 1989.G.E. 1997. Waves. D. ZGE 379/3 Geological Oceanography Sources of sediments. (ed). 1989. The Sea Floor: An Introduction to Marine Geology. J.. Tides and Shallow-water Processes. Nature of hydrothermal circulation. Resources from the ocean floor. S. Beach. 156 .H. Origin and morphology of ocean basins and margins. Palmer. 1980. S. identify the source of sediment and the fundamentals of fluid flow 2. Generalized Reciprocal Method of Seismic Refraction Interpretation. The Ocean Basins: Their Structure and Evolution. An Introduction to Coastal Geomorphology.G. explain patterns of deep-sea sediment and resources from the ocean floor Ref. describe the trends of sediment transport and depositional environment 3.H. Pethick. Springer-Verlag. Patterns of deep-sea sedimentation. Bedforms and internal structures. Properties of fluid flow. Seibold. composition and types of deep- sea sediments. Sources. Wiley. 1984.

R. 157 . Cullum. idectifying limits and constraints. production parameters). functions. G. using chck lists & design review procedures. McGraw-Hill. prosedur asembli. performance. students are able to: 1. techniques and media in presentation of a report. Books: 1. present and defend the outcome of design Ref. 3. Prerequisite: (S) MAT 181/4 Programming for Science Applications or ZCE 111/4 Computational Physics Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. rationale for adopting proposed solution. Handbook of engineering design. 2. 1986. (ii) Preparing a design report: Analying possible design solutions (matrix analysis.D. London: Butterworths. mind mapping. brainstorming. cost. Perisian-perisian ransfor yang bersesuaian umpamanya rekabentuk berpandu ransfor. lintasan genting.g. Dieter. aesthetics. (iii) Using computer technology in the design process: Key features of a computer aided design system. specifying new technologies used. The topics to be covered include: (i) Preparing a design specification: Identifying customer requirements (e. evaluating costs & future potential.SYNOPSES OF CORE COURSES – ENGINEERING PHYSICS ZKT 221/2 Engineering Design The aim of this course is to give students on opportunity to experience the process of carrying out a design project. identifying and matching design parameters and resource requirements. forced decision making). 1998. penyelenggaraan terancang. applying relevant standards and legislation. pemilihan bahan dan analisa matriks. Engineering design: A mvvbaterial and processing approach. softwares and their applications. extracting design information from appropriate sources. carry out a project of design involving synthesising parameters that will affect the design solution 2.E. It will thus enable them to appreciate that design involves ransformer parameters which will effect the design solution. report the progress of project on design. work with other members for solving the design problem and to achieve customer’s needs 3.

define the class of materials using atomistic and bandgap theory 2. Prentice Hall. insulators. 158 . sol- gel. Photoconductor Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 106/3 Electronics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Engineering Design Process. Thin films growth methods.. nanostructures. 5. Thomson. 1998. Fundamentals of Semiconductor Fabrication.. bulk materials. May. Materials for photodetector. students are able to: 1. S.. B. polycrystals. Preparation of polymers and glass. Prentice Hall. Yousef Haik. characterized and fabricated 4. N. diffraction. lithography. 4. 3rd Ed. Materials for solar cell. optical. ZKT 222/3 Electronic and Photonic Materials I Classes of materials: metals. Growth of conducting single crystal material. Materials for light emitting diodes. metallization.. A. M.P.J. Characterization of thin film and bulk material: electrical. Neamen. growth of single crystal epitaxial film and multilayers: LPE. laser ablation. describe the class of materials based on their dimension 3. Optoelectronics – An Introduction. 4. D. Samuel A. Books: 1. Banerjee. ion implantation. semiconductors. single crystals. W. polymers. 2. dielectric deposition. MBE methods. VPE. sputtering. Fabrication methods. ion beam microscopy. wet and dry etching Type of junctions. thin films. Sze S. Irwin. 1989. G. Fundamentals of engineering design. ceramics. 6th Ed.. Wilson & J. MOCVD. describe the electronic and photonic devices and their operations Ref. diffusion. 2003. 1992.. S. Hawkes. Wiley. 2004 3. 2005. Solid State Electronic Devices.: Prentice-Hall. Lewis. Basic processing of bulk ceramic. Streetman. J. explain how the materials are grown. Semiconductor Physics and Devices.E. Materials for lasers. Photorefractive materials and holography storage. glasses. imaging. Englewood Cliffs.

A.. S. E. A Text-Lab Manual. perform the design projects in the machine and electronics workshops 159 . Prentice Hall. Buku Panduan eksperimen yang disediakan. Teich. Kasap. Tischler. Wiley. As such students will be required to build simple physical models/products based on sound engineering principles. perform machine operations following all safety precautions 2. 2 nd Ed. 2. Fundamentals of Photonics. B. They will be allowed to work on some of these processes. O. Fiber Optics and Laser. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 192/2 Physics Practicals II Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. perform the photonics experiments in fundamental and complex fibre optic communications 2. Optoelectronics – An Introduction to Materials and Devices. ZKT 297/3 Practical Training Students will be introduced to the various basic processes commonly found in machine and electronic workshops. Graw Hill. J. perform good practices in experimentation including keeping a lab book and keeping the experiment station clean 3. 1991 3. 1996 ZKT 296/6 Photonics Laboratory Selected experiments in photonics Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 293/2 Physics Practicals III Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. students are able to: 1. 1992. M. students are able to: 1. 2001 6.. Books: 1. Mc. Saleh and M. C. use the equipment in the electronics workshop following all safety precautions 3. Elements of safety will be emphasized. Singh. Students will also be introduced to the basics of technical drawing and they will be given opportunities to practice independent design and analysis. report experimental results with manuscript quality Ref. Optoelectronics. Optoelectronics and Photonics – Principles and Practices. 5.

Martin and Roland Schinzinger. McGraw Hill. meaning of responsibility. John Wiley & Sons. Code of ethics and professionalism of the engineer – themes of ethics. code of ethics. behavioral management. report the implementation of the project and the conclusions from the study 4. types of managers. Management. J. corporate social responsibility. Thomson Wadsworth. work culture. M. demonstrate results of critical thinking in problem-based projects and practice leadership roles Ref. professionalism. describe the engineering discipline and identify the good qualities of an engineer 2. management processes and approaches. organizations. C. safe and economical products for the society. Inc. 2nd edition. thinking and literature review 3. explain the basics of management and industrial laws 4. students are able to: 1. responsibilities. explain the ethical issues of engineering profession and justify the decisions to solve ethical problems 3. E. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. students are able to: 1. Books: 1. Prerequisite: (S) ZKT 296/2 Physics Practicals I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Impact of technology on society and environment – responsibility of engineers to develop useful. M. 2000 ZKT 396/6 Engineering Physics Projects Consist of a selection of experiments and projects.ZKT 321/3 The Engineer in Society Engineering profession – duties. 2005 2. Harris Jr. S. present the outcome of the project successfully 160 . John R. Engineering Ethics. Rabins. Basic skills in management and law – globalization impact. 8th edition. 2005 3. perform the process including independent work. Schermerhorn Jr. Ethics in Engineering. form a sufficient coordination with the project partner and conduct a physics project successfully 2. Mike W. Pritchard. ethical dilemma. views of ethical conduct. 4th edition.

Free energy in direction of divergence and curl. Microwave applications and ferrite devices. Liquid crystals: Basic definitions. DRAM elements in Ics. Piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials. SmA. Alignment of direction by electric and magnetic fields and by pinning at surfaces. define the ferroelectrics materials and properties. Electric field alignment and Frederiks transitions. describe types of ferroelectric. H. Landau theory of displacive transitions. strain sensors and actuators. Nematic ordering. Processing routes and integration with IC technology. students are able to: 1. Ferromagnetic thin film. materials. M. Rotation of optical polarization in pure twist cell. capacitors. SmC and SmC*. devices and applications 2.SYNOPSES OF ELECTIVE COURSES – ENGINEERING PHYSICS ZKE 322/3 Electronic and Photonic Materials II (Special Topics) Ferroelectrics: Basic ideas. domain walls. Applications of bulk type ferroelectrics. pyroelectric detectors. capacitors. ferromagnetic and liquid crystals 4. Applications of ferroelectrics thin film. Relaxor ferroelectrics. Simple applications in display devices. define the advantages and disadvantages of different applications and integration with technology 161 . Properties of PZT family. Prerequisite: (S) ZKT 222/3 Electronic and Photonic Materials I (C) ZCT 307/3 Solid State Physics I Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. definition of direction. Definations of B. sketch the structure of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials and the structure of liquid crystals display 3. Hysteresis loops of ferromagnets. Twisted nematic display cell and operation. Chiral molecules and cholesteric ordering. nonlinear optic crystals. Susceptibility divergence. Optical anisotropy. Dipole switching of SmC* cells and possible applications. Pitch of cholesteric spiral and variation with temperature. Materials design of perovskite ceramics for specific applications. Smectic ordering. Displacive ferroelectrics.

R. 1990. Optoelectronics – An Introduction to Materials and Devices. 3. ZKE 323/3 Electronic and Photonic Devices and Systems Electronic devices: Zener diode. students are able to: 1. Optical instruments: Microscopes. photonic. 1993. Colla (ed. Kluwer. optical switches. Ref. McGraw Hill. UJT. SCR. Gerber. LEDs. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 106/4 Electronics I (S) ZCT 213/2 Optics Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. lasers. S. P. FET. explain the principles of operation of several electronic. Programmable logic controller (PLC). P. The Physics of Liquid Cyrstals.G. Oxford University Press. 1996. Singh. Wright and G. Applied Magnetism. Asti (ed. Books: 1. de Gennes and J. C. Cambridge University Press. cameras spectrometers. Birkhauser. 4. 2. electro-optic and acousto-optic devices 2. J. Chandrasekhar.J. infrared and microwave sources and detectors. Prost. Ferroelectric Ceramics. 1993. N. explain the concept of devices application in electronic and photonic systems 3. MOSFET. Source and detectors: Lamps. Liquid Crystals. 1992. Liquid Crystals. phototransistors. photodiodes. IOPP. interferometer. radiometer. PMT. Electro-optic devices: Modulators (magneto-optic and acousto-optic). CCD. tunnel diode. 5. 1994.L. liquid crystal display and TV. perform calculations that involve electronic and photonic devices and systems performance 162 . integrated optics.D. 6. LASCR. Collings. demonstrate the importance of certain parameters in the design of system based on electronic and photonic devices 4.).). Setter and E.

Ref. Books: 1. T.L. Floyd, Electronic Devices, 5th Ed. Prentice Hall, 1999.

2. R.L.Boylestad and L.Nashelsky, Electronic Devices and Circuit
Theory, 8th Edition, Prentice hall, 2002

3. S.D. Smith, Optoelectronic Devices, Prentice Hall, 1995.

4. P. Bhattacharya, Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices, 2nd Ed.
Prentice Hall, 1997.

5. B.E.A.Saleh and M.C.Teich, Fundamentals of Photonics, John
Wiley, 1991

ZKE 324/2 Display and Storage Technology

Video output technique. TV line format. Text display. Dot matrix display. Segment
display. LED. Vacume fluorescence display (VFD). Electroluminescience display.
Colour CRT. Monochrome CRT. Plasma display. Display resolution.
Lyquid crystal devices: physics and applications. Electro-optical effect used in liquid
crystal displays (LCD). Multiplexing capability and optical memory of liquid crystal
cells and basic properties for applications in high information contentscreens. Supertwist
liquid crystal screens, active matrix addressing LCD, ferroelectric LCD.
Plasma fluycies, Polymer disflay

Electron beam storage. Bubble and charge coupled memories. Cassettes. Semiconductor
storage. Electromagnetic storage. Optical tape storage. Optical disc storage. Quantum
storage. Data storages: Hard disk, floppy disk, CD and DVD.

Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 213/2 Optics

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the theoretical concepts behind displays as well as information storage
techniques

2. describe the technological fabrication steps of different types of display as well as
data storage devices

3. explain the operations of several display and storage devices

Ref. Books: 1 Magnetic Materials, Structures and Processing for Information
Storage;
Ed by B. Daniels Hardcover (July 2000) Material Research
Society.

163

2 Display Technologies II by Fang-Chen Luo (Editor), et al.
Hardcover (June 1998). Society of Photo-optical
Instrumentation Engineers.

3 Advanced Optical Data Storage: Materials, Systems, and
Interfaces
to Computers by Pericles A. Mitkas (Editor) Zameer U. Hasan
(Editor),
Hans J. Caufal, (October 1999) Society of Photo-optical
Instrumentation Engineers.

4 Magneto-Optical Recording Materials by Richard J. Gambino
(Editor),
T. Suzuki (Editor) (August 1999) IEEE.

5 Advanced Optical Data Storage: Materials, Systems, and
Interfaces to
Computers by Pericles A. Mitkas (Editor) Zameer U. Hasan
(Editor),
Hans J. Caufal, (October 1999) Society of Photo-optical
instrumentation
Engineers.

ZKE 325/4 Optical Fiber Technology and Optical Communication

History of the optical fibre. Electromagnetic wave in optical fibre and optical fibre
material. Total internal reflection. Acceptance angle and cone. Characteristics of optical
fibre; numerical aperture, mode, V-number, attenuation, dispersion, and bandwidth.
Choosing of Wavelength. A variety of different fibre and their advantages; single mode,
multimode, step index, graded index, and other profiles.

Optical fibre design and fabrication. Preform fabrication; MCVD, PCVD, OVD, and
VAD. Fibre drawing system and manufacturing of various optical cables. Advantageous
and disadvantageous of plastic optical fibre (POF). Characteristics and fabrication of rare
earth doped optical fibre. Principles and operation of wave guide, interferometer,
coupler, modulator, splicer, switch, and some optical sensors. Characteristics and
fabrication of rare earth doped optical fabre. Polarization maintorining fibres.

Fundamental of optical communication. Wave guides and wave guide devices. Wave
division multiplexing (WDM). Transmitters in optical communication: LED and laser
diode, Fabry-Perot laser, and distributed feedback laser diode. Reciever for optical
signals. Theory and operation of optical connectors. Optical connection and launching
losses. Structure and operation of optical modulator such as LiNbO3 and Mach-Zehnder
interferometer. Theory and operation of optical amplifier: semiconductor and rare earth
doped optical amplifier.

164

Optical communication system and architecture; transmitter, receiver, modulator,
amplifier, repeaters, optical fibre medium, multiplexing, and demultiplex. Fiber optic
system design and ransformer ing. Information transmission: Modulation methods
(AM, FM, PCM) multiplexing methods (TDM,FDM, WDM), data rate, noise ratio,
bandwidth, bit error, repeaters, analysis of optical power budget, and system rise time.
Optical communication networks system.

Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 213/3 Optics
(C) ZCT 304/3 Electricity and Magnetism

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the basic concepts related to application of optical fibre technology in
communication

2. explain the principles of electromagnetic wave propagation in optical fibre,
characteristics of optical fibre, a variety of different fibre and their advantages,
process of optical fibre fabrication, transmitter and receiver in optical communication
and fibre optic system testing for application in communication.

3. perform calculation of attenuation and dispersion in optical fibre, optical connection
and launching losses and optical communication networks system

Ref. Books: 1. Fiber Optic Communication 4th Edition, by Joseph C. Palais,
Prentice Hall 1998.

2. Fiber Optic Test and Measurement by Dennis Derickson (Editor)
1998 Prentice Hall.

3. Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers; Fundamentals and Technology
by P.C. Becker, N.A. Olsson, Philippe M. Becker, Jay R.
Simpson, Anders A. Olsson (1999). Academic Press.

ZKE 326/4 Signal and Image Processing

Digital image and signal processing system; processors, digitizer, digital computer,
storage, display, scanner.

Sampling and quantization; image geometry, frequency domain, image and signal
transformations: Fourier transform, discrete Fourier transform, 2-D Fourier transform,
Laplace transform, convolution, fast Fourier transform, Walsh transorm, discrete cosine
transform, Hotelly transform and Hough transform.

165

Signal detection in frequency domain, power spectrum, filters. Encoding, different pulse
code modulation.

Image enhancement, histogramming, smoothing, sharpening, thresholding, edge detection,
spatial mask, linking. Image representation and description.

Industrial vision system; automated visual inspection, process control and assembly
application. Holografhy

Prerequisite: -

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain all basic principles in digital signal and image processing and display
including acquisition, processing and enhancement

2. explain image and signal transformation

3. relate the knowledge with the industrial applications

Ref. Books: 1. Image Processing, Analysis, and Machine Vision by M. Sonka,
V. Hlavac and R. Boyle, 3rd edition (830 p.) substantially
updated and published by Thomson Engineering in 2007, ISBN
0-495-08252-X.

2. Digital Image Processing by Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E.
Woods. Third Edition (2007) Addison-Wesley Pub Co.

3. Algorithms for Image Processing and Computer Vision by
James R. Parker, (November 1996) John Willey & Sons.

4. Digital Image Processing by Kenneth R. Castleman, (August 21,
1995) Prentice Hall.

ZKE 327/3 Solid State Lighting I

Solid State Lighting I will cover a brief introduction to semiconductor material systems
and growth techniques used for producing light emitting diodes (LEDs). The basic of
structures, properties and operation as well as other applications of LEDs will be taught.

Prerequisite : (C) ZCT 307 Solid State Physics I

166

Learning Outcomes :

1. Explain in basic structures, properties and operation as well as other applications
of light emitting diodes.
2. Understand and explain the fabrication of LEDs, from the aspects of growth until
metallization process.
3. Know and differentiate the characterization techniques for LEDs.

Ref. Books: 1. Light Emitting Diodes, 2nd Edition, by E.F Schubert, Cambridge
University Press, 2006.

2. Introduction to Light Emitting Diode Technology and
Applications, by Gilbert Held, CRC Press, Taylor & Francis
Group, 2009.

3. Introduction to Solid-State Lighting, by A. Zukauskas, M.S Shur
and R. Gaska, Wiley & Sons, Inc, 2002.

4. Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Edition, by S.M Sze, John
Wiley & Sons (Asia) Pte., 1999.

5. An Introduction: The Physics of Low-Dimensional
Semiconductors, by J.H. Davies, Cambridge University Press,
1998.

ZKE328/3 Solid State Lighting II

To understand the electrical and optical properties of light emitting diodes and to study
how it could be modified for use in solid state lighting applications. Students will learn
the principles of calorimetry, photometry and color rendering as well as the thermal
resistances across the junctions in LEDs.

Prerequisite : (S) ZKE 327/3 Solid State Lighting I

Learning Outcomes :

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. identify the LED’S type and in depth understanding of LED’s electrical and optical
properties.

2. explain fundamentals and characteristics of visible and ultraviolet emitter materials
and able to design and simulate DBR reflectors for light extraction.

3. calculate and analyze thermal resistance network at various junction temperatures
for one dimensional heat flow and explain the principles of calorimetry,
photometry and relevant color rendering principles in LEDs.

167

2. F. 2. Davies. Ltd. The radio universe. relate radio data with physical processes in the region Ref. recognize and elaborate receiving and data processing instruments 3. 5. 4. J. Radio telescopes. Shur and R. Krieger Publ. Introduction to Light Emitting Diode Technology and Applications . Radio interferometry. 2nd Edition. students are able to: 1. John Wiley & Sons (Asia) Pte. 2002. Active radio stars.. by S. Books : 1. understand and affirm the principles of radio astronomy 2. Cambridge University Press. 168 . Gaska. Inc. G. Light Emitting Diodes. Taylor& Francis Group. CRC Press. Moran. 3. 2009. Radio Astronomy (1966).. Introduction to Solid-State Linghting. Schubert. by J.D. Active radio galaxies. Radio Astronomy Projects (2003). Radio – Sky Publishing 3.. W. ZKE 378/4 Introduction to Radio Astronomy History of radio astronomy. M. Lonc. Physics of Semiconductor Devices. S.Ref. Prerequisite: (S) ZAE 376/4 Astronomy Principles and Practices Learning Outcomes At the end of the course.. Swenson. Image systhesis. by Gibert Held. John Wiley & Sons. IInterferometry and Synthesis in Radio Astronomy (2001. Kraus.. recognize and appreciate the contributions of radio astronomy to knowledge 4. M. 1998. 2006. by E. Sze. R. 1999. J. Zukauskas. by A. Cosmic microwave background (CMB). 2nd Edition. Cambridge University Press. 2nd edition). An Introduction: The Physics of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors. Books : 1. Thompson.H.

follow the instructions of the experiment and perform the experiment 2. Medical Physics Wiley. Wiley & Sons. Nervous system.Gastro- intestinal system. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 293/2 Physics Practical III Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Books: 1. and Skofronick J. Muscle and skeletal system. define the terms associated with human anatomy and physiology 2. students are able to: 1. G. F H.SYNOPSIS OF CORE COURSES – MEDICAL PHYSICS ZMT 298/2 Medical Physics Practical Consist of a set of selected experiments. Cardiovascular system. including reproductive system. understand and explain the functions of each system in order to maintain the balancing of the activity in the human body Ref. report the experimental result ZMT 231/4 Human Anatomy and Physiology Cell structure and function. explain the 10 human systems. Anatomy and Physiology: The Unity of Form and Function. Anatomy and Physiology in the following : Respiratory system. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Martini and E. Saladin. students are able to: 1.G. John. 4th edition (2006). McGraw-Hill 4th edition. Cameron J. 169 . 2. Homeostasis. 11th edition (2005) 3. K. 1978. its associated organs and the functions of the organs 4. Endrocrinology.R.F Bartholomew Benjamin/Cummings. (2006) 4. Genito-urinary system.J. analyze the acquired data 3.R. Tortora and S. Grabowski. Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology. explain the levels of structural organization in human body 3.

ZCE 331/4 Radiation Biophysics

Introduction to atomic nucleus and its characteristics. Nucleus as a source of radiation.
Interaction of radiation with matter. Interaction mechanism of photons and electrons with
matter. Interaction of neutrons, alpha particles, heavy nuclei and nuclear fission
fragments with matter.
Detection and measurement of radiation. Radiation dosimetry. Production of
radionuclides and its use in tracer techniques. Biological effects of radiation.

Prerequisite: (P) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics)

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the interaction mechanism of ionizing radiation with matter

2. explain the concepts of the detection and measurement of radiation

3. explain the process of production of the radionuclides and its use

4. explain the biological effects of radiation

Ref. Books: 1. Attix, F.H. Introduction to Radiological Physics and Radiation
Dosimetry, John Wiley & Sons, 1986 (2nd Edition, May 2002).

2. D.T. Graham, Principles of Radiological Physics Churchill
Livingstone, 2003.

3. Johns, H.E. & Cunningham, J.R., Physics of Radiology
(4th Ed.), Springfield, Illinois: Charles C., Thomas, 1983.

4. Abdul Ghaffar Ramli, Keradioaktifan: Asas dan Penggunaan
DBP, 1991.

ZMT 334/3 Physics of Diagnostic Radiology

X-ray tube and generators. X-ray spectrum. Interaction of X-rays in human body.
Scattering radiation. Film-screen radiography. Fluoroscopy, tomography, mammography.
Digital radiography. Quality control and testing of radiographic X-ray machine. Film
image quality: contrast, resolution. MTF. Radiation hazards associated with diagnostic
radiology. Current developments in diagnostic radiology.

Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics)

170

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. understand and distinguish the basic concepts between conventional and digital
radiography

2. explain the work operation of fluoroscopy, tomography and mammography

3. explain the radiation hazards associated with diagnostic radiology

4. explain the current technology in diagnostic radiology

5. understand and explain the factors and parameters associated with film image quality
as well as quality control and testing of radiographic X-ray machine

Ref. Books: 1. P.P. Dedy & B Beaton Physics of Diagnostic Radiology 2nd
.ed., IOP 1999.

2. W.R. Hendee & E.R. Ritenour Medical Imaging Physics 3rd
ed., Mosby Yearbook Khas, 1994.

3. A.B. Wolbarst Physics of Radiology, Appleton & Lange, 1993.

4. Curry T.S. et al. Christensen’s Physics of Diagnostic Radiology
4th ed., Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger, 1990.

5. S. Webb The Physics of Medical Imaging, Adam Hilger, 1988.

6. P. Sprawls Physical Principles of Medical Imaging 2nd. Ed.,
Medical Physics Publishing, 1995.

ZMT 335/3 Physics of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine

Introduction to radiotherapy. Radiobiology basics for radiotherapy. Isodose curves, depth
dose, field size, Corrections for body inhomogeneities and tissue curvature.

