V.

P R O P E R T I E S O F NEON

CONTENTS

A. V a p o r Pressure

B. D e n s i t y of S a t u r a t e d V a p o r and L i q u i d

C. C o m p r e s s i b i l i t y Factor

D. Specific H e a t
1. S a t u r a t e d l i q u i d
2. Gas

E. H e a t of V a p o r i z a t i o n

F. E n t h a 1py

G. Thermal Conductivity
1. L i q u i d
2. Gas

H. D i e l e c t r ic C o n s t a n t
1. L i q u i d
2. Gas

I. S u r f a c e Tension of L i q u i d

J. Viscosity
1. L i q u i d
2. Gas

K. V e l o c i t y of Sound
1. G a s

v-INDEX

VAPOR PRESSURE LIQUID NEON

Source of Data: R . D . McCarty and R . B . Stewart, "Thermodynamic
Properties of Neon fram 25 t o 300OK Between
0 . 1 and 200 Atmospheres", Cryogenics Division
National Bureau o f Standards

Temperature Pressure
0
K ( atm)

25 0.50366
26 0.70902
27 0.97255
28 1 J037'
29 1.7124
30 2.2088
31 2.8031
32 3 SO61
33 4.3286
34 5 .28ia
3s 6.3773
36 7.6271
37 9.0439
38 10.641
39 12.432
40 14.434
41 ' 16.661
42 19.133
43 21.867
44 24.887
44.4 26.19

V-A-1

30.0

20.0

10.0
h
9.0

i
u)

8.0
n 7.0
u)

E
t
6 .O
0
Y 5.0

w 4.0
az
3
cn
v) 3.0
w
a
a
2.0
az
0
a
a
>
- I - t H W W - H I V A P O R PRESSURE I
M i
ID
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.6

0,s

0.4 I 1 I I I I I I I I
I
I I I I I I I I I I
I
I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
I
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

25 30 35 40 45

TEMPERATURE ,OK

V-A- 2

51. 1 and 200 A t m o s p h e r e s " .43 1.01800 37 807.81338 43 2434.95 1.65 1.48300 V-B-1 .99156 38 965.02 .67 0 -96319 39 1152.24020 26 69.20640 28 121. C r y o g e n i c s D i v i s i o n N a t i o n a l B u r e a u of Standards Saturated Saturated Vapor Liquid ~- T e m p e r at u r e P 3 4 0 K (g/cm 1 x LO 25 c.15080 31 249.O 0. 1.68 1.85944 42 1981.019 1.708 L.17000 30 199.1103~1 33 379.65096 44.109 1. 22370 27 93.1 0.26 1.61 1..75363 44 3224 .4 4830 .D.58 1. M c C a r t y and R.18850 29 157.93235 40 1375. "Thermodynamic Properties of N e o n f r o m 25 t o 300°K B e t w e e n 0 .8 DENSITY OF SATURATED VAPOR AND LIQUID NEON Source of D a t a : R.6 0. S t e w a r t .04280 36 673.6 0.73 0.B.13100 32 309.5 0.O 0.5 0.89822 41 1645.06640 35 559.08880 34 462.23 1.

OK V-B-2 .TEMPERATURE.

Z ‘tlOl3Wd ALlllt3ISS3tldW03 .

C r y o g e n i c s .27 42 3.80 26 1.85 28 1.1 .36 37 2.88 29 1.47 38 2.92 30 1.96 V-D-1.2. a t a t C o n s t a n t V o l u m e of L i q u i d N e o n " .82 I 27 1.27 36 2. V o l . 27-30 (1966) Temperature C (5 0 K 0 joules/g K 25 1.96 31 2.12 34 2.77 43 4.58 39 2.06 ' 33 2. "The S p e c i f i c H e .g. SPECIFIC E~EAT( os ~ 0 ) SATURATED -LIQUID NEON Source of D a t a : G l a d u n .01 32 . C.97 41 3.77 40 2.19 35 2.

