STRATFORD UNIVERSITY

Catalog Addendum
2016-2017 Maryland Catalog

This addendum contains supplements, additions, and updates to the Stratford
University 2016-2017 Catalog. The catalog is considered incomplete without
this supplement.

February 10, 2017 Version T1.0
Schedule of Tuition and Fees

Item Cost
Undergraduate tuition $370.00 per credit $1,665.00 per course
Graduate tuition $495.00 per credit $2,227.50 per course
Military tuition assistance $186.66 per credit $840.00 per course

Application Fee $50.00 (non-refundable, one-time fee)
Expedited I-20 Processing and Mailing Fee $200.00
Graduation Fee (Undergraduate) $195.00
Graduation Fee (Graduate) $235.00
Insufficient Funds Fee $30.00
Late Payment Fee (gap payment plan) $25.00
Late Payment Fee (non-gap payment plan) $100.00
Late Registration Fee $100.00
Library/Textbook Fees Varies based on book/action
Parking Fee $50.00 per calendar year
Payment Plan Fee (1 term)* $50.00
Payment Plan Fee (3 consecutive terms)* $50.00
Payment Plan Fee (through graduation)* $100.00
Payment Plan Fee (up to 12 months after graduation)* $125.00
Payment Plan Fee (13-24 months after graduation)* $250.00
Prior Learning Assessment Fee $200.00 (non-refundable, per course)
Replacement Diploma Fee $35.00
Replacement ID Fee $15.00
Student Activity Fee $100.00 (non-refundable, one-time fee)
Transfer/Withdrawal Fee for International Students $1,000.00
Transcript Request Fee $10.00
Tuition Payment Plan Fee $50.00

Program Specific Fees
Chef Uniform $375.00 (one-time fee)
Kit, Culinary or Baking $375.00 (one-time fee)
Food Fee $88.00 per credit $396.00 per course
Supplemental Instructional Fee $88.00 per credit $396.00 per course
Transfer kit fee (baking to culinary) $110.00 (one-time fee)
Transfer kit fee (culinary to baking) $60.00 (one-time fee)

See catalog for information about which programs and courses have fees.
*Payment plan fees are waived if student participates in auto debit. Fees are non-fundable and payable with first installment.
Note: The University reserves the right to adjust tuition and fees at any time

Staff Listing
Baltimore Campus Staff Jennifer Harvill, Registrar
Dr. Lee McGahey, Campus Dean Lesley Otterbein, Manager, Student
Darryl Campbell, Campus Director Financial Services
Nick Grasso, Director of Admissions Elizabth Greeley, Librarian

Faculty Listing
Arts and Sciences Faculty
Cordia Grandea Baltimore Geraldine Smith Baltimore
MS–University of Baltimore DEd – University of North Florida
Joseph Ojih Baltimore MA – University of Mississippi
PhD– Walden University Gregory Smith Baltimore
MS – University of Phoenix LLM, MA, JD – American University Washington College of Law
Maria Petrovici Baltimore BA – University of Maryland College Park
MBA – York College University

School of Hospitality and Culinary Arts Faculty
Jan Bandula Baltimore Certified Culinary Educator
World Certified Master Pastry Chef WACS Global Master Chef - American Culinary Federation

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Russell Cooper Baltimore Certified Pastry Chef – L’Academie de Cusine
BS – Johnson & Wales University Certified Executive Pastry Chef
Donnisha Grant Baltimore Charlene Porter Baltimore
MEd – Strayer University MS – Baltimore International College
BS – Morgan State University BS – Norfolk State University
AA – Baltimore International College Godfrey Pratt Baltimore
Gregory Hare Baltimore EdD – The George Washington University
AA – Baltimore International College MA – The George Washington University
Melissa Hopkins Baltimore Michael Santos Baltimore
AAS – Baltimore International College AAS – Baltimore International College
AAA – Suny of Morrisville Edwin Scholly Baltimore
Frederick Huber Baltimore BS – The Art Institute of Washington
AAS – Baltimore International College Eric Yeager Baltimore
Amanda Lotts Baltimore BS – Johnson & Wales University
BA – Auburn University

Stratford University’s 2016-2017 catalog is now in effect. Since this catalog’s original publication on March 25, 2016, the
following significant changes have been implemented. Additions/amendments incorporated in this version of the addendum are
noted in italics and appear at the top of the table below. Older addenda changes appear in order of page number below the most
recent changes. Additions to the catalog language appear underlined, while removed language is struck.
*Date is the same for publication and effective, unless otherwise noted.

