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APPENDICES

1.

Public Library Standards

2.

Evaluation of the Columbia River Demonstration

3. Grays Harbor/Pacific County Argeement

4. The Timberland Service Area

5. 106% Levy Rate Calculation Form

6. Timberland Revenues 1968-1985

7. Timberland Expenditures

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PUBLIC LIBRARY SERVICE

A GUIDE TO EVALUATION, WITH MINIMUM STANDARDS

PUBLIC LIBRARY

(.:-: :-:.:.:-:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:-: ···················0-

c:·:·:-:·.·:·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.;.: :.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:-:.:.:J:

prepared by the AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 1956

condensed by the WASHINGTON STATE LIBRARY Olympia, Washington 1964

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THE PUBLIC LIBRARY'S FUNCTIONS AND GOAL

The American Library Association's document on PUBLIC LIBRARY SERVICE is based on 70 guiding principles which are basic to the establishment of standards. 200 standards provide criteria for measuring achievement of minimum adequacy. For a tnle picture, principles are the beginning and the end of an evaluation with standards serving to aid judgment.

As indicated in this guide, the functions of the Public Library fall into DvO categories: materials and services •

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MATERIALS are provided for these purposes:

To facilitate informal self-education of all people in the community To enrich and further develop the subjects on which individuals are undertaking formal education

To meet the informational needs for all

To support the educational, civic and cultural activities_.9f groups and organizations

To encourage wholesome recreation and constructive use of leisure - time

SERVICES performed include:

Logical organization of materials for convenient use through shelf arrangement, classification and cataloging

Lending of materials so that they may be used in the location and at the time sui.tedto each individual

Provision of information service designed to locate facts as needed Guidance to individual$ in the use of educational and recreational material

Assistance to civic, cultural and educational organizations, in locating and using materials for program p1.anning, proj ects and the education of members

StimUlation of use and interpretation of materials through publicity, di.splay, reading lists, story hours, book talks, book and film discussion and other appropriate means either in the library or

in community organizations

Other topics considered in the guide--Personnel, Physical facilities, Organization and control of materials, and Structure and government of library service--are concerned wi.th the means necessary for achievement of the library's functions.

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Page '2

Each standard applies to all ages and groups; if its provlslons are met ( 'l/

for one part of the population but not for another, a standard is not achieved.

The achievement of these standards is possible only through libraries working together, sharing materials and services to meet the full needs of their users.

The American Library Association Standards refer to "syst ems" of libraries.

In Washington State we call them District and Regional Libraries.

Good library service, which would be the result of achieving these standards, is possible in Washington oruy through the establishment of such Tlsystems.1T

STRUCTURE AND GOVERNMENT OF LIBRARY SERVICE

The purpose of this plan for library service is to insure for every person a level of library service that meets his essential needs. Such "systems" or affiliations of libraries must prevail if sound standards are to be met.

PUBLIC LIBRARY SERVLCE SHOULD BE UNIVERSALLY AVAILABLE

1. Every individual should have free library service available in his )
local community.
2. Every individual should also have access through his local outlet
to the full range of modern library facilities provided by regional,
state and federal library agencies. THERE SHOULD BE A COMHUNITY LIBRARY EASILY ACCESSIBLE TO EVERY READER, AND IT SHOULD CONNECT HIH WITH THE TOTAL RESOURCES OF HIS REGION AND STATE

1. The cOITununity library should have sufficient resources to enable it to provide the most frequently requested material from its collection.

2. The community library should be as easy to reach as the local shopping center.

3. The community agency should have at least one professional staff member, or in small communities close and regular guidance by professional personnel.

4. The community library should maintain a program of service.

5. The community library should be a part of a larger system of libraries with which it has a clear and official relationship.

A CENTRAL LIBRARY OR REGIONAL CENTERS OPEN TO EVERY RESIDENT OF A NATURAL REGION SHOULD HAKE AVAILABLE THE ESSENTIAL RESOURCES AND PERSONNEL OF MODERN SERVICE

1. The central library should provide a comprehensive collection of library materials to cover the interests of its region.

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J?age 3

2. The central library should provide non-print materials of communication, such as educational films and recordings.

3. The central library should provide information and bibliographic tools to locate facts and specialized resources.

4. The central library should have a staff that includes special professional personnel for children, adults, audio-visual, etc.

THE CENTRAL LIBRARY AND THE COMMUNITY LIBRARIES IN A NATURAL DISTRICT SHOULD FUNCTION TOGETHER IN A "SYSTEMTI OF AFFILIATION FOR LIBRARY SERVICE

IN EACH STATE A PROGRAM OF SUPPLE~ffiNTAL LIBRARY SERVICES MUST BE MAINTAINED AT THE STATE LEVEL TO BACK UP SEPARATE LIBRARIES AND LIBRARY SYSTEMS THROUGHOUT THE STATE

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY SHOULD BE UNDER THE GENERAL GOVERNMENTAL CONTROI, OF CAPABLE AND INTERESTED OFFICIALS

1. Trustees should be chosen not for partisan reasons, but for their value to the citizens, government and library in interpreting the needs of the communf.ty i, the will of the government, and the policies of the library.