O K V-D-1.2 .r l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l I l l l l l l r r l l r l l l l l r l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ~ I I 1 I I 25 30 35 40 45 50 TEMPERATURE.

A .245 - 0. Proc.98 0.97 .154 1.269 30 I .252 30 0 0 0.248 0. +3z% @.08 0. 100 ( 1912) gives a value of Cp /C.- tal Atm. Physik 3. 850-76 (1928) give a value of Cp /C.80 0.6 5.-mole'K 3 26.669 1.n1 27. 0. at 0% and Patm of 1.152 1.80 0.248 0 247 2.149 1.8 5 -43 0.148 1.97 2.01 4*99 0. . '1 674 170.l 0. (London) 86.266 3 -07 0..1 . .97 2.706 1. L.31 0..m5 97 2'- 3 .147 0. 4.263 3 007 0. at OOC and 1 a t m of 1. 0 147 . J .11 0. Table of Selected Values Pressure cal C - tal tal -.8152 4-95 5.9784 0.98 ..717 26.1 0-9822 0 87!n 4.54 74.151 1.M 0.673 90.66.24 0.692 26.148 1..0 . Michebs.2 5.251 3 . msica Comnts : Holborn.147 0 148 0. 0.677 1. R.99 2.m 0. Fhysik (4).4 5.151 0 149 1. Ramsay.0 1.687 q. 87.96 .246 2.25 0.64.95 5.4 0.6 5. Roy.97 0. SPECIFIC HEAT o f CASEOUS WEOES Source of Data: Keesom.36 0. REPORT 60-56 8 V-D-2.726 2a.19 5 -07 0 257 0. and Otto. Ann.96 4.01 . J .152 1. .W 1.22 0 259 30 0 4 0.2 5.@J 0. Soc.65.668 Taken from WADD TECH.25 0. O.0 62.246 0 246 - 2. 0. W.670 1.1-12 (1925) give a value 02 cP /c. and Gibson.744 26. A. H.0 2'73.I 1161-70 (1934).25 q. 2.156 1. W.Oh 3.9581 4. at 19°C and 1 atm of 1.748 n.25 0.I4 . and van Lammeren.55 0. 0 147 0.

cal / gm-OK 8 . S P E C I F I C HEAT .

B.55 33 75.69 41 47.80 29 83.62 32 77.D.90 40 52. C r y o g e n i c s D i v i s i o n N a t i o n a l B u r e a u of Standards Temperature 0 K joules/ g 25 88.20 67.1 and 200 A t h o s p h e y e s " . Source of D a t a : R.12 44.4 0 8 V-E-1 .81 44 22..67 26 87.51 31 ' 79.91 42 42.15 38 ' 60. M c C a r t y and R. S t e w a r t .23 30 81. HEAT OF VAPORIZATION O F NEON .23 28 84. "Thermodynamic P r o p e r t i e s of N e o n from 25 t o 300°K B e t w e e n 0.69 39 56.86 1) 35 36 70.52 27 86.23 43 34.31 37 64.31 34 72.

.

