You are on page 1of 37

Unit: Raisin in The Sun

Unit Goals and Objectives

Big Idea: How does race impact our daily lives? How does the media use persuasion to convey

a message?

Objectives:

General Objective: Students will critically analyze their own lives in relation to the text and

advertising visuals. Students will understand that visuals play a role in shaping public opinion.

When reading, students will compare their own understanding of society and social interactions

to the motives of the characters. Students will understand the historical events that took place in

the 1950s still carry on today. The play, along with visuals, will help students visualize racial

tensions of the time period and the different ways people vocalized their opinion on race.

Students will compare themes found in both the play and political cartoons. Students will then

break down the visuals and cartoons using persuasive techniques. In the end, students will

create their own visuals using the persuasive techniques covered in class.

VA SOL:

11.1 The student will make informative and persuasive presentations.


a) Gather and organize evidence to support a position.
b) Present evidence clearly and convincingly.
c) Address counterclaims.
d) Support and defend ideas in public forums.
e) Use grammatically correct language, including vocabulary appropriate to the
topic, audience, and purpose.
f) Monitor listening and use a variety of active listening strategies to make
evaluations.
g) Use presentation technology.
h) Collaborate and report on small-group learning activities.

11.2 The student will examine how values and points of view are included or excluded
and how media influences beliefs and behaviors.
a) Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge in
ways others can view, use, and assess.
b) Use media, visual literacy, and technology skills to create products.
c) Evaluate sources including advertisements, editorials, blogs, Web sites, and other
media for relationships between intent, factual content, and opinion.
d) Determine the authors purpose and intended effect on the audience for media
messages

11.4 The student will read, comprehend, and analyze relationships among American
literature, history, and culture.
a) Describe contributions of different cultures to the development of American
literature.
b) Compare and contrast the development of American literature in its historical
context.
c) Discuss American literature as it reflects traditional and contemporary themes,
motifs, universal characters, and genres.
d) Analyze the social or cultural function of American literature.
e) Analyze how context and language structures convey an authors intent and
viewpoint.
f) Explain how the sound of a poem (rhyme, rhythm, onomatopoeia, repetition,
alliteration, assonance, and parallelism) supports the subject, mood, and theme.
g) Explain how imagery and figures of speech appeal to the readers senses and
experience.
h) Explain how an authors specific word choices, syntax, tone, and voice support
the authors purpose.
i) Read and analyze a variety of American dramatic selections.
j) Analyze the use of literary elements and dramatic conventions including verbal,
situational and dramatic irony used in American literature.
k) Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing,
and critical thinking questions before, during, and after reading texts.

National Standards:

1. Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of
themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information;
to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment.
Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
2. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their
knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their
understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure,
context, graphics).
3. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style,
vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
4. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and
punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss
print and non-print texts.
5. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by
posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g.,
print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit
their purpose and audience.
6. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases,
computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate
knowledge.
7. Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and
dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.
8. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of
literacy communities.
9. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for
learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Assessment Plan

Learning Outcomes:

Students will create a visual to pitch an opinion found in a cartoon or the play

Students will participate in warm ups and exit slips to develop original opinions

Students will analyze societal themes carried in literature and visuals

Students will use discussion to critically analyze the play

Students will reflect on an events that took place during the 1950s

Students will practice SOL questions

Students will fill in character sheets to help analyze character and human traits

Lessons:

Hook (Day One):

SOLs: 11.2

Objective: How does images affect our interactions with one another? What tools do advertisers

uses to persuade their audience?


Materials: PowerPoint with visuals, video on political cartoons (embedded in powerpoint) and

Blooms worksheet for all the visuals

KUDS:

Students will know that each image uses persuasion

Students will understand that images help form opinions about race

Students will discuss with other another the value of each image

Students will writing down their opinion on a sheet of paper

Students will write down what they see and feel when observing images

Students will hypothesis the importance of images

Visual Discovery Lesson (7 Images)

(5 minutes) Students will be given a set of questions to answer (the lowest level of Blooms

taxonomy) based on an image presented on the board. Students will be asked to answer those

questions on a separate sheet of paper (all answers will be turned in and graded at the end of

class). Students will analyse the first picture with the class. Questions will be as follows:

1. What imagery is used in the image?

2. What do you see?

3. Who? What? Where?

(5 minutes) After students finish answering the questions by themselves, they will participate in

a think, pair, share. As a class, we will then discuss what students see.