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THE FUNCTION OF THE LIBRARY BOARD AND OF THE CHIEF LIBRARIAN AND THE STAFF SHOULD BE CLEARLY DIFFERENTIATED

PUBLIC LIBRARIES AND SCHOOL LIBRARIES ARE PART OF A NETWORK OF LIBRARY FACILITIES, AND SHOULD (V'ORK TOGETHER TO PROVIDE COORDINATED AND COMPLETE SERVICE FOR CHILDREN AND YO{mG PEOPLE

1. If the public library is called upon to provide service in the schools, additional funds should be made available for this function.

SERVICE

The ultimate aim of all public library activities is service to the people. Through service functions, the library staff meets the user, helps him locate resources, furnishes materials, and aids him in its use. The collection is maintained for such service; cataloging activities are carried out to facilitate it; buildings and equipment provide the physical means for it; the library personnel exists to provide service.

THE PROGRAM OF FACH LIBRARY SHOULD BE FOCUSED UPON CLEAR AND SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES

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THE PUBLIC LIBRARY SHOULD BE CLOSELY INTEGRATED WITH THE COMMUNITIES IT SERVES

1. Continuous and periodic study of its community should be made by the library in order to know people, groups, and institutions thoroughly, and to keep up with developments and changes.

2. Library staff members should participate in the life of the community.

3. The community-related library should be in regular touch with other agencies and their activities.

WELL PLANNED HOURS OF SERVICE MUST BE MAINTAINED BY ALL UNITS IN A LIBRARY SYSTEM

1. The central or headquarters library should be open daily for the full range of services during morning, afternoon, and evening hours, \vith Sunday services adjusted to local needs and conditions.

2. The conununi ty library should provide services to the public some substantial part of five days a week, the times to be sel.ect ed upon basis of maximum use.

3. Bookmobiles should maintain regular schedules of visits at intervals no greater than two weeks, and of sufficient length to offer pro-

fessional advisory ser',~j_ce. -

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY MAKES PROVISION FOR USE OF MATERIALS OFF THE PREMISES, UNDER REGULATIONS \YHICH ENABLE BUSY PEOPLE TO UTILIZE THEM

1. All book resources except those which are used daily in the library (reference books) and which the agency cannot afford to duplicate, including rare items, should be available for circulation.

2. Films, recordings and pictures should be available for circulation.

EACH LIBRARY "SYSTEM" SHOULD PROVIDE SERVICE TO MEET THE FREQUENT INFORMATIONAL AND RESEARCH NEEDS OF ITS COMMUNITY.

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY HAS A POSITIVE PROGRAM OF GUIDANCE TO INDIVIDUALS IN THE ~SE OF EDUCATIONAL, INFORMATIONAL AND RECREATIONAL MATERIALS

'1. Each library system should be prepared to guide and to stimulate use of materials by personal consultation, lists of materials, instruction in the use of the library, displays, arrangement of the collection, radio and television presentations; the library should facilitate

the use of materials by verbal, visual or other interpretative means.

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY PROVIDES MATERIALS AND SERVICES FOR GROUPS AND INSTITUTIONS

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THE PUBLIC LIBRARY }ffiY SPONSOR OR CO-SPONSOR GROUP ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE FRAHEWORK OF ITS OWN PROGRAH

BOOKS AND NON-BOOK MATERIALS

The public library exists to provide materials which communicate experience.and ideas from one person to another. Its function is to assemble,preserve and to make easily and freely available to all people such materials.

MATERIALS SHOULD BE SELECTED, RETAINED AND DISCARDED IN THE LIGHT OF CONSCIOUS OBJECTIVES OF EACH LIBRARY

MATERIAIJS ACQUIRED SHOULD MEET HIGH STANDARDS OF QUALITY IN CONTENT, EXPRESSION AND FORMAT

WITHIN STANDARDS OF PURPOSE AND QUALITY, COLLECTIONS SHOULD BE BUILT TO MEET THE NEEDS AND INTEREST OF PEOPLE

THE LIBRARY COLLECTION SHOULD CONTAIN OPPOSING VIm.,rS ON CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS OF INTEREST TO THE PEOPLE

THE COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY IS INCLUSIVE AND CONTAINS WHATEVER FORMS OF MATERIALS CONTRIBUTE TO THE PURPOSES OF THE LIBRARY

1. Non-book materials should be an integral part of the collection and, within limits of availability and usefulness, should be provided to the same degree as books.