623 136.65 3.7 5.5 5.9 $294 732.iq .204 179.828 4.0 187.58 354.8 249.6 4.3 3.224 325.019 99.5 3.4 5.5 0.1 6.839 1.454 $07.98 291.61 176.315 142.6.8 107.838 14.056 12.3 115.105 14.72-K) (Sut tep = 37. Advances i n Thennophysical P r o p e r t i e s a t Extrene Temperatures and Pressures.1 2.TI4 280 11388 35P.0 4.820 10.975 16.7 6.1 4.2 3.7 0.7 4.360 7.630 182.060 106.162 2.88 144.7l.876 488.9499 1.7? 312.022 15.4 249.103 18.191 18.0 3.3 537.342 72.208 181.7 3.724 529.616 167.E632 10. - .4 i.563 4.19 333.027 u.084 5.784 78.052 5.2E 260 53.Eo61 3% -3d.82 354.173 651.231 5.7 373.6% To Convert volume (v) i n cubic centimeters per gram (cm"/g) t o (cu f t / l b ) multiply (cm"/g) by .01 121..026 3 .1 3.0 3. New York (1'365) pp.2 4.9 4.1 atm P = 1 atm P = P atm P = 5 "t"' P = i n -.530 16.O .927 244. 4.5 3.830 12.837 223.8p 180 36.032 2.0 375.776 110 4473 177.136 6.838 120 24.6 2.56 r27.3 3.6 4.1 4.6 125.64 206.oc5 30 1216 95.9 3.>.9 6.5 .312 .0 4.7E 269. Advvanc-s i n Thermnphysical Properties e t Extreme Temperatures and Pressures.208 122.336 148.732 83.727 7.01C 140 28.7 I( .0 4..7 91.347 20.01 2.6 6.W 1.4 249.33 177.922 .m 50 2031 115.7 5.834 31. Triple point.938 130.5 4.91 152.888 89.4 5.58 187.39b .6 104.-44.1 3.09 91.9 4.978 98.943 1.9 4.749 10.1 I .871 610.833 3.255 .m '69.6 3.974 201.98 243.2 4.8 311.4 .8 4.1 3.3 332.515 228.970 5.37" .673 12.8 .820 221 373.8 3.9 3.970 1.1 3.3 3.590 976.877 120 4883 188.069 40.265 179.79 270.8 2.57s 11.5 4.56 353.358 8.1 2.731 80 15.42 :05.693 iu.1 4.9 3.311 2.6 3. per gram 'K ( j/g'K) t o (Btu)lb'R).402 813.850 11.91 - * 'From published d e b .06 166.6 229.0 5.0 4.501 34.3 3.945 123.345 366.0 7%.4 4.4 4.7 311.508 N.625 "577 220 45.4 3.2 3.5 4.934 60 2439 126.640 97.13 172.683 406. American Society of Mechanic el Enginoers . no 3153 146. n .a77 15.917 4.403 4.3 5.5 3. 35 311.037 2.8 208.502 220 894 9 291.09 207.369 55.15 226.873 2.4 229.47~0 .0 3.486 12. Critical point.010 155.035 563.535 90 36 I 3 157. FTO Temp P = 0.09"K) OK - ( S e t tenp = 29.787 447.169 44.6.5 156.9%6 1.3 5.691 260 10575 332.7 4.537 '47.6 5.8 3.2 2.0 5..58 249.23885 V-F-1 .6 3.194 35.697 82.5 3.0 4. - .4 .342 203.508 162.45n Z25.7 11 .8 5.0 3.381 G.15 311. vapor below t h e line).1 167.6 4.2 4.837 0.393 200 8134 270.0 352.4 5.a019 1.511 7.501 855.I% 25 .635 4.80 311.872 96. Conversion0 for Units.- Temp "K P = 20 atm ( S a t t e r n = 42.271 7.3 1.27 174.5 177.856 34.257 43.35 FP8.552 447.58 248.8 291.84-97.0 146.213 (.tm (Sat temp = 27.42993 To convert entropy (s) in loulec.4 3 * 369 8.0 .9 3. F.162 242.3 1.5 6.420 55.2 'I .014 I 30 40 .60-K) (Sat temp = 33.0 4.451 81.602 4.5 3. t o Equivalent i n B r i t i s h System of Units: To convert temperature i n degreec Kelvin ("9) t o degresc Rankine ('R) .1 5.1: 280 57.3 2.905 11.40 290.4 167.1 3.75 156.260 48.275 19.356 195. multiply (OK) by 1.789 81.4 .550 89. Bald h o r i z o n t e l line i n d i c a t e s phose change (liquid above.6 156.66 141.4 3.991 la.5 4. American Society of Mechmical Engineers.0 4.n 95.& 60 50 5% 1.679 3.4% 4.j + ( s a t vapo 104.509 I 100 20. :'go.8 4.715 110 22.F l.4 63.7 3. 6 3.273 180 7321 249.7 3.41 185.2 177.800 114.1 4.61 'J9.580 365.l 200 41.9 4.5 11 09 9.850 300 12201 373.9 5.209 120.5 208.958 36. multiply (atm) by 14.7 2.u 163.739 203.725 18.7 146.9 .1 270.61 114.17 154.010 .8 3.0 h.8 3.1 270.2 56.26 109.4 2.137 114.568 I 90 17.4 353.1 3.7 2. N o m 1 boiling point.24 290.9 3.131 160 6507 229.5 5.6 - T V h G h V h cm'le - JIg - j/E cm"/g i/p (Sat I.6 5.0 11 .e00 570.0 229. New York (1965) pp 84-97.46 332. - -.3 6.350 .0 5.114 16.97 300 61.82 228.8 3.4 79.3 93.7 3.79 186.224 7.313 4.2 6.96 375.601 240 9761 311.5 291.12 270.6 3.016018 W convert enthalpy (h) in joules per gram (j/g) t o (Eitullb) multiply ( J I B ) by .7 5.3 4.3 5.475 9.2.131 240 49.1 a311 40 1624 105.3 4. K) - P = 40 atm P = 60 atm I = P = 100 atm (Sat Liq) 1.673 058 33R.749 139 352.7 4.0 5.8450 12.696 204.7 373.7e 333.969 140 5694 208.E348 13.558 65.438 212.65 374.8 5.680 73.9 3.086 284.3 291.936 160 32.455 324.033 153.168 163.518 2.?19 64.9 5 . multiply ( j/g°K) by .1 332.8 2.27 104.447 117.8 5.6 1.6 311.663 100 4067 167.2 5.3 4.8 1.6 125.BO42 1 1.2 3.983 11.0 208.918 23.24 183.240 ( s a t Vapor 4.684 11.41 165.8 270.7 2.8 To convert pressure i n atmospheres (atm) t o ( p s i = ) .68 ~48.642 488.2 5.922 14.&a0 5 .059 146.744 159. * From published data.539 9.7 373.5 153.8 .4 4.5 4.3 25 1011 90.444 163.39 145. A 1 112.586 .0 187.213 20.959 2.19 139.191 .E73 1.7 4.

