Rachel Goodbar

Dr. Tenore
FIIA

FIIA Part 1:

Unit Rationale

This unit is designed for a 10th grade honors English class that is reading the novel The
Gender Games, by Bella Forrest. This unit will cause students to think critically when
examining dystopian literature and society. By looking at gender through the novel The
Gender Games students will gain understanding of the role that society plays in shaping
our concepts of gender, the norms that come with gender, and the way gender plays a role
in shaping identity. In addition, students will look at identity throughout this novel
gaining understanding of the way identity is shaped both through experience and through
the world we live in. Throughout this unit students will be asked to interpret this novel
and make connections between the world of dystopian literature and the society that we
live in, draw conclusions about their findings.

Big Ideas and Essential Questions:
The big ideas of this unit are identity and gender, specifically looking at how societal
norms regarding gender shape identity and culture. Throughout this unit students will be
asked to consider the following questions:
· How is identity formed?
· How is perspective influenced by gender norms?
· How is gender constructed by the novel? By society? Throughout time?

Texts
The major text for this unit is the novel The Gender Games, by Bella Forrest. This book
deals with two dystopian societies where one is patriarchal and one is matriarchal, which
will allow students to examine concepts of gender and identity in two different types of
societies. This book is important for students to read because it will expose them to the
idea of our patriarchal society has of gender taken to the extreme, as well as giving
students an opportunity to look at what happens what happens when a matriarchy is taken
to the extreme. This book is important for students to read because it will allow them to
think critically about the way identity is shaped in a world ruled by gender, allowing
students to make connections between the text and our world. This text is important for
students to read right now because of the pressing gender issues our society is facing.
This novel will allow students to explore those ideas in the safe space of a dystopian
novel while still letting them make those connections. Additional texts will include video
clips relating to gender norms in society, the movie She’s the Man, as well as a
combination of articles revolving around the ideas of identity and gender.

Instructional Approaches
During this unit many instructional approaches will be used to cover the learning goals
and encourage students to think critically and creatively. Vygotsky’s instructional
approaches to small group learning will be implemented with students through partner
reading, small group discussion, silent conversations, and various other strategies
Vygotsky). In addition, students will use close reading to examine and analyze the text in
relation to the big ideas and essential questions of this unit (I. A. Richards). Student
centered work will be used often in this unit as students track the big ideas of this unit
while reading (Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Opposed). These instructional approaches
will structure activity for this unit so that students are able to make connections between
the text and the big ideas and essential questions of this unit.

Learning Goals
· SWBAT compare and contrast multiple gender perspectives on society
· SWBAT identify and explain influences on identity both character’s identity
· SWBAT relate Matrus and Patrus to society in the U.S. throughout the years
· SWBAT write a personal essay about the major influences on both student’s and
characters identities

Assessments
I will assess students formally and informally throughout the four weeks. The formal
assessment for this unit will be a personal essay students will write based off of a bell-
ringer from the first week about the influences in shaping their own identities. Students
will write about the major influences that affected their identity and will compare and
contrast their experiences with one character from the novel.

Standards:

LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its
development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and
refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text,
interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

LAFS.910.RL.1.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support
analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the
text.

LAFS.910.W.1.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey
complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the
effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

LAFS.910.W.2.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and
audience.

LAFS.910.W.2.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing
what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

LAFS.910.W.3.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and research.

Unit Calendar:
Agree/ Gender norms Identity – Marshmello Partner
Disagree Intro to review big journal reading with
Activity patriarchy / ideas mind mapping
Intro to matriarchy Read Chapter Reader’s
dystopian lit Prologue 1 & 2 while theatre with
marking questioning
norms
Newspaper Journal – Journal – In class Review essay
Connection identity video identity partner assignment
and share & reading with and rubric
discuss Reader’s Reader’s mind mapping
theatre with theatre with Group
In class Cornell notes Cornell notes discussion
reading –
silent reading
Writing day Buzzfeed Workshop Reader’s Journal
Reader’s gender roles – theatre
theatre with in class Silent Partner
questioning reading with conversation Discussion reading with
Cornell notes mind mapping
Workshop In class Finish novel She’s the man She’s the man
Essays reading with with
Discussion: worksheet worksheet
Reading with BI, EQs
questioning Essay due
Lesson Plan Day 1
Rachel Goodbar
Dr. Tenore
Intro to Dystopian Lit
*Lesson plan based on a 50-minute class

Purpose/rationale: This lesson is designed for a 10th grade honors
classroom that is about to start reading The Gender Games by
Bella Forrest. This lesson aligns with the big ideas of the unit,
gender and identity which students will be exploring the novel
through as well as the world around them. This lesson aligns with
the Florida State Standards by having students determine a central
idea of a text and collaborate in discussions on diverse topics. The
timing for this lesson is appropriate because it is introducing
dystopian literature preparing students to read the novel. After this
lesson students will continue to build on ideas of dystopian
literature as well as analyzing the big ideas of the unit throughout
the course of the novel. This lesson will have students determining
their beliefs about common dystopian themes as well as
introducing them to dystopian literature and the dystopian world of
The Gender Games.
Language Arts Florida Standards:
LAFS.910.RL.4.10 By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend
literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of
the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and
proficiently.

LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and
analyze in detail its development over the course of the text,
including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific
details; provide an objective summary of the text.

LAFS.910.SL.1.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led)
with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.

Objectives:
 SWBAT identify distinguishing features of dystopian
literature.
 SWBAT defend ideas on a given subject regarding dystopian
ideas.
Materials:
 Computer and projector
 Questions to ask students
 1 “Agree” sign, 1 “Disagree” sign

Anticipatory set (5 minutes):
To begin class the teacher will take attendance and explain to
students that there are three spaces in the classroom: Agree,
disagree, and neutral. The teacher will explain the activity and tell
students that she will read a statement and students will choose one
area to go to, but will only go to the neutral section if they strongly
do not know how they feel.

Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
Time Student is doing Teacher is doing

20 Students will listen to Teacher will read statements
minute teacher as she calls out to students and ask them to
s statements and move to move to either the “agree” or
either side of the classroom “disagree” section of the
labeled “agree” or “disagree” classroom. Teacher will
depending on their stance. observe student movement
Student will explain their and ask students to defend
views on the statement. their stance.

20 Students listen and take Teacher presents the Prezi to
minute notes on the Prezi of the students while monitoring
s aspects that define dystopian that they are taking notes on
literature. the aspects that define
dystopian literature.

Summary/Closure (5 minutes):
Students will turn in an exit slip, where they will write on a half
sheet of paper two things that they have learned about dystopian
literature and one thing they predict about the next novel they will
be reading.

Assessment:
 Formal assessment: There is no formal assessment for this
lesson.
 Informal assessment: Teacher will monitor student
understanding of dystopian themes through their participation
in the class activity.
Homework/follow-up assignment:
None.

Accommodations/adaptations:
 English Language Learner (ELL): Student will be
accommodated through flexible school scheduling for use of
extra time for quizzes and exams, access to a dictionary,
modeling, and use of illustrations.
 Speech Impairment: Student will be accommodated through
oral presentation, directions repeated, copied directions to the
student, and through verbal encouragement.
 ADHD: Student will be accommodated through previously
determined guiding clues and preferential seating to keep the
student on task.

Attachments/Appendices:
Attachment A:

Attachment B: http://prezi.com/abap6w3vocyp/?
utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share

Plan B:
If this lesson isn’t working the teacher will switch so that the Prezi
is being presented first and then will lead a class discussion about
the statements written out after students have been introduced to
dystopian literature. If this lesson is too easy the teacher will have
students try to persuade other students to move to their side of the
classroom and will lead a class discussion about what statement
resonated with students the most.
Lesson Plan Day 2
Rachel Goodbar
Dr. Tenore
Intro to The Gender Games
*Lesson plan based on a 50-minute class

Purpose/rationale: This lesson is designed for a 10th grade honors
classroom that is about to start reading The Gender Games by
Bella Forrest. This lesson aligns with the big ideas of the unit,
gender and identity which students will be exploring the novel
through as well as the world around them. This lesson aligns with
the Florida State Standards by having students determine a central
idea of a text and collaborate in discussions on diverse topics. The
timing for this lesson is appropriate because it is introducing
dystopian literature preparing students to read the novel. After this
lesson students will continue to build on ideas of dystopian
literature as well as analyzing the big ideas of the unit throughout
the course of the novel. This lesson will have students looking at
and evaluating group norms as well as the norms that we see in our
own society. In addition, this lesson will teach students about
matriarchal and patriarchal societies looking at how we see them in
society as well as how we will see them in The Gender Games.
Language Arts Florida Standards:
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and
analyze in detail its development over the course of the text,
including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific
details; provide an objective summary of the text.
LAFS.910.SL.1.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of
collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led)
with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.

Objectives:
 SWBAT identify group and gender norms
 SWBAT differentiate between matriarchal and patriarchal
society

Materials:
 Computer and Projector
 Prezi
 2 sets of group norms (5 copies for each group)

Anticipatory set (3 minutes):
Students will start the class by receiving a post-it note. Teacher
will ask students one norm that they have to live by because of
their gender. Teacher will collect post-it notes.

Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
Time Student is doing Teacher is doing

5 Students work in half- Teacher splits the class into two
minutes class groups to read the and gives each group two
group norms that they different sets of group norms.
were given. Students Teacher has students prepare to
prepare to act their norms use their group norms.
out.

6 Students walk around the Teacher monitors students as
minutes class and interact with they walk around and act out
people of the other group their group norms to each other.
using the norms that have
been assigned for them.
8 Students guess the other Teacher has students guess the
minutes group’s norms and other group’s norms. Teacher
discuss the impact that leads discussion about the
these norms had on the impact that group norms had on
group and interactions the group's communication with
with the other groups. and to each other.

14 Students are listening and Teacher leads the Prezi on
minutes taking notes on what matriarchy and patriarchy in
matriarchy and patriarchy society and what that looks like
are. Students are listening in our book. The teacher
as the teacher introduces introduces The Gender Games to
the next novel. the class.

6 Students listen as the Teacher reads the preface of the
minutes teacher reads the preface novel to the students.
to the students

Summary/Closure (7 minutes):
Teacher will take post-it notes from the beginning of class and read
them out loud while separating them on the board by gender and
norm. Teacher will end class by asking students what type of
society they think that we live in.

Assessment:
 Formal assessment: None.
 Informal assessment: Teacher will understand student
understanding of group norms through participation in group
and post-it note activity.
Homework/follow-up assignment:
None.

Accommodations/adaptations:
 English Language Learner (ELL): Student will be
accommodated through flexible school scheduling for use of
extra time for quizzes and exams, access to a dictionary,
modeling, and use of illustrations.
 Speech Impairment: Student will be accommodated through
oral presentation, directions repeated, copied directions to the
student, and through verbal encouragement.
 ADHD: Student will be accommodated through previously
determined guiding clues and preferential seating to keep the
student on task.
Attachments/Appendices:
Attachment A: http://prezi.com/jk7zc-xlmapq/?
utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy

Plan B:
If this lesson isn’t working the teacher will remove the group norm
activity from the lesson plan and focus on teaching students what
matriarchy and patriarchy are and discussing group norms with
them as a class, discussing group and gender norms that affect
them specifically. If this lesson finishes too quickly the students
will begin reading The Gender Games.
Lesson Plan Day 3

Rachel Goodbar
Dr. Tenore

Beginning the novel
*Lesson plan based on a 50-minute class

Purpose/rationale: This lesson is designed for a 10th grade honors
classroom that is beginning to read The Gender Games by Bella
Forrest. This lesson aligns with the big ideas of the unit, gender
and identity which students will be exploring the novel through as
well as the world around them. This lesson aligns with the Florida
State Standards by having students determine a central idea of a
text as well as having students analyze the course of the main
character’s development of her identity. The timing for this lesson
is appropriate because it is spring semester and students feel
comfortable enough in the classroom to explore themes of identity
and gender in relation to the book and their own lives. After this
lesson students will continue to build on ideas of dystopian
literature as well as analyzing the big ideas of the unit throughout
the course of the novel. This lesson will have students questioning
and writing about what has shaped their own identity as well as
beginning to read the novel while tracking the theme of identity.
Language Arts Florida Standards:
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and
analyze in detail its development over the course of the text,
including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific
details; provide an objective summary of the text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over
the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the
plot or develop the theme.

