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5A Grammar

Relative clauses

1
P I R A T E
Student A
A Work in AA pairs. Complete the relative 2 3

clauses in each clue. 4 5 6


A C C U S E J U D G E
Across
1 A person crime is copying and 7
P R I S O N E R
selling films.
4 A verb, the meaning is to say that 8 9
someone did something bad or illegal. T R I A L I N N O C E N T

6 A person a sentence is passed.


7 A person has lost their freedom. 10 11 12 13
L A W Y E R R E W A R D
8 The process a criminal is found guilty
or not guilty.
14 15
9 Someone is not guilty, is this adjective. S T R I C T

10  A job there are many specialities, for


example: prosecutor, solicitor, defence.
16
11 Money offered to can help the police A R R E S T
solve a certain crime.
14  Laws send people to prison for a long
time are this adjective.
16  The moment police handcuff a suspect
and read them their rights.
B Work in AB pairs. Take turns to read your clues to your partner and complete the crossword.

Student B 1

P
A Work in BB pairs. Complete the relative R
clauses in each clue. I
2
S
3
D
Down 4 5
C S
6
U E
1 A place criminals serve their sentences. R O S T
7
2 The feeling you get when you think I N P E
someone is doing something bad. M I C
3 A person job is to investigate serious 8
I
9
I C T
crimes.
N N I I
5 A person commits an illegal act.
A V O V
9 The period police look into a crime. 10
L E U
11
E
12
W
13
R
12  A person questions are asked about S S I E
what they saw during a crime. 14 15
S I T T L
13 A verb, the meaning allows a person to
O N I N E
go free again after being imprisoned.
L M G E A
14  The time prisoners are held on their 16 17
own is this kind of confinement. I A A S S

15
A person home is a prison cell. T T T S E
A E I
B Work in AB pairs. Take turns to read
R O
your clues to your partner and complete the
Y N
crossword.

Cambridge English Empower C1 Teachers Book Cambridge University Press 2016 PHOTOCOPIABLE 209
5B Grammar
Willingness, obligation and necessity

A Work in pairs. What do you need to do in each of these jobs? Complete the descriptions with your ideas.

Zookeeper Stunt performer


Responsibilities Responsibilities
preparing food and feeding one particular type of animal liaising with the production team to create stunts
cleaning out pens and cages and monitoring planning stunts, getting equipment and performing stunts
accommodation conditions carrying out risk assessments, completing detailed
checking for signs of distress, disease or injury in animals paperwork
caring for sick animals under the direction of a vet adapting your movements to match the actor you replace
answering visitors questions and giving talks or lectures following strict choreography
keeping daily records, normally on a computer performing on location at shoots worldwide
Requirements Requirements
experience of ...
qualifications in ...


Conditions and benefits Conditions and benefits


Police detective Food scientist
Responsibilities Responsibilities
Establishing controlled crime scenes and examining these inventing new recipes and modifying foods, for example
for evidence to create fat-free products
Interviewing complainants, suspects and witnesses investigating ways to keep food fresh, safe and attractive
Preparing charges or information for court cases and finding ways of producing food more quickly and cheaply
providing testimony as a witness in court testing the safety and quality of food
Preparing warrants and assisting in raids and arrests providing accurate nutritional information for food
Maintaining progress reports and files on suspects labelling
Conducting surveillance
Requirements Requirements




Conditions and benefits Conditions and benefits

B Interview each other for one of the four positions. Use the phrases in the box to talk about the
requirements of the position and willingness to fulfil the requirements.

be under no obligation to ... have no objection to ... be supposed/expected/required/obliged to ...


be advisable ... have nothing against ... have no choice but to ...
be prepared for ... have no problem with ... be happy to ...

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5A Vocabulary
Crime and justice

Student A

A Work in AA pairs. Read the story of Sean Brannigans criminal life. Try to complete the gaps. Student B
has the same story, but with different gaps. Decide on questions to ask Student B to check your ideas.

Sean Brannigan had been in trouble with the law all his life. As a teenager, he was always getting
into fights, and once the fight was so bad he was convicted of 1 assault. As it was his
first offence, he was given community service, but he did not learn his lesson, and even after he
was brought 2 with his victim he refused to apologise.
In his early twenties, he was fined 10,000 for credit card 3 . On another occasion, he
was held in custody on 4 of possession of a controlled substance, but there was not
enough 5 to take him to trial.
In his forties, Sean ran a business, and everything was going well until an employee made an
allegation of tax 6 against him. He offered the investigating tax inspector 20,000 to
forget about it, but he was arrested for bribery and corruption.
Seans lawyer wanted him to 7 guilty, hoping that he would serve a reduced sentence,
but Sean refused. The tax inspector gave 8 in court and Sean was found guilty. Of
course, he was not given 9 imprisonment because he hadnt murdered anyone, but he
was told he would have to serve the full sentence of ten years in prison. He was also banned from
ever 10 a business again.

B Work in AB pairs. Take turns to ask your partner questions to check your ideas and complete the gaps.

C Discuss the text in your AB pairs. What should be done with people like Sean? Can they be helped or
should they just be punished?

Student B

A Work in BB pairs. Read the story of Sean Brannigans criminal life. Try to complete the gaps. Student A
has the same story, but with different gaps. Decide on questions to ask Student A to check your ideas.