.

BL .UBS.3 “Vnn.v-P.

11 29 1. 44-45 (1963) Temperature K 0 25 26 1. V-G-1.91 Table constructed from d a t a taken from smoothed curve i n source. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF LIQUID NEON Source of D a t a : Lochtermann.15 1 27 1.1 . Cryogenics 3.125 28 1.07 30 0.13 27 5 1.17 1..13 28 5 1. "Thermal Conductivity of Liquid Neon". E.

TEMPERATURE. OK V-G-1.2 .

C. A m .Og 90 *4 * 86 4.. J.6 Kannuluik. B. .93 It -.09 6.Sources of Data: Mu. ( U d o n ) -' 65B 701-9 (1952) Srivastava.016 (I 4- Calculat . 93. 3. I. R.32 It 0 !33 -09 *ii . 300-5 (1954) C.5 1. 342 (1919( Weber.09 180 * 7. Chm.12 ..70 it 0 273 009 11.09 7 978 .og 60 "3. OC ca1/cm-sec -OK OC OK caI/cm-sec -OK -213 . 3259 437. mys. L. where KO 11. Proc Roy. REPORT 60-56 V-G-2. Ppoe.89 73-09 200 8. S o .13 II -133 -09 140 *6.73.32 11 - e 'I -193 909 80 x4.20& - Taken from WADD TECH. . ROC.43 91.' Values + Interpolated values Presented as Q/K. E.00 11 200 11 -281. Weber. ~ y a 1.00 "5. B.1 .09 9.97 go .74937 I1 'I. Phye. 0.Og 70 *4 17 .99 I' 223.5 194* 59 8..87 II -153 *09 120 "5.33 35 061 308*7 *11.79 x 10-5 -100 173 009 + 8. smr (London) 7 0 ~ - 369-78 (1957) Thorns.W% used by the Leiden laboratory i n 1917 and 1918. phye.94 59 198.Og -183 .15% i s of no consequence because of the Q ratme dcpndence of thermal conductivityandtb relative uncertainty of -the conductivity measurements. Ac&.78.99 II -113. 1.76 It -183 . -182. 1338-53 (1918) Comments : Conversiom from 0% t o "K i n the table below are based on a value of the ice point of 273 . Physik.10 II -150 123.72 * 8.53 78. 2.99 273 909 f11.04 II -1-73 -09 100 *5 .5. H. aria S 8.. 19-4 (1948) .12 4. 22.66 4. S c 9 Verslag Wetemchappen Amsterdam 26.13 x 10-5 -203 . 481 (1917) . Temperature Thermal Cond.97 90. 83.Og 160 a6..04 cal/cm-sec-'% a t O°C #-If f.4 91 69 i4. The disagreement wLth the currently accepted value. W.84 36 -91 310 S12. and C b X i h . S. Soc. Temperature Thermal Cond. S c l Amsterdam 2l.. mem.82 11 -182.19 11 0 273 *09 10. Weber.67 I1 -181.85 8 979 II 90 .

250 300 TEMPERATURE. OK V-G-2.2 8 .

I5 13 57 .. Thermal Cond. C. s.1g°K T a k e n from WADD TECH. E. temperature = 274. ~ert31a. SOC. Proc. 11. . and Martin. (London) A-'l a 496-513 (1934) - Weber. rend. mysik. €IWOC.82 13.g 496-513 (1934)1. S. 48. alandon) 65B. Proc. G .~etenschappen w b r d e m &. I T = 274. and ~ k a d . (Mndon) -'65~ 701-9 (1952) Kanuuluik.6 U-30 I1 41 89 13 47 " 19. W 3 .3 . A value of 11. Compt.. and L e papy M.. 701-9 (1952)1. L.6 u. E. gas temperature = 374. F* Proc.0 u.49"K . 50. and Ctulaan.29 . 11.04 x loo5 g-cel/cm sec % given by Weber is consi&red to be the best value at zT3.58 17. (Mndon). W.. 10.29 57 42 13 59 " 42.Og"K and 1 atmosphere.43 13 59 55. phys. G. 577-92 (1915)1. Soc.28 It 66.%A 10. Roy.4 11. H.12 x 10 g-cal/cm 8cc % [Kanpuluik.4 u. Roy.09% aad 1 atmosphere are 10. Soc. tt I' 30.Sources of % t a t Kannuluik.91 x 10-58g-cal/cmsec "K [Bannawitz.. Bloc. REPORT 60-56 V-G-2. cm/@ cell/cm-sec-°K cm/Hg cd/cm-sec-OK 67.0 ll. 479-503 (19g) Conrmcnts : Values of the! thermal conductivity at 273. W. 193.. Thermal Cond.60 It * mean.58 x 10-5 67. Physik. E.10 x 10-5 g-cal/cm sec 9c [Kannuluik.w-)c mean gas. W.92 x 10-5 g-cal/cm 8ec % [Curie M. Phys.87 x 10' g-cal/cm sec IC [Weber. 1338-53 (1918)1.40 13.79"K 1 T = 373.56 25 56 13. 82. Press.0g°K* Press . Ann. and C 7. 0 . Ann.28 x 10-5 75 *07 13. L.30 l1 33.. 842-3 (1931)]. r n T Mwtia.