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SYSTEHATIC REHOVAL FROM COLLECTIONS OF MATERIALS NO LONGER USEFUL IS ESSENTIAL TO HAINTAINING THE PURPOSES AND QUALITY OF RESOURCES

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1. Annual withdrawals from the collections should average at least five per cent of the total collection.

THE LOCAL LIBRARY IN EACH COMMUNITY STANDS AS THE FIRST AND CONVENIENT RESOURCE FOR ALL READERS

1 .. Books and other materials regularly used should be "in the collection of each community library.

2. The community library must be able to draw upon larger collections to meet the needs of readers.

A LIBRARY ITSYSTEMI! MUST HAVE RESOURCES COVERING MOST INTERESTS IN THE SEVERAL COMMUNITIES IT SERVES IN SUFFICIENT DUPLICATION TO MEET MOST REQUESTS WHEN MADE

1. There should be at least 100,000 volumes of currently useful printed

materials in a library IT system. " .

2. 4,000 - 5,000 separate til t.Les should be added to a library "ays't em" annually, including 400 - 500· children's titles, and approximately

250 new adult titles selected as of interest to young adults. ) \

3. 300 - 400 periodical titles should be currently received, with approxi- (, mately 50 per cent retained in back files.

4. 250 films should be in the collection of a library "system" with at least 25 added per year.

5. 1,500 long-playing recordings should be held, with 300 new records purchased annually.

•• . .• ,., .•• " ••• ,.,~.. ••.•• """ 1'", •••.• ,- •• ",.,'.' -,', ........ . • • • • • - •••.. , .' •.

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PERSONNEL

No library can render effective service without adequate and competent personnel. The library I s unique function of serving as the one unbiased, non-partisan bureau of information for all the people calls for personnel of the highest competence and integrity.

LIBRARY POSITIONS SHOULD BE CLEARLY DEFINED AND DIFFERENTIATED IN TERMS OF REQUIREMENTS, DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Existing studies of 'the nature of li.brary tasks indicate the professional staff in a library "syst-em" should be approximately onethird of the total personnel, and the non-professional staff (excluding maintenance personnel) approximately two-thirds.

THE NUMBER OF STAFF ME~ffiERS SHOULD BE SUFFICIENT TO PERFORM THE DUTIES INVOLVED IN ASSEMBLING, ORGANIZING AND INTERPRETING MATERIALS, AND TO PROVIDE CONSISTENTLY EFFICIENT SERVICE AT ALL HOURS WHEN THE CENTRAL AGENCY AND COMMUNITY OUTLETS ARE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

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1. One staff member should be the minimum provision for each 2,500 people in the service area.

2. All libraries serving populations of 5,000 or more should have fulltime personneL

3. Community libraries should be in charge of a professional librarian or should be under regular guidance of professional staff elsewhere in the IIsystem" who are readily and frequently accessible.

THE STAFF IN EACH LIBRARY "SYSTEM'! SHOULD INCLUDE PERSONS PROFESSIONALLY TRAINED IN THE VARIOUS MAIN SERVICES SPECIFIED

1. In each library "syst em" there should be at least one professional staff member for each of the following aspects of library service: administration, organization and control of materials, information and advisory service for adults, information and advisory service for young adults, information and advisory service for children, and extension service.

In a "system" serving 100,000 people, at least 15 professional librarians will be needed, distributed over these categories.

THE ORGANIZATION AND CONTROL OF MATERIALS

Without organization, materials are difficult to locate; without control, there is no opportunity for fair and equal access by many readers.

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THE PHYSICAL LOCATION AND FACILITIES OF THE WORKING SPACE FOR ORGfu~IZATION OF l'fATERIALS SHOULD BE PLk\fNED FOR HAXIMUM ECONOHY AND EFFECTIVENESS

1. Processing operations should be adjacent to public service areas and to each other.

2. \vhenever budget and the nature of the work justify it, the machine should be substituted for hand work and the power-driven machine for the manually-operated one.

p. Standardized equipment and supplies should be used.

ALL HATERIALS SHOULD BE MADE AVAILABLE FOR USE AS PROHPTLY AND KEPT AVAILABLE AS CONTINUOUSLY AS POSSIBLE

1. Staff and equipment should be provided and processes so planned as to insure new materials being added to the collection promptly.

SOUND BUSINESS PRACTICES SHOULD BE OBSERVED IN THE ACQUISITION OF MATERIALS

1. The library should secure the best discount possible on books and other materials, commensurate with satisfactory service.

THE COLLECTION OF LIBRARY MATERIALS SHOULD BE ORGfu~IZED LOGICALLY AND, APPROPRIATE CATALOGS AND GUIDES SHOULD BE MADE AVAILABLE

1. Every library must have a finding list of the processed holdings of its coLlection.

2. The card catalog should be designed to serve the peculiar information and other demands made on each library.

3. A system of orderly location of materials should be provided.

4. A system of identifying each item in collections must be provided.

ALL LIBRARY l'fATERIALS SHOULD BE KEPT IN USABLE ATTRACTIVE CONDITION

.1. Inspection, shelf reading or other means should be used regularly to insure prompt attention to need for remarking, repair, or rebinding of materials.