Date* Page Change
2/10/2017 6 Update Accreditation section to read:
Stratford University is accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools
(ACICS) to award certificate, diploma, associate’s, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees. ACICS is recognized
by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), a national advocate and institutional voice
for self-regulation of academic quality through accreditation. CHEA is an association of 3,000 degree-
granting colleges and universities and recognizes 60 institutional and programmatic accrediting
organizations.
2/10/2017 9 Update Academic Calendar to read:
Term 4 Session C 7/31/2017 10/8/2017 7/31/2017-8/6/2017 9/4, Labor Day -
University closed
2/10/2017 13 If any or all of the absences occur after these dates, grades are awarded based on student achievement
except in the case of an appeal.
2/10/2017 26 Update Stratford Extra Rewards Program section to read:
The Stratford Extra Rewards program is for first-time Stratford University undergraduate students
transferring 50% or less of their program requirements and/or continuing Stratford University students as
of Term 4 2016. The program is valued at up to two courses for associate’s students and up to four
courses for bachelor’s students. This scholarship cannot be combined with any other Stratford
scholarship, grant, or discount.
2/10/2017 26 Add the following sections:
Short-Term Scholarship
The University periodically offers short-term, program- or campus-specific scholarships with varying
criteria for those who qualify. These scholarships are offered during specific terms and on a limited
availability basis. The University website captures information for these scholarships including criteria
for the scholarship, the application procedures and deadlines, and the amount of the scholarship.

International Student Scholarships
The University’s International Student Office awards scholarships for students who enter the University
through the International Student office. All scholarship applicants must meet admissions requirements,
be in good standing with Stratford University, must maintain valid F-1 status, and have a zero balance.

• Global Diversity Scholarship: Students eligible for this scholarship must be new or transfer
students from one of the following countries Haiti, Cuba, Jamaica, Bahamas, South America,
Afghanistan, Europe, Sri Lanka, Yemen, Jordan, Oman, Palestine, Mongolia, Canada, Sudan,
Korea, Taiwan, Libya, Tunisia, Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Japan, Thailand, Equatorial Guinea,
Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Malaysia, Indonesia, Pakistan. Applicants must start their
program during term 2, 3, or 5. Scholarship is applied after the second term. Students are
eligible for up to five awards valued at $1,500 each.
• Stratford Merit Scholarship: Applicants for undergraduate program must demonstrate English

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language proficiency score of 7.5 IELTS and 90 TOEFL or higher. Applicants for graduate
program must demonstrate, English language proficiency score of 7.5 IELTS and 90 TOEFL or
higher, and GRE score of 310 or higher. Applicants with backlog may not be eligible. Transfer
students may not qualify if they are transferring in three or more courses to Stratford
University. Initial status students must enroll within six months of the award of the scholarship
to avail the award. Scholarship applications are due at the time of application to the University.
Initial status students must enroll within six months of the award of the scholarship to avail the
award. Eligible students may earn up to $2,000 per calendar year. Up to five total awards may
be granted in one calendar year. The award is credited to the student’s tuition for the third term
of enrollment. A maximum of one award can be granted to an eligible student per calendar year.
Two awards available per department, at undergraduate and graduate level, per term.
• ESL Program Scholarship: Eligible for new and current students who have been enrolled in
Stratford University’s ESL program for at least two terms and have successfully completed both
terms and who matriculate to degree programs after completing a minimum of two terms in the
ESL program. Deadline to apply is in week five of the student’s second term of enrollment.
Awards are credited to the student’s tuition for the third quarter of enrollment. . Eligible
students may earn up to $2,000 per calendar year. Up to five total awards may be granted in
one calendar year.