1900 1.OO 1.OO 1. .1865 28 .1907 ~ 26. e t al.1839 26.. 6.61 1.87 1.38 1.1836 27 .10 1 A850 27.62 1.86 1.50 1.1843 27. C r y o g e n i c s .25 1.25 1 1846 27 . 21-24 (1966) T risins T fa1 . 1889 28.1828 26.1880 28 .1861 27.ll 1.37 .11 8 V-H-1. DIELECTRIC CONSTANT LIQUID NEQN Source of D a t a : B e w i l o g u a .75 1.75 1.00 1.1 .62 1.1831 26.1887 28. T(’>K) 8 T (OK) E 26.1824 26. I .1858 27.86 1.1897 28. “Measurements on L i q u i d N e o n ” .38 1.l.1883 28.1854 27.50 1.50 1 1868 27.1872 28. Vol.1876 28.75 I.1893 29.

170 .2 .5-29.2" K) V-H-1.1 60 1150 ' 1140 1.8" K) 1.8-44.130 1420 1.1 80 1..DIEZECTRIC CONSTANT OF LIQUID NEON I I o Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 5 0 Run 6 26 27 T Dlelectrlc conrtant of llquld neon (24. 1.1 10 T (OK) Dielectric constant of liquid neon (29.

40 j C. 1259 (1930). C. B.. Hector. Jeletis concludedthat the wide discrepancies in the data of previous observers are due i n part. Cuthbertson. Measurements of the dielectric constant of neon yielded the value of 1. C.. 569-85. Using the same general method.0001337 and 1. Watson. e. reported values of 1.0001346 for O°C and 1 atmosphere. 2093 (1932). C.2 . M. Proc. E. Roy. D. determined from measurements at 25 and -191°C respectively. 2. (London) z. G. Phys. Jelatis. 6593 (1948). Appl.and Woernley. The Rare Gases and Hydrogen. Bryan found the value of the dielectric constant for neon at one atmosphere and O°C to be 1. 42. E.615-17. They observed no such difference. The Dielectric Coefficients of Gases. 26. Helium.. He gives values of 1.419-25. . Proc.A. Roy. lol-5.0001341 resulting f r m s i x and five determinations respectively at S I T (Probably 0 OC and 1 atmosphere). SOC. SOC. Cuthbertson and Cuthbertson report an index of refraction which through the Cauchy relation is equivalent to a dielectric constant of 1. Rev. J.000133 at O°C and 1 atmosphere. (1948) Measurements of Dielectric Constant and Dipole Moment of Gases by the Beet-Frequency Method.0001274 0.. (London) E. 2366 (1946). L.000134 and 1. Bryan. end Ramewemy. Rev.Sources of Deta: (1929). (1932) The Refraction and Dispersion of Neon and . at least. 25. C.A. G.000148 after calibrating his instrument with air assMling its dielectric constant to be l.. L. L. A.A. The Melectric Constants of Argon and Neon. Part I. and Cuthbertson. J.. 2. (1946) The Dielectric Constants of Eight Gases.0001229 determined from measurements at 25OC and 1.000005 at 0°C and 1 atmosphere..A. (1931).ned from measurement8 at -191°C. to the neglect of certain stray components in the circuits involved. They also report values for 25"C of 1. K. Phys. Phys. Watson et al..0001233 determi. G. Rao. Reprinted from NBS Report 8252 v-H. 2. Hector and WoerriLey made a study of dielectric constants primarily to determine whether there was a marked difference between values obtained by static techniques and by high frequency techniques. 40. Using the heterodyne-beat method. G.000589. 5320 (1931)- . C-A.

Chem. S e i .8 25 25 07 26 5*15* 26. Phys. G.6 4. 253-61 (1945) Van Urk... Acad. 13. H. Proc.n * Experimental values * Smqothed values Taken from WADD TECH. and Nijhoff. A. Keesom. P. T. 482-4 (1926) Table of Selected Value8 I Temperature "K 24 24.4 4. Amsterdam 35. E. W.44.REPQRT 60-56 v-1-1 .80* 27.69" 28 4.45 28.99" 27 4. J. SURFACE TENSION of SATURATED LIQUID NEON Sources of Ddta: - Guggenheim. A . .3 4.