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PHYSICAL FACI2:.ITIES

The public library building should serve as a symbol of library service.

It should offer to the community a compelling invitation to enter, read, look, listen and learn. The environment provided by public library facilities should achieve the level of furrctiorral efficiency and beauty found in the best schools and homes.

THE PHYSICAL FACILITIES OF A PUBLIC LIBRARY SHOULD FIT THE PROGRAM OF LIBRARY SERVICE

'.

1. Both an experienced librarian and a qualified architect should be available from the beginrling of a building project to its completion, and should work in full cooperation.

2. Planning of a new building, or rer..ovatior.. of an old structure should start with a program statement covering objectives, activities and requirements before even prelimir.aYy plans are drawn.

THE LIBRARY BUILDI)l"G MUST BE INVITING AND EASY TO USE

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1. The library building should be well marked. _

2. There should be provisfo:1 for adequate outside lighting and e..xterior exhibit space.

3. Books and reading areas should be visible from the outside and easy to reach by users upon entering the building.

4. Rooms, service points, collections a:::.d parts of collec'tions within the building should be clearly identified.

THE LIBRARY STRUCTURE SHOULD BE EFFICIEN'r, FLEXIBLE AND EXPANDABLE

1. Fixed wal.Ls should be kept to a minirr.um.

2. Points for supervision of readers shou.Ld be located and consolidated for ecor.ominal opera't.i on,

THE HIGHEST STANDARDS FOR LIGETING Ai.\i) O'::'~ER Pl!"YSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS SHOu~D BE rffiINTAINE~

1. Quant Lty of light should achieve at least 50 foot candles on reading surfaces, and in adCition light must: be evenly distributed and glare avoided.

2. Special atte'!:rtion should be given to control of sound, by accoustical treatrr.ent, proper covering, partitio~s, etc.--all physical mearlS short of a sign readir..g "Sf.Lence.."

3. Air conditior.ing should be used w"here climate cO::1ditions have caused such equipment to be used in mode:m commercial buildir:gs and where traffic noise forbids open l<?i:1dow3.

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THE CENTRAL OR HEADQUARTERS BUILDING SHOULD BE LOCATED AND DESIGNED

SO AS TO PROVIDE HAXIHUN ACCESSIBILITY AND SPACE FOR THE FULL RANGE OF STANDARD LIBRARY SERVICE.

L Shelving and exhibit space.

2. Storage space.

3. Study areas.

4. Separate children and young people's space.

5. Hultipurpose rooms.

6. Facilities for mobi.le units.

THE LOCAL COMMUNITY IJIBRARY SHOULD HAVE SPACE AND FACILITIES TO SERVE AS A READING CENTER FOR ITS IMMEDIATE DISTRICT

1. Shelf and exhibit space.

2. Study area.

3. Work space and staff quarters.

COMHUNITY LIBRARIES AND BOOKHOBILE STOPS SHOULD BE PROVIDED AT INTERVALS SO THAT EVERY SCHOOL-AGE CHILD IS ABLE TO REACH A LIBRARY OUELET ALONE

FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT SHOULD HARMONIZE WITH THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE ( 1 \

BUILDING AND CONTRIBUTE TO THE LIBRARY PROGRAM

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EVALUATION of the

COLUMBIA RIVER REGIONAL LIBRARY DEHONSTRATION

Washington State

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Local initiative is most desirable in a

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pre-Demonstration period so that citizens of the area feel that the program is the result of their interest, not one simply superimposed on them.

In order to accomplish this, it is first necessary to locate lay leadership which is interested in developing and promoting library services in the area, before the Demonstration begins.

This leadership must be nonpartisan and represent both rural and town interests so that full cooperation exists and an entire area will participate in the program for the mutual benefit of all.

The professional staff, with the basic know-how, must of necessity inform this lay leadership on all facets of the program and continue to be a-resource and provide impetus during the entire program. However, too much professionalism is to be avoided.

Ideally, the lay leadership would conduct the informational public relations program. This program must be continuous

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throughout the Demonstration. An educative process to acquaint all

citizens with the numerous facts pertaining to the program will

involve repetition. Even with such a continuing program, it should

be recognized that lack of understanding, particularly of the tax

structure, will continue to exist. Emphasis must be placed on the

fact that library services do cost money and the local areas will

ultimately assume these costs if they wish to continue services.

Such continuing information should be low key as citizens are not

too receptive to information doled out too far'ahead of the time

when the issue is to be decided.