2/10/2017 33 Update Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition section to read:
A non-refundable fee per course must be paid before the materials submitted to the committee are
reviewed; the amount of this fee can be found in the catalog addendum. A maximum of 22.5 quarter-
credits towards an associate’s degree and a maximum of 45 quarter-credits towards a bachelor’s degree
may be granted for life experience. PLAR may not be used from capstone or externship courses. Credit
given for prior experience cannot be used as a substitute for a course previously taken for which a
passing grade was not received.
2/10/2017 34 Update Credit by Exam section to read:
Stratford University accepts exam credit from courses such as the College Level Examination Program
(CLEP), Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Educational Support (DANTES), DANTES Subject
Standardized Tests (DSST), Excelsior College Exams (ECE), Straighterline, and Advanced Placement
(AP) exams and awards credit for these examinations which can be found on the respective exam
information website. Students must achieve the minimum recommended score for the exam to receive
credit. DANTES examinations are identical to CLEP examinations, but are offered solely to enlisted
military personnel. The University establishes DANTES examination equivalents and awards credit in the
same manner as the CLEP examinations. Students should submit a transcript of their exam score sheet(s)
to the Office of the Registrar for evaluation. These credits are denoted on student transcripts as CE.
2/10/2017 40 Remove the follow from the Arts and Sciences Courses section:

2/10/2017 43- Update undergraduate courses including names, numbers, descriptions, fees, and prerequsites to read:
51 Remove:
HUM410 Understanding World Cultures 4.5 credits

SCI250 Microbiology 4.5 credits
This course examines the structure; nutrition; growth; genetics; classification; and ecology of bacteria,
viruses, fungi, and protozoa. Attention is given to methods of microbial control and the human immune
response to microbes. Students also learn the fundamentals of microscopy, laboratory safety, scientific
method, and techniques of experimentation. This course has health sciences lab (on-ground students only)
and supplemental instructional fees. Prerequisite: None. Lecture Hours: 30; Lab Hours: 30.
Note: Online students are responsible for obtaining lab materials to complete lab activities. These are
easily obtained, everyday materials.
2/10/2017 54 Update Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition section to read:
A non-refundable fee per course must be paid before the materials submitted to the committee are
reviewed; the amount of this fee can be found in the catalog addendum. Graduate-level previous
experience credit is typically not awarded, however, in compelling situations, credit for prior experiences
may be awarded. A maximum of 27 quarter-credits towards a master’s degree may be granted for life
experience. PLAR may not be used from capstone or externship courses. Credit given for prior experience
cannot be used as a substitute for a course previously taken for which a passing grade was not received.
2/10/2017 70 Update Student Records and Release of Information section to read:
All records are maintained in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.
The University withholds all non-directory information from third parties unless the student requests, in

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writing, for the information to be released. The University defines directory information as name, address
(local, permanent, and electronic mail), telephone numbers, date and place of birth, program(s)
undertaken, credit completed, dates of attendance, enrollment status (full-time, part-time, not enrolled),
date of graduation, degrees and awards received, and student activities. The University has adopted
policies and procedures which permits students the opportunity to view their educational records upon
request. Educational records mean those records, files, documents, and other material containing
information directly related to a student. Educational records do not include working papers concerning
students, such as informal notes and other temporary notes of a similar nature in the sole possession of
the faculty or staff and are not accessible or revealed to any other person.
The University does not permit access to or release of confidential information to any individual or
agency without the written consent of the student, except for the following reasons:
• Records required by Stratford University officials in the proper performance of their duties
• Organizations conducting studies for educational and governmental agencies
• U.S. government agencies as listed in Public Law 93-380
• Accrediting agencies
• Parents of dependent children as defined in the Internal Revenue Code of 1954
• Appropriate persons in connection with an emergency listed as emergency contacts
• Other educational institutions upon request of transcripts for students seeking enrollment in
that institution
• In connection with the award of federal student aid
• In response to legal court orders

6/24/2016 6 Update Legal Control to read:
Frank Turnage, Chairman of the Board
Richard Shurtz, Secretary to the Board
Richard Anderson
Veer V. Bhartiya
Dr. Michael Hillyard
Tariq Khan
Ed Meehan
Craig Quigley
Mary Ann Shurtz
Daniel Woodley
9/2/2016 16 Update the Honor Code section to read:
First Violation
A faculty member who believes a violation has occurred must contact the designated department
representative to determine whether a prior violation was committed by the student. If the alleged
violation of the Honor Code is a first violation, it may be resolved through a faculty-student joint
conference or by requesting an Academic Integrity Review to determine the accuracy of the allegations
and assign appropriate penalties, if warranted. The joint conference is to be held at a time acceptable to
both parties. The faculty member informs the student of the details of the suspected violation and the
reasons for believing it has occurred. The faculty member is under no obligation to disclose third-party
individuals at this time. The minimum penalty for a first violation may be failure of the assignment and
the maximum is failure of the course. The faculty works alongside the student to make this a learning
opportunity. The student learns why their work is considered plagiarized and how to tie to other work or
paraphrase. The assignment is returned, retaken, or a zero is given on the assignment. The faculty denotes
the incident in PowerCampus. The minimum penalty for a first violation may be failure of the assignment
and required completion of anti-plagiarism training.

