You are on page 1of 13

MEDT 7476

Assessment Implementation Project


J.B. Campbell

1. Client Information:
Emily Willis
Mathematics Department Chair
Starrs Mill High School
willis.emily@mail.fcboe.org

2. Description and Teacher/Trainer Directions:

This project is taking place during the summertime, therefore teachers will
complete the professional development course 100% online. Each participating
teacher will receive the same instructions as the facilitator, and will work through
the activities at their own pace. The completed activities will be shared with the
facilitator through the use of shared Google Document designed for this
professional development session. The facilitator will assess the participants
readiness to implement the Desmos Interactive Grapher utility into their
classrooms by the Desmos Development Session Rubric.

Instructions to Participants

In order to receive professional development credit for the Desmos Development


Session, you must submit the three included activities to the shared google
document:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1C9JUpZtppVexY6WM7uoDgN0NvoIIuxa10
oVYkw0ve4E/edit?usp=sharing. All activities will be assessed according to the
included rubric. Successful completion includes a score of 75% or better (18 out
of 24) on the rubric.

Initial Startup: For any teacher not familiar with online account setup
procedures, technology as a whole, or the Desmos graphing utility specifically.

1. Log in to your Chromebook using your FCBOE email account.


2. Go to the website: www.desmos.com and press the red Start Graphing
button.
3. In the top right corner of the screen, select the green Create Account
button. Then select the Link to your google account option. Next select
Allow (this gives permission for Desmos to view your profile information).
4. Allow participants 5 minutes to explore the Desmos platform on their own.
5. To begin, type in a linear equation of your choice. (ex. y = x+2, f(x) = -3x -
1) Hopefully, Desmos has graphed a line. Click on the colored wavy line
circle to turn the graph on and off. Click on the gear symbol to see other
options including delete, duplicate, convert to a table, as well as the ability
to change colors using a mouse click on the colored circle.
6. Drop down under the linear equation and click the open space to start a
new equation. Next, type in a quadratic equation of your choice. (ex. y =
x2) Desmos will recognize the ^ symbol but also provides the user with
easy to use square buttons. The full keyboard is available for the user,
and an on-screen keyboard is also available using the A B C button.
7. Position the arrow at the intersection of your two curves and click. Desmos
will give the user the intersection point to within 3 decimal places
accuracy.
8. Clear all of your functions using the grey x in each function box.

Activity #1: Restricting curves

1. Graph y = x + 2 and y = x2. Find the intersection points of these two


curves.
2. In order to graph only the region bounded by both curves, we must restrict
the domain of both functions. To do this, the user must add braces {} at
the end of the function rule containing the x-values required. For instance,
the user might type y = x + 2 {-1 x 1}. Hopefully, only the portion of the
line between the x-values of -1 to 1 is now showing. Restrict both
functions using the x-values of the intersection points so that only the
region bounded by both curves is graphed.
3. Click Save graph. Click Untitled Graph and rename: Lastname_Act1. In
the top right corner, click the green arrow button to share your graph.
Copy and paste the link address into the Desmos Professional
Development Google Doc that was shared with you before the session
date.

Activity #2: Investigating Transformations

1. Open a new blank graph by clicking on the three horizontal bars in the top
left corner of the screen. Write the following equation: y = mx + b and
select add slider for both m and b. Now you have two sliders that will
change the value of m and b in your equation. There is even the option to
play and have the slider move through the values on its own. Once you
are comfortable with the use of the sliders, delete the equation y = mx + b.
2. Create a new function with variables to represent vertical (a) and
horizontal (b) stretches, horizontal shifts (c), and vertical shifts (d). (ex. y =
a(b(x+c))2+d )
3. Repeat this process with 3 other functions of your choice.
4. By clicking on the circle beside each graph, you can only isolate one
graph at a time. By adjusting the sliders for each variable a, b, c, & d, you
can investigate the effect of each variable on the graph.
5. Click Save graph. Click Untitled Graph and rename: Lastname_Act2. In
the top right corner, click the green arrow button to share your graph.
Copy and paste the link address into the Desmos Professional
Development Google Doc that was shared with you before the session
date.