All organized groups must be contacted again and again, to III

gain their support and understanding. The importance of contacts

with all levels of those involved in school programs cannot be

underestimated, since school connected personnel can carry the

message throughout the area with their many contacts. It is

especially important that organizations such as the League of

Women's Voters should be made aware of the program at its very

inception so that sufficient time is afforded or a complete study.

Any misinformation should be corrected immediately and complainers

talked with directly to get at the root of any misunderstanding

which may have developed.

Basically, the non-librarians present agreed that the

professional staff would have to provide the library organization

and service for at least a full year before a vote of the people

and were unanimous in feeling that a program of effective public

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information is essential too, to assure a successful campaign in establishing the library by vote.

The actual campaign must be short and intense, with the contact work being done by the lay people. It is interesting to note here, however, that Ferry County, in contrast to some other areas, felt very strongly that the professional library staff meeting with various local groups was a most successful approach. Though there was an active interested lay citizens group working in that county, they attribute the highly successful campaign to the contacts made by the professional librarian. Succinctly expressed, then, as a future guide in such programming: repetition of facts is absolutely essential with flexibility of approach a netessity factor. Use whatever approach appears logical after assessing a given local situation.

Where local community libraries exist prior to a Demonstration, built-in difficulties may arise, in relationship to local autonomy. It is essential that a complete understanding of the library program be given to all concerned prior to the Demonstrat.ion's beginnings and throughout its continuance. This is the one area where admittedly the Columbia River Regional Library Demonstration was weakest in its effectiveness. Community librarians are apt to have a fear of increased professionalism, so the advantages of this new program to their particular libraries need to be presented in a way to assure acceptance. In a previously organized library system which becomes a part of a new,

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larger program, the branch librarians are the key to success in enlisting support for expansion of the overall program, especially as related to the addition of bookmobile service in rural areas as a supplemental adjunct, not as competition to the existing branch library.

Old time staff members, inclined to resist changes in program or even methods may, perhaps need to have "their hands held" as they are encouraged to accept a new approach. Another alternative in dealing with the "doubting Thomas" might be the inflating of his importance by soliciting the assistance of "the one" who can best do thi.s particular job. Basically, it all resolves itself into the fact that the character of the communities differ, as do those of personalities, an d each has to be handled as the situation demands.

Local library boards should be made aware of what comprises good library service, even if their particular community may not be participating in the Demonstration. They need to be informed since their voices will be heard w'ithin the area. There is a decided problem to overcome in attempting to inform and sell public officials, both city and county, local library trustees, local branch librarians and local library staffs. Governmental officials may tend to slough off any knowledge of the program, since they may consider it to be the province of the respective library board. Every effort should be made to acquaint them with the facts whether they favor or oppose the program - as they will be asked questions

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by virtue of their positions and should knmv the answers, or at

least where to get them. It is true, too, that during a

Demonstration period, officials may change making it necessity to

continue the educational program if information with new officials.

(In fact, experience has now shown that this is a vital factor in

situations requiring contracts. It should be stressed again and

again with the citizens in the cooperating communities. It is

especially important where no library service was provided prior to

the demonstration period.)

It was agreed that it is desirable for each county to have a

Library Advisory Committee representing the various areas of the t>

county, first to help plan the service pattern and later to

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maintain participation and interest throughout the Demonstration.

This Committee might well continue as a permanent organization

after a library district is established. As a counterpart, a

region wide organization of local library trustees, such as the

King County group, was discussed as a desirable approach.

The group of citizens from North Central Washington who

shared their opinions with the librarians at the Evaluation Meeting

concluded their comments with their appreciation for the program,

expressions of great pleasure that it was successful, their

recognition of the work yet to be done in the newly established

library's initial organizational period which contractual

agreements with incorporated communities are negotiated and their

willingness to continue their efforts in its behalf.

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The suggestion was made, before this part of the meeting was ended, that as a political expediency, consideration be given to an area on the west side of the state for a future library demonstration program, the east side now having had the privilege and advantage.

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THIS AG?.3318IrT outlines a cooperative arrangement between the .RURAL LIB:2.~lY DISTRICT OF PACIFIC COUNTY, Raymond,

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"Rashlngton, and the GRAYS HARBOR COUNTY RURAL LIBRARY DISTRICT,

Montesano, Washington.

The obj ect· of this agreement is to mutua.lly provide library service to the communities of Pacific County as defined

herein, that are not readily accessible for such service from

the Rural Library District of P~cific County.

Under this arrangement the Rural Library District of Pacific County agrees to provide a collection of books for both aduits and children to the number of not more than one thousand and not.less than three hundred volumes a year. This colleotion

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qf books shall be pooled with the Grays Harbor Rural Library District book collection for distribution at the discretion of the Grays Barbor County Rural Library District. All books purchased by either party to this agreement remain the property of the

party so purchasing, and are pooled in order to give the advantages of a larger collection to the communities served under this

agreement.