Second Violation
If a student has been found to have committed an Honor Code violation at any time during enrollment at
the University, any subsequent violation is considered as a second violation. Thus, a violation committed
by a graduate student who also committed a violation as a Stratford undergraduate would be classified as
a second violation. If the alleged violation of the Honor Code is a second violation, a joint conference
may be held to determine whether the allegation has merit. An Academic Integrity Review by the campus
dean is conducted regarding all alleged second violations in addition to or in replace of the joint
conference. All proven second violations of the Honor Code result in failure of the course and dismissal
for the term. These decisions must be approved by the campus director and dean. Only these individuals
may recommend alternative actions. A second issue with plagiarism results in a more in depth learning

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session held with the faculty, student, and campus librarian. Students may be required to repeat the online
modules on avoiding plagiarism and APA.
9/2/2016 17 Update the Standard Term of Non-Attendance section to read:
As such, students are not required to repeat the admissions process; if a student does not return in the
subsequent term, the last date of attendance marks the start of the non-enrolled period.
8/1/2016 25 Remove Stratford University Academic Scholarship Program section
8/1/2016 25 Remove High School Senior Scholarship Program section
8/1/2016 25 Update the Stratford First Scholarship section to read:
The Stratford First Scholarship is designed for eligible high school seniors who enroll at Stratford
University during the summer and fall terms following their high school graduation. Up to five recipients
are selected at each campus each year to receive $10,000 to be applied toward tuition and fees. This
scholarship cannot be combined with any other Stratford scholarship, grant, or discount.
11/11/2016 25 Update Stratford First Scholarship section to read:
The Stratford First Scholarship is designed for eligible high school seniors who enroll at Stratford
University during the summer and fall terms following their high school graduation. Up to five recipients
are selected at each campus each year to receive $10,000 to be applied toward tuition and fees. This
scholarship cannot be combined with any other Stratford scholarship, grant, or discount.
8/1/2016 26 Update the Stratford Extra Rewards section to read:
The Stratford Extra Rewards program is for first-time or new Stratford University undergraduate students
transferring 50% or less of their program requirements. The program is valued at up to two free courses
for associate’s students and up to four free courses for bachelor’s students. This scholarship cannot be
combined with any other Stratford scholarship, grant, or discount….
…Students must sign the Extra Rewards program acknowledgement form confirming knowledge of the
terms and conditions of the program if they are eligible and choose to participate.
11/11/2016 26 Update Stratford Extra Rewards Program section to read:
The Stratford Extra Rewards program is for first-time Stratford University undergraduate students
transferring 50% or less of their program requirements and/or continuing Stratford University students as
of Term 4 2016. The program is valued at up to two free courses for associate’s students and up to four
free courses for bachelor’s students. This scholarship cannot be combined with any other Stratford
scholarship, grant, or discount.
9/2/2016 35 Update the SAP Conditions section to read:
Repeated Courses: Courses are counted as attempted each time the course is taken. All grades remain on
the transcript, but only the last grade is included in the CGPA.
9/2/2016 40 Update the Arts and Sciences Courses to read:
HUM111 History of Cultures Across Antiquity 4.5
HUM200 Creative Expression 4.5
HUM250 Cross-Cultural Competency 4.5
HUM320 The Cultural Mirror: Fiction 4.5
HUM400 Philosophy and Religion 4.5
SCI210 Environmental Science 4.5
9/2/2016 41 Add to the Associate of Applied Science in Advanced Culinary Arts program description:
At the end of the program, students are able to:
1. Use a broad range of principles and practices in culinary and dining room services to operate or
function in a commercial kitchen.
2. Use safety and sanitation measures necessary to maintain a safe food service facility.
3. Demonstrate various communication strategies to relate to customers, coworkers, managers and
diverse populations within culinary/baking industry.
4. Explain the critical thinking strategies used to solve problems related to culinary world.
5. Summarize how information from various sources is used to make decisions within the
culinary/baking industry
6. Demonstrate professional demeanor, attitude and collaboration needed to be successful in the
culinary/baking industry.
9/2/2016 41 Add to Associate of Applied Science in Baking and Pastry Arts program description:
At the end of program, students are able to:
1. Use a broad range of principles and practices in baking and pastry arts to operate or function in
a commercial bakery. Use safety and sanitation measures necessary to maintain a safe food
service facility.
2. Demonstrate various communication strategies to relate to customers, coworkers, managers and
diverse populations within the culinary/baking industry.
3. Explain the critical thinking strategies used to solve problems in the baking/pastry industry.
4. Summarize how information from various sources is used to make decisions within the