(5 minutes) Next students will be asked to interpret the picture and make inferences.

When?

Audience?

Time period?

Emotions depicted?
(5 minutes) Students will turn in their answers and participate in another think, pair, share.

Students will also participate in classroom discussion.

(5 minutes) Finally students will make hypothesis. They will analyze the motives behind the

scene.

What is happening and why?

Synthesizing

Predicting

Evaluation

What is the general message of the ad? What is the story that is being told?

(5 minutes) Students will turn in their worksheet and participate in class discussion. The same

questions will be answered per image. Students will be graded for each worksheet.

(End of Class) The teacher will explain to students that they will be analysing political cartoons

and will be expected to create their own visuals based on the reading of A Raisin in the Sun

and their understanding of persuasive techniques used in visuals.

If there is time at the end of the lesson, the teacher will start the next lesson on how to analysis

a cartoon or ad and show the political cartoon video.

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1SKulqpNABadRPK1g0QKt0UrRcxLE28OUFQOYUUh

OH7g/edit#slide=id.p

How to Analysis a Cartoon or Ad (Day Two)

Concept Development

SOL: 11.2 (All)

Objective: How do visuals use persuasion to sway public opinion? What persuasive techniques

are utilized?

Materials: SOL warm up, Pinterest Concept Board, Concept development chart worksheet,

How to analyze a political cartoon video, Raisin mini documentary, documentary worksheet,

Raisin Trailer
KUD:

Students will know the different persuasive techniques used in visuals

Students will understand the effect persuasive techniques have on the audience

Students will know that creators of art and literature have a message they want their audience

to understand. It is up to the reader or examiner to research what the author or artist is trying to

say.

Students will know the definitions of symbolism, irony, exaggeration, labeling, and analogy

Students will discuss their past knowledge of ethos, pathos, and logos

Students will fill out a chart with their understanding of each concept

Students will discuss with one another to develop understanding

Students will know who the author of A Raisin in the Sun is and her impact on history

Students will watch the movie A Raisin in the Sun trailer

Students will visualize the different characters in the play

Steps:

Students will do daily warm up. Once everyone finishes and the warm up is over, students will

be given the procedure of the concept attainment lesson.

Students will be given example of a concept that the teacher is trying to teach. The teacher will

tell the students that through discussion, the students will create a list on the boards of what

they concept might be. As the lesson continues, the class will edit the list as needed.

Students will be shown visuals examples of the different concepts. The students will guess what

the concept might be, which the teacher or another student will record on the board. Students

will do this for hyperbole, symbol, labeling, analogy, and irony. At the end of each concept

attainment, the students will fill out a chart with the concept, definition, and example. These

charts will be graded at the end of class.

Students will also learn about the author of the play A Raisin in the Sun. They will follow along
the mini documentary with skeleton notes that will be grade at the end of class. Students will

then watch the movie trailer of A Raisin in the Sun to help visualize the different characters

and setting.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ZKDbdWKymvE9EpdCBLA937d3yFHHXoXV6Xph_9wsg

wE/edit

Daily lessons (8-9 days)

SOLs being covered: 11.4, 11.2

Objective: How does political cartoons use persuasive techniques to portray a message? How

does A Raisin in the Sun touch on history? What themes are discussed in both the play and

cartoons of the time?