Radiotherapy equipment. Characteristics of Co-60 machines and linear accelerators.
Brachytherapy. Quality control. Safety aspects of treatment room design. Current
developments in radiotherapy.

Basic physics in radionuclide imaging. Principle of tracers in nuclear medicine. Ideal
characteristics of radioactive agents for diagnosis. Ideal characteristics of radioactive
agents for therapy. Rectilinear scanners. Gamma cameras. Technetium generator.
Internal dosimetry.

Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 104/3 Physics IV (Modern Physics)

171

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the basic concepts related to radiotherapy and nuclear medicine

2. classify the radiotherapy and nuclear medicine equipments

3. explain the dose distribution and analyze the scattered radiation in radiotherapy

4. classify the radionuclide properties used in nuclear medicine

5. perform safety aspect related to radiotherapy and nuclear medicine sources

Ref. Book: 1. F.M. Khan, The Physics of Radiation Therapy 3rd . edition
(2003).

2. Cherry S.R., Sorenson J.A. and Phelps. M.E., Physics in Nuclear
Medicine, (2003).

3. Mettler F.A. and Guiberteau M.J., Essentials of Nuclear
Medicine Imaging, Saunders (W.B.) Co. Ltd., 5th edition (2005).

4. M.E.J. YOUNG., Radiological Physics, H.K. Lewis & Co., Ltd,
(2003).
5. J.R. Williams & D.I. Thwaites, Radiotherapy Physics in
Practice, Oxford University Press, 2nd edition (2000)

ZMT 397/6 Medical Physics Project (two semesters)

A course of two semesters duration inclusive of project and seminar. Where applicable,
the use of computers is employed in the project embarked.

Prerequisites: (S) MAT 181/4 Programming for Scientific Applications
and (S) ZMT 298/2 Medical Physics Practical.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. study the literature review

2. write the project report

3. present the work in a seminar and viva-voce

172

SYNOPSES OF ELECTIVE COURSES – MEDICAL PHYSICS

ZME 336/4 Medical Instrumentation

X-ray tube and generators. CT scanners. Gamma cameras, collimator design, crystal
selection, photomultiplier drift. Interface circuit. Multi-detector system and rotational
gamma camera. Instrumentation in magnetic resonance imaging. Ultrasound source and
detector. Characteristics of piezoelectric materials. Single element transducer design and
field characteristics. Medical lasers: types, properties and medical applications. Optical
microscopy and electron microscopy. Computers in medicine.

Prerequisite: (S) ZCT 106/3 Electronics I

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain the X-ray tube structure, describe the fundamentals of X-ray generator and
discuss about X-ray production and detection

2. explain gamma camera components, MRI instrumentations, ultasound, medical
lasers, optical and electron microscope

3. discuss the hazards and aplications of lasers in medicine

4. discuss various computer applications in medicine

Ref. Book: 1. D.W. Chakeres & P. Schmalbrock Fundamentals of Magnetic
Resonance Imaging, Williams & Wilkins, 1993.

2. A. Katzir Laser & Optical Fibers in Medicine, Academic Press,
1993.

3. Mettler F.a. and Guiberteau M.J. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine
Imaging, Orlando, Grune & Strtton 3rd. Edition, 1991.

4. Matthew Hussey, Basic Physics and Technology of Medical
Ultrasound, MacMillan Publ. Ltd., London and Basingstoke,
1985.

5. McDicken w.N. Diagnostic Ultrasonics: Principles and Use of
Instruments 3rd. ed., Churchill Livingstone 1991.

173

ZME 338/4 Physics of Medical Imaging

Photography process, solid state detector and CCD. Signal/noise and sensitivity.
Calibration, horizontal field and splitting technique. Digitizer and plate scanner.
Hardware for image processing, software techniques, histogram, convolution, fringe
upgrading, Fourier techniques and slit synthesis. Discrete, 2-D, and fast. Fourier
transformer. Laplace, Hough, Walsh and Hotelly transforms and their applications.

Information acquired from imaging such as data acquired in CI., MRI, angiography,
infrared and ultrasound imagings.

Physical factors that may be considered in each technique to enhance imaging
information.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students are able to:

1. explain all basic principles of digital image processing

2. analyse digital images

3. explain the process of image acquisition, enhancement, storage, format, and display

4. discuss the principles of image processing and its applications in medical imaging
equipments systems

Ref. Books: 1. Sprawls P. Physical Principles of Medical Imaging 2nd. ed.,
Medical Physics Publishing, 1995.

2. W.R. Hendee & E.R. Ritenous Medical Imaging Physics 3rd.
ed., Mosby Yearbook, 1994.

3. Z.J. Cho, J.P. Jones & M. Singh Foundations of Medical
Imaging, John Wiley, 1993.

4. D.W. Chakeres & P. Schmalbrock Fundamentals of Magnetic
Resonance Imaging, Williams & Wilkins, 1993.

5. Richard R. Carlton & Arlene M. Adler. Principles of
Radiographic Imaging, Delmar Learning, 4Rev Ed edition, 2005.

174

develop programs using advanced programming structures (modular programming. solar and ocean energy as well as biomass and their effects on the environment. Strings. Modular programming: functions. Strategies in solving complex problems. A brief introduction to programming concepts. files manipulation. Thomson Learning. 2nd edition. history of energy use. (2002). Output formatting. understand fundamental computer programming concepts and algorithm development in problem-solving 2. File processing. sources of energy. selection and repetition. Advanced data types: arrays. ZCU 100/2 Energy and The Environment Energy and related concepts. Program control structures: sequence. (2006) “A First Book of C++: From Here to There”. Use of hydropower. pointers) which add values to the computer programs Ref. wind. solve problems in mathematics and scientific applications using a computer programming language 4.S. Australia. nuclear. 3. Efficient use of energy. Pointers. Consumption of fossil fuels and its effect on the environment. energy units and quality of energy. Course Technology.SYNOPSES OF UNIVERSITY COURSE MAT 181/4 Programming for Science Applications Introduction to basic computer concepts: computer hardware and software. Classes and object oriented programming. 2. Energy situation in Malaysia and her energy policy. Introduction to C++ language: writing simple C++ programs but comprehensive. Brooks Cole. students are able to: 1. “C++ Programming: From Problem Analysis To Program Design”. Basic C++ operators. Problem solving and program design. World energy consumption. geothermal. Bronson Gary J. Modeling. “Understanding Programming: An Introduction Using C++”. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Enumerations and structures. 3rd edition. Books: 1. 175 . Thomson Learning. apply appropriate programming techniques/structures and strategies in transforming the description of a problem into executable computer codes 3. Course Technology. Malik D. Cannon Scott (2001).

Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Kleinbach. Robert A. 2008 2. explain the generation process of renewable and non-renewable energy resources 4. Energy and Environment Module. Energy: Its Use and the Environment (3rd Edition). John Wiley and Sons. Hinrichs and Merlin H. distinguish and explain the types of energy and differentiate between fossil energy and renewable energy 2. relate the advantages of energy and its effects on the environment 3. Kraushaar. Energy and the Environment (2nd Edition). Books: 1. Ristinen and Jack P. Brooks Cole. 2001 176 . explain and analyze energy efficiency and discuss the current development of energy usage in Malaysia Ref. 2006. students are able to: 1. 3. CETREE. Roger A.

INDEX OF COURSES (APPLIED) Advanced Geology ZGE361/2 152 Applied Physics Project ZAT394/6 133 Applied Spectroscopy ZAE385/4 135 Astronomy Principles and Practices ZAE376/4 134 Atomic and Nuclear Physics ZCE305/3 Calculus and Linear Algebra ZCA110/4 113 Classical Mechanics ZCE208/2 Complex Analysis and Differential Equations ZCT210/4 121 Computational Physics ZCE111/4 137 Display and Storage Technology ZKE324/2 163 Electricity and Magnetism ZCT304/3 126 Electronic and Photonic Devices and Systems ZKE323/3 162 Electronic and Photonic Materials I ZKT222/3 158 Electronic and Photonic Materials II ZKE322/3 161 Electronics I ZCT106/3 116 Electronics II ZCT206/3 119 Energy and The Environment ZCU100/2 175 Energy Studies ZCE341/4 138 Engineering and Environmental Geophysics ZGE375/2 155 Engineering Design ZKT221/2 157 Engineering Physics Project ZKT396/6 160 Exploration Geophysics I ZGT268/3 146 Exploration Geophysics II ZGT269/3 146 Geology I ZGT161/3 141 Geology II ZGT162/3 141 Geology Oceanography ZGE379/3 156 Geology Practical ZGT190/2 142 Geophysical Data Analysis ZGT264/2 143 Geophysics Practical ZGT295/4 149 Geophysics Project ZGT395/6 150 Human Anatomy and Physiology ZMT231/4 169 Instrumentation ZAT283/3 129 Introduction to Astronomy ZCE275/4 Introduction to Microprocessors ZAT281/4 128 Introduction to Oceanography ZGT272/3 148 Introduction to Radio Astronomy ZKE378/4 168 Laser and Its Applications ZAE384/4 135 Low Dimensional Semiconductor Structures ZAT389/3 131 Material Science ZAE282/3 133 Mathematical Methods ZCT218/3 124 Medical Instrumentations ZME336/4 173 Medical Physics Practical ZMT298/2 169 Medical Physics Project ZMT397/6 172 Meteorology I ZGT265/3 143 Meteorology II ZGT270/3 147 177 .

Non – Destructive Testing ZAE388/4 136 Optical Fiber Technology and Optical ZKE325/4 164 Communications Optics ZCT213/2 124 Photonics Lab ZKT296/2 159 Physics I (Mechanics) ZCA101/4 112 Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) ZCA102/4 112 Physics III (Vibrations. Waves and Optics) ZCT103/3 115 Physics IV (Modern Physics) ZCT104/3 116 Physics of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine ZMT335/3 171 Physics of Diagnostic Radiology ZMT334/3 170 Physics of Medical Imaging ZME338/4 174 Physics of Semiconductors Devices ZAT386/4 130 Physics Practical I ZCT191/2 117 Physics Practical II ZCT192/2 118 Physics Practical III ZCT293/2 125 Physics Practical IV ZCT294/2 Potential Field Interpretation ZGE371/3 154 Practical Training ZKT297/3 159 Pure Physics Project ZCT390/6 Quantum Mechanics ZCT205/3 118 Radiation Biophysics ZCE331/4 170 Remote Sensing ZGT374/3 149 Seismic Data Processing ZGE373/3 154 Semiconductor Fabrication Processes ZAT387/4 130 Signal and Image Processing ZKE326/4 135 Solid Earth Geophysics I ZGT266/3 144 Solid Earth Geophysics II ZGT267/3 145 Solid State Lighting I ZKE327/3 166 Solid State Lighting II ZKE328/3 167 Solid State Physics I ZCT307/3 127 Solid State Physics II ZCT317/3 Statistical Mechanics ZCT207/2 120 Structure of The Universe ZGE277/4 151 Synoptic Meteorology ZGE360/3 151 The Engineer in Society ZKT321/3 160 Thermodynamics ZCT212/2 123 Tropical Meteorology and Forecasting ZGE364/3 153 Vector Analysis ZCT211/2 122 X-Ray Analysis ZCE351/3 139 178 .

SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 179 .

Vision Centre of excellence for education and research in the field of biological sciences. Ability to design and implement scientific experiments 6. biodiversity. in three years. We offer exciting opportunities to students over a wide variety of topics related to Biological Sciences. The 2 months internship programme will provide the students with valuable industry and corporate exposures. To establish and enhance the collaboration with industries for education input and research. In addition. environmental deterioration. Good Laboratory Practices and usage of common and advanced laboratory equipment 5. 180 .SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES INTRODUCTION Excellence in research and teaching is our aspiration. plants. microbial and cellular processes in the first year. Students with this essential knowledge will excel in any career path that they choose. To provide quality and innovative teaching and learning for its entire degree program. 2. global warming and climate change. The intricate relationships between life forms and their environments 3. biodiversity loss. animals. The diversity of life forms and the reasons for this 2. Mission 1. students are also encouraged to participate in an optional internship programme during the semester break at the end of the second year. Students graduating from the School of Biological Sciences will be equipped with the following knowledge: 1. students can choose to specialise in either Agrobiology. Biotechnology. 3. 4. Students are exposed to essential fundamental knowledge on ecosystem. Aquatic Biology. Environmental Biology or Biology and Management of Vector and Parasites leading to a degree in Bachelor of Applied Science (Honours). The School of Biological Sciences is proud to produce students who can think in a holistic manner to ensure a sustainable tomorrow. deforestation. the students also develop innovative skills and are able to generate and test new ideas. In addition. Role of all life forms in maintaining the delicate balance of our ecosystem 4. To achieve research excellence. To serve the society and country by providing the latest knowledge and technology. Ability to write reports and make scientific presentations The knowledge acquired by the students of Biological Sciences will enable them to make wise decisions with respect to the current global environmental issues such as pollution. In the second year. which is driven by research-active staff from diverse academic and research backgrounds.

Latiffah Ahmad Ghazali (Post-Graduate Studies & Zakaria (Academic & Student Research) (Industry & Community Development) Network) Programme Chairman Assoc. Dr. Dr. Prof. Prof. Ng Wing Keong Dr. Ahmad Ramli Dr. Amir Hamzah Prof. ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Dean Prof. Dr. Dr. Sreeramanan a/l Arip Mohd Yahya Subramaniam (Microbiology) (Biotechnology) (Agrobiology) Prof. Dr. Zary Shariman Yahaya Assoc. Yahya Mat Assoc. Siti Azizah Mohd Nor Assoc. Abu Hassan Ahmad Deputy Dean Assoc. Dr. Dr. Shahrul (Aquatic and Environmental (Biology and Management Anuar Mohd Sah Biology) of Vectors and Parasites) (Plant and Animal Biology) 181 . Prof. Dr. Prof. Prof.

Abd Hadi Ahmad Ms.Principal Assistant Registrar Senior Assistant Registrar Mr. Noroslinda Hussain 182 .

PROFESSOR DR. AHMAD RAMLI MOHD YAHYA Microbiology ASSOC. ABU HASSAN AHMAD Deputy Dean (Academic & Student Development) ASSOC. ZARY SHARIMAN YAHAYA Plant and Animal Biology ASSOC. NG WING KEONG Biology and Management of Vectors and Parasites DR. PROFFESOR DR. PROFESSOR DR. LATIFFAH ZAKARIA Programme Chairman Agrobiology DR. PROFESSOR DR. SHAHRUL ANUAR MOHD SAH Biotechnology ASSOC. ABD HADI AHMAD Senior Assistant Registrar MS.ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Dean PROFESSOR DR. YAHYA MAT ARIP Principal Assistant Registrar MR. AMIR HAMZAH AHMAD GHAZALI Deputy Dean (Post Graduate Studies & Research) PROFESSOR DR. SREERAMANAN A/L SUBRAMANIAM Aquatic and Environmental Biology PROFESSOR DR. SITI AZIZAH MOHD NOR Deputy Dean (Industry & Community Network) ASSOC. NOROSLINDA HUSSAIN 183 . PROFESSOR DR.

my Latiffah Zakaria 3506 lfah@usm.my Amirul Al-Ashraf Abdullah 4013 amirul@usm.my Wan Maznah Wan Omar 3533 wmaznah@usm.my Chan Lai Keng 3520 lkchan@usm.my Shaida Fariza Sulaiman 4056 shaida@usm.my Amir Hamzah Ahmad Ghazali 4008/3503 amirhg@usm.my Roshada Hashim 2930/4016/2713 roshada@usm.my Asyraf Mansor 3525 asyrafm@usm.my Chong Shu Chien @ Alexander 4053/4532 alex@usm.my Lee Chow Yang 3523/4151 chowyang@usm.my Mohammed Razip Samian 4007 razip.my Amir Shah Ruddin Md Sah 2717 amirshah@usm.my Tan Shau Hwai.ACADEMIC STAFF PROFESSOR TELEPHONE E-MAIL EXTENSION Abd. Sah 3524 sanuar@usm.my Ahmad Sofiman Othman 4019/4054 sofiman@usm. Sudesh Kumar a/l C.my ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Ahmad Ramli Mohd Yahya 4002/4054 armyahya@usm. Naim 4056 darlinamdn@usm.com Hasnah Md Jais 4009 mjhasnah@usm.my Kamaruzaman Mohamed 4005 mkamar@usm.samian@gmail.my Abu Hassan Ahmad 3815/3181/3504 aahassan@usm.my Mohd. Kanapathi 4367 ksudesh@usm.my Shahrul Anuar Mohd.my Zulfigar Yasin 3500 zulfigarusm@yahoo. Rawi 4061 csalmah@usm. Najimudin 4007/3080 nazalan@usm.my K. Nor 4004/4174 sazizah@usm.my Darah Ibrahim 2926 darah@usm.my Zairi Jaal 3053 zairi@usm.my Ng Wing Keong 4005 wkng@usm. Aileen 3508 aileen@usm.my Baharuddin Sulaiman 3526 baha@usm.my Hamady Dieng 3011 hamachan1@yahoo.my Uyub Abdul Manaf 4002 uyub@usm.my Che Salmah Md.my Mashhor Mansor 3518 mashhor@usm.my Baharuddin Salleh 4001 sallehb@usm.my Yahya Mat Arip 4013 ymarip@usm.my Siti Azizah Mohd. Wahab A.my Darlina Md.my SENIOR LECTURER Ahmad Ramli Saad 3516 aramli@usm. Nazalan Mohd.my 184 .my Hideyuki Nagao 3522 nagaoh@usm. Rahman 3505 arawahab@usm.

my Mohamed Hifni Mohd.my Rosilawati Abdullah 2713 tie@usm.com Rashidah Abdul Rahim 2450/4006 rshidah@usm.my Zulkaflee Ali 2713 zulkafle@usm.my Sreeramanan Subramaniam 3528 sreeramanan@usm. Zain 3531 khaironizam@usm.my Siti Ruzainah Omar 3963 sruzai@usm.my Zary Shariman Yahaya 4001 zary@usm. Abd Muid 3515 hazli@usm. Hazli Hj.my Khaironizam Md.my Nik Fadzly Nik Rosely 5127 nfadzly@usm.my Nazri Abdullah 3525 nazri@usm.com Nik Ahmad Irwan Izzaudin Nik Him 5127 nikirwan@usm.my Nurul Salmi Abdul Latip 3510 salmi@usm.my SENIOR SCIENCE OFFICER Khoo Kay Hock 4954 kkh@usm.my Suhaila Abd.my Rahmad Zakaria 3524 rahmadz@gmail.my Hassan Hj.com Hasnuri Mat Hassan 5929 hasnurie@yahoo.my Siti Najmi Shuhadaa Bakar 3514 ctnajmi@usm. Hamid 2381 ahsuhaila@usm.my Wan Fatma Zuharah Wan Musthapa 4153 wfatma@usm.Foong Swee Yeok 3511 foong_sy@yahoo.my Suriyati Mohamad 4006 suri@usm.com Research Officer Hasni Abu Hassan 2713 hasni@usm.my Zarina Mohd.my Mahadi Mohammad 5912 mahadi@usm. Abdullah 3515 ahassan@usm.my Hamdan bin Ahmad 3048 hamdana@usm. Yassan 4010 zarina@usm.my Mansor Mat Isa 3524 drmansor@usm.com Khairun Yahya 3509/8852750 khairun@usm.my Hj. Baharuddin 3510 mhifniusm@yahoo.my 185 .my LECTURER Chew Bee Lynn 5926 bee_lynn@hotmail.my SCIENCE OFFICERS Roziana Mat Khairuddin 4661 roziana@usm.my Adanan Che Rus 4229 adnanrus@usm.

my Mohd Rashid Othman 3507 omrashid@usm.my Jamilah Afandi 3502 emunit@usm.my CHIEF LABORATORY ASSISTANT Adrian Kessler Oswald 3584 rp_bio@usm.my SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Jamaliah Ismail 3906 ijamaliah@usm.my Mohd Hadzri Abdullah 3532 amhadzri@usm.CHIEF SENIOR ASSISTANT SCIENCE OFFICER Mohd Kassim Abdul Razak 5133 kassimar@usm.my ASSISTANT SCIENCE OFFICER Abdul Malik Yahaya 4228 abdulmaliky@usm.my Mohd Yusof Omar 3537 omyusof@usm.my 186 .my SENIOR ASSISTANT SCIENCE OFFICER Hamizah Zulkurnain 4018 hamizahz@usm.my Johari Othman 3502 emunit@usm.my Khalid Puteh 3532 junled@usm.

Royal Education Award . 2. awarded to the best Bachelor of Applied Science (Honours) degree final year student. USM Gold Medal Award. Those that choose to pursue their careers elsewhere are usually recruited by pesticide and pest management industries. Every year. awarded by Datuk Abdul Rahman Yaakub is to the best Bachelor of Science (Honours) degree final year student. USM Gold Medal Award. Lim Chong Eu. For further details. 7. food industries. Balasingham is to the best final year student in the field of Biology. Ever since then. given by Tun Dato’ Seri Dr..usm. In addition. the undergraduates are naturally inspired to continue with postgraduate studies. a significant number of undergraduates continue to pursue their Masters and PhD. These awards are available to outstanding students: 1. by Nestle Products Sdn. awarded to the best female final year student in all fields. please visit: http://alo. 5. USM Gold Medal Award. It is one of the three pioneering schools to be set up when USM was established in 1969. which now boasts the largest number of post- graduate students in the university.000 members! Its mission is to mobilise resources and advance the USM alumni as an innovative fraternity which nurtures its members and rallies its stakeholders to contribute to the university and to society. awarded to the best Bachelor of Science (Honours) degree final year student.my/ Awards and Dean’s certificate The graduating students from the School of Biological Sciences are considered for a number of awards at both the university and the school levels. it has grown rapidly to become an outstanding research-intensive school.awarded to the best final year student in all fields. aquaculture industries. Alumni The graduates of the School of Biological Sciences are automatically entered to become members of the growing family of USM’s alumni. 6. biotechnology industries and medical devises industries. 3. 187 . These include Forest Research Institute of Malaysia (FRIM). Cancellor’s Gold Medal Award . Institute for Medical Research (IMR) and many more. Because of the presence of a large population of graduate students. by the Majlis Raja-Raja Melayu. Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB). Bhd. awarded in memory of Professor E.General Information Career The School of Biological Sciences is located at the main campus of Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). various governmental and semi-governmental organizations and R&D centers also hire a significant number of the graduates. electronics industries. USM Book Prize.awarded to the best student in all fields. by Persatuan Wanita USM 4. USM Gold Medal Award. which to date amounting to some 100. Federal Land Development Authority (FELDA). Penang.

Higher Education A large number of students from the School of Biological Sciences pursue higher degrees with us. RIKEN (Japan). the ‘School of Biological Sciences’ Alumni Society was created to gather and reunite as many former students and staff of the school. at each semester. the school has student and staff exchange programmes with world-class research institutions such as Universite Henri Poincare (France). As a result of these initiatives. Internationally. Fisheries Department. For further details please contact: Deputy Dean (Research and Postgraduate Studies) School of Biological Sciences Universiti Sains Malaysia 11800 Minden Pulau Pinang Malaysia Tel: 604-6533888 ext. Led by the undergraduates. BioSoc regularly organizes academic. We offer both full and part-time programmes leading to degrees of the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy by research. Purdue University (USA). Bio Society’ motto “Inspire Your Life” is timely as it is also involved with the community and schools through awareness programmes on the potentials of biology as well as addressing the issues of sustainable development. Forest Department. recreation and student development programmes that are essential in creating versatile students and individuals.In addition.ips. Locally. the School of Biological Sciences has very close relationships with FRIM. FELDA. as well as with the academic. the society is advised by a faculty member and the Dean.my/ Industry and Community Network The school reaches out to the local and international communities via active research and academic collaborations.usm. non-academic. the students who achieved academic excellence will also be awarded the Dean’s Certificate. please visit: http://www. Clubs and Society Bio Society (BioSoc) is a platform for students to interact with one another. 4174/4004 Fax: 604-6565125 For more information pertaining to postgraduate studies in USM. administrative and supporting staff. 188 . University of Georgia (USA) and Kyoto University (Japan). MACRES and SIRIM. Department of Agriculture. Mississippi State University (USA).

