the national archives

July

in the

regions…

a monthly calendar of events open to the public

2010

Boys of Summer
The Selective Service System enables the United States to maintain information on those potentially subject to military conscription. All males between the ages of 18 to 25 are required by law to register within 30 days of their 18th birthday. For over 50 years, Selective Service and the registration requirement for America’s young men have served as a backup system to provide manpower to the U.S. Armed Forces. The Selective Service Act of 1917 passed by the 65th United States Congress created the Selective Service System. The act gave the President the power to draft men for military service. In 1940, the 76th Congress passed the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940, establishing the first peacetime conscription in United States history. From 1948 to 1973, during both times of war and peace, men were drafted to fill vacancies in the Armed Forces that could not be filled through voluntary means. In 1973, the draft ended and the United States converted to an all-volunteer military. Mickey Mantle is known as one of the greatest baseball players to ever play the game and holds many records, such as the most World Series homeruns and career “walk-off” (game-winning) homeruns. His magnificent 18-year major-league professional career all for the New York Yankees, however, was not without some controversy. In 1950 Mantle was called back to his native Oklahoma to complete his preinduction physical examination for the selective service. Mantle was labeled 4-F, unfit for service, due to his chronic osteomyelitis (infection in the bone) in his left leg. During WWII, Americans generally believed that young men who seemed physically able were supposed to fulfill their military obligation and serve their country. That perception caused Mantle to endure some public shame and questioning. Mantle had two more medical examinations, in 1951 and 1953. He was again rejected for military service, this time because of ligament damage he incurred to his right leg during the 1951 World Series. This rejection led to a backlash against Mantle from the crowds at games, where he was often called a coward and draft dodger. Ernest “Ernie” Banks, more affectionately known as “Mr. Cub,” is an African American Major League Baseball player who played his entire career with the Chicago Cubs (1953–1971). Born in Dallas, Texas, in 1931, Banks registered for the Selective Service in 1949 as a student of Booker T. Washington High School when he was 18 years old. His draft card shows he had a scar on his right cheek and above his left eye. Banks served two years in the military, and upon his return played in the Negro League for the Kansas City Monarchs. He continued to wage war on the baseball diamond with the Cubs, hitting a career 512 homeruns. He also holds the record for the most extra-base hits by a Cub with 1,009. It is believed that Banks was technically the first African American manager for the MLB when in 1973 he had to fill in for Whitey Lockman who had been ejected, predating Frank Robinson by two years. These were two different men with two very different Selective Service stories. Despite the differences, both went on to become two of the greatest baseball players ever, and both were inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Above top: Selective Service Card for Ernest “Ernie” Banks, RG 147, Courtesy of National Archives at Fort Worth. Above bottom: Selective Service Card for Mickey Charles Mantle, RG 147, Courtesy of National Archives at Fort Worth.

NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION n OFFICE OF REGIONAL RECORDS SERVICES

NARA WestCoast July 2010
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY

Metlakahtla, Alaska, band and other members of community at 4th of July celebration. Item from Sir Henry Wellcome Collection, 1856–1936 Courtesy of National Archives at Anchorage

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Seattle, WA “Brick Wall” Genealogical Discussion Group 11:30 A.M.–1P.M. Workshop Genealogists 206-336-5115

Seattle, WA Overview of National Archives Records 10 A.M.–1P.M. Workshop General Public 206-336-5115 Seattle, WA The National Archives Online 1P.M.–2:30 P.M. Workshop General Public 206-336-5115

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

San Bruno, CA Federal Land Records 9 A.M. Workshop and Tour Genealogists 650-238-3485

18

19 20 21

22 23

24

Seattle, WA Museum of History and Teachers (MOHAI) Teacher Resources Fair 10 A.M. Information Booth and Exhibit K–12 Teachers 206-336-5115

25

26

27 28

29 30 31

The National Archives at

Riverside 951-956-2000 riverside.archives@nara.gov

San Francisco 650-238-3501 sanbruno.archives@nara.gov

Denver 303-407-5740 denver. archives@nara.gov

Seattle 206-336-5115 seattle.archives@nara.gov Anchorage 907-261-7800 alaska.archives@nara.gov

NARA EastCoast July 2010
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY

Fontana Glee Club, North Carolina, 1938 Record Group 142 Courtesy of National Archives at Atlanta