Students will know that political cartoons are bias

Students will know that political cartoons are persuasive

Students will know the different plot points of the play

Students will understand the different dynamics of different characters

Student will understand that there are many ways to display a person's opinion

Student will participate in discussion

Students will follow along with the readings

Students will analyze a political cartoon

Schedule:

SOL warm up (10 minutes) will be given to help students strengthen testing skills. Warm up

passages will be pulled from Fredericksburg's history so students are learning about their town

as well as proper grammar and punctuation use. Questions and examples will be created based

on students weaknesses on past warm up questions.


Read play (40 minutes). Students will take turns reading characters parts of the play.

Periodically the teacher will stop the reading to ask questions and check for understanding.

Quiz (5 minutes). Students will take a quick quiz to check for understanding and focus during

the reading of the play.

Fill out character sheets (10 minutes). Students will color in their characters based on

imagery found in the play. They will also list personality traits of each character. This will help

students keep track of whos who as well as compare and contrast different characters.

Political cartoons (until the end of class). Students will fill out a daily political cartoon

worksheet to practice their understanding of persuasive techniques. These sheets will be

graded.

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1jpb8TRQgoCrzAvp-

ASpYEwy9jXZZtIe0P40GSEXDmc8/edit#slide=id.g2acc38791_096

https://docs.google.com/document/d/11DQSL4oH4JZp3OH9_CilMV-

ndL6wPBN6Mgr4h9yduG0/edit

April Lessons

SOLs being covered: 11.4, 11.2

First class after the SOLs

Students will know the different plot points of the play

Students will understand the different dynamics of different characters

Student will understand that there are many ways to display a person's opinion

Student will participate in discussion

Students will follow along with the readings

Students will analyze different cartoons and apply them to everyday life
Dream warm up (10 minutes) will be given an image and quote to respond to in any way they

like. These different images and quotes will touch on a theme from the play. This will allow the

students to apply to play to real life. Also these warm ups will help the student brainstorm for

their final project on whether or not people should dream.

Review of the play/watch movie =

Read play (30 minutes). Students will take turns reading characters parts of the play.

Periodically the teacher will stop the reading to ask questions and check for understanding.

Quiz (5 minutes). Students will take a quick quiz to check for understanding and focus during

the reading of the play.

- Political cartoons (until the end of class). Students will fill out a daily political cartoon

worksheet to practice their understanding of persuasive techniques. These sheets will be

graded.

Daily lessons for after the SOLs

Dream warm up (10 minutes) will be given an image and quote to respond to in any way they

like. These different images and quotes will touch on a theme from the play. This will allow the

students to apply to play to real life. Also these warm ups will help the student brainstorm for

their final project on whether or not people should dream.

Read play (40 minutes). Students will take turns reading characters parts of the play.

Periodically the teacher will stop the reading to ask questions and check for understanding.
Quiz (5 minutes). Students will take a quick quiz to check for understanding and focus during

the reading of the play.

- Fill out character sheets (10 minutes). Students will color in their characters based on

imagery found in the play. They will also list personality traits of each character. This will help

students keep track of whos who as well as compare and contrast different characters.

-Vocabulary (10 minutes). Students will be introduced to three new words a day. This will allow

for completion of all literary terms. Students will be asked to rewrite the definition in their own

words and create their own example. These different examples will be done in their daily

packets.

- Political cartoons (until the end of class). Students will fill out a daily political cartoon

worksheet to practice their understanding of persuasive techniques. These sheets will be

graded.

-Mini cartoon (until the end of class). Students will be shown different cartoons that utilize the

different visual vocabulary terms from the political cartoon worksheets. They will be asked to

record one form of irony, one analogy, one label, one symbol and what it stands for, and one

hyperbole.

Once reading is complete lesson: SOL 11.8, 11.5

Students will know the message behind A Dream Deferred

Students will understand the different dynamics of different characters

Students will understand the effect of a unsuccessful dream

Student will understand that there are many ways to display a person's opinion
Student will participate in discussion

Students will read the poem and analyze

Students will apply themes to their everyday life

Warm up (5 minutes). According to the play, should people dream?

Read A Dream Deferred (5 minutes) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6JXHzyX60M

Paraphrase the poem (15 minutes). Poem will be on the SmartBoard. Students will follow
along with their own poem and we will go through the poem line by line

Vocabulary exam (15 minutes).