This facility is used heavily by students and researchers from our school as well as from other schools in USM and other universities in Malaysia. CORE COURSES (70 Units) The Core Courses component is made up of courses of level 100. and R & D investigations. ESI and electron diffraction accessories. In addition. undergraduates may specialize in one of the fields listed below: Agrobiology Aquatic Biology Biotechnology Environmental Biology Biology and Management of Vectors and Parasites CURRICULUM A. the Required Core courses (‘Teras Perlu’) and the Elective Core courses (‘Teras Pilihan’). The facilities provided by the unit include Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). They include the Basic Core courses (‘Teras Asas’). Quality Control. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Elective Core and Electives for a chosen specialization. the School of Biological Sciences is equipped with various cutting-edge facilities such as the Electron Microscopy. The school has recently acquired an EF-TEM (Zeiss-Libra120) with EELS. Level 200 and 300 courses are courses from Required Core. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis (EDX). Courses in the Basic Core and Compulsory Core groups are compulsory Level 100 courses where students must attain passing Grades.Facilities As a research-intensive school driven by research-active staff. the Compulsory Core courses (‘Teras Wajib’). DEGREE IN APPLIED SCIENCE PROGRAMME Under the Applied Biology Programme. the Electron Microcopy Unit has also been providing services to the manufacturing industries in this region for the last 20 years particularly for Failure Analysis. Light Microscopy (LM) and Image Analysis (IA). 189 . 200 and 300.

Chemical Sciences and Mathematical Sciences. Students must obtain a total of 30 units. Biological Sciences. Environmental Biology. Biotechnology and Biology and Management of Vectors and Parasites. All undergraduates of the School of Biological Sciences must enrol and attain passing grades for these courses. Aquatic Biology. School of Physics. (i) YEAR I CORE COURSES (30 Units) Level 100 core courses are offered by the various Science Schools. (ii) YEAR II AND III REQUIRED CORE COURSES (35 Units) Required Core courses are those courses offered at Levels 200 and 300 that have been identified according to each specialisation program namely Agrobiology. 190 .g. e. The courses are as follows: Year Semester Course Code Course Title Unit Requirement Basic Core [10 Units] KTT 111/3 Inorganic Chemistry I KOT 121/3 Organic Chemistry I I & II MAA 101/4 * Calculus (for First Year 10 Science Students) MAT 181/4 * Programming For Scientific Application Compulsory Core [20 Units] BOI 101/3 Biodiversity BOI 102/3 Ecology I & II BOI 103/3 Cellular Biochemistry BOI 104/3 Genetics BOI 105/2 Biodiversity and Ecology Practical BOI 106/2 Cellular Biochemistry and 20 I & II Genetics Practical BOI 109/4 Biostatistics * Students are allowed to enroll in either MAA 101/4 or MAT 181/4. Students must enrol in all the Required core courses that are listed in their respective field of specialisation.

while the remaining 6 units are fulfilled by taking courses in biological sciences that are suitable to his/her field of specialisation and approved by the programme. At the end of the second semester. Before a student is allowed to register for the final year project in their respective field of specialisation. a thesis based on the existing regulations and format must be submitted for examination.(B) FINAL YEAR PROJECT All final year Biology students are given the option to register for a final year project of 8 units which spans over 2 semesters. Total overall unit 60 units Total unit for Biology courses 30 units Students who do not register for a final year project must substitute the 8 units with BOE 300/2 – Special Topics in Biology (which carries 2 units). the student must have achieved these minimum cumulative unit requirement. 191 .

Forest and Stored II BGT 211/4 (S) Product Entomology BGT 314/4 Insect Pest Management and II BGT 211/4 (S) Control BBT 301/3 Plant Genetics I BOI 104/3 (S) BOT 205/3 Microscopy and Histological II BOI 101/3 (S) Techniques BMT 217/3 Virology I BOI 101/3 (S) 192 . FIELD OF SPECIALISATION: AGROBIOLOGY Objective The Agrobiology programme encompasses the use of modern biological techniques in the agricultural output system. Course Code Course Title Semester Course Prerequisite Required Core: Level 200 [15 Units] BGT 211/4 Entomology I BOI 101/3 (S) BGT 212/2 Entomology Practical I BGT 211/4 (C) BOI 105/2 (S) BGT 213/3 Plant Pathology II BOI 103/3 (S) BGT 214/2 Basic Laboratory Course in Plant II BGT 213/3 (C) Pathology BOI 106/2 (S) BBT 213/4 Plant Physiology and Development II BOI 103/3 (S) Required Core: Level 300 [14 Units] BGT 300/8 Project in Agrobiology I & II BOE 300/2 Special Topics in Biology I or II BBT 302/3 Economic Botany I BOI 101/3 (S) BST 313/3 Ecology and Management of Weeds I BOI 102/3 (S) BOI 105/2 (S) Elective Core: [15 Units] BGT 311/4 Plant Disease Management I BGT 213/3 (S) BGT 312/2 Advanced Plant Pathology I BGT 214/2 (S) Laboratory BGT 311/4 (S) BGT 313/3 Agricultural. and an introduction to plant pathology centered on an understanding of plant diseases. The main objective of this programme is to explore various approaches in the agriculture system to ensure optimum and economical plant health and yield. disease mechanisms and pathogen interactions. The ultimate goal of the program is to be able to handle problems related to plant productivity in the development of agriculture based industry in the country. Students are also equipped with basic knowledge in insect pest management strategies to gain an insight to the development of plant disease control methods and management strategies. Students learn basic entomology and the role of insects in agricultural systems.

Course Code Course Title Semester Course Prerequisite BMT 302/3 Environmental Microbiology II BMT 202/3 (S) BMT 204/3 (S) BST 202/3 Soil Science and Environment I BOI 102/3 (S) BVT 313/4 Medical and Veterinary Parasitology I BVT 211/3 (S) BZT 311/3 Biology of Vertebrate Pest Animals I BOI 101/3 (S) Elective (4/20 Units) Any biology course that supports the Agrobiology component. (S) = Sequential (Course must be taken earlier) (C) = Concurrent (Course can be taken earlier or concurrent) FIELD OF SPECIALISATION: AQUATIC BIOLOGY Objectives The main objective of the aquatic biology specialisation is to expose students to the basic principles of aquatic science. Students will be exposed to the structures and functions of aquatic flora and fauna. Upon successful completion of the programme. Students should then also be able to carry out research in the field of aquatic sciences. utilization and conservation of aquatic resources. They will also be exposed to basic ecological aspects of various ecosystems and economics of management. students can then utilise it in applied fields. Course Code Course Title Semester Course Prerequisite Required Core: Level 200 [19 Units] BAT 201/3 Limnology I BOI102/3 (S) BAT 202/3 Oceanography I BOI102/3 (S) BAT 213/4 Coastal and Marine Ecosystem II BOI102/3 (S) BST 203/3 Population and Community II BOI102/3 (S) Ecology BOT 205/3 Microscopy and Histological II BOI101/3 (S) Techniques BAT 215/3 Ichthyology I BOI101/3 (S) Required Core: Level 300 [21 Units] 193 . The use of aquatic resources in agriculture and fisheries together with culture techniques will also be discussed. students are expected to have grasped the necessary knowledge and skills to manage the utilization of aquatic resources together with the proper use of aquatic resources for agricultural production. With the basic knowledge acquired in this thrust area.

the importance of environmental protection and conservation of natural resources. (S) = Sequential (Course must be taken earlier) FIELD OF SPECIALISATION: ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY Objectives The Environmental Biology specialisation is structured to strengthen the knowledge and understanding of the various concepts of ecology. This will give a broad understanding about the diversity together with structure and function of tropical ecosystems. Students will also gain valuable exposure to various ecological methods including EIA and GIS technology for environmental management and conservation of natural resources.BAT 300/8 Project in Aquatic Biology I & II BOE 300/2 Special Topics in Biology I or II BAT 311/3 Management of Aquatic II BAT 213/4 (S) Ecosystems BAT 302/3 Fisheries Management II BAT 205/3 (S) BAT 313/4 Aquaculture I BOI 102/3 (S) BST 201/3 Environmental Pollution I BOI 102/3 (S) Elective (4/20 Units) Any biology course that supports the Aquatic Biology component. function and interaction between the abiotic and biotic components of various ecosystems. Course Code Course Title Semester Course Prerequisite Required Core: Level 200 [12 Units] BST 201/3 Environmental Pollution I BOI 102/3 (S) BST 202/3 Soil Science and Environment I BOI 102/3 (S) BST 203/3 Population and Community II BOI 102/3 (S) Ecology BST 204/3 Tropical Ecosystems II BOI 102/3 (S) Required Core: Level 300 [20 Units] BST 300/8 Project in Environmental Biology I & II BOE 300/2 Special Topics in Biology I or II BST 301/3 Environmental Management II BST 201/3 (S) BST 304/3 Wildlife Ecology and II BST 203/3 (S) Management 194 .

to build a strong foundation. 195 . (S) = Sequential (Course must be taken earlier) FIELD OF SPECIALISATION: BIOTECHNOLOGY Objectives Biotechnology. which is then followed by an introduction to the various techniques employed in the biotechnology industry and several key aspects of microbiology. bioinformatics and an in-deepth treatment of genetic engineering. an area of applied biology. chemistry as well as chemical and process engineering. involving the integration of knowledge from microbiology. aims to develop in the students a sound understanding of cellular biology involving microbiology. biochemistry. chemical engineering principles. genetics. This is followed by several advanced topics of biotechnology that cover animal and plant cell culture. molecular biology. biochemistry. involves the practical application of cells or their components in the manufacturing and service industries. Biotechnology is multidisciplinary. genetics. molecular biology and some chemical engineering principles. The programme offered.BST 312/3 Conservation Ecology and I BST 204/3 (S) Natural Resources BST 313/3 Ecology and Management of I BOI 102/3 (S) Weeds BOI 105/2 (S) Elective Core: [12 Units] BAT 201/3 Limnology I BOI 102/3 (S) BAT 202/3 Oceanography I BOI 102/3 (S) BAT 311/3 Management of Aquatic II BAT 213/3 (S) Ecosystems BBT 302/3 Economic Botany I BOI 101/3 (S) Elective (4/20 Units) Any biology course that supports the Environmental Biology component. The programme begins with core courses in the sciences especially biology.

In this thrust area. termites. behaviour and management of important urban and industrial insect pests such as cockroaches. ecology and vector and parasite behaviour that will assist in the understanding of disease epidemiology as well as various management strategies. students specializing in the field will also learn the biology. BTT 202/3 (S) BTT 304/3 Genetic Engineering I BMT 203/3 (S) Elective (4/20 Units) Any biology course that supports the Biotechnology component. Course Code Course Title Semester Course Prerequisite Required Core: Level 200 [24 Units] BTT 202/3 Techniques In Biotechnology I* & II BOI 103/4 (S) BMT 202/3 Mycology I BOI 101/3 (S) BMT 203/3 Microbial Genetics II BOI 104/3 (S) BMT 204/3 Bacteriology I BOI 101/3 (S) BMT 205/3 Immunology II BOI 103/3 (S) BMT 206/3 Physiology and Nutrition of II BOI 103/3 (S) Microbes BMT 217/3 Virology I BOI 101/3 (S) BBT 301/3 Plant Genetics I BOI 104/3 (S) Required Core: Level 300 [20 Units] BTT 300/8 Project In Biotechnology I & II BOE 300/2 Special Topics in Biology I or II BTT 301/3 Tissue Culture Technology I BMT 205/3 (S) BTT 302/3 Fermentation Technology II BMT 206/3 (S) BTT 303/3 Biochemical Engineering II BMT 206/3 (S). filariasis. (S) = Sequential (Course must be taken earlier) FIELD OF SPECIALISATION: BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF VECTORS AND PARASITES Objectives Even in the midst of modernization. dengue/haemorrhagic dengue and other diseases. life history. These issues have brought high rate of illness and mortality to many tropical nations. In addition. * For Biotechnology students only. 196 . ecology. and their relationships with the disease parasites or pathogens that they transmit. bed bugs and stored product insects that are most relevant to the pest management industry. The field of Biology and Management of Vectors and Parasites was initiated with the objective of increasing the knowledge and understanding of the biology of insect vectors such as mosquitoes and house-flies. the students are exposed to the structure and function. pest ants. Malaysia continues to be affected by the vector-borne diseases like malaria.

Course Course Title Semester Course Code Prerequisite Required Core: Level 200 [11 Units] BVT 211/3 Biology of Vectors and Parasites II BOI 101/3 (S) BVT 212/2 Basic Parasitology Practicals II BOI 105/2 (S) BGT 211/4 Entomology I BOI 101/3 (S) BGT 212/2 Entomology Practical I BOI 105/2 (S) Required Core: Level 300 [23 Units] BVT 300/8 Project in Biology and Management of I & II Vectors and Parasites BOE 300/2 Special Topics in Biology I or II BVT 311/4 Medical and Urban Entomology I BVT 211/3 (S). (S) = Sequential (Course must be taken earlier) (C) = Concurrent (Course can be taken earlier or concurrent) 197 . BGT 211/4 (S) BVT 312/2 Practicals on Vectors and Urban Pests I BGT 212/2 (S) BVT 313/4 Medical and Veterinary Parasitology I BVT 211/3 (S) BVT 314/2 Advanced Practicals in Parasitology II BVT 212/3 (S) BGT 314/4 Insect Pest Management and Control II BVT 211/3 (S). BGT 211/4 (S) Elective Core: [10 Units] BMT 205/3 Immunology II BOI 103/3 (S) BOT 205/3 Microscopy and Histological Techniques II BOI 101/3 (S) BOE 201/3 Biological Instrumentation I BOI 103/3 (S) BST 203/3 Population and Community Ecology II BOI 102/3 (S) BST 301/3 Environmental Management II BST 201/3 (S) BZT 211/3 Invertebrate Zoology I BOI 101/3 (S) BZT 212/3 Vertebrate Zoology I BOI 101/3 (S) BZT 213/3 Animal Behaviour II BOI 101/3 (S) BZT 211/3 (C) BZT 212/3 (C) BZT 214/3 Animal Physiology I BOI 103/3 (S) BZT 311/3 Biology of Vertebrate Pest Animals I BZT 212/3 (C) BOI 105/2 (S) Elective (4/20 Unit) Any biology course that supports the Biology and Management of Vectors and Parasites component.

Social Skills. • Compile. eagerness and confidence as applied biologist. to design and conduct experiments and to properly record the results of experiments. 198 . both orally and in writing. • Execute the tasks given responsibly. • Identify the relationship between biology and other disciplines. the applications and impact of applied biology in society. Team Working and Responsibility • Demonstrate the ability to work effective with peers and in teams. • Interpret data and communicate the results to biologists and non-biologists. curiosity. Scientific Methods Critical Thinking & Problem Solving Skills • Interpret data and express the results in clearly written laboratory reports and in oral presentations. Ethics • Demonstrate commitment to ethical issues. accurately and effectively. analyse and solve problems in applied biology by using systematic methods. • Demonstrate the ability to use various retrieval methods to obtain information on issues related to biology. Attitudes. Life Long Learning & Information Management • Use knowledge gained for self development and continuous improvement. Professionalism. Humanities Value. persistence. analyse and interpret data honestly and ethically. • Develop interest. articulate and develop a sustained argument. Communication Skills • Express ideas in an informed and effective manner. • Use modern instrumentation and procedures as well as classical techniques. • Perform multi-tasking and function in multidisciplinary teams and communicate effectively. • Apply knowledge to solve problems related to applied biology Practical Skills • Plan and execute experiments according to scientific methods. students will be able to: Knowledge • Acquire knowledge and understand the concepts of applied biology.Programme Outcomes Upon completion of the programme. Managerial & Entrepreneurial Skills • Apply basic knowledge and principles of management and entrepreneurship related to applied biology field. • Identify. • Perform laboratory techniques safety.

microbes and animals based on their distinguishing features. structures and processes occur in the ecosystem will be discussed. Functional aspects of ecosystems including factors controlling distribution of organisms. habitat and ecosystem and the importance of biodiversity conservation as well as efforts taken by the government in biodiversity conservation. • Understand the basic concept in biodiversity and the need to preserve it. the students are expected to familiarize themselves with the importance of preserving biodiversity. • Determine the limiting factor that characterizes the ecosystems. As ecology is mainly based on field experiences. microorganisms and animals related to the economic values. ecological importance and conservation. • Be equip with practical skills involve in the identification of a diversity of plants. Emphasis will be on biological diversity including discussion on characteristics of various biological groups. population will be taught. SYNOPSIS OF BIOLOGY COURSES BOI 101/3: Biodiversity This course covers elements of biodiversity involving genes. students will be able to: • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic components. therefore students will be exposed to examples of field experiments where data gathering and observation will be included. Discussion will also include topics on legislations and international agreements for the protection of biodiversity and will end with some discussion on biodiversity hotspots. 199 . BOI 102/3: Ecology Basic ecological concepts such as ecosystem. students will be able to: • Have basic knowledge on the species diversity for plant.Leadership Skills • Demonstrate the ability to lead/facilitate teams. • Demonstrate an understanding of the contribution of ecological principles to conservation. structures and processes occur in the ecosystems. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. community. species and ecosystem. primary and secondary production and succession will also be discussed. • Develop awareness about the rich biodiversity especially in the tropical rain forest. The basic components. The students will also be exposed to the problems of loss of species. Since specimens used in the lab are collected from the local environment either in its preserved form or fresh forms. Field work techniques will be included.

organelles and their function. This leads to discussions on the structure and function of macromolecules e.BOI 103/3: Cellular Biochemistry This course discusses the cell in terms of its basic structure. cytoplasmic and maternal inheritance. gene expression and its regulation and RNA processing in eucaryotes. Topics to be discussed also include sex linkage. students should be able to identify the chemical characteristics all the major biological macromolecules and describe their structures and functions. Related ethical and moral issues concerning modern genetics will be discussed. BOI 104/3: Genetics The aim of this course is to introduce the basic principles of genetics which has emerged to be an important field in the understanding of various aspects of biology.g. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. • Describe the mechanisms and regulation of the major metabolic pathways in a living cell. Interesting discussion regarding gene regulation in procaryotes will also be done. In addition. mapping and gene order determination. The structure and function of DNA and RNA as genetic materials will also be presented. At the end of this course. This course begins with discussions on the basic concepts of genetics from inheritance pattern according to Mendel’s Law as well as non-Mendelian inheritance. • Identify the chemical characteristics of all the major biological macromelecules and describe their structures and functions. proteins. replisome and DNA replication. carbohydrate. students should be able to differentiate between prokaryote and eukaryote as well as name the organelles and their functions. This includes chromosome organisation. fats. types of mutants and their applications and gene action and its interaction. It also includes building blocks of macromolecules such as amino acids. carbohydrates and nucleic acids. fatty acids and monosaccharides. The biochemical processes that occur in the cell such as enzymes as catalysts. medicine and agriculture. students will be able to: • Differentiate between prokaryote and eukaryote as well as name the organelles and their functions. fat and protein metabolism. 200 . Population genetics dealing with gene transmission through space and time will be covered. • Describe the structure and mechanisms of enzymes. mutation. This course will also cover the basic concepts of genetic engineering and recombinant DNA technology and their applications in industry. metabolic regulation and biosynthesis of macromolecules are also discussed.

201 . BOI 105/2: Biodiversity and Ecology Practical Students will experience biodiversity principles and concepts in the field. • Organize field and laboratory research methods. and also the extranuclear inheritance. • Gain knowledge and exposure on field and laboratory working conditions. • Know the processes of gene expression and gene regulations (lac and trp operons). This can help consolidate their skills and expertise in both fields. Students will also get opportunities to learn other relevant practical methods and techniques that can assist them in their understanding of these fields. transcription. RNA and chromosome organization. students will be able to: • Predict the outcome of crosses and differentiate between Mendelian and non- Mendelian inheritance. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course student will be able to: • Familiarize field and laboratory research methods and get hands on used of scientific equipments. osmosis as well as plasmolysis. • Know various types of mutation. • Understand the concept of central dogma which encompasses replication. • Show how DNA and RNA were proven to be the genetic materials and know the composition and structures of DNA. their causes and effects on life. Students will be introduced to basic practical principles and concepts as well as familiarise themselves with the use of standard equipment in the field of biochemistry and genetics. BOI 106/2: Cellular Biochemistry and Genetics Practical Students will learn basic practical methods and techniques in biochemistry and genetics. Introduction to biodiversity from species and ecosystem perspectives will be strengthened by hands-on approach of these concepts. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. translation and reverse transcription.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. • Familiarize with various field and laboratory procedures. students will be able to: • Determine membrane transport processes such as permeation.

ponds. correlation and regression. It is hoped that after going through this course. special techniques in biology. treatment designs such as factorial experiments. chemical and biotic environmental parameters 202 .• Determine the factors that affect enzyme activity. probability distribution for binomial. Poisson and normal distributions. BAT 201/3: Limnology Limnology is the study of fresh or saline waters contained within continental boundaries. Hypothesis testing for one and two samples. streams. as long as the body of water is not oceanic.randomised complete block. as well as correlation and regression. both salt and fresh. reservoirs. • Construct genetic map. Topics to be discussed include variability of biological data. Basic training on the use of statistics for data analysis in biological research will be given. including parametric and non-parametric methods. Both the physical and chemical aspects of these aquatic ecosystems will be discussed. wetlands and estuaries. Brackish waters in estuaries also constitute important areas of limnological investigation. experimental design . hypothesis testing (including non-parametric). • Appropriately select statistical procedure/s to analyse their data in order to make conclusions on their studies. • Understand Mendelian genetics. students will have a better idea on how to properly present their data and will be able to analyse their data using the most appropriate statistical method/s in order to make a good inference and conclusion on their research results. BOI 109/4: Biostatistics The course includes a discussion on variability in biological data. • Understand gene interaction and determine karyotype analysis. one and two way analysis of variance. rivers. Emphasis will be given on the characteristics of these inland water bodies. Latin square. The second part of this course will discuss sampling and sample size (for one and two samples). Learning Outcomes At the end of this course. the biotic community and the dynamic activities within this environment. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course the students should be able to: • Understand the functional relationships and productivity of freshwater biotic communities as they are affected by the dynamics of physical. Limnology includes standing and running water. including lakes. students should be able to: • Understand on how to present data that are produced from their studies.

students will be able to : • Have knowledge and understanding about important marine ecosystems and processes. which are currently threatened by humans and what options exist for dealing with these problems. waves and ocean currents. The relationship of these systems to other relevant ecosystems will be studied. Emphasis will be given on the processes and dynamics of these ecosystems. estuaries and the open sea. Field studies to provide students exposure to experimental design. • Be aware of how different fauna and flora adapt themselves in different ecosystems. Sampling techniques. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. rocky shores. Biological oceanography will include discussion on organisms that inhabit the marine environment and marine productivity. • Use various instruments associated with oceanographic research and be able to conduct simple field studies. chemical. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course the students will be able to : • Define various aspects of the oceans including its geology. including tides. physical and biological oceanography. coral reefs. 203 . Other topics will include the cycle of elements and materials in the marine systems and the introduction to water flow phenomena such as tides. sliding of continents and the deep-sea floor. BAT 213/4 : Marine and Coastal Ecosystem The course introduces marine and coastal ecosystems. biology and biological processes as well as its physical features. The economic importance of each ecosystem will be discussed. waves and currents. • Appreciate historical impacts of past human activities on marine ecosystems.BAT 202/3: Oceanography This course encompasses all four aspects of oceanography – geological. This includes the sandy beaches. • Carry out some analysis particularly on water quality. mangroves. sampling methods and analysis in oceanography will be conducted. use of oceanographic equipment and seawater analysis will be taught during laboratory classes. Lectures will start with discussions on the formation of the ocean basins. chemical contents.

students will be able to : • Understand the biology. development and growth in relation to environmental conditions. excretion and osmotic control. reproduction and development of larvae. • Understand the morphology. natural pollutions. • Acquire technical skills and knowledge in various research areas of Aquatic Biology. organic wastes. and also pattern of behaviour. • Understand the behaviour of fish reproduction. learn to write scientific reports and to correctly handle scientific data in research. nerves and sensory organs. feeding. students are able to carry out scientific research in aquatic biology and present their research work in a written thesis and scientific oral presentations. BAT 300/8 : Project in Aquatic Biology A final year research project that aims to expose students to research methods for solving various scientific questions related to the Aquatic Biology sciences. evolution and ecology of fish.BAT 215/3: Ichthyology This course will discuss various aspects of the biology. Such aspects including anatomy. ecology and life history of a few species of fish will be highlighted. At the end of this course. zoogeography. taxonomy. The economic importance. improve communication skills. anatomy and roles and function of structures and organs and their adaptation to the environment. The types of pollution discussed will include those by heavy metals. muscle and movement. • Learn professionalism and high ethics in the working environment. and other 204 . • Understand the importance of fish biology for stock assessment and management. • Apply recent techniques and methodologies in the course of conducting research in various areas of Aquatic Biology. feeding and digestion. respiratory and circulatory systems. evolution and ecology of fish. their causes and methods of pollution abatement and prevention. • Identify the fish species in the Lab and in the field. taxonomy. BAT 311/3: Management of Aquatic Ecosystems In this course students will be introduced to various types of aquatic pollution. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. and external morphology. students will be able to: • Carry out proper and well planned scientific research and have the ability to solve problems related to the Aquatic Sciences. physiology. • Initiate creative and pro-active thinking. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. Emphasis will be given on aspects of adaptation for living in the aquatic habitat.