In return for the use of the collection of books

ab07e mentioned, Grays Harbor County Rurai Library District agrees to give library service co~ensurable with that r~ndered

in Grays Harbor County, to the communities of Grayland, North'Cov~ Tokeland, the same situated in Pacific County, Washington.

It is further agreed that Grays Harbor County Rural Library District shall not be held liable for damages, loss, or

]~ depreciation to the books furnished by the Rural Library District of Pacific County when used as specified above. In so far as

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damage or depreciation may be covered by fines, payments for lost books, or rentals collected by Grays Harbor County Rural Library District, said monies so collected for lost

.

or damaged books which are the property of the Rural Library

District of Pacific County, ~hall revert to said library.

This agreement shall be in full force and effect

from the date of its execution. If at the end of one year from the date of execution it is found to be mutually

agreeable to both parties, this agreement shall 1': automatically'

continue in force until written notice be given by either

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':- ~'-:.. _. " .. ,. '\ ......

,:party ninety days prior to the date of intended termina tr6h.

Signed by the respective governing bodies this

~T_r_le~n~t~y~-~f~i~f~t~h~ __ ~ Day of

___ J.u.1.u.1D...,:;Cl;;l.-.----1945 •

Rural Library District of Facific County

Board of Trustees

By ~21J?a,~~

Pr au en (J

Board of Trustees

Grays Harbor County Rural Library District

:;a%~

-Presiaeri--Board of Trustees

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LEGEND

....__. __ -l L_---JO Timberland Regional Library Serving Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason, Pacific & Thurston Counties

Service Area

in Washington State

®®

Timberland Libraries (In Alphabetical Order)

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1. Aberdeen Timberland Library

2. Timberland Amanda Park Library

3. Centralia Timberland Library

4. Chehalis Timberland.Library

5. Cosmopolis Public Library

6. Elma Public Library

7. Hoquiam Timberland Library

8. Ilwaco Timberland Library

9. Lacey Public Library

10. McCleary Timberland Library

11. W.H. Abel Memorial Library (Montesano)

12. Timberland North Beach Library

13. Timberland North Mason Library

14. Oakville Timberland Library

15. Timberland Ocean Park Library

16. Olympia Timberland Library

17. Timberland Packwood Library

18. Raymond Public Library

19. South Bend Public Library

20. Timberland South Mason Library

21. Tenino Timberland Library

22. Tumwater Timberland Library

23. Westport Timberland Library

24. Winlock Public Library

25. Yelm Timberland Library

26. Service Center (Olympia)

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TAXING DISTRICT _

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LEVY LIMIT CALCULATION 1984 LEVY FOR 1985 TAXES ONLY

~OR 2E:CUUR TAX is»: C';LCUL.;rrC~1 CR A:;~;E:XHION, FOLLOw INSTRUCTIONS BELOW. FOR CONSOLIDATION, USE ONE FORM FOR EACH

.i.~IDI'!IDUH. iHSnICT WVOLV:;:D IN THE'. RSGULAR HA~I~i::R MID ADD THE RESULTS TO GET THE TOTAL LIl1IT.

Year 19

$_--

X 106% =

$

,4. Hi.ghest regular t ax levied in three mos t recent years. Do not include income fro~ refund levy.

3. Curren t'/ear' s assessed value of ne~ construction and improvements in origi.na.l r.i::;trict before annexation has occurred tines last year's levy rate.

1\. II. s

X $ 1$1000 =

$,-----------------------

~. Current year's asses~ed value of state assessed property in original district if an:1exed less last year's assessed value of state assessed property. The remainder to be =ulti~lied by last year's regular levy rate.

$

----~~~-_ $~~~--~-

Current Yr. A1 Previous Yr. All

= $ ----=---:--~Remainder

$.----~----~------

iier.1alr.der

X $~ __ ~--~ __ /$1000 = PreviOUS Yr.

Levy Rate

$_

D. Regular property tax li~it = A + B + C

$

THE F'OLLC',IING THRE:S PARTS, E THROUGH G, ARE: FOR USE IN CALCULATING THE ADDITIONAL LEVY LIMIT DUE TO ANNEXATION. IF

YOU ARS CALCUL,;r::IG ,H::: REGULAR LEVY LWIT FOR A DISTRICT WHICH HAS NOT BEEN ANNEXED, GO ON TO PARTS H, I, J. AND K.

To find the rate to ~e used in F, take the 106% limit as shown in D above and divide it by the current assessed value of the orlgi.na1. district i.ncluding :1e'''/ cons true t i on and Irapr-ovement;s •

$ .-----:=---

D

.. $_-

=

$_. ._1$1000

A.V.

F. A~nexed area's ~urren~ assessed value including new construction and tmpr-ovemen t.s t:'c:es the rate f'ound in E above ,

$----------------

Annexed

Area's At!