Movie / ending synopsis

Last two classes.


SOLs being covered: 11.1

Work on their final project and workshop their writing.


First class students will be asked to create a rough copy of their final to hand in by the
end of class.
Second class students will revise their projects.

Appendix:
NAME:

Concept Attained Definition Example and Non-Example

Irony

Labeling

Hyperbole

Analogy

Symbolism

About the Author


1. What year did Hansberry die?
2. What were her father and mothers jobs?

3. What foundation did her parents create for civil rights?

4. Why was Hansberry assaulted in school?

5. What happened when her family moved into a white neighborhood?

6. Where did her father die?

7. Did she ever finish college?

8. What was her job in NYC?

9. Where did she meet her husband?

10. What play made her a "playwright"?

11. What was Lorraine's other concerns?

12. What did Lorraine die from?


A Dream Deferred

by Langston Hughes

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up

like a raisin in the sun?

Or fester like a sore--

And then run?

Does it stink like rotten meat?

Or crust and sugar over--

like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags

like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?
Vocabulary List
Parallelism - the repetition of words, phrases, or sentences that have the same grammatical
structure, or that restate a similar idea

Parody- the imitation of a work of literature, art, or music for amusement of instruction

Paradox- an apparent contradiction that is actually true

Pastoral- a type of poem that depicts rustic life in idyllic, idealized terms

Personification- a kind of metaphor in which a non-human thing or quality is talked about as if it


were human
Plot- the series of related events that make up a story or drama

Omniscient point of view- all-knowing point of view

First person point of view- the narrator is a character in the story

Protagonist- main character (usually a good guy)


Pun- play on the multiple meanings of a word, or on two words that sounds alike but have
different meanings

Daily References
Symbolism: Cartoonists use simple objects, or symbols, to stand for larger concepts or
ideas. After you identify the symbols in a cartoon, think about what the cartoonist
means each symbol to stand for. (Object that stands for an idea.)

Hyperbole: Sometimes cartoonists overdo, or exaggerate, the physical characteristics


of people or things in order to make a point. (Facial characteristics and clothing are
some of the most commonly exaggerated characteristics.) Then, try to decide what
point the cartoonist was trying to make by exaggerating them.

Labeling: Cartoonists often label objects or people to make it clear exactly what they
stand for. Watch out for the different labels that appear in a cartoon, and ask yourself
why the cartoonist chose to label that particular person or object.

Analogy: An analogy is a comparison between two unlike things. By comparing a


complex issue or situation with a more familiar one, cartoonists can help their
readers see it in a different light. What two situations does the cartoon compare?

Irony: Irony is the difference between the ways things are and the way things
should be, or the way things are expected to be. Cartoonists often use irony to
express their opinion on an issue.
From left to right: Mama (Lena),

Walter, Beneatha, Ruth, Travis

Symbols: Meaning:

1.

2.

3.

Hyperbole: Point Made:

1.

2.

Labels Why was it labeled?

1.

Analogy: What is the familiar scene portrayed? What is the complex issue this scene stands for?
Irony: The way things are... How should it be?

Pathos:
How does the image make the audience feel?

Do you find the image persuasive? Why or why not?

Why would the cartoonist want the audience to feel this way?

Logos:
What easy to recognize labels does the cartoonist use to have his audience draw on past
knowledge?

What facts could the audience recall about his reference?

What would be the counterargument for the cartoon?

Ethos:
How is the cartoonist portraying the widely accepted truth of non-black Americans at this time?

Who is the cartoonist trying to reach?


Symbols: Meaning:

1.

2.

Hyperbole: Point Made:

1.

2.

Labels Why was it labeled?

1.

2.

Analogy: What is the familiar scene portrayed? What is the complex issue this scene stands for?

Irony: The way things are... How should it be?


Pathos:
How does the image make the audience feel?

Do you find the image persuasive? Why or why not?