Sean Brannigan had been in trouble with the law all his life. As a teenager, he was always getting
into fights, and once the fight was so bad he was a of violent assault. As it was his first
offence, he was given b , but he did not learn his lesson, and even after he was brought
face-to-face with his victim he refused to apologise.
In his early twenties, he was c 10,000 for credit card fraud. On another occasion, he
was held in d on suspicion of possession of a e substance, but there was not
enough evidence to take him to trial.
In his forties, Sean ran a business, and everything was going well until an employee made an
f
of tax evasion against him. He offered the investigating tax inspector 20,000 to
forget about it, but he was arrested for bribery and g .
Seans lawyer wanted him to plead guilty, hoping that he would h a reduced sentence,
but Sean refused. The tax inspector gave testimony in court and Sean was i guilty. Of
course, he was not given life imprisonment because he hadnt murdered anyone, but he was told
he would have to serve the j sentence of ten years in prison. He was also banned from
ever running a business again.

B Work in AB pairs. Take turns to ask your partner questions to check your ideas and complete the gaps.

C Discuss the text in your AB pairs. What should be done with people like Sean? Can they be helped or
should they just be punished?

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5B Vocabulary
Employment

Student A: Find someone who ...


would like to work in the financial sector. Why?
thinks the agricultural sector is important in his/her country. Why?
would hate to work in the construction sector. Why?
thinks that workers in the public sector are overpaid. Why?


Student B: Find someone who ...
would like to work in the transport sector. Why?
thinks the manufacturing sector is important in his/her country. Why?
would hate to work in the energy sector. Why?
thinks that people in the retail sector are underpaid. Why?


Student C: Find someone who ...
would like to work in the industrial sector. Why?
thinks the financial sector is important in his/her country. Why?
would hate to work in the manufacturing sector. Why?
thinks that people in the transport sector are underpaid. Why?


Student D: Find someone who ...
would like to work in the energy sector. Why?
thinks the construction sector is important in his/her country. Why?
would hate to work in the industrial sector. Why?
thinks that people in the agricultural sector are underpaid. Why?

230 Cambridge English Empower C1 Teachers Book Cambridge University Press 2016 PHOTOCOPIABLE
Unit 5 Wordpower
Idioms: Crime


If you caught a
When was the last
If a friends child Do you know flatmate red-
time you gave
was up to no anyone who often handed, eating food
someone the benefit
good, would you gets away with you had bought for
of the doubt? What
intervene? murder? How do yourself, what would
happened? they do it? you do?

Are there any areas


Did your parents
Have you ever got have to lay down the
around where you Did you have a
off lightly for doing law with you when
live where you feel partner in crime
something wrong? you were young?
you have to look when you were a
What happened? Why?
over your shoulder? child? Who?
Why is that?

When you were a Are there two What would you


child, what kind of
Have you ever had people in this do if you thought
things did you do
to lay down the class you would someone had
when you were up to
law with someone? describe as got off lightly
no good?
Why? partners in crime? for cheating in a
Why? test?

Have you ever


Do you ever find
Did your parents caught anyone
Can you think of a yourself looking
usually give you red-handed doing
time when you got over your shoulder
the benefit of the something they
away with murder? even when youve
doubt when you shouldnt have
What happened? done nothing
were young? been doing? What
wrong? When?
happened?

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5A Pronunciation
Sound and spelling: s and ss

A Work in pairs. Move through the maze from mission to necessary using words with letters in bold
pronounced /s/ and // only. You can only move one square at a time, horizontally, vertically or diagonally.

mission assault explosion comparison phrase positive possession measure

usual vision permission decision Russian conclusion revision exist

assault dessert prison cousin reason essay treasure easy

impulse conversation choose exercise assassin television accused dismiss

wilderness reason increase dissolve impression tissue muscle necessary

B Work with your partner. Move through the maze from evasion to dessert using words with letters in bold
pronounced /z/ and // only. You can only move one square at a time, horizontally, vertically or diagonally.

exist impulse wilderness increase spouse instant mansion dessert

passion mission cousin reason dissolve professional assistant positive

assistant possessive discussion assault impression usually dismiss rise

vision Russian necessary impulse comparison conversation measure occasion

evasion muscle dismiss permission tissue witness essay passion

260 Cambridge English Empower C1 Teachers Book Cambridge University Press 2016 PHOTOCOPIABLE
5C Pronunciation
Main stress

Ive seen you drive a sports car. I know its a sports car. Ive driven a sports car.

I dont trust your driving. Well, you know my car is off the road?

OK, but could I borrow your car? Borrow my sports car?!

I dont often ask you favours. I know you drove it off the road.

You said you wouldnt have your car for 12 weeks. Dont you trust me?

Er, Ive got a favour to ask. Often enough.

And I wont have it for a few weeks? Another favour to ask?

A Er, Ive got a to ask.

B favour to ask?

A I dont ask you favours.

B Often .

A Well, you know my car is the road?

B I know you it off the road.

A And I wont have it for a few ?

B You said you wouldnt have your car for weeks.

A OK, but could I borrow car?

B Borrow my car?!

A I its a sports car. Ive a sports car.

B Ive you drive a sports car.

A Dont you me?

B I dont trust your .

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