8 0 v-1-2 8 .

.40 0. and Nitrogen". S.08 31. (1963) Tempe r.86 34.83 1.70 1.13 0.09 1.15 28.27 V-J-1.90 0S O 44. " V i s c o s i t y Measurements i n L i q u i d Neon.67 38. Cryogenics.ature Vi s c o si t y 0 K T (10-3poise 25.10 1. 176-177.60 27. VISCBSITY OF LIQUID NEON Source of Data: F o r s t e r .50 0.24 27.10 1.1 .21 28. Argon. 2.

OK V-J-1.2 .TEMPERATURE.

1 90.6 90.3 229. 58. SOC.1 83 45 23.67 It 291. " ~ .20 228.3 77.43% '? 296.2 72.O 23 $2 8 81 291.0 25. an8 ie between 28" and 8 0 0 .345 x 10-3 230. Comments: Two equations which be used to calculate the viacosity where is masued at To and the temperature i s between a d 20 "c.0 17.08 210.76 3.11 11.37 80 .155.1 292. - Teq Viscosity Table of Values Temp e v%S CQ8 ity vi8 COS ity -O K Cent ipoiaes "K Centipoise8 "K Centi~oises 16.0 V-3-2 e II .o 21.0 64.0 270.8 293 -1 90.04 3. All9 -' 578-90 (1928).0 19.0 17. van ItterbeekA. (London).40 81 170.425 240.49 3.ROY.60 9.25 10 43 68.0 273. R.450 I' 260.7 11 298. 'I 283.0 1 w 250 . and van Paemel.8 26.059 x 10-3 14.1 Taken f r o m WADD TECH. .) P ~ C .go .52 m.396 120. m c e of Data: EdwaPde. s.48 x w"3 n 11 140.218 $1 15.1 72.REPORT 60-56 - 300.o 20.42 3 593 If 130. O .

2 . 0 In N V-3-2.

v-J-2 s 3 .

20 40 60 TEMPERATURE.4 8 . OK V-J-2.

51 2.. and Van Paemel.O8?c Corrected Observed viscosity viscosity Preroure Rrtrrure Centipoise Centipoise -@3 -a 300 00 378 9. Physica.5 .273-83 (1940) !Fable of Selected V a l u e s T 20842% T . C. YISCOSITY of GASEOUS NEON (Below 1 atmosphere at 20.186 18149 08 6 0 0 0 -312 0 81528 o . A. gO.om83 o 40521 Reprinted from WADD TECH.08'~~) Source of Data: Van Itterbeek. REPORT 60-56 V-J-2.on2 0 80352 080222 o . 1.42OK and go.

0 4 IO 40 400 PRESSURE .I 0.4 1. mm of Hg . V I S C O S I T Y of G A S E O U S NEON 6 0 0 1 0.