X $' __ ",.-,..",-_.,--_1 $1 000 E (Race)

$,--------------------

G. New 106% levy l!~it for annexation = D + F =

$

--------------------"------------------------------------------,

$-----:::-----,,:---D or G

+ $--~--~~~,--~--- = Amount; nefunded

Or' to be

Refunded

$_------

H. ROT 24.55.070 ;:Jr'ovides that the 106% levy U.mit will not apply to the levy for taxes refu!lded Or' to be r'ef'unded pursuant to Chapters 84.68 and 84.69 RC\'.

.----J

~0t,"il a Ll owab l e leon 3S c:ontrolle1 bJ' the 106% limIt.

$_--

$ I

. " -====================-_J

Amount of levy cer~ified by ccunty legislative authority or taxing district as applicable.

$,------------------------ J

-----_._-

LeSSer of Ite~s _ ~ J.

A-25

TAXING DISTRICT _

COMPUTATION OF PROPERTY TAX LEVY 1984 LEVY FOR 1985 TAXES

(DO NOT USE FOR SCHOOLS)

1. Total di$tric~ caxable value (including state valued utility property, and excluji[!g boats, t irnbe r- assessed value, and the senior citizen exemption

from the regUlar l evy l , Tax base for regular le'/y ....•••••.••••.•••••.•.•••.•• $ _

9.

T.:IX 8i1S:: FeR EXC2SS L.::VY

2. Less assessed value of the senior citizen exemption of less than $15,000 inc;r:e (include total assessed value of property in this categor-y which

exceeds the exemption not included in 1 above) •••••..•.•.•••..•••.•••..•••••••• $

--------------------------

3. Plus T:'mber Assessed Value (T.:IV) .••••••.••..•••..•.•...•.•...•....•.•••• '" '" .$ .

4. Tax base for excess and bond levies (1-2+3) ..•..•......•............•.•........ $

-------------------.

LEVY RATE COt1PUTATION

REGUL~,R LEVY

Type of taxing district

Statutory maxtmum dollar-rate for taxing district •••••••.••.••••••••.•••.••••.••••• s

1$100r '1

(

The dollar a~ount of the certified levy (from K on reverse) minus e~cess inventory ~lscrlbution divided by the assessed value ~hG~n on line 1 above.

$---------------

= $ 1$1000

-----

s

For RSGULAR R,r:-E, ent er- the lesser of the statutory maximum dollar rate or

the certi!'ied levy r'a t e ••..•.•...••.•.•••....••••.•••••••••.••••••••••••••.••.••.. *$ . ,1$1000

S?EC:AL L::VY

The dollar a"ount of the certified levy minus excess inventory distribution diVided by the assessed value shown on line 4 above.

$----------------

$ /$1000

$

201:0 LEVY

"he dollar amount of the cert':'fied levy minus excess inventory distri~ution divided by the assessed value shown on line 4 above •

$----------------

.:; _~ 1$1000

·~jO'!' TO ::XCC:SD T:~E 106~ LIl-H, ,l,S C;'i...ClJLAED ON ras RSVERSE.

';-:11i7 9IST:lICTS: In C(I::J;JUtl:\g t r:e I ev i e s for a joint district, ':'nclude the assessed value and all nece ssnry adj us tment s of th~ entir'e district for the r-egul ar , special, and bond t ax case ,

A-26

TIMBERLAND REGIONAL LIBRARY REVENUES
1968 1970
1968 1969 1970
Balance Forward $ 45,922.71 37,143.07 65,508.18
Property Taxes 1l~9,780.57 292,055.93 578,694.38
City Contract Fees 69,418.62 143,755.78 373,216.18
Land/Timber Operations 31,900.87
State Shared Revenues 31,887.53
Demonstration Grant 150,393.00
Grant in Lieu of Taxes 240,514.00
Sale of Forest Lands 4,285.64
State Grants 19,154.50
Miscellaneous Revenue 5,662.24 135,659.78 52,530.02
II>
Non-Revenue Receipts
,) TOTAL 1 425,462.78 881,029.43 1,120,990.79 The information provided in these Tables was obtained from the Budget Files of the Timberland Regional Library.

),

A-27

TIMBERLAND REGIONAL LIBRARY REVENUES
-----
1971 1973
1971 1972 1973
Balance Forward $ 75,382.03 78,412.99 148,675.11
Property Taxes 735,226.68 834,949.97 932,531.61
City Contract Fees 364,712.41 492,524.39 515,926.95
Land/Timber Operations
State Shared Revenues 75,516.89 59,473.82 70,973.66
Demonstration Grant
Grant in Lieu of Taxes
Sale of Forest Lands
State Grants 24,899.00 41,962.00 208,056.00
Miscellaneous Revenue 14,357.31 5,808.55 63,571. 64
Non-Revenue Receipts ill 2,989.50
TOTAL 1 1,290,094.32 1,513,131. 72 1,942,724.47 .~ ,