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culinary/baking industry.
5. Demonstrate professional demeanor, attitude and collaboration needed to be successful in the
culinary/baking industry.

The mission of the Associate of Applied Science in Baking and Pastry Arts program is to give students
the skills necessary to pursue careers as pastry chefs. This program stresses the general skills required of
all food service professionals from critical thinking and professionalism to an understanding of food
safety, nutrition, and service, while emphasizing baking and pastry-specific skills. The American Culinary
Federation (ACF) accredits this program. This program requires students to purchase a culinary kit and
chef uniform from the University. Students are required to pass the ServSafe exam or possess a food
handler’s license during introductory culinary courses.
9/2/2016 42 Add to Associate of Applied Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management program description:
At the end of program, students are able to:
1. Apply principles of business management in the hotel and restaurant management industry.
2. Demonstrate various communication strategies to relate to customers, coworkers, managers,
and diverse populations within the hotel and restaurant management industry.
3. Explain the critical thinking strategies used to solve problems in the hotel and restaurant
management industry.
4. Summarize how information from various sources is used to make decisions within the hotel
and restaurant management industry.
5. Demonstrate professional demeanor, attitude, and collaboration needed to be successful in the
hotel and restaurant management industry.
6. Perform basic computer functions within the hotel and restaurant management industry.
9/2/2016 42 Add to Bachelor of Arts in Hospitality Management program description:
At the end of the program, students are able to:
1. Demonstrate management theories and applications pertaining to the hospitality industry.
2. Use oral and written communication to relate to diverse populations and viewpoints within the
hospitality industry.
3. Differentiate the management practices and critical thinking strategies to solve problems within
hospitality organizations.
4. Evaluate information from various sources to make decisions and provide leadership within the
resort, hospitality, recreation, and tourism profession.
5. Discuss the importance of teamwork and respecting opinions, feelings, and values of others.
6. Utilize a variety of computer applications in providing hospitality services.
8/1/2016 43 Add to Baking and Pastry Concentration:
CUL111 Culinary Theory and Sanitation
9/2/2016 43-51 Update undergraduate courses including names, numbers, descriptions, fees, and prerequsites to read:
BAK124 Artisan Breads 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL160, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
BAK134 Cakes, Custards, and Creams 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL160, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
BAK154 Specialty and Wedding Cakes 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL160, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
BAK164 Plated Desserts 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL160, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
BAK174 Confectionery Production 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL160, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
BAK232 International Desserts 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL160, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
BAK233 Food Sensitivities and Spa Desserts 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL160, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
BAK234 Holiday Breads 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL160, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
BAK235 Chocolate Arts 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL111, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
BAK236 Sugar Arts 4.5 credits

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Prerequisite: CUL111, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL140 Introduction to Cooking Techniques 4.5 credit
Prerequisite: CUL121, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL142 Garde Manger 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL150 Sauces, Soups, and Stocks 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL152 Elements of Entrée Production 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL160 Fundamentals of Baking 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL111, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL162 Pastry Arts 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL160, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL215 Dining Room Service 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: Passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL251 Bounty of the Sea 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL252 Chiles in the Global Kitchen 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL253 American Regional Cuisine 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL254 International Cuisine 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL255 Italian Cuisine 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL256 Indian Cuisine 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL257 French Cuisine 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL140, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL270 Food Science 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: CUL111, SCI110, MAT111 or MAT210, passing score on the ServSafe certification or
equivalent.
CUL271 Culinary Skills Externship I 4.5 credits
Prerequisites: Approval of the advisor, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL272 Culinary Skills Externship II 4.5 credits
Prerequisites: Approval of the advisor, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL273 Culinary Skills Externship III 4.5 credits
Prerequisites: Approval of the advisor, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL291 Current Topics in Culinary Arts I 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: Approval of the advisor, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL292 Current Topics in Culinary Arts II 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: Approval of the advisor, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL293 Current Topics in Culinary Arts III 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: Approval of the advisor, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
CUL294 Current Topics in Culinary Arts IV 4.5 credits
Prerequisite: Approval of the advisor, passing score on the ServSafe certification or equivalent.
HUM111 History of Cultures Across Antiquity 4.5 credits
This course is designed to provide students with tools to build cultural competence using historical facts
and events as primary guidance. Students are exposed to an array of fundamental experiences that define