• Understand and utilise laws and regulations on conservation and management of the fishery resources. BAT 302/3: Fisheries Management This course encompasses the freshwater (inland fishery and paddy field fishery) and marine fishery (capture fishery) in Malaysia. • Recognize the basics of integrating strategies and approaches in management options. nutrition as well as the economics of aquaculture will be discussed. Aspects of integrated aquatic system management as well as case studies involving local examples will be discussed. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. 205 . students will be able to: • Understand the holistic interactions between land and water. Field visits to aquaculture sites will be an important component of this course. The fisheries principles and methods used in Malaysia will be discussed in relation to the sustainable exploitation of marine fishery resources. Case studies involving examples from all over the world with a focus on Asian tropical aquaculture will be discussed. breeding. • Understand the effect of fish population size and catch to exploitation of fishery resources. • Understand the concept and application of fish stock assessment for fisheries management. The biology of cultured species. models and marketing strategies. disease prevention. effects and their control. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. marine and coastal systems. • Interlink the fish population dynamics for fisheries management. The principle of ecosystem approach in fishery management is also emphasized. The course also includes interactions and conservation of the aquatic environment including the riparian. The fishery law and administration for conservation and its management are also discussed. brakishwater and marine origins. limnological. the choice of culture sites. management strategies. The course also includes the fishery industries in term of fishery products.toxic wastes. BAT 313/4: Aquaculture This course introduces the culture principles of commercially important aquatic organisms of freshwater. • Characterize different types of water pollution. including causes. culture systems. students will be able to : • Distinguish between inland and marine capture fishery resources and type of gears and methods used for exploitation.

• Acquire a fundamental knowledge in the management and husbandry techniques related to the culture of various aquatic animals and plants of commerical importance. BGT 211/4: Entomology This course looks into insects from 5 fundamental perspectives: structure and function. students will be able to: • Apply knowledge of entomology to identify insect in field work. insects as a unit and its diversity. • Have practical knowledge on how to successfully manage an aquaculture farm. behaviour. and expert in current insect classification technique. sensory mechanisms. applied entomology. students will be exposed to the methods and principles of taxonomy and the evolution of the Insecta class. Have the ability to write scientific reports and give effective scientific oral presentations on aquaculture-related topics. glands and muscles. nervous systems. students will be able to : • Have a basic understanding of the local and global aquaculture industry. breeding and development. movement and behaviour. to be leaders and work in teams to identify. control of insect which harmful to man and farm animals and also the importance of pollination. insects and its environment. This course will also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of insects. control of insects.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. 206 . and modern molecular approach. evolution and insect modification in field of forensic. conservation of biodiversity. • Communicate. • Perform ethically. analyse. • Use practical skills. Communication between insects and its biotic and abiotic environment will also be discussed. and molecular entomology. and to solve problems pertaining insect ecology. • Acquire critical thinking skills in discussing various current and controversial issues affecting the global aquaculture industry. In addition. professionally and caring in several situations particularly in agriculture to increase product and economy. • Understand social skill and responsible to insect identification. The subjects covered include: the integument system. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course.

BGT 214/2: Basic Laboratory Course in Plant Pathology This course introduces students to research methods in plant pathology. mechanisms by which plants resist disease and the process of pathogenesis. • Prepare the applied research of plant pathology. collection and preservation of diseased specimens. students: • Are equipped with knowledge on insect morphology useful for identification of main groups of insects in Malaysia.BGT 212/2: Entomology Practical Students will dissect various insects to see different structures of each system. preservation and maintenance of plant pathogens. inoculation methods. 207 . Students are required to initiate an insect collection with diversity at order and family levels. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. micrometry. It includes topics such as preparation of media and nutrient solutions. photography and microphotography. plant disease diagnosis. library research and writing for publication. viroid. mechanisms of pathogen attack and entry into host tissue. • Will be able to identify major groups of insects to families by sight as well as using identification keys. isolation and culture of pathogens. actinomycete. bacteria. survival and dispersal of inoculum. Plant pathogens such as fungi. experimental design. production. virus. sterilization and disinfection. students will be able to: • Understand the basic concept of plant pathology. principles of disease determination. BGT 213/3: Plant Pathology The course introduce students to the concept of disease as an interaction between the pathogen and host under influence of environmental factors. research methodology in the plant house and the field. principles and methods of disease assessment and crop loss. Classification and insect systematics will be the main topic of the course. definition of inoculum potential. Field trips will enhance the learning experience about insects in the natural environment. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. mycoplasma and nematode will be studied with emphasis to their life cycles and disease cycles. pathogenicity and virulence.

plant disease diagnosis and library research. This course will conclude with a discussion on selected important diseases and pathogens in the tropics. micrometry. 208 . BGT 300/8: Project in Agrobiology A final year research project aims to expose the students to research methods for solving proposed problems. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. • Apply biotechnology and molecular techniques in integrated plant disease management. students will be able to : • Apply principles of plant protection and various control methods in integrated plant disease management. Integrated control and application of biotechnology in plant pathology will also be discussed. BGT 311/4: Plant Disease Management This course discusses various principles of plant protection and control methods and their effectiveness. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. microscopy. BGT 312/2: Advanced Plant Pathology Laboratory Exposure to experiments pertaining to control of plant diseases using chemical.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. biological and cultural control. • Carry out literature searches in relation to the proposed research project. students will be able to : • Conduct independent scientific research in the field of Agrobiology. • Deliver effective scientific presentation both in writing and oral presentation. • Understand experimental design. • Understand important plant diseases and pathogens in the tropics. The results of the project will be presented in a seminar and a thesis at the end of the year. including chemical controls. • Understand research methodology in plant house and the field. cultural and biological methods. the use of resistant cultivars and control through legislation. students will be able to: • Understand principles of disease determination and inoculation methods. Visits to research stations to observe disease control implementation in the field.

toxicology. Emphasis will be given on major insect pests. formulation technology. sugar cane and coffee will be studied. stored products and quality of forest products will be discussed. plant resistance and quarantine methods. The unique ecosystem of stored products and the roles of insect pests which cause the damage will be studied. physical. Forest and Stored Product Entomology The course will focus on the insects of economic importance to agriculture. resistance. coconut. • Apply these principles into solving pest management issues. mode of action of various insecticide groups. ecological and safety aspects against non-target organisms will also be emphasised. biological. physiology. fruits. and their suitability from economical. • Exposed to learning on disease control method in agriculture research station. agro forests and plantation forests and forest products will be discussed. and various insect management strategies such as chemical. vegetables. oil palms. • Equipped with tools on dealing with the pests and how to manage or control them. insect growth regulators. rubber. The roles of insects on crop production. semiochemicals. Pests of cocoa. students will be : • Equipt with knowledge on various plant disease control methods such as chemical and biological methods. • Exposed to experiments on integrated plant disease management conducted in the field. BGT 313/3: Agriculture. pollution and biomagnification due to insecticidal usage will be discussed. 209 . Integrations between various control strategies against insect pests. students will be able to: • Understand and appreciate various underlying ecological concepts behind insect pest management and the importance of understanding the biological principles of the targeted organisms when managing them. rice. BGT 314/4: Insect Pest Management and Control This course explores the factors affecting insect population survivorship. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. as well as genetic. In chemical control section. The ecological roles of insects in natural forest.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. cultural. forestry and stored products in Malaysia. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. students will be : • Equipped with knowledge on common pests on crops or forest trees/products and stored products.

water. particularly in Malaysia. • Understand the management and control efforts carried out by the Malaysian Department of Environment and improvement suggestions. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. Sources of various kinds of pollutants such as industrial discharges. BST 202/3: Soil Science and Environment The aim of this course is for students to understand the basic chemical. 210 . The course will end with a look at the existing legislation as well as principle of control strategies and environmental monitoring and to assess their effectiveness in protecting the environment. water and building materials. that can be used to overcome environmental pollution. agricultural production. • Understand the existing legislation. Soil can support all ecosystems on land including large populations of microorganisms that recycle the materials of life. Soil supports dynamic ecological systems and provides plants with support. The soils have the structural and biological properties that distinguish soils from rocks and sediments. terrestrial and atmospheric environment. Understanding soil and managing it well is essential to human welfare. Although global issues will be discussed. and sites for construction and waste disposal. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. their sources and their effects on the environment and living organisms. students will be able to: • Understand the basic chemical. world food needs. radioactive wastes and toxic and hazardous residues and their effects on the biota and man will be examined. Soils are complex biogeochemical materials on which plants may grow. students will be able to : • Understand the kinds of main pollutants. fiber. providing the entire human population with food. physical and biological properties of soils. emphasis will be on local problems. The main objective of this course is to expose students on various issues pertaining to environmental pollution. municipal wastes. Soil also plays an important role in carbon sequestration and prevention of global warming. radioactive and other hazardous wastes and their impacts on human health & environment integrity will also be discussed. The course will conclude with a discussion on the principles and implementation of pollution control and environmental monitoring. solid wastes. nutrients and air. The students will be able to relate the principles of soil science to ecological systems. physical and biological principles of soils. engineering uses of soils and waste disposal. Discussions will involve kinds of pollutants that are received by the aquatic and terrestrial environment as well as air and noise pollution. Noise pollution.BST 201/3: Environmental Pollution This course covers the origin of various types of pollutants that are found in the aquatic.

The part involves basic population parameters for single species. • Identify the source of problems related to soils and how to draw potential steps to remedy the situations. • Understand the community distribution and vegetation patterns. species diversity and community succession. uniform and change. dominance. random. processes and interactions of biotic and abiotic elements in tropical rain forest. BST 204/3: Tropical Ecosystems This course provides an overview to tropical ecosystems and ecology. biotic capability. and ecological niches as well as principles of competitive exclusion will be discussed. The main themes revolve around key concepts and characteristics of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of the tropics with emphasis on Malaysia.• Have basic knowledge on soil functions as affected by the environment with special emphasis on human population activities. • Understand the concept of species richness. communication skills and team work skills through group laboratory practicums. inland water bodies. mangrove. is an important part of this course to clarify ecological concepts. Unique ecological characteristics acquired by a population or community will be discussed. • Apply ecological knowledge in the environmental projects. species diversity and distribution. The community distributions are mainly based on multivariate analysis. This includes density. Fieldwork. BST 203/3: Population and Community Ecology Population Ecology and Community is developed to introduce and expose students to population and community based partly on mathematical approaches. Types of relationships between populations like neutralism. with mini projects. The first part will focus on habitat distributions based on the vegetation patterns. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. mutualism. marine and coral reef ecosystems. leadership abilities. Approach to the topics begins with an introduction to tropical environment and its high biodiversity followed by various ecosystems found in Malaysia. students will be able to: • Understand the basic and advance principles of population ecology and community ecology. • Develop social skills. comensalism. The third part touches upon the basic characteristics of a natural community including a number of important concepts like form and structure of terrestrial communities. Current and pressing issues on humankind’s impact on these ecosystems locally as well as globally will also be discussed with coverage on ecological principles for their conservation. predation. age distribution and life tables. cooperation. degree of survival. 211 . The focus will be on the ecology.

BST 300/8: Project in Environmental Biology A final year research project that aims to expose students to research methods for solving a proposed research problem. • Apply theoretical knowledge to hands-on fieldwork with practices in the field. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. The role and importance of stakeholders. approaches and processes in Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) operated in the context of Malaysia. These concepts are presented in diverse topics in land use planning and Integrated River Basin Management (IRBM). students will be able to : • Carry out proper and well planned scientific research and in solving environmental- related problems. Topics focus on integrated management of potential impacts to the environment during development activities and their mitigation measures.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. The course is developed to introduce environmental management within the context of sustainability. At the end of this course. the media and environmental education in the community are further emphasised. BST 301/3: Environmental Management This is an advanced course in environmental science and management. improve communication skills. • Apply current techniques and methods in the field of environmental biology. a mini-project on current-issue problems and assignments. Other important components of this course are field visits. 212 . • Initiate creative thinking. Discussion also covers management of protected areas. legislation. various methods in Integrated Waste Management (IWM). students will be able to carry out scientific research in environmental biology and present their research work in written thesis and oral presentations. thus requires students to have prerequisite fundamentals of second year environmental biology/aquatic biology courses. • Apply professionalism and high ethical standards in the working environment. learn report writing skills and analyse scientific data in research. students will be able to: • Understand characteristics of various tropical ecosystems and their diversity including ecosystem processes involved. • Acquire skill and knowledge for future studies in environmental biology related areas. The concept of sustainability is heavily emphasized throughout the course content in many forms and applications.

BST 312/3: Conservation Ecology and Natural Resources The course will emphasize on basic conservation ecology on all species and natural ecosystem of the world in general and focus will be given for Malaysia. This course will also consider management techniques for wildlife in Malaysia. Aspects on species or ecosystem protection under conservation acts and regulations and conservation strategic action plan at Malaysian and global levels will be discussed. Field work is an important component that will expose students to natural settings and techniques for field studies.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. 213 . • Understand the important and more critically the wise use of world natural resources. Roles of natural conservation areas and national parks for species and natural ecosystem conservation will also be discussed. Discussion on endangered species and ecosystems. • Understand the ecosystem protection under conservation acts and regulations. dinamics and regulation of species and of populations will be considered. • Exhibit effective oral and written communicative skills. • Provide critical views of best practices and enhanced decision-making skills in managing environmental issues. BST 304/3: Wildlife Ecology and Management The purpose of this course is to increase understanding about the ecology and management of wildlife in tropical areas especially Malaysia. wildlife management. students will be able to: • Understand concept of sustainability and its applications in human-environment interactions. Other than ecological aspects based on the whole ecosystem. including factors involved in the process. students will be: • Fluent in the terminology of wildlife biology. • Acquire enough knowledge to further or continues their education at graduate level. conservation biology and general biology. Specific examples will be discussed. students will be able to: • Understand the important aspects of conservation ecology. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. • Have good knowledge of applications in environmental assessment techniques. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. • Familiar with problem solving skill and quantitative approaches to wildlife biology.

methods in fungal nomenclature and classification.• Understand the strategic action plan at Malaysian and global levels in term of the sustainability of natural resources BST 313/3: Ecology and Management of Weeds In this course. and mode of life. • Differentiate various fungi life-styles which related to their role in the ecosystem and envionments. its origin and phylogeny. general characteristics of fungi. BMT 202/3: Mycology The course provides basic knowledge on various aspects of fungi. fungi as food and mushroom cultures. fungi as food spoilage agent. Medically important fungi. the ecological-management perspective of weeds is discussed. It is crucial to understand the role of fundamental ecological concepts. students should be able to understand: • The types and distribution of weed species. so that growth of the crop is favored over that of the weeds. unicellular fungi and fungal-like organisms. especially in agroecosystems. Biological and ecological aspects of weeds need to be studied in order to control and manage weed populations to maintain or improve yield of desirable plant species. • Distinguish the phyla of true fungi and fungal-like organism. Learning Outcomes At the end of this course. • Identify the economic importance of fungi in food industry. • The degree of weed infestation. spoilage of timber products and plant pathogens will also be discussed. 214 . These include topics such as fungal existence. Herbicides and their use as an important aspect of modern weed management are also addressed. • The control and management of weeds in the agro ecosystems. • Differentiate among the microfungi. students will be able to: • Distinguish the characteristics and basic structures of true fungi and fungal-like organisms. Other topics include the economic importance of fungi such as alcohol fermentation and fungal application in industries. especially the weed-crop relationship to be manipulated for an effective weed management. medicine. habitat. macrofungi. specific features and examples from various fungal groups. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. manufacturing and as plant pathogens.

bacteriophage as genetic system (transfection. F element. gene regulation (operon concept. characteristics and importance of plasmids. Bacterial and archaeal systematics will cover classification. students will be able to: • Relate the functions or importance of archaeal and bacterial fine structures to their chemical constituents. BMT 204/3: Bacteriology The course will cover in depth discussion on bacteria in aspects of systematics of archaea and Gram negative bacteria. types of mutants and in situ mutagenesis). antigen and antibody. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. • Strategize the enrichment. natural immunity. lactose operon. gene transfer in bacteria such as transformation. Learning Outcomes Understand the principles of operons and gene regulation using the bacteriophage. abnormal bacteria and filament-like Gram positive bacteria and morphologically complex bacteria. Recombination (by general. specific sites. taxonomy. episome and transposon. fundamentals of cellular immunity responses. antigen and antibody interaction. fungal and yeast genetics. lysogeny and lysis cycle). • Describe the basis for characterization of archaea and bacteria. isolation and maintenance of some important archaea and bacteria. Gram positive bacteria. and attenuation). HFr. BMT 205/3: Immunology This course covers the principles and basic concepts of immunology. Students will also learn the base composition of nucleic acid. phylogeny and concept of species and numerical taxonomy. specific and F-duction) and conjugation (mating type. acquired immunity and the complement system. mutagenesis and mutant (mutagenesis agent. chromosomal transfer and analysis). DNA hybrids. • Relate their characteristics to economic importance. hybridization and amino acid sequencing as other approaches in the taxonomy. recombinant model. identification. The areas to be studied include the historical development and scope of immunology. zygote forming kinetics. chromosome replication. lactose and tryptophan operons as examples.BMT 203/3: Microbial Genetics This course involves the discussion on bacterial and viral chromosomes. nomenclature. This particular aspect will enable examination of various characteristics of bacteria and archaea to determine how these characteristics affect their roles in the daily life of mankind. hypersensitivity 215 . tryptophane operon. transduction (general. exchange of genes).

• Understand and apply the knowledge in immuno-diagnostic tests. BMT 206/3: Physiology and Nutrition of Microbes The course discusses the processes that take place in the development of microorganisms such as growth. 216 . autotrophy and heterotrophy. • Describe and explain the regulation of enzyme and coenzyme. methylotrophy. genomics and proteomics tools in bacterial physiology. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. adaptation of microorganisms in environment. students will be able to: • Understand the basic concepts of immunology and apply the knowledge in infection and protective immunity. transport model and types of transport in aerobes and anaerobes and photosynthesis. anaerobic. BMT 217/3: Virology This course aims at the introduction and understanding of virology. protein. growth kinetics and energetics. biomolecules and its regulation – nucleic acid. nutrient stress and stringent control. explain and analyze various metabolic pathways and its regulation. graft immunity. students will be able to: • Describe and explain the process that take place in the development of microorganism such as growth. • Describe. transport model and types of transport in aerobes and anaerobes. aerobic and photosynthetic pathways. synthesis and construction of cell membrane and cell wall and enzyme and coenzyme regulation will be discussed. • Understand the basic concepts of immune disorders. microbial electron transport system. • Describe and explain the synthesis of biomolecules and its regulation. autoimmunity and immunity against cancer. The strategies in handling viral problems are different from other organisms. energy transduction – energy source and carbon framework. carbohydrates and lipids. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. The problems become more complicated because viral diseases cannot be cured. plants and human. carbon equilibrium and redox in fermentation. • Describe and explain global Control Network. effect of environmental factors on growth. Identification of metabolic pathways. Virus is a minute entity that has a significant effect as it causes various diseases in microorganisms. animals. microbial cell cycle. coupling of electron transport with phosphorylation. growth kinetics and energetics. The cost implication in viral diseases is large.(allergy) – immediate type and late type.

air borne microbial dispersion. • Explain bioreactor designs. students will be able to: • Know and perform DNA cloning pronciples and analysis techniques. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. restriction endocleases. animal. Practical skills that will be introduced also include characterization of microbial growth. food spoilage by microorganisms. the role of microorganisms in the natural ecosystem such as terrestrial. BTT 202/3: Techniques in Biotechnology The objective of this course is to develop skills in various techniques in enzyme technology. growth kinetics in open and closed systems. characteristics and functions of its major components. and biochemical engineering.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. Latest tools dealing with bioinformatics will be presented. DNA ligase. • Describe the principles of microbial behavior in an ecosystem. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. aquatic. DNA transformation and DNA sequencing will also be covered. • Understand the molecular aspects of virology. • Understand roles of microorganisms in the natural ecosystem and microbial activities which have economic and social implications. Fundamental techniques dealing with recombinant DNA technology involving methods of DNA cloning. fields such as nitrogen fixation. the role of microorganisms in sewage and domestic treatment and biodegradation of complex chemical compounds and recalcitrants. students will be able to : • Understand the importance of microbial interactions and the effects on the environment. BMT 302/3: Environmental Microbiology The course emphasises on the principles of microbial behavior in an ecosystem. will also be discussed. extreme environments. methods of separation and purification of materials from different types of fermentors. development of microbial community and microbial activities which have economic and social implications. 217 . In relation to that. agriculture and environment fields. fermentation. students will be able to : • Describe the basic concepts in general virology and its significant in medical. air pollution and its prevention. immobilization of biocatalyst (cells and enzymes) and biocatalytic fermentors. • Understand and appreciate the virus existence.

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. students will be able to: • Manage time between lab work and lectures. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. BTT 300/8: Project in Biotechnology In this course. BTT 302/3: Fermentation Technology The major topics covered in this course are organism selection. The technology and kinetics of large scale fermentations will also be discussed. the final year student is offered a research project that introduce the students to research methods for solving a proposed problem. • Prepare a thesis and a scientific report. • Present an oral scientific seminar. • Produce and maintain healthy mammalian cell cultures. • Establish plant cell suspension cultures for the production of secondary metabolites. fermenter design and operation. cell cultures in plant breeding.• Explain various downstream processes and enrichment techniques. Among the areas covered are: methods for culturing and maintaining cell cultures. • Execute plant modification technique for production of transgenic plants. The results of the project will be presented in a seminar and a thesis at the end of the academic year. students will be able to: • Understand different plant tissue culture techniques for mass propagation of plantlets and for germplasm conservation. hormones and interferons. improvement and preservation. • Understand the importance of aseptic techniques and to describe the reasons for the use of cell cultures and the types of culture which may be used. • Manage and carryout a Biotechnology research project. hybridisation and organogenesis (plants). monoclonal antibodies. • Describe various purification techniques and chromatography principles. BTT 301/3: Tissue Culture Technology This course will discuss current developments in the application of plant and animal cell culture in biotechnology. and biotransformations involving free and immobilised cells/enzymes. production of metabolites. coordination of microbial metabolism. industrial waste treatment. 218 . substrate and inoculum preparation.

bioinformatics and heterologous protein over-expression. • Engineer biochemical processes involving microbial or enzymatic product formation. Latest tools dealing with bioinformatics will be presented and practised. scale-up processes. selectivity and factors involved in controlling bioreactor systems. this course will introduce the students to various techniques involved in genetic engineering such as library construction. plant genetic transformation. 219 . • Understand operational stability. agitation and aeration. The operational stability and selectivity and performance of bioreactor systems will also be discussed. Topics to be discussed will include fermentation kinetics in batch. students will be able to : • Manipulate microbial metabolism. • Understand the principles and operation of a bioreactor and auxilliary instrumentations. gene cloning. • Discuss biochemical reactions in wastewater treatment processes. • Develop a fermentation process train. filtration.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. • Discuss biological reactions involving free and immobilised cells/enzymes. BTT 304/3: Genetic Engineering Taking off from “BTT 202/3: Techniques in Biotechnology”. fed-batch and continuous cultures. Students completing the course would have sound footing in basic techniques to conduct research in molecular genetics with minimal high- level supervision. The course includes engineering processes in large scale fermentation and process control for product formation. extraction. instrumentation for process control and downstream processes such as centrifugation. BTT 303/3: Biochemical Engineering The objective of this course is to introduce of engineering methods and principles in industrial fermentation processes. • Describe mathematically enzymatic and microbal fermentation kinetics. sterilization of media and air. students will be able to : • Appreciate the importance of engineering principles in applied science. broth rheology. industrial chromatographic techniques and purification. prepare substrate and inoculum. involving upstream and downstream processes. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course.

Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. technique and skill to identify parasites. The course will be taught from a global viewpoint. and preautions/hygienic steps for disease control. treatment using drug/anthelmintics. 220 . • Identify the life cycle end ecology of some arthropod vector as well as parasites and pathogens. blood and other organs will be introduced. • Perform Bioinformatics analysis. etc BVT 212/2: Basic Parasitology Practicals This course will give emphasis to protozoan animals and helminthes that cause diseases in man and domestic animals. • Perform genetic engineering techniques. nematodes and trematodes. Insect of medical importance and its involvement with other animals in relation to disease epidemiology will be discussed. • Determine parasitic infection and use current knowledge. trypanosomiasis. students will be able to : • Understand genetic engineering techniques. vertebrates. students will be able to: • Identify some protozoan and helminthes that cause diseases in human and domestic animals and demonstrate essential knowledge in taxonomy. specimen to be studied will include tapeworms. Vector insect groups will be emphasized. with emphasis on interactions (parasitism and symbiosis). The taxonomy and morphology of protozoa in the intestine. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. with emphasis on the ecology and biology of arthropod populations. effects of parasites on their hosts and the ecology of parasites and vectors. students will be able to: • Understand the basic biological concept of vectors and parasite diseases. life cycles. dengue fever. For helminthes. parasites and pathogens.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. morphology and physiology of some protozoa and helminthes in animals. BVT 211/3: Biology of Vectors and Parasites Students will be exposed to the biological concepts encompassing parasites and vectors. • Apply knowledge of vector an parasites to differentiate major types of diseases like malaria.

• Understand the role of insects in transmission of diseases. students will also learn the philosophy of urban entomology and concepts of human environment. ecology and management of medically- important insects (mosquitoes. behaviour. Hymenoptera. • Understand the basic philosophy of urban pest management. their classification and mounting for permanent display.• Understand and adhere to professional parasitological practices and responsible to the public’s interest. bed bugs and stored product insects). • Demonstrate skill in the collection of insects. filariasis. as well as diagnosis of several diseases caused by insect vectors. students will be able to : • Carry out research and solving scientific problems. Emphasis will be given on Malaysian insect pest species and insect orders such as Diptera. In addition. It aims to expose the final year students to research methodology which are commonly use for solving a proposed problem. 221 . Hemiptera. Mallophaga. behavior and management of medical and urban insect pests. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. Anoplura. ants. technical support structures. The role of insect vectors in the transmission of tropical diseases (malaria. BVT 311/4: Medical and Urban Entomology This course discusses the biology. career development opportunities. • Verifies the impact of parasitological solutions in a global economic environmental and societal context. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. role of journals. Blattodea. and can explore some research areas of the discipline. termites. • Use current technique in various ecosystems. Japanese-B encephalitis. and others) will also be discussed. BVT 300/8: Project in Biology and Management of Vectors and Parasites This course involves with students each doing a research as a final year research project for two semesters. Siphonaptera. house flies and biting flies) and urban insects (cockroaches. students will be able to : • Understand the biology. • Apply professional working environments and activities. The results of the project will be presented in a thesis and a viva voce at the end of the project. Coleoptera and Lepidoptera. • Use the acquired knowledge for future studies on the control of vectors and parasites. dengue. biocoenoses and urban ecosystem.

lice. Students are also exposed to insect sampling and culture technigues and techniques for the bioefficacy evaluation of insecticide products. houseflies and rodents. BVT 313/4: Medical and Veterinary Parasitology This course will discuss important aspects of protozoa and helminths that infect man and animals. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. and biting hornets. domestic ants. Zoonotic diseases will also be discussed. pathogenesis. behavior and control of medically important parasites. students will be able to : • Comprehend the basic biological concept and morphology of vector and urban pests. • Apply knowledge of parasite classification and their evolution in order to understand effective methods used for controlling these parasites • Discuss various aspects of important groups of protozoa and helminthes which infect and cause diseases in man and domestic animals. termites. BVT 312/2: Practicals in Vectors and Urban Pests This course gives students an insight into various biological aspects and identification of vectors such as mosquitoes. wood-boring beetles. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. cockroaches. epidemiology. students will be able to: • Understand the biology. pathological effects. anatomy and physiology. prevention and disease control. • Understand the role of parasite and prevention on some zoonotic diseases. fabric moths. • Understand the taxonomy. Topics in this course will include epidemiology. chemotherapy. Emphasis will be given on protozoan and helminthic diseases of man and domestic animals in Malaysia and Asia. ants. pathology and parthenogenesis and control methods of parasite. culture technique. house flies and biting flies as well as urban pests such as cockroaches. • Select techniques and comparison of household insecticide in controlling vectors and urban pests. • Indentify the species. Emphasis is given on the habitats of these insects as well as control approaches that can be under taken to overcome the breeding of such insects. diagnosis. life cycle. • Apply knowledge of vectors and urban pests in controlling their abundance and population dynamics.• Plan and design an integrated pest management programme against medical and urban insect pests in a specific environment. life cycle and ecology on mosquitoes. 222 .

photosynthesis. photorespiration. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. • To calibrate size of adult and eggs of nematode.. and cestode. BBT 213/4: Plant Physiology and Development This course involves the various aspects of plant growth and development such as water and nutrients transportation. metabolism and nitrogen fixation. Various types of mutations and their consequences and also the behaviour of chromosomes in euploids and aneuploids. stool and blood film examinations. trematode. enhance vegetative propagation and production of secondary products will be emphasized. photoperiodism and developmental regulatory systems. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. increase resistance of plants to herbicides and pathogens. • Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamentals plant biochemistry and metabolism. • Diagnose several diseases caused by parasites. BBT 301/3: Plant Genetics The course is tailored to provide a comprehensive understanding in the area of plant genetics. students will be able to : • Demonstrate competency in conducting parasitology practicals. seed dormancy. including photosynthesis process and roles of hormones in plant growth and development. The role of plant physiology in some aspects of biotechnology such as to improve crop yield. Emphasize will be given on the areas of advanced Mendelian and non- Mendalian genetics together with their application in agriculture. Techniques that will be taught include post-mortem of small animals (mice. Various types of plant 223 .BVT 314/2: Advanced Practicals in Parasitology This practical course is intended to expose students to various parasitological techniques which can help a parasitologist in carrying out research. germination. plant development. and protozoan slide. • Prepare preserve specimens and also thick and thin slides. students will be able to: • Understand the concept of plant physiology and development from the perspectives of biochemical and genetic processes. including those of extreme environments.). • Describe in detail plant morphological and physiological responses and adaptations to variations in selected environmental variables. frogs. The effect of transposition will also be discussed. etc. including blood stain. • Inspect various types of slides.

and describe factors that contributes towards phenotipic variance • differentiate the structure and features of the three plant genomes BBT 302/3: Economic Botany This course will discuss the relationship between plants and man. 224 .breeding systems will be introduced. • Understand the importance of plant to the history and culture of human and their economic importance. centre of origin and Vavilor's theory about economic plants are included. linkage and gene mapping as well as the application of recombinant DNA technology in plant. namely erosion of plant genetic resource variability and plant conservation. students will be able to : • understand advanced Mendelian and non Mendelian genetics application of Mendelian genetic in agriculture • know molecular basis of inheritance. Student will be introduced to plant genetic resources. products. Emphasis will also be given on the areas of evolution and chromosome changes. • Equip with knowledge on the relationship between plant. Evolution of cereal plants such as rice. food source and the future of plants. • Understand the importance of various plant groups. Important plant groups from the economic point of view products and use will also be taught. and understand chromosome behavior in euploids and aneuploids • know the objectives and the types of plant breeding system • map the gene arrangement based on three factor linkage analysis • describe factors that are required for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium to apply and those that violates the equilibrium. The green revolution and problems of food sources will be discussed. economy and human. the origins of agriculture and the influence of plants on history. maize and wheat. students will be able to : • Understand the basic and applied concept of economic botany. Answering evolutionary and plant population questions using numerous genetic / molecular approaches will be provided. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. gene mutation. diseases and genetic resources. economy and culture of man. the mobile genetic elements and itsconsequences after transposition. These will include aspects of plant diseases and their consideration concerning world problems about plant usage. In addition the characteristics of the three plant genomes will be discussed. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. the biology of eukaryotic genes.

225 . confocal and electron microscopes will be taught and demonstrated. Basic principles and applications of light. numerical aperture. freeze drying) and analysis equipment (Kjeldahl. Students will be given the opportunity to study techniques in fixation and preservation of specimens. Learning Outcomes At the end of this course. extraction and purification and analysis such as respirometer. techniques and use of laboratory equipment such as Centrifuge. atomic spectrophotometer. namely theory and practical. and depth of field will also be taught. Concepts such as resolution. staining and sectioning. Spectrophotometer. CO2 & O2 meters). BOT 205/3: Microscopy and Histological Techniques This course is aimed at introducing students to the basic principles and concepts of microscopic and histological techniques. Gas Chromatography. kjeldahl. dark- field. fluorescence. students will be required to give a seminar and an essay on the topic which has been researched on. electrophoresis. Freeze dryer.BOE 201/3: Biological Instrumentation This course is intended to introduce students to the theoretical principles and use of laboratory equipment. contrast. Among the principles/techniques that will be discussed are assay principles. UV/Vis. Student will be requested to conduct data mining on a relevant topic through the use of library facilities and the internet. The course is divided into two parts. phase contrast. • Improve on their soft skill namely in presenting their findings orally. manometer. and the preparation of histological slides. Subsequently. This course is geared for students that are interested in courses that involve the study and efficient use of laboratory equipment in research. flame photometer and pH. construction and use of the microtome. illumination. students should be able to understand the theoretical principles. students will be able to : • Use the internet and library in data mining in their relevant fields. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. emphasis being given to the practical aspects. spectrophotometry. Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). Electrophoresis. chromatography. electroforesis and chromatography. Emphasis will be given to the use of extractor equipment (centrifuge. Flame photometer and other analysis equipments BOE 300/2: Special Topics in Biology This course is intended to increase and deepen students’ knowledge in their respective fields of specialization.

Coelenterata. Adaptive radiation and success shown by various groups of vertebrates will be presented and compared with the present-day fauna. functional homology and life cycles. Ostracoderm. Placoderma. • Understand the classification of invertebrates such as Protozoa. Chondrichthyes. species evolution. Echiinodermata. function and adaptation of invertebrates. • Gain basic knowledge on the current informations pertaining to the microscopic and histological techniques technologies. Porifera. Birds and Mammals) will be discussed with reference to vertebrate Paleontology and modern structure. evolution. • Understand the functions of the microscope components and their basic principles.g. Nematoda. and render the details visible to the eye. anatomy. Arthropoda and Annelida. students will be able to: • Understand how a microscope accomplishes its three tasks: produce a magnified image of the specimen (magnification). Several phyla will be discussed. • Master selected microscopic preparations and also understand basic histological techniques.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. • Understand the diversity. Reptiles. namely on classification and phylogeny. Mollusca. Characters and success of various vertebrate (e. camera. adaptation. Mollusca. Nematoda. • Differentiate different groups of invertebrate animals. invertebrates diversity. Osteichthyes. including Protozoa. Amphibians. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. 226 . Platyhelminthes. structure. BZT 211/3: Invertebrate Zoology This course will discuss numerous aspects of Invertebrate Zoology. Cnidaria. Porifera. structure. BZT 212/3: Vertebrate Zoology The course will discuss Hemichordata and Protochordata and their relationships with the Vertebrates. function and physiology in order to survive in various environments. The main focus will be on adaptation. students will be able to: • Understand the phylogeny of invertebrates. separate the details in the image (resolution). Echinodermata and Annelida. Agnatha. Platyhelminthes. or other imaging device (contrast).

circulation. students will be able to : • Understand the historical background. function. In addition. Other important topic includes social behaviour and their importance. adaptation and conservation of vertebrate animals. students will be able to : • Understand the basic concept of animal physiology. • Understand the important subjects in behaviour such as mating strategies. • Understand different group of vertebrate animals. Emphasis will be placed on the functional characteristics of the respiratory. BZT 213/3: Animal Behaviour Students will be introduced to animal behaviour as a scientific discipline that touches basic concepts of ethiology. excretion. motivation and its function in behaviour and physiological influence towards behaviour will also be discussed. territorial concept. and earliest principles of the vertebrate zoology. social organisation and the function of dominant hierarchy. students will be able to : • Understand the basic concepts of behaviour and ethology. • Understand the functional characteristics of respiratory.Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. excretion. circulation. • Understand the diversity. • Understand the function and importance of behaviour and the evolution of behaviour. type of stimulants and how it is accepted will be discussed. 227 . social and learning behaviour. nervous and reproductive systems in animals. activity and altruistic and behavioural evolution. BZT 214/3: Animal Physiology This course centers on the mechanisms which underlie the functioning of the main physiological systems in Vertebrates. • Deliver effective scientific essay on vertebrate zoology. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. homeostatis. territoriality. pioneering scientists. communications. nervous and reproductive systems and their control. evolution. • Understand the mechanisms and the different functioning of the main physiological systems in animals. The way a particular behaviour is expanded. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course.

• Understand the different approach in the control of vertebrate pest. mechanical and biological controlling methods as well as reduction of their source of food and regulatory control measures. • Understand the importance of vertebrate pest in the urban. Combinations of two or more methods of control to manage vertebrate pests. namely physical.BZT 311/3: Biology of Vertebrate Pest Animals This course will discuss on numerous factors which allow classes of vertebrates to live as pest populations and various steps taken to control them. aspects of action. toxicity. environmental and economical aspects will also be discussed. students will be able to: • Understand the factors which enable various group of vertebrates to survive as pest animals. • Deliver effective scientific report and presentation. Within the context of chemical control. chemical. agricultural and secondary growth areas. Learning Outcomes At the end of the course. and the best possible approach and its effects on the ecological. physiology and pesticide technology as well as its effect on environment and magnification will be discussed. 228 .

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 229 .

The program emphasizes the applications of mathematics and gives emphasis to computing in the study of mathematical sciences. The School offers four areas of specialization: (i) Applied Statistics (ii) Operations Research (iii) Mathematical Modelling (iv) Mathematics and Economics The above specializations were created in an effort to produce trained graduates in areas of applied mathematical sciences to support the nation’s manpower need. 230 . The courses have been structured to provide a specialized and solid applied mathematical sciences education. and providing a strong commitment towards the aspiration of society. SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES (www.my/math) INTRODUCTION The Bachelor of Applied Science degree program in this School was introduced in the 1987/88 Academic Session. developing holistic individuals. MISSION To lead and innovate in achieving excellence in Mathematical Sciences at the international level through advancing and disseminating knowledge and truth. The skills acquired provides a solid foundation for further development of mathematical skills. VISION To be a recognised department of mathematics that can attract excellent students and produce quality mathematicians nationally and internationally.mat.usm. instilling qualities that stress academic excellence and professionalism. the country’s vision and universal aspirations. This is to produce graduates who are capable of carrying out research and development works in industries as well as in public and private agencies.

(iv) have an educational experience that motivates them to pursue life-long learning. (v) have a solid foundation to be enrolled in a university graduate programme or employed. (iii) possess professional attitudes. the student is 1. Programme Learning Outcomes At the end of the program. able to apply analytical skills and is competent in a variety of operations research techniques to solve problems. 7. Programme Learning Outcomes At the end of the program. 4. 3. 231 . (ii) have a solid foundation for further development of mathematical skills. 6. 5. the student is 1. able to work collaboratively as part of a team. (iv) have an educational experience that motivates them to pursue life-long learning. competent in the fundamental concepts. able to identify. able to convey ideas and statistical knowledge clearly and effectively in both written and oral form. formulate. analyze and solve applied and industrial problems through the integration of operations research techniques with other disciplines. professional. BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE (OPERATIONS RESEARCH) Programme Objectives Graduates of Bachelor of Applied Science (Operations Research) will (i) have a specialized and solid operations research education. formulate. able to be a skilled and innovative leader. able to pursue independent study and continuous personal and professional development. (ii) have a solid foundation for further development of mathematical skills. theories and results of statistics and able to apply skills in statistical reasoning. 9. responsible and ethical. (iii) possess professional attitudes. 3. competent in the fundamental concepts and theories of operations research. (v) have a solid foundation to be enrolled in a university graduate programme or employed. able to identify. analyze and solve applied and industrial problems through the integration of statistical techniques with other disciplines. 8. able to identify business and entrepreneurship opportunities. 2. good ethics and leadership qualities. The student is also competent in a variety of statistical techniques to solve problems. good ethics and leadership qualities. 2.BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE (APPLIED STATISTICS) Programme Objectives Graduates of Bachelor of Applied Science (Applied Statistics) will (i) have a specialized and solid applied statistics education.

the student is 1. (iii) possess professional attitudes. 7. 9. 3. 6. (iii) possess professional attitudes. able to be a skilled and innovative leader. 232 . capable of identifying. 5. 2. 8. a critical thinker who adopts a scientific approach towards solving problems. (iv) have an educational experience that motivates them to pursue life-long learning. computational techniques and ICT. responsible and ethical. a skilled and innovative leader and manager of resources. professional. good ethics and leadership qualities. a team player who is accountable and responsible. (iv) have an educational experience that motivates them to pursue life-long learning. able to convey ideas and operations research knowledge clearly and effectively in both written and oral form. 4. BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE (MATHEMATICAL MODELLING) Programme Objectives Graduates of Bachelor of Applied Science (Mathematical Modelling) will (i) have a specialized and solid mathematical modelling education. (v) have a solid foundation to be enrolled in a university graduate programme or employed. good ethics and leadership qualities. able to pursue independent study and continuous personal and professional development. formulating. 7. Programme Learning Outcomes At the end of the program. able to identify business and entrepreneurship opportunities. able to work collaboratively as part of a team. analyzing and solving problems in science and engineering. capable of improving his or her mathematical knowledge as part of a life long learning process. an effective and confident communicator. (ii) have a solid foundation for further development of mathematical skills. 5. responsible and ethical. (v) have a solid foundation to be enrolled in a university graduate programme or employed. (ii) have a solid foundation for further development of mathematical and economics skills. 8. knowledgeable in the fundamentals of mathematical sciences and competent in the application of mathematical modelling to science and engineering. BACHELOR OF APPLIED SCIENCE (MATHEMATICS AND ECONOMICS) Programme Objectives Graduates of Bachelor of Applied Science (Mathematics and Economics) will (i) have a specialized and solid mathematics and economics education. skilled in computer programming. professional. 6.4.

is professional. responsible and ethical. analyze and solve economic problems through the integration of mathematical techniques . is competent in a variety of mathematical techniques to solve problems.Programme Learning Outcomes At the end of the program. 5. is able to pursue independent study and continuous personal and professional development. is able to identify. 8. understands how mathematical concepts and processes can be used to develop economics and financial knowledge. 7. is able to work collaboratively as part of a team. 6. 2. 3. is able to communicate ideas and knowledge in mathematics and economics clearly and effectively in both written and oral form. the student 1. 233 . is able to identify business and entrepreneurship opportunities. is able to be a skilled and innovative leader. 9. 4. formulate.

Ihsanul Anwar Shamsur Rahim Ms. Mohd. Rahman Science (Mathematics) (Mathematics and (Applied Statistics/Operations Applied Science Academic Economics) Research) (Mathematical Modelling) Co-ordinator ASSISTANT REGISTRARS Mr. Nor Farah Shaik Omar Senior Assistant Registrar Assistant Registrar 234 . Ali (Academic and Student Development) (Industry & Community Network) (Graduate Studies and Research) PROGRAM CHAIRPERSONS Assoc. Ismail DEPUTY DEANS Assoc. Prof. Adam Baharum Assoc. MAIN ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF DEAN Professor Ahmad Izani Md. Tahir Ismail Assoc. Prof. Dr. Dr. Prof. Hailiza Kamarulhaili Professor Low Heng Chin Professor Jamaludin Md. Prof. Rosmanjawati Andrew Rajah Applied Science Applied Science Ahmad Abdul Majid Abd.

my SENIOR ASSISTANT REGISTRAR Mr.usm.my (Acting (1/3/12-31/12/12): Dr.my DEPUTY DEAN (Graduate Studies and Research) Professor Jamaludin Md. Ahmad Abd.usm. Prof.my ASSISTANT REGISTRAR Ms.my 235 . Adam Baharum adam@cs. Andrew Rajah andy@cs.usm. Ismail dean_mat@usm. Hajar Sulaiman hajar@cs.usm. Hailiza Kamarulhaili ddsa_mat@usm. Ali ddpg_mat@usm.my APPLIED SCIENCES (MATHEMATICS AND ECONOMICS) Dr.my DEPUTY DEAN (Industry & Community Network) Professor Low Heng Chin hclow@cs. Nor Farah Shaik Omar nor_farah@usm.usm. Ihsanul Anwar Shamsur Rahim anwar@usm.usm.my APPLIED SCIENCE (MATHEMATICAL MODELLING) Assoc. Prof. Rosmanjawati Abdul Rahman rosmanjawati@usm. Prof. Majid majid@cs.my PROGRAM CHAIRPERSONS SCIENCE (MATHEMATICS) Assoc. Mohd Tahir Ismail mtahir@cs.my APPLIED SCIENCES (APPLIED STATISTICS/OPERATIONS RESEARCH) Assoc.my DEPUTY DEAN (Academic and Student Development) Assoc. Prof.ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF ADMINISTRATION E-mail DEAN Professor Ahmad Izani Md.my ACADEMIC CO-ORDINATOR Dr.

my Sek Siok Kun.my Ahmad Abd.usm. Dr 3960 shidah@cs.usm.my 236 .my Fam Pei Shan. Dr 4778 rosmanjawati@usm.usm.my Norlida Mohd. Dr 4767 atinah@cs.my Farah Aini Abdullah. Dr 3943 kongvp@cs.my Abd. Dr 2070 sklee@cs.my Ang Miin Huey.my Husna Hasan.usm.my Hailiza Kamarulhaili.my Azhana Ahmad.my ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Adam Baharum.usm.my Ahmad Izani Md. Noor.my Suraiya Kassim.my Michael Khoo Boon Chong. Dr 3945 arahni@cs. Mohd. Dr 3969 husna@cs.my Low Heng Chin.my SENIOR LECTURER Adli Mustafa. Ali.my Andrew Rajah.usm. Ms 4773 ksuraya@cs. Dr 3941 mkbc@usm. Ali.my Lee See Keong.usm. Dr 3940 zarita@cs.my Ena Jamal.my Zarita Zainuddin. Piah.my Shamsul Rijal Muhammad Sabri.my Jamaludin Md. Ms 3958 norlida@sm. Ali.my Norhashidah Hj. Dr 3657 izani@cs. Ms 2356 hayati@cs. Ismail.my Hajar Sulaiman.usm.usm. Dr 3966 rosihan@cs.usm. Dr 4771 azhana@usm. Dr 4780 andy@cs.my Joshua Ignatius. Dr 2428 saratha@usm. Dr 5908 fpeishan@usm.my Kong Voon Pang.usm.usm.my Norhashidah Awang. Mr 3942 adam@cs.my Nuzlinda Abdul Rahman. Rahni Mt.usm. Dr 4774 shidah@usm.my Mohd.usm.usm. Dr 3641 hclow@cs. Tahir Ismail. Dr 3384 josh@usm.usm. Dr 4779 hajar@cs. Dr 4765 farahaini@usm. Ms 3658 ena@cs.my Noor Atinah Ahmad. Majid. Dr 2071 mtahir@cs.usm. Dr 3648 hailiza@cs. Dr 3968 adli@cs.usm.usm. Dr 3965 majid@cs. Dr 4781 nuzlinda@usm.usm.usm.my Ong Hong Choon.ACADEMIC STAFF PROFESSOR TELEPHONE E-MAIL EXTENSION Dato’ Rosihan M. Dr 4772 mathamh@cs.my Rosmanjawati Abdul Rahman.usm.my Saratha A/P Sathasivam. Dr 4763 hcong@cs. Dr 5338 sksek@usm. Dr 3656 jamaluma@cs.my Noor Hayati Marzuki.usm. Dr 3964 rijal@usm.

Dr 4770 syteh@usm. Abd. Dr 4783 ahyahya@cs.my Yahya Abu Hasan.Syakila Ahmad. Ms 4775 zalila@cs.my Tan Guat Yew. Dr 4782 syakilaahmad@usm.my SUPPORT / TECHNICAL STAFF Nur Atiqah Jamaluddin Secretary Norrizah Hj.my Yazariah Mohd Yatim.my Zalila Ali.usm. Hamid Secretary Azizah Abdul Rani Senior Administrative Assistant (Clerical/Operation-Finance) Faridah Hashim Senior Administrative Assistant (Clerical/Operation) Khairul Azly Abdul Kadir Administrative Assistant (Clerical/Operation) Rohartina Razali Administrative Assistant (Clerical/Operation) Suriati Mukhtar Administrative Assistant (Clerical/Operation) Yusnita Yusop Administrative Assistant (Clerical/Operation) Zalem Tekor Administrative Assistant (Clerical/Operation) Syed Mohamed Hussain Syed Osman Senior Technician Hartini Ahmad Computer Technician Arzahar Ismail Senior Office Assistant Mohd Ibrahim Mohd Shariff Senior Office Assistant 237 .my Teh Su Yean.usm. Ms 3944 gytan@cs. Dr 3384 yazariahmy@usm.usm.

Note that some minor programs offer 16 units and some offer 20 units.REQUIREMENT OF THE PROGRAM (a) Specialization in Applied Statistics. Operations Research and Mathematical Modelling Type of Courses Classification Units Core T 70 Minor / Elective M/E 20-24* University U 15-18 Total Number of Units 105-112 * A student who choose a Minor needs to accumulate 16 or 20 units from one of the Minor programs and obtain units from MAT181/4 : Programming for Scientific Applications as an Elective. (b) Specialization in Mathematics and Economics Type of Courses Classification Units 92 (Mathematics : 50) Core T (Economics : 42) University U 15-18 Total Number of Units 107-110 238 .

CORE COURSES Students in the specialization areas of Applied Statistics. Operations Research and Mathematical Modelling must accumulate 70 units while 92 units is required for students in Mathematics and Economics: Applied Statistics Compulsory (46 units) MAT 101/4 : Calculus MAT 111/4 : Linear Algebra MAT 161/4 : Elementary Statistics MAT 102/4 : Advanced Calculus MAT 122/4 : Differential Equations I MSG 162/4 : Applied Statistical Methods MAT 251/4 : Introduction to Operations Research MAT 263/4 : Probability Theory MSG 285/2 : Statistical Laboratory MSG 286/2 : Operations Research Laboratory MAT 363/4 : Statistical Inference MSG 391/6 : Project Specialization Options (16 units) MSG 262/4 : Quality Control MSG 265/4 : Design and Analysis of Experiments MSG 366/4 : Multivariate Analysis MSG 367/4 : Time Series Analysis MSG 368/4 : Sample Survey and Sampling Technique Operations Research Compulsory (46 units) MAT 101/4 : Calculus MAT 111/4 : Linear Algebra MAT 161/4 : Elementary Statistics MAT 102/4 : Advanced Calculus MAT 122/4 : Differential Equations I MSG 162/4 : Applied Statistical Methods MAT 251/4 : Introduction to Operations Research MAT 263/4 : Probability Theory MSG 285/2 : Statistical Laboratory MSG 286/2 : Operations Research Laboratory MAT 363/4 : Statistical Inference MSG 391/6 : Project 239 .

Operations Research and Mathematical Modelling students are also required to acquire 8 units from the following list: BOM 111/4 : Biodiversity BOM 112/4 : Ecology CPT 112/4 : Discrete Structure CPT 114/4 : Logic & Applications KFT 131/3 : Physical Chemistry I KOT 121/3 : Organic Chemistry I KTT 111/3 : Non-Organic Chemistry I KUT 101/2 : Chemistry Practical I KUT 102/2 : Chemistry Practical II ZCA 101/4 : Physics I (Mechanics) ZCA 102/4 : Physics II (Electricity & Magnetism) 240 .Specialization Options (16 units) MSG 252/4 : Linear and Integer Programming MSG 253/4 : Queueing System and Simulation MSG 354/4 : Network Flows MSG 355/4 : Inventory Control MSG 356/4 : Mathematical Programming Mathematical Modelling Compulsory (62 units) MAT 101/4 : Calculus MAT 111/4 : Linear Algebra MAT 161/4 : Elementary Statistics MAT 102/4 : Advance Calculus MAT 122/4 : Differential Equations I MAT 202/4 : Introduction to Analysis MAT 203/4 : Vector Calculus MAT 222/4 : Differential Equations II MAT 282/4 : Engineering Computation I MSG 228/4 : Introduction to Modelling MSG 281/2 : Modelling Laboratory I MSG 282/2 : Modelling Laboratory II MSG 322/4 : Fluid Mechanics MSG 327/4 : Mathematical Modelling MSG 389/4 : Engineering Computation II MSG 391/6 : Project Applied Statistics.

Mathematics and Economics Compulsory Mathematics Courses (46 units) MAT 101/4 : Calculus MAT 111/4 : Linear Algebra MAT 161/4 : Elementary Statistics MAT 102/4 : Advanced Calculus MAT 122/4 : Differential Equations I MSG 162/4 : Applied Statistical Methods MAT 251/4 : Introduction to Operations Research MAT 263/4 : Probability Theory MSG 285/2 : Statistical Laboratory MSG 286/2 : Operations Research Laboratory MAT 363/4 : Statistical Inference MSG 391/6 : Project Specialization Options (4 units) MSG 356/4 : Mathematical Programming MSG 367/4 : Time Series Analysis Compulsory Economics Courses (24 units) SKW 109/3 : Introduction to Economic Issues SEW 101/3 : Microeconomics SEW 103/3 : Macroeconomics SEW 202/3 : Intermediate Microeconomics SEW 204/3 : Intermediate Macroeconomics SEW 303/3 : Economics History SEP 206/3 : Malaysian Economics SEP 324/3 : Elementary Econometrics Specialization Options (18 units) Choose 2 from 4 of the following courses: SEU 224/3 : Agricultural Marketing and Cooperative Economics SEU 227/3 : Development Economics SEU 230/3 : Labour Economics SEU 231/3 : Islamic Economics 241 .

history and philosophy of science courses. students of the School of Mathematical Sciences are allowed to take any course outside the Schools of Mathematical Sciences. Banking and Financial Market SEU 335E/3 : Public Sector Economics I SEU 336E/3 : Environment Economics and Natural Resource SEU 339E/3 : Economic Planning and Project Analysis Choose 2 from 5 of the following courses: SEU 411E/3 : International Trade SEU 413E/3 : Monetary Economics SEU 416E/3 : Public Sector Economics II SEU 421E/3 : International Finance SEU 422E/3 : Applied Economics SKILL / OPTIONAL COURSES In order to fulfill this requirement. 242 . thinking techniques. foreign languages. Students are encouraged to take English language [LHP code]. Chemical Sciences. Biological Sciences and Physics.Choose 2 from 5 of the following courses: SEU 332/3 : Behavioral Economics SEU 334/3 : Money.

MAT 101/4 : Calculus . MSG 368/4 : Sample Survey and MSG 162 (S) 2 Sampling Technique 23. MAT 161/4 : Elementary Statistics . MSG 285/2 : Statistical Laboratory MSG 162 (S) 1 15. 1. MSG 262/4 : Quality Control MSG 162 (S) 2 13. MAT 181/4 : Programming for . MSG 286/2 : Operations Research MAT 251 (S) 2 Laboratory 16. MSG 367/4 : Time Series Analysis MSG 285 (S) 2 22. MAT 111/4 : Linear Algebra . 1. 2 MAT 102 (S) 10. MSG 253/4 : Queueing System and MAT 263 (S) and 2 Simulation MAT 181 (S) 12. MSG 356/4 : Mathematical MAT 251 (S) 2 Programming 20. MSG 162/4 : Applied Statistical MAT 161 (S) 2 Methods 8. MSG 366/4 : Multivariate Analysis MSG 162 (S) and 1 MSG 285 (S) 21. MSG 265/4 : Design and Analysis of MSG 162 (S) 2 Experiments 14. 1. MAT 102/4 : Advanced Calculus MAT 101 (S) 2 5. 2 Scientific Applications 7. MSG 252/4 : Linear and Integer MAT 251 (S) 2 Programming 11. 1 2. MSG 354/4 : Network Flows MAT 251 (S) 1 18. 2 3. MSG 355/4 : Inventory Control MAT 251 (S) 2 19. MAT 122/4 : Differential Equations I MAT 101 (S) and 2 MAT 111 (S) 6. MAT 251/4 : Introduction to MAT 111 (S) and 1 Operations Research MAT 161 (S) 9. MSG 391/6 : Project Applied Statistics : 1 and 2 MAT 263(S) and MSG 285 (S) Operations Research : MSG 286 (S) 243 . Code & Title of Courses Prerequisite Semester Offered 1. MAT 263/4 : Probability Theory MAT 161 (S) and 1. 2 4.COURSE PREREQUISITE AND SEMESTER OF OFFERING The prerequisites and semester of offering of the compulsory – core and specialization optional – core courses and MAT 181/4 are as follows: Applied Statistics Specialization / Operations Research No. MAT 363/4 : Statistical Inference MAT 263 (S) 1 17.

MAT 181/4 : Programming for . MSG 387/4 : Computer Graphics MAT 181 (S) 1 19. Mathematical Modelling Specialization Semester No. MAT 282/4 : Engineering MAT 181 (S) 1 Computation I 11. 1. MAT 222/4 : Differential Equations MAT 122 (S) 1 II 10. 1. MAT 161/4 : Elementary Statistics . MAT 102/4 : Advanced Calculus MAT 101 (S) 2 5. MSG 284/4 : Introduction to MAT 181 (S) and 2 Geometric Modelling MAT 102 (S) 15. MSG 383/4 : Data Structures for MAT 181 (S) 2 Computer Graphics 18. 1 2. MSG 389/4 : Engineering MAT 282 (S) 2 Computation II 21. Code & Title of Courses Prerequisite Offered 1. 2 Scientific Applications 7. MSG 282/2 : Modelling Laboratory MSG 281 (S) 2 II 14. 2 4. 2 3. 1. MAT 111/4 : Linear Algebra . MSG 327/4 : Mathematical MSG 228 (S) 1 Modelling 17. MSG 228/4 : Introduction to MAT 122 (S) 2 Modelling 12. MAT 122/4 : Differential Equations I MAT 101 (S) and 2 MAT 111 (S) 6. MAT 101/4 : Calculus . MSG 322/4 : Fluid Mechanics MAT 222 (S) 2 16. MAT 202/4 : Introductions to MAT 102 (S) 2 Analysis 8. MSG 281/2 : Modelling Laboratory I MAT 181 (S) 1 13. MAT 203/4 : Vector Calculus MAT 102 (S) 1 9. MSG 391/6 : Project Mathematical Modelling : 1 and 2 MSG 228 (S) Computer Modelling : MSG 284 (S) The offering and prerequisites of courses for the mathematics component of Mathematics and Economics specialization are the same as for those in Applied 244 . MSG 388/4 : Mathematical MSG 284 (S) 1 Algorithms for Computer Graphics 20.

SKW 109/3 : Introduction to Economic Issues - 2. SEU 422E/3 : Applied Economics SEW 202 (S). SEU 416E/3 : Public Sector Economics II SEW 202 (S). SEW 204/3 : Intermediate Macroeconomics SEW 103 (S) 6. SEP 324/3 : Elementary Econometrics SEW 101 (S). SEU 411E/3 : International Trade SEW 101 (S) 19. SEU 224/3 : Agricultural Marketing and SKW 109 (S) Cooperative Economics 10. then course A must be taken and assessed before course B is taken. SEW 103 (S) Analysis 18. SEW 103/3 : Macroeconomics SKW 109 (S) 4. SEW 101/3 : Microeconomics SKW 109 (S) 3. SEU 421E/3 : International Finance SEW 103 (S) 22. SEU 231/3 : Islamic Economics SKW 109 (S) 13. Statistics specialization. Code & Title of Courses Prerequisite 1. Banking and Financial Market 15. SEP 206/3 : Malaysian Economics SKW 109 (S) 8. SEU 339E/3 : Economic Planning and Project SEW 101 (S). The prerequisites of courses for the Economics component are as follows: No. SEU 413E/3 : Monetary Economics SEW 103 (S) 20. SEU 227/3 : Development Economics SKW 109 (S) 11. SEW 204 (S) Sequential prerequisite (S) means if course A is a sequential prerequisite (S) to course B. SEW 202/3 : Intermediate Microeconomics SEW 101 (S) 5. SEU 230/3 : Labour Economics SKW 109 (S) 12. SEW 103 (S) 9. SEU 335E/3 : Public Sector Economics I SEW 202 (S) 16. SEW 303/3 : Economics History 7. SEU 332/3 : Behavioral Economics SEW 101 (S) 14. 245 . SEU 334/3 : Money. SEU 336E/3 : Environment Economics and SEW 101 (S) Natural Resource 17.SEU 335E (S) 21.

Operations Research Specialization Year of Semester 1 Units Semester 2 Units Study MAT 101 4 MAT 111 4 1 MAT 161 4 MAT 102 4 MAT 181 4 MSG 162 4 4 MAT 122 4 MAT 251 4 MSG 252* 4 2 MAT 263 2 MSG 253* 4 MSG 285 MSG 286 2 MAT 363 4 MSG 355* 4 3 MSG 354* 4 MSG 356* 4 MSG 391 6 MSG 391 6 * Optional Courses : Choose 4 from the 5 listed courses.SPECIALIZATION AND COMPULSORY CORE COURSES REGISTRATION GUIDE Applied Statistics Specialization Year of Semester 1 Units Semester 2 Units Study MAT 101 4 MAT 111 4 1 MAT 161 4 MAT 102 4 MAT 181 4 MSG 162 4 MAT 122 4 MAT 251 4 MSG 262* 4 2 MAT 263 4 MSG 265* 4 MSG 285 2 MSG 286 2 MAT 363 4 MSG 367* 4 3 MSG 366* 4 MSG 368* 4 MSG 391 6 MSG 391 6 * Optional Courses : Choose 4 from the 5 listed courses. 246 .

In which case. students specializing in Mathematical Modelling will be given the option of joining the B. subject to the agreement of the Dean.Mathematical Modelling Specialization Year of Semester 1 Units Semester 2 Units Study MAT 101 4 MAT 161 4 1 MAT 111 4 MAT 102 4 MAT 181 4 MAT 122 4 MAT 222 4 MSG 228 4 2 MAT 282 4 MSG 282 2 MSG 281 2 MSG 389 4 MAT 203 4 MAT 202 4 3 MSG 327 4 MSG 322 4 MSG 391 6 MSG 391 6 At the end of their third semester. the courses to be taken are as follows: Semester Courses Unit MSG 383 4 4 MSG 282 2 MSG 284 4 MAT 203 4 5 MSG 387 4 MSG 391 6 MAT 202 4 6 MSG 388 4 MSG 391 6 247 . App. Sc (Computer Modelling) program.

MAA 102/4 : Calculus for Science Students II 3. MSG 162/4 : Applied Statistical Methods 7. MSG 262/4 : Quality Control 10. Choose 1 from these courses. MAT 263/4 : Probability Theory 9. MAA 101/4 : Calculus for Science Students I 2. b . MSS 211/4 : Modern Algebra 248 . MAT 203/4 : Vector Calculus 8. Choose 2 from these courses. MAT 122/4 : Differential Equations I 6. MAA 111/4 : Algebra for Science Students 4. Year of Semester 1 Units Semester 2 Units Study MAT 111 4 MAT 102 4 MAT 101 4 MSG 162 4 1 MAT 161 4 SEP 206 3 SKW 109 3 SEU 224b 3 SEU 227b 3 MAT 251 4 MAT 263 4 MAT 122 4 MSG 285 2 MSG 286 2 SEW 101 3 SEW 202 3 2 SEW 103 3 SEW 204 3 SEU 230b 3 SEP 304 3 SEU 231b 3 SEU 334 c 3 SEW 303 3 SEU 336 cE 3 SEU 339 cE 3 MAT 363 4 MSG 356a 4 MSG 391 6 MSG 367a 4 SEU 332c 3 MSG 391 6 3 SEU 335 cE 3 SEU 416d E 3 SEU 411d E 3 SEU 421d E 3 SEU 413d E 3 SEU 422d E 3 a Optional Courses . c .Mathematics and Economics Specialization Students are required to check the list of courses offered at the beginning of each academic session. MAA 161/4 : Statistics for Science Students 5. d Choose 2 from these courses MATHEMATICS MINOR PROGRAM 1. Choose 2 from these courses.

Besides that.5 and accumulated at least 14 units. Tan Sri Dato' Professor Sir Alexander Oppenheim Book Prize for the best first year student. Gold Medal Award to the best final year student in the field of Applied Sciences (Mathematics). Mathematical Sciences Society This society organizes various activities in order to promote Mathematics amongst USM and secondary school students. a postgraduate computer laboratory and a research and development laboratory. The Dean’s Award will be conferred to a student who has excelled both academically and in co-curriculum activities. These laboratories are equipped with MS Windows based computer facilities. Dato’ Abdul Razak Yusof Gold Medal Award to the best final year student in the field of Mathematical Sciences. Courses which they have taken to fulfill the core requirements must be replaced by the above listed courses. The Dean Lists certificates are awarded every semester to each academically excellent student who has obtained a GPA of at least 3. Only one award is available for each year of study from each program. Telesol Sdn. A student of a CGPA of 3. 2. SCHOOL’S FACILITIES The School of Mathematical Sciences has 3 undergraduate computer laboratories.7 and above in an academic session is qualified to be considered for this award. Bhd. 3. net-worked laser printers and CD Writers. the School has also a graphic calculator laboratory. Awards Besides awards from the University. Please refer to the minor program guide book for further details.Mathematics minor students have to accumulate 16 units and it is compulsory for them to take both MAA 101/4 and MAA 111/4 either as core or minor courses. Graduate Program The School also offers the following graduate programs:  Master of Science (Mathematics) by research  Master of Science (Statistics) by research  Mixed Mode Master of Science (Mathematics)  Mixed Mode Master of Science (Statistics)  Master of Science (Teaching of Mathematics) by course-work  Doctor of Philosophy by research 249 . there are 3 other specific awards for mathematics students: 1. Students of School of Mathematical Sciences are encouraged to join this society.

Bayan Lepas Technoplex Industrial Park Mukim 12 SWD 11900 Bayan Lepas. Lee Wen Jau Senior Staff Engineer / Technical Manager Intel Technology Sdn. Penang 4. Nawawi Senior Engineering Manager Advanced Manufacturing Technology Motorola Technology Sdn. Dr. Mr. Mr. Amir Hamzah Mohd. Penang 3. Free Industrial Zone. Bhd. Bayan Lepas Technoplex Industrial Park Mukim 12 SWD 11900 Bayan Lepas. Plot 2. Bhd.Industry Advisory Panels for School of Mathematical Sciences 1. Bayan Lepas 11900 Penang 2. Bhd. (Company No. 36420-H) Bayan Lepas Free Industrial Zone Phase 3. Halaman Kampung Jawa 11900 Penang 250 . Penang 5. Dr. Bhd. Edward Chooi Kok Kee Quality Management & Methods (QMM) Robert Bosch (M) Sdn. Teoh Ping Chow Principal Staff Engineer Motorola Technology Sdn. Plot 2. Ms Michelle Leong IT Program Manager & AP IT Vendor Manager IT | Information Technology Agilent Technologies Malaysia FTZ. Phase 1 11900 Bayan Lepas.

one-sided continuity. continuity on a closed interval. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. volume and surface area of revolution. implicit function and its derivatives. Operations of functions (including composite functions). completeness axiom for R .curve sketching. Techniques and applications of integration: Various techniques of integration. area. limit theorems. arc length. find the derivative of functions using various rules of differentiation 3. Antiderivatives. prove. properties of x →0 x limits (uniqueness. proof is emphasized using definition of limit. mean value theorem. x . integratibility. Derivatives: Concept of derivative. fundamental theorem of calculus. properties and rules of differentiation. and their connection with differentiation and integration 2. Rolle’s theorem. squeezing principle. Parametric representation for curves. [ x ] . Riemann integral: Upper and lower sums. apply method in differential and integral calculus to problems in life and physical sciences 251 . preservation of order).chain rule. rates of change and modelling problems. Exponential and logarithmic functions. students are able to 1. Continuity: Concept of continuity. trigonometric functions. interpret and apply key theorems in differential and integral calculus 5. local extremum. Limit: Definition using ε − δ . know about functions and limits. integral as a limit of Riemann sums. Differentiability and continuity. Intermediate value theorem. Graph of functions. MAT 101/4 Calculus Functions: Concept of function.SYNOPSIS OF COURSES 1. concavity. rational functions. lim . Tests for monotonicity. extremum theorem. Applications . sin x One-sided limits. evaluate integral of functions using various quadrature methods 4. Inverse functions (including inverse of trigonometric functions).

T. rates of change. differential. Differentiation: Differentiability and continuity. Polar coordinates. implicit function and its derivative. Fundamental theorem of calculus. and their connection with differentiation and integration 2. L’Hospital’s rule. Antiderivative. Inc. John Wiley & Sons. 5th edition. Calculus. arc length. Reference Books 1. MAA 101/4 Calculus for Science Students I Functions: Domain. Operations of functions (including composition of functions). find the derivative of functions using various rules of differentiation 3.tangent. apply method in differential and integral calculus to problems in life and physical sciences 252 . Thomson Brooks/Cole. onto function. condition for integrability. Spivak. Integration: Definite integral as a limit of Riemann sum. Intermediate value theorem and extremum theorem. 3rd edition. 2. volume and surface area of revolution. Applications . Techniques and applications of integration: Various techniques of integration. x . Exponential function and logarithmic function. Calculus. curve sketching. transcendental functions (including hyperbolic functions). chemistry and economics. evaluate integral of functions using various quadrature methods 4. (2003). Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. M. know about functions and limits. Publish or Perish. rules of differentiation.M. Newton Raphson method. area. 2nd edition. Continuity: Concept of continuous functions. (1994). J. maximum and minimum. Calculus Vol I. Parametric representation for curves. students are able to 1. Rolle’s theorem. trapezoidal rule and applications in biology. [ x ] . 2. Apostol. range. rational functions. Stewart. Graph of functions. Limit: Concept of limit and its basic properties. chain rule. 1-1 function. 3. Inverse function. centre of gravity. mean value theorem. (1967). normal. co-domain.

proof of matrix properties in terms of linear transformation. 3. Springer-Verlag.R. kernel and images. Stewart. 2. Gauss elimination process.C. Applied Calculus. interrelate matrices with linear transformations 5. (2004). M.. (2005). 6th edition. 2. Life and Social Sciences. Pearson Addison Wesley. Thomson Brooks/Cole. MAT 111/4 Linear Algebra Vectors in R n : Vector operations. 3. R n as an inner product space. Reference Books 1. Thomas Calculus.J. inner product. Tan. equations of line and plane. Finite Dimensional Vector Space. 4. Macmillan. Cauchy Schwartz inequality. Springer-Verlag. subspace. Berrosford. Smith. Matrices: Matrix operations. and Giordano F. 3. system of linear equations (solutions in the form of homogeneous solution and particular solution). Eigen values. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. A. interrelate concepts of the vector space R n with the general vector space 3. G. cross product. students are able to 1. Leon. applications for least squares problems. column space.M. 5th edition. Vector spaces in R n : Linear independence. Linear Algebra. elementary matrix. S. 2nd edition. Applied Calculus for Managerial. use the elementary row operations to obtain solutions of systems of linear equations 2. Hass J. Thomson Brooks/Cole. Reference Books 1. identify the concepts of diagonalizing a matrix. diagonalization of matrices.D. (1998). eigen vectors. (2005). L. 253 . row space. (2003). and Rocket. (1974). J. P. Halmos. 3rd edition. Linear transformation T : R n → R m : Matrix representation of linear transformation with respect to an ordered basis. dimension. 3rd edition. R. apply concepts of inner product to find the orthonormal basis through Gram- Schmidt process and least squares solutions 4. Linear Algebra with Applications. Weir. inverse matrix. Houghton-Mifflin. 11th edition. Calculus. Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization process. row and column elementary operations. S. basis. 3rd edition. (1990). position vectors.

and Penney. solutions of linear system of equations with LU decomposition. 3. elementary matrix. finding inverse of a matrix. elementary row and column operations. Elementary Linear Algebra.. 9th edition. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. link between the orthogonality concept with the least square method to solve inconsistencies 4. Bayes Theorem. Reference Books 1. echelon form. Determinants: Finding a determinant through a minor expansion. column space and row space of a matrix. Saunders College Publication. Prentice Hall. Edward. students are able to 1. Roman.E. Gauss elimination. 2. MAA 111/4 Algebra for Science Students Matrices: Matrix operations. (2005). spanning sets and bases. S. Cramer’s rule. Null space. independence. and develope a firm understanding of the solutions structure of linear systems 2. D. 4. methods of matrix diagonalization. MAT 161/4 Elementary Statistics Numerical and graphical description of data. An Introduction to Linear Algebra with Applications. and Daniel. 3rd edition. J. (1988). (1985). 5. Matrix diagonalization: Eigen values and eigen vectors. Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization process. Elementary Linear Algebra. Introduction to probability: concept of probability.H. dimensions. C. find solutions of linear systems effectively using the theory of matrices.W. Jr. H. John Wiley & Sons. Cayley-Hamilton theorem. finding the inverse of a matrix using determinant. Anton. Vector space in R n : Concept of linear independence. Empirical law and Chebyshev theorem. B. conditional probability. Noble. describe the key concepts of Euclidean vector space  n and linear transformations on  n 3. Applied Linear Algebra. properties of determinant. Gauss- Jordan elimination. Prentice-Hall. counting techniques. rules of probability. System of linear equations : Homogeneous system and non-homogeneous system. Random variables and its probability distributions: 254 . row reduced echelon. (1988).4. solve many problems on matrix diagonalization.

“Statistics: A First Course”. Freund. students are able to 1. Mc Nemar test Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Tukey quick test. (2003). Continuous distributions: expected value and standard deviation. B.F. Poisson approximation to binomial distribution. G. Run tests: Wald Wolfowitz test.A. Hypothesis testing: mean. Alan.L. describe data graphically and numerically and communicate their meanings in general 3. & Perles. differentiate between situations that are suitable for the application of parametric methods and non-parametric methods. perform data analysis correctly and make appropriate decisions and conclusions in solving problems 5. J. contingency table-test of independence and test of homogeneity. “Linear Regression Analysis”. normal. 3. identify the appropriate statistical methods to be used in making inferences about one and two populations based on information from relevant samples 4. Estimation: point estimation. Poisson. Prentice Hall. Special continuous distributions: uniform distribution. hypergeometric. “Modern Elementary Statistics”. identify different types of data and the appropriate way to manage each type of data 2. proportions and variance of one and two populations. 2. Reference Books 1. Chi-square distribution. (2003). Prentice Hall. Tests based on binomial distribution: sign test and Cox-Stuart test. Sampling distributions: mean. Fisher exact test. proportions and variance of one and two samples. Normal approximation to binomial distribution.M. (1999).. F distribution. Wiley.E. 255 . interval estimation for mean. Chi-square test: multinomial distribution and test of goodness of fit. Tests based on rank: Wilcoxon sign rank test and Mann-Whitney test. Seber. applications of central limit theorem. proportions and variance of one and two populations. J. Freund. Poisson.Discrete distribution: expected value and standard deviation. Special discrete distributions: Bernoulli/binomial distribution. J. J.

normal. Estimation: point estimation. 4. Normal approximation to binomial distribution. Tukey quick test. conditional probability. 2. Prem. (2003). Tests based on binomial distribution: sign test and Cox-Stuart test. make statistical inferences for population parameters based on sample statistics 4. & Perles.M. Poisson. Wiley. proportions and variance of one and two populations. Continuous distributions: expected value and standard deviation. “Modern Elementary Statistics”. 3. Hypothesis testing: mean. 256 . Poisson. Fisher exact test. rules of probability. Chi-square test: multinomial distribution and test of goodness of fit. “Introductory Statistics”. Random variables and its probability distributions : Discrete distribution: expected value and standard deviation. counting techniques. Prentice Hall. Special continuous distributions: uniform distribution. Chi-square distribution. B.6. applications of central limit theorem. proportions and variance of one and two populations. S. proportions and variance of one and two samples. Poisson approximation to binomial distribution. T. Run tests: Wald Wolfowitz test. hypergeometric.E. (2005). students are able to 1. Empirical law and Chebyshev theorem. J. Freund. F distribution. Bayes Theorem. independence. identify the appropriate parametric and non-parametric methods in making statistical inferences. “Statistics: A First Course”. contingency table-test of independence and test of homogeneity. J. Freund. have a clear understanding of the basic concepts of statistics such as probability and random variables 2. McClave & Sincich. Sampling distributions: mean. MAA 161/4 Statistics for Science Students Numerical and graphical description of data. Prentice Hall. Reference Books 1. (2006). Tests based on rank: Wilcoxon sign rank test and Mann-Whitney test. J. interval estimation for mean. differentiate between discrete and continuous random variables and use them appropriately 3. (1999). Special discrete distribution: Bernoulli/binomial distribution.M. Prentice Hall. Introduction to probability: concept of probability. McNemar test Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. “Statistics”.

MAT 102/4 Advanced Calculus L’Hospital’s rule. John Wiley & Sons.M. Apostol. iterated integrals. 2. continuity. derivative and integration of these functions 5. Lagrange multiplier method. Maximum and minimum. total differential. approximation of function by Taylor’s polynomial with remainder. and their relationship 2. J. ratio test. Calculus. 5th edition. know about functions of several variables and the concepts of limit. 4. (1994). Function of several variables: Limit and continuity. n- th term test. know about sequences and series of real numbers. Publish or Perish Inc. II. (1969). Improper integrals. 3. identify different type of improper integrals and determine their convergence 4. T. Spivak. Thomson Brooks/Cole. Partial derivatives. differentiation and integration of power series term by term. root test. 2nd edition. Calculus. change of variables. Sequence and series of numbers: Monotone convergence theorem for sequence. alternating series test (may include Raabe test).M. Multiple integrals. students are able to 1. comparison test. radius of convergence. interval of convergence. (1967). Vol. integral test. 257 . Taylor Series. I. T. Apostol. Vol. directional derivatives. Stewart. 3rd edition. M. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. absolute and conditional convergence. evaluate multiple integral of functions of several variables using the iterated integral or/and transforming into other types of coordinates. Calculus. Power series. Taylor polynomials. Calculus. chain rule. John Wiley & Sons. Divergence and convergence of series.7. Reference Books 1. partial derivatives for implicit functions. (2003). find series representation for certain basic functions 3.

J. Calculus. Function of several variables: Partial derivatives. find the partial derivatives using chain rule. J. Taylor polynomials. biology and chemistry. Multiple integrals. 258 . differentiation and integration of power series term by term.J. Power series: Taylor series and Maclaurin series. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. approximation of function by Taylor’s polynomial with remainder. Pearson Addison Wesley. determine the convergence of a sequence. directional derivatives and their applications 4. 11th edition. chain rule. Differential equations: First order differential equation and methods of solution. power series and improper integrals 2. M.D. and Smith. Stewart. 2. select and use an appropriate test to determini the convergence of the series 3. applications in economics. alternating series test. R. Lagrange multiplier method. Calculus. F. integral test. Divergence and convergence of series.. (2005). ratio test.J.. n-th term test. Bradley. students are able to 1. 5th edition. Strauss. directional derivatives. 3. MAA 102/4 Calculus for Science Students II Sequence and series of numbers: Monotone convergence theorem for sequence. Prentice-Hall. radius and interval of convergence. Improper integral. 3rd edition. Hass. comparison test. (2002). Weir. Thomson. Thomas’ Calculus. and Giordano. G. Maximum and minimum. series. evaluate a double integral in cartesian and polar coordinates apply the methods in first order differential equation to problems in life and physical sciences. K.8.L. (2003). Reference Books 1. Brooks/Cole. M.

MAT 122/4 Differential Equations I Ordinary differential equations: linear and nonlinear. A brief introduction to programming concepts. Output formatting. sequence.. 6th edition. D. Basic C++ operators. Edwards.. (2005). & DiPrima. H. ecology. have quantitative reasoning skills. Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling. Strategies in solving complex problems. MAT 181/4 Programming for Scientific Applications Introduction to basic computer concepts: Computer hardware and software. Software: usage of standard software such as MATLAB is encouraged. D.. understand fundamental concepts and theory of differential equations (DE) and able to apply DE procedures in routine and non-routine concepts 2. Strings. C. M. Pointers. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. & Cullen. (2005). E. Upper Saddle River. 10. Program control structures. 3. Advanced data types: Arrays. 8th edition. The existence and uniqueness theorem. Problem solving and program design. conceptual understanding and are able to effectively communicate in mathematics. 259 . Zill. gain computational skills needed in understanding applied problems 5. Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problems. 2. R. First order equations: introduction to standard solution techniques. (2004). homogeneous and nonhomogeneous. 3rd edition.C. students are able to 1.G. R. Applications: economics. select and use appropriate DE strategies and techniques 3.9. Pacific Grove: John Wiley & Sons. selection and repetition. NJ: Pearson Education. & Penney. simple error analysis. Toronto:Thomson/Brooks/Cole. Systems of first order linear equations: introduction. Modular programming: Functions. Introduction to C++ language: Writing simple C++ programs but comprehensive. Reference Books 1. Standard methods for solving homogeneous and nonhomogeneous equations. degree and order. Power series solutions: ordinary points only. Numerical methods : Euler’s method and Heun’s method. Elementary Differential Equations & Boundary Value Problems. Second order equations with constant coefficients. Enumerations and stuctures. W. Boyce. File processing. demonstrate an understanding of the appropriate use of DE modeling 4.E. etc.

260 . Multiple linear regression model: Multicollinearity. 2nd edition. Randomized complete block design and Latin square design. Principles of experimental design: Replication. understand fundamental computer programming concepts and algorithm development in problem solving 2. Test to compare several means of treatments: Analysis of Variance Completely randomized design. (2006) “A First Book of C++: From Here to There”. files manipulation. randomization. Malik D. Course Technology. estimation and prediction. Course Technology. Penerbit USM. significance tests. pointers) which add values to the computer programs. 4. coefficient of determination. 2. Orthogonal contrast. Reference Books 1. (2002). Applied linear regression Correlation coefficient: Pearson. identification of outliers and influential observations. solve problems in mathematics and scientific applications using a computer programming language 4. 3rd edition. Norhashidah M. Friedman test and Cochran test. Thomson Learning. develop programs using advanced programming structures (modular programming. Cannon Scott (2001). Australia. residual analysis. interpreting coefficients. students are able to 1. Tukey’s test and Dunnett’s test for comparing treatment means with a control. Bronson Gary J. Post-hoc contrasts: the least significant difference method. Nonparametric tests: Kruskall-Wallis test. local control. “Understanding Programming: An Introduction Using C++”. Brooks Cole. Duncan’s multiple range test. Analysis of variance for unbalanced design. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. C++ Programming An Introduction (Reprint 2008). “C++ Programming: From Problem Analysis To Program Design”. Bonferroni test. MSG 162/4 Applied Statistical Methods Introduction to Experimental Design Elements of experimental design. median test. Simple linear regression model: Least squares method. Thomson Learning. apply appropriate programming techniques/structures and strategies in transforming the description of a problem into executable computer codes 3. 3. Test for equality of k variances.S. Ali and Tan Guat Yew. Analysis of variance approach to regression analysis. Scheffe’s test. 11. 2007. Non-parametric tests: Spearman and Kendall test.

3. Continuity: Limit of a function. An Introduction to Statistical Methods and Data Analyis. 12. D. relate topics from calculus such as limit and continuity from a more advanced view point 4. Ott. check for model assumptions 3. analyze data for regression models.C. and use them in writing proofs 3. students are able to 1.F. Wiley. Metric spaces: Limit point. connected set. Heine Borel theorem. Design and Analysis of Experiments. Cantor set. continuous function. discontinuities. continuity and connectedness. and Longnecker. 5th edition. rearrangements. 2. equicontinuous families of functions. illustrate them with examples. students are able to 1. (2003). subsequence. (2000). absolutely convergent series. completeness axiom. closed and open sets. Linear Regression Analysis. Sequence and series of functions: Pointwise convergence and uniform convergence. compact sets. construct mathematical proof using mathematical logic. Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem. Sequence and series of numbers: Convergent sequence. have a firm understanding of the real number system and its topological properties 2. interchange of limits. Seber. and Alan. select and apply the appropriate statistical technique for an experimental design 4. monotonic functions. Countability of sets. differentiate between a parametric test and a non-parametric test 5. state mathematical definitions precisely.L. upper and lower limits.A. interior point. Wiley. Reference Books 1. continuity and compactness. M.L. J. R. Duxbury. infimum and supremum. MAT 202/4 Introduction to Analysis Real numbers: Algebraic and order properties. the extended real number system. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. 261 . G. addition and multiplication of series. Montgomery. identify the different basic designs of an experiment 2. Stone-Weierstrass theorem. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. (2001). Cauchy sequence.

M. mean value theorem. divergence theorem. continuity.R. (2005). Vector Calculus. J. Differential: Limit. Matthews. 2nd edition. divergence. torsion. 3rd edition. 2. chain rule.J. students are able to 1. (1976). linearly independent vectors. 2. (1998). (1974). state and use Green’s theorem in the plane. Mathematical Analysis. implicit function theorem. Apostol. Green’s theorem. Freeman and Co. 2nd edition. independent path. MAT 203/4 Vector Calculus Vectors: Vector product. directional differentiation. curvature. Reference Books 1. (1976) Methods of Real Analysis. Vector function: Curve. surface and volume integrals 5. analyze the differential geometry of 3-dimensional curves 3. partial differentiation. divergence and curl of scalar and vector fields in terms of artesian. arc length. 262 . Rudin. W. T. cylindrical and spherical coordinates 4. S. 13. and extreme values. differential. Principles of Mathematical Analysis. 3rd edition. evaluate line. and Tromba. analytic geometric vector. evaluate scalar. global inverse. 3. R.E. Frenet’s formula. triple product. Colley. Springer-Verlag. tangential vector. tangent. W. Goldberg. Stoke’s theorem. P. A. curvilinear coordinates.H. Marsden. vector and triple products and their uses in the description of lines and planes 2. Reference Books 1. Vector Calculus.J. evaluate the gradient. McGraw Hill. change of variables in multiple integration.C. Integration: Iterated integration. Addison-Wesley. curl. Taylor’s theorem for function of several variables. divergence theorem and Stokes’ theorem. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Pearson Prentice Hall. surface integration. Inverse function theorem. (2003) Vector Calculus. double integration. line integration. 3. John Wiley & Sons.

8th edition. W. Pacific Grove: John Wiley & Sons. Partial differential equations: some introduction to partial differential equations that are normally used to solve problems in mathematical physics and methods for solving these equations. & Cullen. both homogeneous and non-homogeneous 2. & DiPrima. Fourier series and the Sturm-Liuoville problem. 2. Academic Press. (2005). standard form and simplex method. (1986). formulate problem into a linear programming model 2. Elementary Differential Equations & Boundary Value Problems. 263 . students are able to 1. Elementary Partial Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problem. interpret series expansion of functions based on infinite set of orthogonal functions into the solution of Sturm-Liouville problem 4.C.. analyze solutions of boundary-value problems for different forms of boundary and intial values. (2005). choose and use a suitable method to solve a problem 3. M.14. Linear programming: modelling. Sensitivity analysis.E.. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. 6th edition. Applications of operations research in decision analysis.C. Transportation and assignment problems. MAT 251/4 Introduction to Operations Research Scientific methods and operations research. 3. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. autonomous system and its stability. Andrews L.G. students are able to 1. Project scheduling: PERT-CPM. Exposure to some relevant software packages. graphical solution. Project planning.. D. analyze the local stability of plane autonomous systems 3. solve problems involving linear system of equations. Zill. Reference Books 1. do the economic interpretation of the optimal solution and do the sensitivity analysis.R. R. Boyce. Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problems. solve partial differential equations using separation of variables 5. MAT 222/4 Differential Equations II Advanced theory on system of differential equations and its solutions: focus will be given on methods for solving nonhomogeneous systems. 15. Orthogonal function. Toronto: Thomson/Brooks/Cole. Project crashing.

(2001). Some special distribution: Bernoulli. and Craig. Markov and Chebyshev inequality. (1995). moment generating function and the kth.T. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics.d.d. Sampling distribution: chi-squares.f. examine problems of joint and conditional p. probability density function and distribution function. expectation and moment generating function. the concept of mutually exclusive and independence. E. binomial. H. E.v. Taha. Problem Solving Exercise In OR. 264 .) of any random variables (r. Muhammad Jantan. Law of Large numbers.f’s and their moments and determine the dependence between two r.f. distribution function of random variables. 8th edition. Pulau Pinang: Penerbit USM. Poisson. S.f. gamma.f. find the probability density function( p.v’s. define probability and prove basic theorems in probability 2.f.) and hence.V. Transformation 1-1. Central limit theorem.V. 2. Norman. 7th edition.A. uniform. and Tanis. and Titchie. Pearson Prentice Hall.d. develop distributions of sample mean and variance from a normal distribution and distribution of functions of two or more r. (2007). J. A. MAT 263/4 Probability Theory Probability: Expansion of the axioms of probability. 3. (1981). bivariate normal random variables. covariance.’s and d. Ross. Probability and Statistical Inference. 2. normal.) and distribution function (d. t and F. obtain the mean.v’s 5. A First Course in Probability. Lancaster Lancord. independence of two random variables. Hogg. Reference Books 1.beta.v. and the properties of its distribution 4. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. conditional probability density function and distribution function. Operations Research: An Introduction. R. Random variables. or d. Pengantar Penyelidikan Operasi. moment from this p. exponential. Siri Edisi Awal. 3. Reference Books 1. 3. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. conditional probability. hypergeometric. Prectice Hall. Hogg. (2006). Prectice Hall. students are able to 1.A. onditional expectation. 16. Bayes theorem. 5th edition. Bivariate random variables: density function and joint distribution function. chi-square. 6th edition. variance. negative binomial. R. identify daily problem that can be solved in terms of r.

construct and apply formulas to approximate specific derivatives of functions by differentiating appropriate interpolating polynomials. likelihood ratio tests for testing the mean. apply numerical integration and differentiation to find an approximate value of an integral 5. Numerical differentiation and integration. fundamental lemma of Neyman- Pearson. Polynomial interpolation. D. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. MAT 282/4 Engineering Computation I Introduction to basic numerical methods: rounding errors and computer arithmetic. R. analysis of variance.A.W. 3. students are able to 1. Fausett.L. variance. 5th edition. Cheney. uniformly most powerful test. 18. Thomson. goodness-of-fit tests. and Kincaid. power function. Unbiased estimators with minimum variance. unbiasedness. “Applied Numerical Methods For Engineers Using MATLAB”. Point estimation using the method of maximum likelihood and the method of moments. Interval estimation : confidence intervals for small and large samples. Solution of non-linear systems of equations. “Numerical Mathematics and Computing”. equality of two means and equality of two variances for normal distribution. order statistics. L. Reference Books 1. Sampling distributions. Pivotal quantity. construct interpolating polynomials for a given set of data 3. S. state and analyze the formulas for error in polynomial interpolation 4.V. (2004). and Harris. Prentice-Hall.17. Solution of non-linear equations. Solution of linear systems of equations: direct methods and iterative methods. critical region. (1999). 2.R. apply numerical methods to solve a given non-linear equation and state the general conditions which guarantee the convergence of the methods 2. efficiency and sufficiency. Point estimation: properties of estimators–consistency. stochastic convergence. limiting distribution. most powerful test. non-parametric statistics. Hypothesis testing : statistical hypothesis. Schilling. MAT 363/4 Statistical Inference Revision of probability theory. E. Thomson. (2000). Numerical methods to compute eigenvalues and eigen vectors. Completeness property for a family of distributions. “Applied Numerical Analysis Using MATLAB”. 265 . types and sizes of errors.

I. A. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. derive point estimators and construct confidence intervals 4. 4th edition. “Mathematical Statistics with Application”. “Penerbit USM”. environment. students are able to 1..A. find the distributions and joint distributions of random variables and random vectors 3. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. Hogg. MSG 228/4 Introduction to Modelling The aims of this course are to: a) expose students to the basic concepts and methodology in modelling. M. 2. interpret models and solutions (if appropriate) and draw inferences from them 4. 19. and economics. Reference Books 1. 7th edition. (1995). have a firm understanding of probability theory and statistical inference 2. 3. 266 . (2004). Khatijah. (1978). “Pengantar Teori Statistik. Topics include: (i) interpreting graphs (ii) optimization (iii) ordinary differential equations (iv) data analysis (v) difference equations (vi) simulation. “Introduction to Mathematical Statistics”. skills and tools used in a variety of models 3. conduct testing of hypotheses to verify claims. Areas of interest may consist of biology. Miller. Craig. engineering. recognise and use the connections between mathematics and other disciplines. S. & Miller. Macmillan.T. students are able to 1. b) introduce standard mathematical tools in modelling.V. demonstrate understanding of methods. New York. build a simple mathematical model from a verbal description or a tabular data 2. R. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course.

New York: Macmillan. cutting plane technique. Williams P. Goal programming: formulation and solution. Maurice. Integer programming model: pure integer and mixed integer model. Introduction to Mathematical Modeling using Discrete Dynamical System: Brooks-Cole. Applications of software packages for modelling and simulation of queueing systems. Random numbers. R. duality theory. 2. Birth and death process. Discrete event simulation. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Characteristics of exponential and Poisson distributions. Marotto (2005). Brooks-Cole. Belmont. 2. Exposure to relevant software packages. Applications to practical problems. 21. Fox. Discussion about the theoretical and also the application of queueing models : M/M/1 and its extension. Che Rohani Yaacob (2001). Academic Press. Pengaturcaraan Linear dan Integer. Frederick. (1992). MSG 252/4 Linear and Integer Programming Linear programming: revised simplex method. E. Penerbit USM. Weir. Operations Research Applications and Algorithms. Queueing networks. branch and bound method. A First Course in Mathematical Modeling.A. Reference Books 1. implicit enumeration. apply the duality theory to any linear programming problem 3. Winston. use any of the techniques taught in this course to solve linear and integer programming problems 4. 3rd edition. detect the similarities and differences between simplex and revised simplex methods 2. terminologies and notations. California: Duxbury. 0-1 model. Mathematical Models for Society and Biology. Reference Books 1. D. H. 3. Operations Research An Introduction. formulate a goal programming problem and find its solution using suitable methods. Giordano. 267 . R. Queueing models involving nonexponential distributions. (2003).L. 20. students are able to 1. 3. sensitivity analysis. Beltrami. dual simplex method. W. Simulation: general simulation concept. (2001). (1993). MSG 253/4 Queueing System and Simulation Queuing theory: general queueing model. Frank. Taha.