T is the temperature and y is the specific heat ratio. Lab. J. Univ. (Continued on f o ~ o w i n gpage) V-K-1. 148 (1949) Van Itterbeek.. H. Acad. H.665) and the velocity of sound in meters per second.1°K at various pressures between 0 and 0. 889 (1938) Comments: The values of the velocity of sound in gaseous neon are given here as functions of pressure and temperature for temperatures from 26.16"~). and Van Lammeren. Physica 1. W. J. A. The units of the velocity of sound in neon gas used in the tabulations below and on the graphs are: temperature in degrees Kelvin (0°C = 273. The error caused by the resonator (heat conduction and viscosity) in the experimental apparatus was corrected by means of the Kircbhoff-Helmholtz formula as reported by Keesom and Van Itterbeek. A..25'~isotherm on the plot of the velocity of sound versus pressure has been terminated at the point of saturation. The 26. M. i.25'~ isotherm has been terminated at the saturated vapor pressure. Amsterdam 33. Proc.1161 (1934) Other References: Grennspan. L.. The 26. 440 (1930). No estimate is made of the accuracy of the measurements or the purity of the neon gas used. E. The values of the velocity of sound at 0 pressure were calculated for the ideal gas ..9825 atmospheres. and Van Itterbeek. Leiden No.pressure in atmospheres (g = 8% . c = where c is the velocity of sound. All the data tabulated below are from Keesom and Van Lameren listed above under "Sources of Data". P. A. Comrmlns. and Thys. 644 (1956) Keesom. Am. W. Physica I. Acoust.e average values from measurements at several frequencies in the audible sound range. R is the gas constant. Physica 2. 2Oga (1930) Shdrzyk. SOC.25OK to 273. VELOCITY of SOUND in GASEOUS NEON Source of Data: Keesom. A. Phys. Acta Phys. 28.e. Sci.1 . !he values of velocity of sound by Keesom and Van Lammeren are th.125 (1940) Van Itterbeek... and Mariens.. Austriaca g.

80"K 26.o 0. differing slightly from the value of 4.3 0.11 0. The specific be- havior of helium and neon was also explained.8626 433 4 9 170. REPORT 60-56 V-K-1.1 Van Itterbeek and Thys made measurements of the velocity of sound in neon gas using a sound wave with a frequency of 304.2 90.9 m/sec.8152 225 7 62.6 0. and xenon at various pressures between atmospheric and a few mm Hg.8053 135 6 0.24 0. Skudrzyk derived relations of absomtion and velocity of sound and com- pared them with the classical hypothesis of Stokes.4113 133-0 0.6024 136.4 kilocycles per second.5063 132. Van Itterbeek and Thys conclude that their own neon contained a small amount of hydrogen.9581 249 3 74.9825 134.8 0.3 0.4. krypton.1376 138.25"K 0. argon.54 0. m/sec reported by Keesom and Van Lammeren. and compared the results with existing theories.9822 342.2 .) Comments: (cont ) Temp. VELOCITY of SOUND in GASEOUS NEON (Cont. Pressure Velocity OK atm .9 0.2859 137.9 0.9784 207.1 Velocity of Sound in Gaseous Neon as a Function of Pressure Keesom and Van Lammeren 27. From these measurements they calculated the value of the velocity of sound at 0°C and l atmosphere pressure in neon gas as 434. m/sec 273 1 0.2763 133 5 0. Taken from WADD TECH. Greenspan measured the speed and attenuation of sound at 11 megacycles in helium.2%) of neon had been added to study the effect of this impurity. neon. whereas Keesom and Van Lammeren had used audible sound. Van Itterbeek and Mariens made measurements on carbon dioxide to which small amounts (0.4514 136.6760 131.33.

6 0.3 0.0 PRESSURE.n ” z n 135 3 0 3 cn 0 442 cn ~ 0 Lb 0 >- >.9 1.4 0.3 . PRESSURE. p s i a 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 I38 452 450 I37 448 TI TI 5 136 E 0 446 rn Q) rn Q) \ \ rn c aI : I Q) Q) c 0) 444 E .7 0.I 0.8 0.2 0. k 111: 0 0 440 0 o 134 -I w -I w > > 438 I33 436 434 I32 0 0. atmospheres V-K-1.5 0.

500 440 400 420 400 300 380 200 360 -0 c 0 U V 340 c aJ 100 0 0 v) W \ ln \ t v) c + 320 aJ !i W rc 000 n 9.4 . a L 2 300 z 3 3 0 0 m v. O K V-K-1. 260 t u 0 0 -I 100 W s W > 240 > 220 '00 200 '00 I80 160 00 I40 20 60 100 140 I80 220 26 0 TEMPERATURE . 280 LL )OO LL 0 0 > >- I- .