8
western culture through its evolution across time. The overall goal is to identify the historical roots of
western culture and how it has evolved and adapted into our multicultural society. Prerequisite: None.
HUM200 Creative Expression 4.5 credits
This course is designed to uncover and investigate the creative aspects of human expression. Through the
analysis of literature, drama, visual arts and music, students will learn to make connections between the
various elements of emotional and artistic expression for the purpose of growing and enhancing their own
creativity skills. Prerequisite: None.
HUM250 Cross-Cultural Competency 4.5 credits
This course is designed to provide students with tools to build cultural competence in today's world.
Students develop awareness and understanding of cultural diversity by examining the most important
characteristics found across a variety of contemporary cultural systems. The overall goal is to analyze the
challenges and benefits of diversity and develop greater cultural intelligence that promotes and capitalizes
on living and working together in a multicultural society. Prerequisite: None.
HUM320 The Cultural Mirror: Fiction 4.5 credits
This course investigates the uses of fiction in a range of narrative styles, from traditional and innovative
to western and non-western. Emphasis is placed on the appreciation and meaning of verbal texts across
different cultures, times, and forms. The goal is to assess how the various manifestations of literary
production shape both our emotions and, as a reflection, the very world that surrounds us. Prerequisite:
None.
HUM330 The American Experience 4.5 credits
This course highlights the development of American values and institutions through the historical analysis
of a broad range of social, political, environmental and economic factors. Students examine the impact of
ideals such as individualism, success, and national character on the creation and evolution of the
American society, from the establishment of the first Colonies to the Industrial Revolution. Prerequisite:
None.
HUM400 Philosophy and Religion 4.5 credits
This course examines fundamental human values and how they are applied across major philosophical
systems and religions. This investigation takes place both along temporal as well as geographical
coordinates. Students are provided the tools to develop critical reflection on their own lives and the
impact these have on the surrounding world. Prerequisite: Approval of the advisor.

HUM420 The Contemporary World 4.5 credits
This course is designed to explore topics related to contemporary global themes and explores their effects
in an increasingly interconnected world. Students learn about various factors that shaped recent events
using a balanced perspective. The topical nature of this course helps students develop an understanding of
the twentieth century, as well as prepares them to construct informed arguments about events that are
unfolding today. Prerequisite: Approval of the advisor.
SCI110 General Science 4.5 credits
This course examines scientific concepts and principles in an integrated manner to provide an overview of
the sciences. Students are introduced to the data collection and analysis of the predictive models and
engage in arguments based on evidence. The real world problems are solved through the integration of
scientific and engineering practices. Topics may include physics, meteorology, chemistry, earth science,
and biology as a means to solve real world problems. They engage in scientific communication, both
orally and in writing. Prerequisite: None.
SCI210 Environmental Science 4.5 credits
This course investigates the impact of a variety of factors both human and natural that affect the
environment. Through the study of authentic environmental situations, students engage in investigations
and labs to determine causal relationships and suggest remedies. Prerequisite: None.
9/2/2016 56 Update the SAP Conditions section to read:
Repeated Courses: Courses are counted as attempted each time the course is taken. All grades remain on
the transcript, but only the last grade is included in the CGPA.
9/2/2016 61 Add to Master of Science in International Hospitality Management program description:
At the end of the program, students are able to:
1. Analyze the theories and principles of guest service management and etiquette practices used in
the international hospitality industry.
2. Develop a plan for executing an industry event.
3. Evaluate accounting and fiscal planning strategies used in the global market.
4. Construct sales, marketing, and operational plans appropriate for the international hospitality

9
industry.
5. Apply the principles of supervision and management.

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