TIMBERLAND REGIONAL LIBRARY REVENUES

)

Balance Forward Property Taxes

Sale of Tax Title Prop. Forest Excise Tax

City Contract Fees Private Forest Yield Land/Timber Operations State Forest Yield State Shared Revenues Demonstration Grant Grant in Lieu of Taxes Sale of Fixed Assets Sale of Forest Lands Federal Grants

State Grants Miscellaneous Revenue

Non-Revenue Receipts

TOTAL

)

1974 1976

1974

$ 24,552.26

1,070,108.04

501,204.90

77,431.49

32,941. 75

15,000.00 117,575.00 45,247.16

1 1,884,060.60

1975

69,723.44 858,741. 60 7,449.83 154,588.08 568,937.40 2,550.98

45,778.34

58,057.43

11,027.89

36,239.83

1,813,094.82

A-28

1976

-19,144.00 945,446.88 5,368.54 497,163.33 589,649.05 22,633.02

14,194.66

24,743.07

43,847.13

2,123,901.68

A-29

TIMBERLAND REGIONAL LIBRARY REVENUES

1977 1979

1977

1978

1979

Balance Forward $ 45,358.39 183,547.59 278,838.10
Property Taxes 1,040,351.59 1,173,514.87 1,273,445.58
Sale of Tax Title Prop. 317.92 1,937.25 8,052.32
Forest Excise Tax 582,398.99 554,499.41 555,755.58
City Contract Fees 581,118.65 788,268.50 837,197.58
Private Forest Yield 43,700.57 28,342.21 54,693.42
Land/Timber Operations
State Forest Yield 5,897.11 13,537.36 7,896.52
State Shared Revenues Demonstration Grant Grant in Lieu of Taxes ~ Sale of Fixed Assets Sale of Forest Lands Federal Grants

Federal Grants Direct State Grants Miscellaneous Revenue Refunds

Non-Revenue Receipts

34,280.78 51,114.96 63,184.01
8,454.66 24,450.00 ( ')
819,585.40 50,429.60
44,432.47 51,020.76 93,114.56
171,307.94
*
225,016.67 TOTAL

1 3,197,441.87

2,904,667.17

3,592,952.28

* Includes $ 100,016.67 - Sale of Coupon Warrants 125,000.00 - Transfer from Reserve Fund

)

A-30

TIMBERLAND REGIONAL LIBRARY REVENUES
1980 1982
1980 1981 1982
Balance Fo rwar d $ 344,387.69 239,270.21 451,507.39
Property Taxes 1,349,496.74 1,610,105.67 1,792,700.34
Sale of Tax Title Prop. 4,412.48 3,612.96 7,464.51
Forest Excise Tax 718,196.16 982,092.24 873,553.28
City Contract Fees 881,095.71 961,536.34 1,188,354.79
Private Forest Yield 61,892.18 236,216.22 174,250.09
Land/Timber Operations
State Forest Yield 994.22 20,963.06 3,993.95
State Shared Revenues
Demonstration Grant
Grant in Lieu of Taxes
Sale of Fixed Assets 167,495.95 44,850. t4 89,230.56
Sale of Forest Lands
) Federal Grants Indirect 41,610.00 865.57
Federal Grants Direct
State Grants 835.00 1,631.00 500.00
Hiscellaneous Revenue 79,722.58 133,735.01 133,194.62
Refunds 16,012.55 8,900.30
*
Non-Revenue Receipts 13,343.27 10,247.23 547,017 .22
TOTAL 1 3,679,494.53 4,253,160.38 5,262,632.32 * Includes $ 153,855.25 - Sale of Coupon Warrants 393,161.97 - Transfer from Reserve

)

TIMBERLAND REGIONAL LIBRARY REVENUES

Balance Forward Property Taxes

Sale of Tax Title Prop. Forest Excise Tax

City Contract Fees Private Forest Yield Land/Timber Operations State Forest Yield State Shared Revenues Demonstration Grant Grant in Lieu of Taxes Sale of Fixed Assets Sale of Forest Lands Federal Grants Indirect Federal Grants Direct State Grants Miscellaneous Revenue Refunds

Non-Revenue Receipts

TOTAL

* Estimated Revenues.

1983 1985

1983

$ 555,451.69 2,661,864.52

2,421.30 727,411.89 568,383.00 172,790.24

25,614.16

216,650.91

805.78

120,461.41 3,298.71

1 5,055,153.61

1984

815,707.00 3,104,768.00

2,215.00 404,903.00 321,372.00 239,480.00

49,486.00

64,597.00

146,943.00

5,149,471.00

A-31

* 1985

379,320.00 3,315,753.00

5,000.00 405,000.00 342,748.00 200,000.00

9,500.00

50,000.00

157,325.00

4,864,646.00

-::'\ f

.J (

A-32

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