Why would the cartoonist want the audience to feel this way?

Logos:
What easy to recognize labels does the cartoonist use to have his audience draw on past
knowledge?

What facts could the audience recall about his reference?

What would be the counterargument for the cartoon?

Ethos:
How is the cartoonist portraying the widely accepted truth of non-black Americans at this time?

Who is the cartoonist trying to reach?


Title: What is Done in our Classrooms Today

Symbols: Meaning:

1.

2.

Hyperbole: Point Made:

1.

2.

Labels Why was it labeled?

1.

Analogy: What is the familiar scene portrayed? What is the complex issue this scene stands for?

Irony: The way things are... How should it be?


Pathos:
How does the image make the audience feel?

Do you find the image persuasive? Why or why not?

Why would the cartoonist want the audience to feel this way?

Logos:
What easy to recognize labels does the cartoonist use to have his audience draw on past
knowledge?

What facts could the audience recall about his reference?

What would be the counterargument for the cartoon?

Ethos:
How is the cartoonist portraying the widely accepted truth of non-black Americans at this time?

Who is the cartoonist trying to reach?


Symbols: Meaning:

1.

2.

Hyperbole: Point Made:

1.

Labels Why was it labeled?

1.

2.

3.

Analogy: What is the familiar scene portrayed? What is the complex issue this scene stands for?

Irony: The way things are... How should it be?


Pathos:
How does the image make the audience feel?

Do you find the image persuasive? Why or why not?

Why would the cartoonist want the audience to feel this way?

Logos:
What easy to recognize labels does the cartoonist use to have his audience draw on past
knowledge?

What facts could the audience recall about his reference?

What would be the counterargument for the cartoon?

Ethos:
How is the cartoonist portraying the widely accepted truth of non-black Americans at this time?

Who is the cartoonist trying to reach?


Symbols: Meaning:

1.

2.

Hyperbole: Point Made:

1.

Labels Why was it labeled?

1.

2.

3.

4.

Analogy: What is the familiar scene portrayed? What is the complex issue this scene stands for?

Irony: The way things are... How should it be?


Pathos:
How does the image make the audience feel?

Do you find the image persuasive? Why or why not?

Why would the cartoonist want the audience to feel this way?

Logos:
What easy to recognize labels does the cartoonist use to have his audience draw on past
knowledge?

What facts could the audience recall about his reference?

What would be the counterargument for the cartoon?

Ethos:
How is the cartoonist portraying the widely accepted truth of non-black Americans at this time?

Who is the cartoonist trying to reach?


Title Why was it titled this?

Analogy: What is the familiar scene portrayed? What is the complex issue this scene stands for?

Irony: The way things are... How should it be?


Pathos:
How does the image make the audience feel?

Do you find the image persuasive? Why or why not?

Why would the cartoonist want the audience to feel this way?

Logos:
What easy to recognize labels does the cartoonist use to have his audience draw on past
knowledge?

What facts could the audience recall about his reference?

What would be the counterargument for the cartoon?

Ethos:
How is the cartoonist portraying the widely accepted truth of non-black Americans at this time?

Who is the cartoonist trying to reach?


Persuasive essay rubric:

Directions: Using A Raisin in the Sun, answer the following prompt. Please use specific details
from the play and real life to support your thesis.
Prompt: Do dreams positively influence a persons life?

50 points Grammar Syntax Turn in Two body Attachment


and paragraphs
-2 points for Mechanics relate to the
proper format book

-Thesis
statement is
worth four
points

There are three 10 points= 15 points= 5 points= 10 points = 10 points=


body there are no the author essay is the last two attached to
paragraphs mistakes has clear and turned in on body the final
that include concise time paragraphs paper are the
strong TS, CD, sentences relate to the previous
CM, CM, CP, book rough drafts.
and CL.
(First drafts
will only be
accepted if
students has
completed 3+
paragraphs)

The 7 points= 7 points= the 5 points= 5 points= 0 points=


introduction there are 1- author has essay is up to only one there is no
addresses the 5 mistakes two three days body rough draft
prompt and sentences late paragraph attached to
has a strong that are not relates to the the final
thesis clear book paper
statement.