Activity #3: Create A Picture Project

1. Create a picture using your knowledge of functions and transformations.


You may use as many equations as you like as long as you can keep
track of them all on your design. You must use a minimum of three
different kinds of functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, trigonometric,
etc.). Be sure that all of your equations include the necessary domain
and/or range restrictions to prevent unintended overlapping of curves.
Change colors as needed to give your picture a unified look and to
demonstrate your knowledge of this feature.
2. Click Save graph. Click Untitled Graph and rename: Lastname_Project. In
the top right corner, click the green arrow button to share your graph.
Copy and paste the link address into the Desmos Professional
Development Google Doc that was shared with you before the session
date.
3. Measurement Tool:

Desmos Development Session Rubric


CATEGORY Beginning (1) Developing (2) Accomplished (3) Exemplary (4) Score
Activity 1 Two graphs are Two graphs are Two graphs are visible Two graphs are
visible, however visible and have and create a mostly visible and create
no domain domain bounded region. Both a bounded region.
restrictions are restrictions, but do graphs have domain The domain
present. not create a restrictions close to the restrictions for
bounded region. intersection points of both graphs
the two curves. correspond with
the intersection
points of the two
curves.
Activity 2: Only one function Two different types Three different types of Four different
Functions is represented. of functions are functions are types of functions
represented. represented. are represented.

Activity 2: Only one slider Two slider buttons Three slider buttons Four slider
Sliders button is present. are present. Both are present. Each buttons are
This slider button slider buttons slider button controls a present. Each
controls a control different different transformation slider button
transformation of transformations of of the function(s). controls a different
the function(s). the function(s). transformation of
the function(s).

Project: Only one type of Only two or three Three different types of Four or more
Functions function is used types of functions functions are used for different types of
for the project. are used for the the project. The project functions are used
The project project. The project contains less than six for the project.
contains less than contains less than functions in total. The project
four functions in five functions in contains more
total. total. than six functions
in total.
Project: There are There are There are There are
Restrictions domain/range domain/range domain/range domain/range
restrictions for at restrictions for at restrictions for at least restrictions for
least 25% of the least 50% of the 75% of the functions every one of the
functions functions (relations) listed. functions
(relations) listed. (relations) listed. (relations) listed.

Project: There is no A picture is A picture is presented A unified, creative,


Aesthetics overall picture beginning to take with unified colors and picture is
created, only an shape however, intersecting curves, but presented
overlapping of color changes and lacks originality and containing design
functions. restrictions have design details. details as well as
not been used various
effectively. intersecting
curves.
Total ____/24

Comments:
4. Example of Participant Submission:
Activity #1: Student B

Activity #2: Student B


Activity #3: Student B
Teacher Feedback:

Desmos Development Session Rubric


CATEGORY Beginning (1) Developing (2) Accomplished (3) Exemplary (4) Score
Activity 1 Two graphs are Two graphs are Two graphs are visible Two graphs are
visible, however visible and have and create a mostly visible and create
no domain
restrictions are
present.
domain
restrictions, but do
not create a
bounded region. Both
graphs have domain
restrictions close to the
a bounded region.
The domain
restrictions for
3
bounded region. intersection points of both graphs
the two curves. correspond with
the intersection
points of the two
curves.
Activity 2: Only one function Two different types Three different types of Four different
is represented. of functions are functions are types of functions
Functions
represented. represented. are represented.
4
Activity 2: Only one slider Two slider buttons Three slider buttons Four slider
button is present. are present. Both are present. Each buttons are
Sliders
This slider button
controls a
transformation of
slider buttons
control different
transformations of
slider button controls a
different transformation
of the function(s).
present. Each
slider button
controls a different
4
the function(s). the function(s). transformation of
the function(s).

Project: Only one type of Only two or three Three different types of Four or more
function is used types of functions functions are used for different types of
Functions
for the project.
The project
contains less than
are used for the
project. The project
contains less than
the project. The project
contains less than six
functions in total.
functions are used
for the project.
The project
4
four functions in five functions in contains more
total. total. than six functions
in total.
Project: There are There are There are There are
Restrictions domain/range domain/range domain/range domain/range
restrictions for at
least 25% of the
functions
restrictions for at
least 50% of the
functions
restrictions for at least
75% of the functions
(relations) listed.
restrictions for
every one of the
functions
4
(relations) listed. (relations) listed. (relations) listed.