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1

2
Philadelphia, PA First Friday Genealogy Open House Noon Genealogists 215-606-0100

3

Exhibit: Philadelphia, PA “Stand Up and Be Counted!” Ongoing

4 5

6

Pittsfield, MA Beginning Your Genealogy Research at NARA 6 P.M. Workshop Genealogists 413-236-3600

7

8

9

10

New York, NY Educational Resources at NARA All Day Workshop and Tour K–12 Teachers 866-840-1752

New York, NY New York’s National Treasures Noon–3 P.M. General Public 866-840-1752

11 12

Pittsfield, MA Research French Canadian Ancestors, Pt. 1 10 A.M. Workshop/Genealogists 413-236-3600

13

14 15

16

17

Pittsfield, MA Research French Canadian Ancestors, Pt. 2 1:30 P.M. Workshop/Genealogists 413-236-3600

18

19

20

21

22

23 24
Pittsfield, MA

Beginning Your Genealogy Research at NARA 9 A.M. Workshop/Genealogists
413-236-3600 Pittsfield, MA

Pittsfield, MA Using the Federal Census Workshop 6 P.M. General Public Genealogists 413-236-3600

Using Federal Census Records 10:30 P.M. Workshop/Genealogists
413-236-3600

25

26

27

28

29

30

Pittsfield, MA

Finding Your Immigrant Ancestor at NARA 2 P.M. Workshop/Genealogists
413-236-3600 Pittsfield, MA

Philadelphia, PA Civil War Teacher Institute All Day Conference K–12 Teachers 610-692-4800 x235

Genealogy on the Internet 12:30 P.M. Workshop/Genealogists
413-236-3600

The National Archives at

Pittsfield 413-236-3600 pittsfield.archives@nara.gov

Boston 866-406-2379 waltham. archives@nara.gov

New York 866-840-1752 newyork. archives@nara.gov

Philadelphia 215-606-0100 philadelphia.archives@nara.gov Atlanta 770-968-2100 atlanta. archives@nara.gov

31

NARA Midwest July 2010
SUNDAY MONDAY

Photograph of swimming beach at South Kawishiwi Campground, Ely, Minnesota, November 1962 Record Group 95 Courtesy of National Archives at Chicago

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY Kansas City, MO Partisan Pieces: Quilts from Political and Patriotic Persuasion 9 A.M. General Public 816-268-8000

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1

2

3

Exhibit: Kansas City, MO “Partisan Pieces: Quilts from Political and Patriotic Persuasion” 7/1–10/1/10

4 5

6

7

Gladstone, MO Exhibit: Nothing for Something: Oscar Hartzell and the Sir Francis Drake Estate Con 7 P.M. General Public 816-268-8000

8

9

10

Exhibit: Gladstone, MO “Nothing for Something: Oscar Hartzell and the Sir Francis Drake Estate Con” 7/1–10/1/10

Kansas City, MO Beginning Indian Genealogy 10 A.M. Study Group General Public 816-268-8000

11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Kansas City, MO Get Capone Author Jonathan Eig 6 P.M. Lecture General Public 816-268-8000

Exhibit: Kansas City, MO “Mugged! Facing Life at Leavenworth” 6/11–8/7/10

Exhibit: Chicago, IL “Becoming American: Immigrants, the Federal Courts in Chicago, and the Expansion of Citizenship, 1872–1991” Ongoing

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

Raytown, MO Introduction to the National Archives 5:30 P.M. Lecture General Public 816-268-8000

Kansas City, MO Beginning Indian Genealogy 10 A.M. Study Group General Public 816-268-8000

25

26

27

28

29

Exhibit: Chicago, IL “James B. Parsons: More Than a Judge” Ongoing

Kansas City, MO Booth Staffing All Day Information Booth General Public 816-268-8000

30

Kansas City, MO Finding Your Family: Turning the Spotlight on Resources from the National Archives at Kansas City 8 A.M. Lecture/General Public 816-268-8000

Kansas City, MO Finding Your Family: Turning the Spotlight on Resources from the National Archives at Kansas City 8 A.M. Lecture General Public 816-268-8000

31

The National Archives at

Chicago 773-948-9001 chicago.archives@nara.gov

Kansas City 816-268-8000 kansascity.archives@nara.gov

St. Louis 314-801-0850 Archival Programs Division

Fort Worth 817-831-5620 ftworth.archives@nara.gov

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful