UNLV/Department of Teaching & Learning

Elementary Lesson Plan Template

UNLV Student: Lily Garcia PSMT Name: Caitlin Tomassetti /
Julie Reynolds

Lesson Plan Title: Everyday Math Lesson Plan Place Value and
Lessons Topic: Estimation

Date: 1/23/17 - 1/27/17 Estimated Time:

Grade Level: Grade 3 School Site: Vegas Verdes

1. State Standard(s):
● 3.OA.D.8 - Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and
estimation strategies including rounding. (This standard is limited to problems posed with
whole numbers and having whole-number answers)
● 3.NBT.A.1 - Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the
nearest 10 or 100.
● 3.NBT.A.2 - Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and
algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between
addition and subtraction.
● 3.MD.C.5ab - Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand
concepts of area measurement. a. A square with side length 1 unit, called “a unit square,”
is said to have “one square unit” of area, and can be used to measure area. b. A plane
figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said to have an
area of n square units.
● 3.MD.C.6 - Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square
in, square ft, and improvised units)
● 3.MD.C.7a - Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. Find the
area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is
the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.

2. Teaching Model(s):
● Teacher Centered - Direct Instruction
● Student Centered - Cooperative Learning
3. Objective(s):
● SWBAT
○ evaluate and explain reasonableness of answers using mental,
computation and estimation strategies
○ explain that rounding is a form of estimation
○ identify place value positions up to 1000
○ use different strategies based upon place value to add and subtract.
○ explain and model their strategies
○ explain that area is the space inside of a plane figure and that the
area of a plane figure can be measured by counting unit squares that do not
overlap and have no gaps.

4. Materials and Technology Resources:
● Shuffle to 1,000 number cards
● Whiteboards
● Math journals
● Base-10 blocks
● ELMO/Smartboard
● Partial sums and column addition anchor chart
● Student Reference Books
● 1-foot squares for Explorations
● Pattern blocks
● Centimeter cubes

5. Instructional Procedures
MONDAY:
a. Motivation/Engagement:
● TW review writing numbers in expanded form
● SW write numbers in expanded form on their whiteboards
○ Ex: 189 → 100 + 80 + 9
b .Developmental Activities or Learning Experiences:
● TW direct students to read the objectives and Math Message
○ For each problem, round or use close-but-easier numbers to make
an estimate, then solve. Use your estimate to check whether your answer is
reasonable.
○ Ex: 44 + 77 = ? → Estimate: 40 + 80 = 120
● TW highlight vocabulary within objectives and Math Message
● SW independently solve Math Message
● SW turn and talk ( Lemove - 43) to their shoulder partners to discuss (Lemov -
Habits of Discussion - 42) their estimation strategies
● TW cold call (Lemov 33) on pairs to share their strategies aloud
● TW review and model partial-sums addition
○ Ex: 44 + 77 = ?
○ What is the expanded form of each addended (DoK 1)
○ I can add the tens and ones in any order. 40 + 70 = 110, 4 + 7 =
11. Now I can add the tens and ones together. 110 + 11 = 121.
○ How can we check to see if our answer is reasonable? (DoK 1)
○ Does 121 seem like a reasonable answer? (DoK 2)
● TW model another example using partial-sums addition
● SW practice partial sums with partners
● SW complete math journal page 69
c. Closure:
● TW review journal page 69 and review partial sums addition

d. Extension:
● TW introduce Shuffle to 1,000
○ SW read and discuss directions from their Student Reference
Books
○ TW model how to play Shuffle to 1,000
● In pairs or groups of 3 play Shuffle to 1,000 to practice estimating sums and
making combinations close to 1,000

7. Assessment and Evaluation of Learning:
a. Formative: TW circulate during peer discussion / practice to formatively assess students
b. Summative: Students’ completed journal will serve as a summative assessment

8. Homework Assignment: SW practice partial sums addition using Math Masters page 84

TUESDAY:
5. Instructional Procedures

a. Motivation/Engagement:
● TW review rounding numbers
● SW orally round numbers
○ Is 42 closer to 40 or 50?
○ Is 210 closer to 200 or 300?
b .Developmental Activities or Learning Experiences:
● TW direct student to read the objectives and Math Message
○ Use partial sums to add. Show your work.
○ 47 + 68 = ?
○ 248 + 187 = ?
● SW solve Math Message and turn and talk (Lemov - 43) to their shoulder
partner to explain how they solved the Math Message
○ Does 115 make sense? 435? Why? (DoK 2)
● TW invite students to model how they solved the Math Message
● TW explain that students will continue to use estimates to check their answers as
well as use a new method for adding called column addition
● TW explain and model column addition using the examples from the Math
Message
● TW ask students to compare and contrast partial sums addition and column
addition with their partners
○ How are partial sums addition and column addition alike? (Dok 2)
○ How are they different? (Dok 2)
● SW share similarities and differences aloud
● TW model another example of column addition and invite students to explain
each step
● SW practice column addition with a partner using math journal page 71
● SW trade math journals and explain their partner’s work for Problem 3
● SW share partner’s strategies aloud
c. Closure:
● TW display two anchor charts with two methods: partial sums and column
addition
● Anchor charts will be placed in two different areas of the classroom
● SW stand by the addition strategy they prefer
● SW explain why they prefer the addition strategy

d. Extension:
● SW use Plickers to review vocabulary

7. Assessment and Evaluation of Learning:
a. Formative: TW circulate during peer discussion / practice to formatively assess students
b. Summative: Students’ completed journal will serve as a summative assessment

8. Homework Assignment: SW practice column addition using Math Masters page 87

WEDNESDAY:
5. Instructional Procedures

a. Motivation/Engagement:
● TW review rounding and estimation
● Using whiteboards, SW round numbers to estimate sums and differences
○ 99 + 49 → 100 + 50 = 150
○ 49 - 21 → 50 - 20 = 30
b .Developmental Activities or Learning Experiences:
● TW direct students to read the objectives and Math Message aloud
○ Subtract. Show your work and explain it to a partner.
○ 56 - 24 = ?
● SW solve the Math Message and share their subtraction strategies
○ Number grids, number lines, open number lines, etc.
○ Which strategy did you use to solve the math message? (DoK 1)
● TW highlight and model counting up on an open number line
○ Why do we need to add the jumps when we use an open number
line (DoK 2)
● SW practice counting up and explaining their strategies to a partner
● TW model another way to record counting up subtraction
● TW explain that using number sentences and open number lines are similar and
different
○ How do you choose the size of your jumps (Dok 2)
● TW ask students to turn and talk (Lemov - 43) to their shoulder partners to
discuss the similarities and differences between the two strategies (Lemov - Habits of
Discussion - 43)
● SW work in pairs to complete math journal page 73

c. Closure:
● TW review math journal page 73 and ask students to discuss whether they prefer
using open number lines or number sentences to solve subtraction problems

d. Extension:
● If students complete subtraction problems, they must find another strategy to
solve the same problems

7. Assessment and Evaluation of Learning:
a. Formative: TW circulate during peer discussion / practice to formatively assess students
b. Summative: Students’ completed journal will serve as a summative assessment

8. Homework Assignment: SW practice counting-up subtraction using Math Masters page 89

THURSDAY:
5. Instructional Procedures

a. Motivation/Engagement:
● TW review estimation
● TW display a set of problems
● SW use whiteboards to estimate the sums to solve the problem
○ Ex: Which of these has a sum of about 200?
■ 153 + 52 75 + 63 198 + 71
b .Developmental Activities or Learning Experiences:
● TW display a set of problems
● SW use whiteboards to estimate the sums to solve the problem
○ Ex: Which of these has a sum of about 200?
■ 153 + 52 75 + 63 198 + 71
● TW direct students to read the objectives and Math Message aloud
○ Solve using base-10 blocks. Be ready to show and explain what
you did.
○ 71 - 46 = ?
● SW solve the math message with a partner and explain how they used the base-10
blocks to solve
● SW explain their strategies for solving the math message aloud
● TW review and model expand-and-trade subtraction
○ 71 - 46 → 70 + 1, 40 + 6
● TW point out that the expanded form of our numbers shows tens and ones, similar
to base-10 blocks
● TW guide students through several examples of expand and trade subtraction
● For each example, TW ask: Do we need to make any trades? (DoK 1) How do I
make the trades? (Dok 2)
● SW practice expand and trade independently using journal page 75
● SW share their responses with a partner as they finish and discuss the strategies
they used
c. Closure:
● SW compare and contrast counting-up and expand-and-trade strategies
● Which method would take less time for a problem such as 1,000 - 996? Why?
(Dok 2)
d. Extension:

7. Assessment and Evaluation of Learning:
a. Formative: TW circulate during peer discussion / practice to formatively assess students
b. Summative: Students’ completed journal will serve as a summative assessment

8. Homework Assignment: SW practice expand and trade subtraction using Math Masters p. 90

FRIDAY:
5. Instructional Procedures

a. Motivation/Engagement:
● TW review estimation and rounding
● TW display a set of problems
● SW use whiteboards to estimate the differences to solve the problem
○ Ex: Which has a difference of about 100?
■ 115 - 49 362 - 258 329 - 111
b .Developmental Activities or Learning Experiences:
● TW direct students to read the objectives and Math Message aloud
○ Read journal page 78 with a partner. Talk about how you might set
up the graph. Be ready to share your ideas about what scale to use.
● SW discuss parts of the graph that are already labeled
○ What parts of the graph do we still need before graphing our data
(Dok 1)
○ What intervals could we use to graph the data? Would intervals of
1 work? Why? (Dok 2)
● TW guide discussion of explaining bar graphs before students complete the bar
graph on page 78
● TW introduce Explorations A, B, and C (Students will rotate between
explorations)
● Exploration A: Creating a Scaled Bar Graph
○ SW sort their set of pattern blocks by shape and create a scaled bar
graph to show their data
● Exploration B: Measuring Area
○ TW review area and square units with students
○ SW use 1-foot squares to measure the area of a rectangular surface
(i.e. a desk)
○ SW record the area of different rectangular surfaces
○ SW compare the areas of the surfaces they measured
● Exploration C: Partitioning Rectangles
○ TW review the term partition
○ TW explain that we can find the area of a shape by partitioning it
into equal parts
○ SW practice partitioning rectangles and measuring area

c. Closure:
● SW compare and contrast Explorations B and C
○ How are Explorations B and C similar? How are they different?
(DoK 2)

d. Extension:
● SW review and play Shuffle to 1,000

6. Accommodations, Modifications and Differentiations for Diverse Learners:
● Accommodations:
○ Students who have difficulty seeing may move closer to the front
of the classroom.
○ Time: Students will be allotted more time (if needed) to complete
specific tasks
○ Students who struggle with English may work with a peer who can
translate from Spanish to English.
● Modifications:
○ Students who struggle with English may write in their native
language.
○ Students who cannot demonstrate understanding in writing may do
so orally.
● Differentiations:
○ Teacher will model how to complete tasks throughout the lesson
○ Students who struggle with place value may use base-10 blocks
○ Students who struggle with base-10 blocks will be provided with a
place-value mat

7. Assessment and Evaluation of Learning:
a. Formative: TW circulate during peer discussion / practice to formatively assess students
b. Summative: Students’ completed journals for each exploration will serve as a summative
assessment

8. Homework Assignment: None
9. Reflection:
a. Strengths:
b. Concerns:
c. Insights: