Carluen, John Ramon H

BSIT – 202I
I. Enumerate and discuss the FF. State process, Transition Process, Threads,
Termination, and Scheduling Algorithm.
A. State Process

New State The process being created.

Terminated State The process has finished execution.

Blocked (waiting) State When a process blocks, it does so because
logically it cannot continue, typically because it is waiting for input that is not
yet available. Formally, a process is said to be blocked if it is waiting for some
event to happen (such as an I/O completion) before it can proceed. In this
state a process is unable to run until some external event happens.

Running State A process is said t be running if it currently has the CPU,
that is, actually using the CPU at that particular instant.

Ready State A process is said to be ready if it use a CPU if one were
available. It is runable but temporarily stopped to let another process run.

B. Transition Process

Transition 1 occurs when process discovers that it cannot continue. If
running process initiates an I/O operation before its allotted time expires, the
running process voluntarily relinquishes the CPU.
This state transition is:

Block (process-name): Running → Block.

Transition 2 occurs when the scheduler decides that the running process
has run long enough and it is time to let another process have CPU time.
This state transition is:

Time-Run-Out (process-name): Running → Ready.

Transition 3 occurs when all other processes have had their share and it is
time for the first process to run again
This state transition is:

Dispatch (process-name): Ready → Running.
Transition 4 occurs when the external event for which a process was waiting
(such as arrival of input) happens.
This state transition is:

Wakeup (process-name): Blocked → Ready.

Transition 5 occurs when the process is created.
This state transition is:

Admitted (process-name): New → Ready.

Transition 6 occurs when the process has finished execution.
This state transition is:

Exit (process-name): Running → Terminated.

C. Threads
User-Level Threads
User-level threads implement in user-level libraries, rather than via systems
calls, so thread switching does not need to call operating system and to
cause interrupt to the kernel. In fact, the kernel knows nothing about user-
level threads and manages them as if they were single-threaded processes.

Kernel-Level Threads
In this method, the kernel knows about and manages the threads. No runtime
system is needed in this case. Instead of thread table in each process, the
kernel has a thread table that keeps track of all threads in the system. In
addition, the kernel also maintains the traditional process table to keep track
of processes. Operating Systems kernel provides system call to create and
manage threads.

D. Process Termination

Normal Exist Most processes terminates because they have done their
job. This call is exist in UNIX.

Error Exist When process discovers a fatal error. For example, a user tries
to compile a program that does not exist.

Fatal Error An error caused by process due to a bug in program for
example, executing an illegal instruction, referring non-existing memory or
dividing by zero.

Killed by another Process A process executes a system call telling the
Operating Systems to terminate some other process. In UNIX, this call is kill.
In some systems when a process kills all processes it created are killed as
well (UNIX does not work this way).

E. Scheduling Algorithm

First Come First Serve (FCFS)
 Jobs are executed on first come, first serve basis.
 It is a non-preemptive, pre-emptive scheduling algorithm.
 Easy to understand and implement.
 Its implementation is based on FIFO queue.
 Poor in performance as average wait time is high.
Shortest Job Next (SJN)
 This is also known as shortest job first, or SJF
 This is a non-preemptive, pre-emptive scheduling algorithm.
 Best approach to minimize waiting time.
 Easy to implement in Batch systems where required CPU time is known in
advance.
 Impossible to implement in interactive systems where required CPU time is
not known.
 The processer should know in advance how much time process will take.
Priority Based Scheduling
 Priority scheduling is a non-preemptive algorithm and one of the most
common scheduling algorithms in batch systems.
 Each process is assigned a priority. Process with highest priority is to be
executed first and so on.
 Processes with same priority are executed on first come first served basis.
 Priority can be decided based on memory requirements, time requirements or
any other resource requirement.
Round Robin Scheduling
 Round Robin is the preemptive process scheduling algorithm.
 Each process is provided a fix time to execute, it is called a quantum.
 Once a process is executed for a given time period, it is preempted and other
process executes for a given time period.
 Context switching is used to save states of preempted processes.
II. Illustrate the process transition diagram, process control block

Process Transition
Diagram

Process Control
Block

III.

STATE PROCESS:
New State The process being created.

Terminated State The process has finished execution.

Blocked (waiting) State When a process blocks, it does so because logically it
cannot continue, typically because it is waiting for input that is not yet available.

Running State A process is said t be running if it currently has the CPU

Ready State A process is said to be ready if it use a CPU if one were available.

TRANSISTION PROCESS

1. Block - occurs when process discovers that it cannot continue. If running process
initiates an I/O operation before its allotted time expires, the running process
voluntarily relinquishes the CPU.

2. Time Run Out - occurs when the scheduler decides that the running process has
run long enough and it is time to let another process have CPU time.

3. Dispatch - occurs when all other processes have had their share and it is time for
the first process to run again

4. Wakeup - occurs when the external event for which a process was waiting (such
as arrival of input)

5. Admitted - occurs when the process is

6.Exit - occurs when the process has finished execution

Compute the given table below computing the AWT (Average Waiting Time) and ATT (Average Turn-around Time) of
the following CPU Scheduling Algorithm using the Gantt chart scheme.

Process Burst Time Arrival Time Priority
P1 5 0 1
P2 19 6 2
P3 3 9 1
P4 5 10 2
P5 7 15 1

CPU Scheduling AWT ATT
Algorithm (ms) (ms)

FCFS 17.6 25.4
SJF 8.8 14.8
P (Preemptive) 12.4 20.2
RR 7.8 7.8