C. John Wiley& Sons. cause-and-effect diagram. 7th edition. assess queueing systems using analytical methods and simulation 3. D. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. (2004). U. Prentice Hall.A : John Wiley & Sons.C. 5th edition. D. p. interpret and solve quality-related problems 4. 3.A. Introduction to Statistical Quality Control. 3. Quality Control. MSG 262/4 Quality Control Seven tools for statistical quality control: check sheet. students are able to 1. communicate orally and in written form pertaining to quality. 2.M. median-range. np. Acceptance sampling plans. Double sampling plan. stratification. Butterworth-Heinemann 268 .K. apply both graphics and quantitative quality measurement and quality analysis tools 3. 3rd edition. Operating characteristic curve of a sampling plan. Producer risk and consumer risk. Prentice Hall.A : Pearson Prentice Hall. total quality management(TQM) and quality control (QC) 2. & Harris. strengthen their mathematical and professional report writing ability. U. Specification limits. Oakland. D. derive the performance measurement formulas of various queueing models 2. students are able to 1.. (1992) Introduction to Simulation Using GPSS/PC. J. (2003) Operation Research: An Introduction. 22. (1996). Pareto diagram. MIL-STD 105E and Dodge-Romig sampling plans. work as a team to solve quality related issues 5.S. histogram.S. Reference Books 1. CUSUM. EWMA. (2005). 7th edition.A. Statistical process control: control charts X − R. Statistical Process Control. Gross.S. Montgomery. c and u. 3rd edition. analyze. X − S . define and describe the concepts of quality. U. J. Reference Books 1. 2. master the use of a computer simulation package 4. Process capability.H. Single sampling plan. scatter diagram and control charts. New Jersey. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. (1998) Fundamentals of Queuing Theory. Besterfield. Chisman. Taha H. Oxford.

and Maurer. Two-level fractional factorial designs: the one-half fraction of the 2k design. design with both nested and factorial factors. fitting response curves. students are able to 1. confounding the 2k factorial design in 2p blocks. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Snedecor. W. Experimental Design with Applications in Management. Iowa. Inc. definitions and basic principles. Taguchi approach.C. the split-plot design. 2. Nested and split-plot designs: the two-stage nested design and the general m- stage nested design. split-plot designs with more than two factors and the split-split-plot design. statistical analysis of the fixed effects model and the random effects model. two-factor and three-factor factorial designs. and Cochran. confounding the 2k factorial design in four blocks. John Wiley & Sons. the one-quarter fraction of the 2k design and the general 2k-p fractional factorial design. Engineering and the Sciences. Ames. R. Montgomery. 269 . model adequacy checking. MSG 265/4 Design and Analysis of Experiments Introduction to factorial designs: the general factorial design. partial confounding. 6th edition.G. The Iowa State University Press. Berger. The analysis of covariance. Blocking and confounding in the 2k factorial design: blocking a replicated 2k factorial design. D. interprete the results and write the conclusions for the different designs. The 2k Design: 22 design and 23 design. Statistical Methods. (2005).D. G. a single replicate of the 2k design. (2002). confounding in the 2k factorial design. perform the analysis of variance for the data obtained from different designs 3.W. (1967). Three-level and mixed-level factorial design. Duxbury 3. P. Response surface methods. Design and Analysis of Experiments. blocking in a factorial design. identify the different design of experiments and explain the procedures of designing those experiments 2.E.23. design resolution and construction and analysis of the one-half fraction. confounding the 2k factorial design in two blocks. Reference Books 1.

use mathematical tools with competence 2. write simple Mathematica programs in procedural. 2. Independent learning is encouraged as much as possible to diversify students’ approach using the software Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. design a solution and implement the solution. symbolic computations (manipulating formulas) and graphical manipulations (create 2-D and 3-D graphs) 2. Case studies on different aspects of mathematical modeling and computer modeling are presented. find information needed to solve a computerized problem 3.24. Draw curves and solids using 3-D features in AUTOCAD and use shading technique to render the models Reference Books 1. Mc Graw Hill. rule-based and functional-based styles to perform desirable tasks 3. rule-based and functional-based styles to perform desirable tasks and use Mathematics as a tool in solving simple mathematical models. students are able to 1. 4. 111 McInnis Parkway. create and document computational models for mathematical experiments and explorations. understand and use Mathematica to perform numerical computations. developed 3D models using 3DMAX and produce an animation video clip with low end hardware and software 270 . Independent learning is encouraged as much as possible to diversify students’ approach using the software Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Learning AutoCAD 2010. Write simple Mathematica programs in procedural. USA. 25. Noor Atinah Ahmad. students are able to 1. analyze a problem and determine if it could feasibly be solved with current resources. MATLAB: Pendekatan Penyelesaian Masalah Matematik. CA94903. MSG 281/2 Modelling Laboratory I The objectives of this course is to introduce the use of AUTOCAD software to transfer hand created drawing using primitive drawing objects and MATLAB software to solve problems in mathematical modeling and numerical computations. symbolic computations (manipulating formulas) and graphical manipulations (create 2-D and 3-D graphs). MSG 282/2 Modelling Laboratory II The objective of these course is to use 3DMAX packages for graphical animations and use Mathematica packages to perform numerical computations. 4. Yahya Abu Hasan. Zarita Zainuddin & Low Heng Chin (2002).

Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Springer-Verlag (2005). osculating circle. torsion. New York. tensor-product. Data fitting and parametric interpolation. Bézier curves and surfaces: derivatives. symmetry. Cambridge University Press. Reference Books 1. first fundamental and second fundamental forms. Hermite polynomial.L. 271 . Wellin (2005) An Introduction to Programming with Mathematica. Representation by parametric and implicit equations. K. Vol I. 3rd edition. 5. B- spline surfaces. MSG 284/4 Introduction to Geometric Modelling What is geometric modeling: mathematical methods in geometric modeling. partition of unity. de Casteljau algorithm.IV. Paul R. relation with Bézier. Polynomial interpolation: Lagrange polynomial. (2005) 3Ds Max 7. normal. Giambrano. compatibility conditions. (1997). Coons surfaces: Boolean sum. Parametric and geometric continuity: definition. Wiley Publishing. B-splines curves and surfaces: B-splines basis. Geometric smoothness versus parametric smoothness. Introduction to differential geometry: tangent. Murdock. have the knowledge of geometric modelling and able to practice them confidently 2. Bernstein polynomial: motivation. shape preserving properties. 26. New Riders Publishing. Frenet-Serret formulas. recursive property and derivatives. “3D Graphics and Animation: From star up to standing out”. curvature. 4. application of these continuity to composite curves and surfaces. 2. The Mathematica Guide Books. mean and Gaussian curvatures. Stephen Wolfram (2003). Meusnier theorem. Inc. differences between parametric and geometric continuity. degree reduction and elevation. analyze and interpret the geometric properties of curves and surfaces in mathematical representations 3. build and manipulate curves and surfaces using computers. positivity. 5th edition Wolfram Media. properties of B-splines curves. Some historical background. binormal. Aitken algorithm. students are able to 1.The Mathematica Book. 3.

Faux and Pratt (1980).J. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Applications to real world problem will be emphasised. D. W. David Salamon (1999).C. R. Montgomery. Geometric Modelling. Linus Schrage (1997). 3. Wiley. LINGO. Computer Graphics and Geometric Modeling. relate to and learn any future OR softwares using the help files and tutorials. apply statistical packages to the data set 2. Springer Verlag. H. Reference Books 1. Statgraphics to analyse data and interpret their results. (1996). Microsoft Project 2000 Bible. (2000). LINDO. Reference Books 1. interpret results in simple case study. students are able to 1. 3. Prentice Hall. 28.A. “Analysis of Variance. Brooks/Cole Publishing Company. relate the statistical reasoning from the results obtained 3. Christensen. 272 . Mortenson (1997). MSG 285/2 Statistical Laboratory Expose students on the applications of certain statistical packages such as SPSS. Conover. Wiley. Elaine Marmel (1999). 3. John Wiley. SAS. MSG 286/2 Operations Research Laboratory Use of operations research packages such as SAS/OR. QM/POM. Microsoft Project and others will be taught. England: Halsted Press. 27. Chapman & Hall. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. 2. students are able to 1. use the OR softwares taught to solve LP problems 3. Minitab. Optimization Modeling with LINDO 5th edition. Reference Books 1. Operations Research: An Introduction. Taha. TORA. Computational Geometry for Design and Manufacture. (2003). formulate and interpret outputs of the linear programming problems solved by the specified softwares 2. Designand Analysis of Experiment. 2. “Practical Nonparametric Statistics”. Design and Regression”. Chichester. (1999). IDG Books Worldwide. 2. 7th edition.

Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Brooks/Cole. C. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. laminar/turbulent flows 2. TUNA.29. Two-dimensional motion (potential flow theory). A. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics. Open channel flow. Mechanics of Fluid. Differential analysis of fluid flow. E2DISP. 2. Frank. 273 . distinguish different types of flows and apply the relevant equations to compute quantities of interest. 3rd edition. Finite control volume analysis of fluid flow. state the definition of a fluid and related concepts such as viscosity. MSG 322/4 Fluid Mechanics Review of vector calculus. Basic concept of boundary layer theory. MATLAB and MATHEMATICA to solve real life problem simulations 4. formulate and solve real life problem simulations by PDE using analytical and numerical solution techniques such as FDM and FSM 3. students are able to 1. Flow through pipes.T. (2004).W. 30. 3. Reference Books 1. R. compressibility. DEER. MSG 327/4 Mathematical Modelling The objective of this course is to enable students to see how mathematical models are developed from first principles and then to see the consequences through further mathematical and numerical analysis. Basic concept of fluid dynamics and kinematics. formulate the governing equations of fluid mechanics using a finite control volume and an infinitesimally small fluid element model 3. Wiggert (2003). 5th edition. Merle. C. Potter and David. References will be provided by the instructor of the course. and McDonald. design and implement efficient codes by FORTRAN. formulate and solve simple real life problems by ODE by analytical and numerical methods such as RK2 and RK4 2. Fluid Mechanics 5th edition. McGraw Hill. M. interpret and synthesize simulation results by means of WASP7 and in- house simulation models I1Disp. Models (which should be amenable to analysis) from a particular area of applied mathematics are taken to illustrate the ideas. students are able to 1. John Wiley.W. Fox. Basic statics.

MSG 355/4 Inventory Control Basic concepts of inventory control. use appropriate algorithms to solve network flow problems 4. (2003). Travelling salesman problem: Hamiltonian circuit and some branch and bound solution techniques. students are able to 1. 2. Reference Books 1. MRP. Magnanti. Ahuja. New Jersey : Prentice Hall. Shortest route problem: tree building program. N-period production scheduling model. Use of computer packages to obtain solutions. JIT system. N-period dynamic EOQ model.L & Orlin. 274 . buffer stock. explain clearly the basic issues in inventory management 2. Maximum flow problem: cut-set concept. price breaks model. Klein algorithm. Floyd algorithm. perform economic interpretation of network flow solutions. interprete the solution obtained from a given inventory problem. 'Out-of-Kilter' algorithm and applications. Yen algorithm and applications.A. General network simplex method. Prim algorithm and applications.B . Operation Research: An Introduction. ABC inventory system. MSG 354/4 Network Flows Basic concepts of graphs and network Minimum spanning tree problem: Kruskal algorithm. Chinese postman problem: Eulerian circuit and some solutions methods. comprehend the underlying theorems of network flow problems 3. 7th edition. General inventory control model. Prentice Hall. formulate/translate real life problems as network flow problems 2. tree changing algorithm. J. Minimum cost flow problem: Busacker & Gowen algorithm. Probabilistic models: continuous review model single period model. Pulau Pinang: Penerbit USM. students are able to 1. Adli Mustafa (1991). Ford-Fulkerson labelling algorithm and applications. multiple-item with storage limitation model. Deterministic inventory models: classic EOQ model. Aliran Rangkaian. Taha.31. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Algorithmn and Application. 3.T. 32.K. H. R. use a suitable method for finding the optimum solution to a given inventory problem 4. identify a suitable model for a given inventory problem 3. Network Flows: Theory. multiperiod model. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course.

formulate the real problems to NLPs 3. H. (2003).S. Sherali. Duxbury. solve NLPs using the appropriate techniques 4. New Jersey : Prentice Hall.L. the Lagrange multiplier. C. the Newton-Raphson method. 2. Johnson. unconstrained and constrained problems including the golden section search. interpret the solutions and making inferences from the results 5. D. Taha. Planning. H. recognise the differences between linear programming problems (LPs) and non-linear programming problems (NLPs) 2. (2003). Taha. and D. students are able to 1. (2003). Inventory Control. R. John Wiley. Introduction to Nonlinear Optimisation: A Problem Solving Approach.A. separable programming. the Kuhn-Tucker method.. 3. the method of feasible directions. (1993). New York: Wiley. (1979). techniques used to solve NLPs with one and several variables. Introduction to dynamic programming and its applications to sequential decision problems. Case studies. quadratic programming. L. H. New York: MacGraw-Hill. geometric programming. basic concepts in optimisation theory. North-Holland: Elsevier. and Venkataramanan. Reference Books 1. Wismer. including extremum (maximum and minimum). use software packages to solve NLPs and interpret the software output.A. 7th edition New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 4. 2. 275 . 2nd edition.M.A. 4th edition. Scheduling and Inventory Control. Nonlinear Programming: Theory and Algorithms. New York. M. Operations Research: An Introduction. Love.D. Montgomery (1974). Exposure to some relevant software packages. Operations Research: An Introduction. M. S. and Shetty. 3. Bazaraa. optimality criteria and convexity. Operations Research in Production. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Nonlinear programming problems (NLPs): definition and formulation. 33. MSG 356/4 Mathematical Programming Introduction: review of differential calculus. Introduction to Mathematical Programming. the method of steepest ascent. and Chattergy. Reference Books 1. W. Winston. (1978).

Introduction to principal component analysis. Multivariate Statistical Methods: A primer. average linkage and complete linkage. Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. Reference Books 1. apply both graphics and quantitative multivariate techniques to data analysis 3. define and describe the ideas of multivariate data and techniques 2. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Nonhierarchical clustering methods: Mac Queen’s K-mean methods.W. Sampling distributions for X and S . MANOVA. Quadratic forms. 2nd edition.Comparison of several multivariate means. Johnson. 5th edition. (1994). USA. New Jersey.L. 5th edition. Fisher’s discriminant Function. W. Introduction to clustering methods. & Wichern.F. analyze. Applications of multivariate techniques. New Jersey. Population and sample principal components. (1998). Applications. Orthogonal factor model. interpret and solve multivariate problems 4. J. classification for several populations. R. students are able to 1. Revision of matrix algebra and random vectors. D. Manly. Anderson. Tatham. Similarity measures. B.C.E. Applications. Factor rotation and factor scores. 2. Confidence region and simultaneous comparison of the component means. Multivariate data. R. Hair. Chapman & Hall. Classification for two multivariate normal populations..J. Introduction to factor analysis. & Black. Introduction to discrimination and classification.. R. Discriminationtechniques. 3. (2002).F. Prentice Hall International. Inference for the mean vector. 276 . Hierarchical clustering methods: single linkage.34. Methods of estimation.A. Applications. Applications. Random sampling. Multivariate normal distribution. Sample geometry. Multivariate Data Analysis. MSG 366/4 Multivariate Analysis Introduction. New York. communicate orally and in written form pertaining to multivariate analysis. work as a team to solve multivariate problems 5. Prentice Hall International.

277 . systematic sampling design. mixed model (ARMA process). apply a group of time series models to any time series data using various time series statistical packages such as Minitab. autoregressive process (AR process). differentiate methods for estimating population parameters and the bounds on the error of estimations 4. MSG 368/4 Sample Survey and Sampling Technique Sampling design: simple random sampling design for finite population – with and without replacement. stationary time series. seasonal and heteroscedasticity 4. Estimation and bound estimation error. select appropriate models for the given time series 3. MSG 367/4 Time Series Introduction: examples of time series data. identify the design of sample survey 2. moving average process (MA process). fully understand and explain the fundamental time series concepts and terminologies 2. William W. generate inferences about a population from the information contained in a sample. Chatfield. Probability models for time series: pure random process (white noise). produce a well-organized report which includes concise explanation of the steps taken and interpreting results of time series analysis. random walk. Cambridge University Press. Frequency approach to time series. apply the sampling procedures for selecting the sample from the population 3. students are able to 1. critically differentiate time series elements such as non-stationary. Sample size determination for the above sampling designs. Autocorrelation functions and partial autocorrelation functions. Case studies will be given. SPSS and EViews 5. transformation (filtering and differencing). cluster sampling design. forecasting: Box-Jenkins methods. (1996). 2. hapman & Hall. 36.35. Regression and ratio estimates. students are able to 1. The Analysis of Time Series: An Introduction. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. integrated models (ARIMA process). John Gottman A Comprehensive Introduction for Social Scientists. S. Spectral analysis. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Reference Books 1. Wei Univariate and Multivariate Methods. C. Estimation in the time domain. stratified sampling design. 3. two-stage sampling design.

for example. GIF and PNG. quick sort. Mendenhall. 37. Fractal geometry: descriptions of self-similarities and fractal dimensions by using Sierpinski triangle and von Koch snow flakes. CGM. Graphics file compression techniques by using run-length encoding and Huffman codings. Theory of Sample Surveys. Introduction to graphics file format. (1997). Comparison of fractals and L-grammars. Differences between bitmap graphics and vector graphics. W.R. binary tree sort and radix sort. Computer memory management. 3. design. M. Ways to store data in different data types. Scheaffer. Descriptions of commonly used graphics file formats. sequential search. Behaviours of recursion and its program implementation. students are able to 1. (1995) Elementary Survey Sampling. combine and compare different types of data structures used in computer graphics. R. Sons. Reference Books 1. for example. octtrees and BSP trees. binary search trees. Introduction to linear data structures.L. Duxbury Advanced Series. Advantages and problems of each allocation. BMP. linked list. real numbers and characters. manipulate. One’s and two’s complements. 2. L. binary trees. 278 . DXF. quadtrees. Static and dynamic memory allocations. (1977). selection sort. Sorting: background in general. binary search and binary tree search. Sampling Techiques. and Ott. Cochran. Searching: algorithms and analysis of searching. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. John Wiley. for example. W. have the knowledge on the fundamental concepts and computational algorithms of data structures for computer graphics 2. Bubble sort. Recursion: definitions and processes. Chapman & Hall. and non-linear data structures.E. JPG. implement the computational algorithms and techniques of data structures with a high level of confidence and proficiency 3. for example as integers.G. MSG 383/4 Data Structures for Computer Graphics Introduction to information and data. Representation of the data structures by using both arrays and linked lists. Thompson.

produce 2-D animations. which involve modelling coordinate system. Version. constraints. basic positioning methods. polygons. Window clipping by Cohen-Sutherland algorithm. The effect caused by difference in refresh cycle of raster monitors and object construction time taken by the buffer. line style and fill style. understand the fundamental concepts and standards in computer graphics 2. double buffering and raster operations. (2003). 2D and 3D transformations and viewing. OpenGL functions are used throughout the syllabus to illustrate the computer graphics concepts. students are able to 1. Addison- wesley Publishing Company. display window coordinate system and screen coordinate system. MSG 387/4 Computer Graphics Introduction to computer graphics and its applications. apply the right techniques in producing pictures through programming 4.S. Prentice-Hall.g. i. Difference between RGB colour code and colour lookup tables. Overview of raster graphics and transformation pipeline. key-frame specifications. device coordinate system. i. object definitions. Design of animation sequence in 4 development stages. 2.e. Explanation on software standards and GKS. i. generations of in-between frames. 38. world coordinate system. use graphics pipeline and appropriate transformations involved at each stage of the pipeline 3. Raster methods for computer animation. Attributes of graphics primitives like colour.e. rubber-band methods and gravity field. Pauline Baker (1986). Draw polylines with different line joining methods. 279 . Describing and using viewing parameters to change the shape of the object. Various interactive picture construction techniques. Constructing pixel mask for line styles and using bit arrays for fill style. normalized coordinate system. e. triangles. dragging. (1993). Differences in viewing and modelling transformations. logical input devices defined under GKS. Thomson Course Technology. 2nd edition. storyboard layout. grids.e. Introduction to Computer Graphics. Computer Graphics C. Donald Hearn and M.D. Foley et al. etc. Graphics output primitives in drawing of lines. Reference Books 1. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Malik. using viewport to change the ratio of clipping window. Data Structures Using C++. 3. James D. transformations between different coordinate systems.

Partial Differential Equations 280 . knot insertion algorithm. Sams Publishing Company. OpenGL SuperBible. 3rd edition. de Boor Cox algorithm. relation between the number of control points and knots. Wiley. Computational Geometry for Design and Manufacture. Triangular Bézier surfaces. James. (1993). reparameterization. MSG 389/4 Engineering Computation II Ordinary Differential Equations Initial value problems: single step and multi-step methods. subdivision algorithm for irregular surfaces (Catmull-Clark). B-spline curves and surfaces: Basis functions using convolution method. Mortenson (1997). Introduction to Computer Graphics. students are able to 1. England: Halsted Press. 2. Addison- wesley Publishing Company. Springer-Verlag. Geometric Modelling. Splines: Splines and natural splines. 3. conversion between basis functions. use mathematical and computational methods to describe and design curves and surfaces 3. Benjamin Lipchak. subdivision algorithm. 39. rational curves and surfaces. David Salamon (1999). S. simulate and represent an object geometrically under a computer control. composite curves and surfaces. Uniform and non-uniform basis functions. D. Reference Books 1. 2. M. Donald Hearn. Computer Graphics and Geometric Modeling. Reference Books 1. beta splines and corner-cutting algorithm. Faux and Pratt (1980). Prentice Hall. Computer Graphics with OpenGL. Basis functions using truncated power functions and properties. have a firm understanding of the mathematical algorithms in computer graphics. 3. Richard. Chichester. 3rd edition. Wright. MSG 388/4 Mathematical Algorithms for Computer Graphics Bézier curves and surfaces: Degree elevation and subdivision algorithm. finite segment and finite difference methods. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. System of equations and higher order equations. Foley et al. Boundary value problems: shooting method. 40. and the principles and theories of computer modelling 2. NURBS. Pauline Baker (2003).

conduct a meaningful discussion on the various aspects related to the project 3. R.L. “Numerical Mathematics and Computing”. 41. Fausett. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. E. D. and Kincaid. S.W. Elliptic equations: standard finite difference schemes for Poisson equation. stability and convergence. Parabolic equations: FTCS and Crank Nicolson method. write a report and present their research findings. “Applied Numerical Methods For Engineers Using MATLAB”. 3. Consistency. (1999). interpret and synthesize simulation results. 2. Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this course. Thomson. 5th edition. (2000). Thomson. Prentice-Hall. L. students are able to 1. “Applied Numerical Analysis Using MATLAB”.A. Reference Books 1. Hyperbolic equations: method of characteristics and finite difference methods for the wave equation. and Harris. formulate and solve real life problem simulations such as lake and river pollution by BVP for PDE 3. 281 . design and implement efficient codes FORTRAN to solve real life problem simulations for ODE and PDE 4. carry out a research project 2. Cheney. MSG 391/6 Project The aims of this course are (i) to give an opportunity for students to work on a particular topic relevant to the program (ii) to give students an introduction to the methods and experience of research and to make them better prepared to start a research degree or work in a research and development environment (iii) to develop students’ ability to organize their work in a substantial project (iv) to develop students’ ability to present their work in both written and oral form. Schilling. Solution of resulting systems of linear equation.V.R. recognize and solve IVP for ODE by analytical and numerical methods such as RK2 and RK4 2. students are able to 1. (2004).

Index to Undergraduate Courses Advanced Calculus MAT 102/4 257 Algebra for Science Students MAA 111/4 254 Applied Statistical Methods MSG 162/4 260 Calculus for Science Students I MAA 101/4 252 Calculus for Science Students II MAA 102/4 258 Calculus MAT 101/4 251 Computer Graphics MSG 387/4 279 Data Structures for Computer Graphics MSG 383/4 278 Design and Analysis of Experiments MSG 265/4 269 Differential Equations I MAT 122/4 259 Differential Equations II MAT 222/4 263 Elementary Statistics MAT 161/4 254 Engineering Computation I MAT 282/4 265 Engineering Computation II MSG 389/4 280 Fluid Mechanics MSG 322/4 273 Introduction to Analysis MAT 202/4 261 Introduction to Geometric Modelling MSG 284/4 271 Introduction to Modelling MSG 228/4 266 Introduction to Operations Research MAT 251/4 263 Inventory Control MSG 355/4 274 Linear Algebra MAT 111 253 Linear and Integer Programming MSG 252/4 267 Mathematical Algorithms for Computer Graphics MSG 388/4 280 Mathematical Modelling MSG 327/4 273 Mathematical Programming MSG 356/4 275 Modelling Laboratory I MSG 281/2 270 Modelling Laboratory II MSG 282/2 270 Multivariate Analysis MSG 366/4 276 Network Flows MSG 354/4 274 Operations Research Laboratory MSG 286/2 272 Probability Theory MAT 263/4 264 Programming for Scientific Applications MAT 181/4 259 Project MSG 391/6 281 Quality Control MSG 262/4 168 Queueing System and Simulation MSG 253/4 267 Sample Survey and Sampling Technique MSG 368/4 277 Statistical Inference MAT 363/4 265 Statistical Laboratory MSG 285/2 272 Statistics for Science Students MAA 161/4 256 Time Series MSG 367/4 277 Vector Calculus MAT 203/4 262 282 .

Disagree 3 . 1. Please respond to items 1 . 1 2 3 4 6.Strongly Agree Please circle the number. This information will be useful for the university in improving this guidebook. 1 2 3 4 2. The information provided in this guidebook is clear and easy to understand. The information provided in this guidebook is accurate. 2. Please send this feedback form to School’s General Office in the 4th week of Semester I. please suggest in the space below. 1 2 3 4 4. 3. 1 2 3 4 If you chose 1 or 2 for question no. Academic Session 2012/2013 283 . 1 2 3 4 5. If there is any other information that you think should be included in the guidebook. Overall. I would rate the quality of this guidebook as good.5 below based on the following 4-point scale.Agree 4 . STUDENTS’ FEEDBACK The aim of this feedback form is to obtain students’ response regarding the content of this guidebook. please provide the number of the pages(s) that contain the inaccurate information. This guidebook is very useful. I prefer to use the CD that is provided compared to this guidebook. 1 .Strongly Disagree 2 .