The 4 points= 4 points= the 0 points= 0 points= the


conclusions there are 6- author has 3- essay is more author does
first sentence 11 mistakes 5 sentences than three not use an
restates the that are days late example from
authors thesis. unclear the book
Each body
paragraph is
addressed in a
full sentence
and the last
sentence has a
strong
epiphany

0 points= 0 points= the


there are author has 5+
12+ unclear
mistakes sentences
Name _______________________________________ Period ______ Score _______/100

Political Cartoon in the form of a Playbill or Poster Rubric


Directions: Using previous cartoons that we have looked at in class as a guide, you are to design an
original political cartoon of your own addressing the value of dreams in A Raisin in the Sun. Cartoonist
should use this opportunity to show their understanding of the motif of dreams as well as their
knowledge of cartoon vocabulary. Be sure to color your image. To score well, you need have one
example of symbolism, labeling, hyperbole, irony, and an analogy. I dont expect everyone to be world
class artists, but I do expect that everyone will take their time, be neat, and show effort. (50 points)
PROMPT: Should people have dreams and aspirations in life?

On a typed document and attached to this sheet, briefly explain your images use of symbolism,
labeling, irony, hyperbole, and analogy. (In case I dont understand your amazing drawing!) (10 points per
explanation). Any mechanical or grammar error will result in a point reduction.
Symbolism- What are the different symbols that you used and what do they stand for? Why did you draw
this interpretation? How can the reader apply these symbols to their own lives?

Labels- What labels did you use? Why did you use these labels? What facts can the reader recall from
your different labels?

Irony- How are things in the moment of the image? How should things be? What ironic wording do you
use (if any)? What is the images bias?

Hyperbole- Why did you exaggerate that part of the image versus the other? What emotions do you want
the reader to feel off of these exaggerations? Why? How does your exaggerations add the the final
message of the piece?

Analogy- What is the simplified scene that is depicted? What complex issue does this scene stand for?
What can the audience learn from this message? What is your call to action?

CRITERIA ADVANCED PROFICIENT BASIC BELOW


(5 points) (4 points) (3 points) BASIC
(2 0 points)

- shows clear - shows - shows some - shows no


understanding of understanding of understanding of understanding of
A Raisin in the A Raisin in the content content
Content Sun Sun - some content - little to no
- content is - most content is is relevant to content is
relevant to the relevant to assigned topic relevant to
prompt assigned topic - content is assigned topic
- content is - content is mostly somewhat - little to no
accurate accurate accurate content is
accurate

Symbolism is Symbolism is Symbolism is Symbolism is


Symbolism clearly conveyed discernable in marginally poorly or not
in graphics and/or graphics and/or demonstrated in demonstrated in
words used words used graphics and/or graphics and/or
words used words used

Hyperbole Hyperbole is Hyperbole is Hyperbole is Hyperbole is


clearly conveyed disconcernable in marginally poorly or not
graphics and/or demonstrated in demonstrated in
word use graphics and/or graphics and/or
words used word use

Labeling The cartoonist The cartoonist


uses at least one does not use a
form of labeling form of labeling

Graphics and/or Graphics and/or Graphics and/or Graphics and/or


Visual text are clearly text are legible text are text are illegible
Presentation legible and and neatly somewhat
outstandingly presented legible
presented

Analogy The cartoonist The cartoonist The cartoonist An issue is not


creatively takes a illustrates a illustrates a presents
complex issue complex issue complex issue
found in the story from the story in a from the play
and illustrates in a simpler manner
simpler manner

Irony The cartoonist The cartoonist The cartoonist The cartoonist


uses words and uses words and depicts only the lacks an ironic
images to images to depict one part of the element
creatively depict the ways things definition of irony
the ways things are vs. how things
are vs. how should be
things should be