Project: There is no A picture is A picture is presented A unified, creative,


overall picture beginning to take with unified colors and picture is
Aesthetics
created, only an
overlapping of
functions.
shape however,
color changes and
restrictions have
intersecting curves, but
lacks originality and
design details.
presented
containing design
details as well as
4
not been used various
effectively. intersecting
curves.
Total 23 / 24

Comments: Excellent use of all features of the Desmos graphing utility! In Activity #1,
your functions did not meet at the intersection points. However, your project shows your
ability to set domain restrictions to include intersecting curves.
5. Report of Findings
The positive aspects of the assessment implementation were many. First, all
participants who attempted the professional development were able to successfully
complete the activities and project without additional help from the facilitator. I can
conclude that the instructions were sufficient for completion of the training. Second, the
submission of their completed activities through the google document submission page
turned out to be a very easy way to collect submissions and keep track of participants
progress. Third, all participants expressed a desire and confidence to use Desmos in
their classrooms with their students as a result of the professional development. All in
all, the submissions of all participants met and exceeded my expectations for this
professional development project.
The areas I see that need improvement are the setting for the professional development
and the culminating project. Even though the online learning setting was adequate (and
the only option for this project in the summertime), I believe the participation rate would
have increased if this training had occurred during the school year in our professional
learning community classtime. I was hoping for greater than 50% participation from the
math department, however, the participation rate was closer to 35%. Second, in a
collaborative group setting like our professional learning community time, I believe the
training would extend beyond the basic learning activities to more experimentation with
the Desmos graphing utility. This may have occurred at the individual level but went
unobserved due to the training taking place online. Finally, the culminating project
requires participants to demonstrate their knowledge of the objectives of the training.
However, the project is more representative of a student task or project instead of a
professional project. I believe that a better culminating project, in addition to the current
one, would be for teachers to partner together by subject areas to create Desmos
activities that match the current units of study.

6. Report of Impact on Student Learning: Analysis of Rubric Categories and Scores:


In Activity #1, all
students
demonstrated
accomplished (3)
or exemplary (4)
skills.

In Activity #2:
Functions, all
students
demonstrated
exemplary skills.

In Activity #2:
Sliders, all
students
demonstrated
accomplished (3)
or exemplary (4)
skills. However,
placement of the
slider variable b
in equations
should be
addressed.
In Project:
Functions, all
students
demonstrated
accomplished
(3) or
exemplary (4)
skills.
Deductions
were for
insufficient
number of total
functions in
both cases.

In Project:
Restrictions, all
students
demonstrated
exemplary skills.

In Project:
Aesthetics, all
students
demonstrated
accomplished
(3) or exemplary
(4) skills.
Deductions were
for insufficient
design details
utilizing
intersections of
curves in all
cases.
The average score for all participants is a 22.4 out
of 24 or 93.3%.

Subgroup Analysis:

Years of
experience did
not contribute
to a noticeable
statistical
difference in
total scores:

6-10 yrs: score 22 11-20 yrs: avg. score 22.5 20+ yrs: avg. score 22.5
Level of
education did
not contribute
to a noticeable
statistical
difference in
total scores:

Bachelors: score 22 Masters: avg. score 22.0 Specialist: avg. score 22.5

Level of
confidence
with
technology did
not contribute
to a noticeable
statistical
difference in
total scores:

Developing: avg. score 22.3 Proficient: avg. score 22.5

All participants were able to successfully complete the training without additional
support. All students scored either Accomplished or Exemplary in every category. The
successful completion rate of the professional development training is 100%. In
addition, there was no distinguishable difference in the scores of any of the subgroups:
years of experience, level of education, or confidence with technology. Based on the
analysis of these results, this particular training session should be considered valuable
for all math teachers, regardless of years of experience, comfortability with technology,
or level of education. Furthermore, any differences based on gender cannot be
determined since only 1 male teacher (out of 5 participants) completed the training.
7. Future Instructional Plans
As previously mentioned, future instruction should include an emphasis on developing
classroom activities using the Desmos graphing utility among teachers of common
subject areas. The facilitator agrees that completion of the training will not prepare
teachers to create activities using Desmos, but will familiarize them with the tools and
capability of the program. Thus, it is suggested that future instruction include additional
collaboration time between teachers as well as being delivered using face-to-face
instruction instead of an online format.
In addition, the participant samples indicate a possible error in teacher understanding
concerning the transformation properties of the different values as seen in the Activity
#2 sliders score report. In future instruction, a review of the transformations produced by
the different placement of values should be done by the facilitator before participants
complete Activity #2. By correcting this issue before teachers design lessons for
students to complete, teachers can make certain that their own Desmos lessons
address this critical concept of function transformations.