Title The title creatively The title depicts There is a title There is no title
depicts the stance the stance of the that somewhat to the work
of the artists. artist depicts the
(Could use irony stance of the
or quotes) artist

Comments:
Creative Writing Assignment (75 points) and Pinterest board (25 points):

Prompt:Travis is the only non adult character in the play A Raisin in the Sun. From what we
know about Traviss childhood, where do you think Travis ended up? Write a journal entry from
Traviss point of view in his adult life. Where is he now? How old is he? What did he
accomplish? Did he follow a dream and have a life goal? Travis must draw on past experiences
from the play to explain where he is now. Have fun with this! Draw inspiration from Traviss
childhood and interactions he has witnessed. Did the story really have a happy ending?

*Full points will be assigned to writers that demonstrate textual knowledge and creative flair

Any mechanical or grammar error will result in a point reduction.


Must be at least 500 words; anything less will result in point reduction.
Possible points Points earned

500 words 30

Creative flair 20

References to past events 30


(please highlight in green)

Errors - Points deducted =

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Create your own ORIGINAL Pinterest board: Please create a Pinterest board with the following:
2 examples of irony
2 examples of hyperbole
2 different analogies
2 different forms of labels
2 different symbols

On a separate sheet of paper please explain your why these different images represent the
vocabulary. This sheet also should have the link to your Pinterest board.

Any mechanical or grammar error will result in a point reduction.

Any complete Pinterest board without an explanation sheet will result in half credit (50%)

Possible points Points earned

2 examples of irony 1 point

2 examples of hyperbole 1 point

2 different analogies 1 point

2 different forms of labels 1 point

2 different symbols 1 point

Points per explanation 2 points per explanation

Errors - Points deducted =


Poetry rubric (75 points) and Pinterest board (25 points):

Prompt One: What happens to a person when their dreams dont come true?
Prompt Two: What happens to a person when their dreams do come true?

A Raisin in the Sun was inspired by Langston Hughes poem A Dream Deferred. Write two
poems from the prompts above. Each poem should have a set rhyme scheme and uses
conventions such as simile, metaphor, hyperbole, analogies, and symbolism. Each poem should
also reference a specific scene from the play.

Any mechanical or grammar error will result in a point reduction.


Both poems must be a minimum of four stanzas with four lines.

*Full points will be assigned to writers that demonstrate textual knowledge and creative flair

Please label the following per poem:

-The rhyme scheme, if any (AABB, ABAB, et.) please label each line
-At least one simile - highlight in yellow
-At least one metaphor - highlight in orange
-Two hyperboles - highlight in green
-The overall analogy- please explain what the analogy is at the bottom of the paper
-At least two symbols - highlight each symbol in pink and write the meaning on the bottom
of the poem
- At the bottom of the page, write a 5 sentence synopsis of the scenes which inspired your
poems.

Possible points Points earned

There is at least one 2


highlighted simile
There is at least one 2
highlighted metaphor

There are two hyperboles 2.5 per hyperbole


highlighted

There is an explanation of the 5


overall analogy

There are at least two 2.5 per symbol


highlighted symbols

There is a five sentence 8


synopsis of the scene that is
referenced

Errors - Points deducted =

There are at least four 3.5


stanzas with four lines per
poem

Poems (2) Poem one = 37.5 Poem one =


Poem two = 37.5 Poem two =
*for a total of 75 points

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Create your own ORIGINAL Pinterest board. Please create a Pinterest board with the following:

2 examples of irony
2 examples of hyperbole
2 different analogies
2 different forms of labels
2 different symbols

On a separate sheet of paper please explain your why these different images represent the
vocabulary. This sheet also should have the link to your Pinterest board.

Any mechanical or grammar error will result in a point reduction.

Any complete Pinterest board without an explanation sheet will result in half credit (50%)

Possible points Points earned

2 examples of irony 1 point


2 examples of hyperbole 1 point

2 different analogies 1 point

2 different forms of labels 1 point

2 different symbols 1 point

Points per explanation 2 points per explanation

Errors - Points deducted =