Objectives:
 SWBAT recognize gender norms in literature.
 SWBAT examine influences on identity in literature.
Materials:
 Copy of The Gender Games for every student
 Student journals
 Computer and projector
Anticipatory set (5 minutes):
Students respond to the bell-ringer in one paragraph written on the
board: What has shaped your identity? While students do this, the
teacher takes attendance and passes out novels to every student.

Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
Time Student is doing Teacher is doing

5 The students are listening The teacher describes what
minute as the teacher explains the students will be paying attention
s big ideas of the units and to as they read the novel. The
what students should be teacher goes over the big ideas
paying attention to in the of the unit with the students.
reading.

35 Students are listening and The teacher reads the first two
minute participating as the class chapters with students and
s reads the novel. Students listens as they contribute to
are stopping and marking reading. The teacher stops to ask
gender norms and aspects students questions about identity
of in the dystopian society and gender as they read. The
as they read. teacher also has students
marking aspects of gender and
identity in the text.

Summary/Closure (5 minutes):
Students will write on a piece of paper what they think three
influencing factors are that shaped Violet’s identity and submit it
for an exit ticket.

Assessment:
 Formal assessment: Teacher will monitor student
understanding of shaping identity through the exit slip and
the bell-ringer.
 Informal assessment: Teacher will monitor student
understanding of identity and gender through participation in
discussion throughout the reading.
Homework/follow-up assignment:
None.

Accommodations/adaptations:
 English Language Learner (ELL): Student will be
accommodated through flexible school scheduling for use of
extra time for quizzes and exams, access to a dictionary,
modeling, and use of illustrations.
 Speech Impairment: Student will be accommodated through
oral presentation, directions repeated, copied directions to the
student, and through verbal encouragement.
 ADHD: Student will be accommodated through previously
determined guiding clues and preferential seating to keep the
student on task.
Attachments/Appendices:
Attachment A:
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1lHh_sAisNDUkQHevsMoemeTc_BRaDoGDu7
OqUUdMHmk/edit?usp=sharing

Attachment B:

Plan B:
If this lesson is not working the teacher will revise based off of
student needs. If this lesson is too hard, the teacher will point out
aspects of identity and gender to students during reading. If the
lesson is too easy students will read on their own or with partners
and will identify aspects of gender and identity on an individual
level. If this lesson finishes too quickly students will begin the
reading for the next day.
Lesson Plan Day 4
Rachel Goodbar
Dr. Tenore

Responding & Reading
*Lesson plan based on a 50-minute class

Purpose/rationale: This lesson is designed for a 10th grade honors
classroom that is beginning to read The Gender Games by Bella
Forrest. This lesson aligns with the big ideas of the unit, gender
and identity which students will be exploring the novel through as
well as the world around them. This lesson aligns with the Florida
State Standards by having students determine a central idea of a
text as well as having students analyze the course of the main
character’s development of identity. The timing for this lesson is
appropriate because it is spring semester and students feel
comfortable enough in the classroom to explore themes of identity
and gender in relation to the book and their own lives. After this
lesson students will continue to build on ideas of dystopian
literature as well as analyzing the big ideas of the unit throughout
the course of the novel. This lesson will have students questioning
and writing about what has shaped their own identity as well as
beginning to read the novel while tracking the theme of identity.
Language Arts Florida Standards:
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and
analyze in detail its development over the course of the text,
including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific
details; provide an objective summary of the text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over
the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the
plot or develop the theme.

Objectives:
 SWBAT analyze how culture’s norms impact literature
 SWBAT examine identity in literature.
 SWBAT make predictions revolving around a particular
theme.
Materials:
 Computer and projector
 Copy of The Gender Games for every student
Anticipatory set (4 minutes):
Students watch the music video “Alone” by Marshmello while the
teacher takes attendance and passes out copies of The Gender
Games to every student.

Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
Time Student is doing Teacher is doing

8 Students respond to the Teacher monitors students as
minutes questions projected on the they respond to the prompts on
board. Students then the board about the Marshmello
share with a partner and video, teacher has students pair
then with the class. and share their responses.

35 Students participate in Teacher leads reader’s theatre
minutes readers’ theatre for with students for chapters 3,4,
chapter 3,4, and 5 while and 5. Teacher stops to ask
stopping to answer students questions as they read.
questions from the
teacher.

Summary/Closure (3 minutes):
Students will turn in a post-it note with a prediction for the next
chapter focused around the big idea of identity, gender, or norms.

Assessment:
 Formal assessment: What students hand in and you grade
 Informal assessment: Teacher will monitor student
understanding of identity and norms through participation in
the think pair share and answering questions during reading.
Homework/follow-up assignment:
None.

Accommodations/adaptations:
 English Language Learner (ELL): Student will be
accommodated through flexible school scheduling for use of
extra time for quizzes and exams, access to a dictionary,
modeling, and use of illustrations.
 Speech Impairment: Student will be accommodated through
oral presentation, directions repeated, copied directions to the
student, and through verbal encouragement.
 ADHD: Student will be accommodated through previously
determined guiding clues and preferential seating to keep the
student on task.
Attachments/Appendices:
Attachment A:
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1lHh_sAisNDUkQHevsMo
emeTc_BRaDoGDu7OqUUdMHmk/edit?usp=sharing
Attachment B:

Plan B:
If this lesson is not working the teacher will read the novel to
students while stopping to ask them questions and have them write
down the answers and then share. If this lesson is too easy teacher
will let students silent read while answering the questions that will
instead be posted on the board. If this lesson finishes too quickly
teacher will have students start reading Chapter 6 with a partner. If
this lesson finishes too late, the teacher will cut the pair and share
part of this lesson.
Lesson Plan Day 5
Rachel Goodbar
Dr. Tenore
Partner Reading
*Lesson plan based on a 50-minute class

Purpose/rationale: This lesson is designed for a 10th grade honors
classroom that is beginning to read The Gender Games by Bella
Forrest. This lesson aligns with the big ideas of the unit, gender
and identity which students will be exploring the novel through as
well as the world around them. This lesson aligns with the Florida
State Standards by having students determine a central idea of a
text as well as having students analyze the course of the main
character’s development of her identity. The timing for this lesson
is appropriate because it is spring semester and students feel
comfortable enough in the classroom to explore themes of identity
and gender in relation to the book and their own lives. After this
lesson students will continue to build on ideas of dystopian
literature as well as analyzing the big ideas of the unit throughout
the course of the novel. This lesson will have students partner
reading chapter 6 while mind mapping, having one student track
identity and one student track gender so that students are digging
deeper and collaborating on the big ideas of this unit

Language Arts Florida Standards:
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and
analyze in detail its development over the course of the text,
including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific
details; provide an objective summary of the text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over
the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the
plot or develop the theme.

Objectives:
 SWBAT recognize gender norms in literature.
 SWBAT examine influences on identity in literature.
Materials:
 Chapter 6 worksheet for every student
 Copy of The Gender Games for every student
Anticipatory set (5 minutes):
The teacher takes attendance and passes out copies of The Gender
Games to every student.

Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
Time Student is doing Teacher is doing

3 Students are listening Teacher will pair students for
minutes as teacher explains the partner reading based on ability
instructions for partner level. Teacher explains to students
reading. that they will be mind mapping as
they read for identity.

37 Students partner read Teacher monitors students as they
minutes chapter 6 of The partner read chapter 6 of The
Gender Games. Gender Games.

Summary/Closure (5 minutes):
Students will review mind mapping with teacher.

Assessment:
 Formal assessment: Students will hand in the chapter 6
worksheet to be graded for completion and accuracy.
 Informal assessment: Teacher will monitor student
understanding of identity development through participation
in partner reading and worksheets.

Homework/follow-up assignment:
Students will finish chapter 6 if not finished in class.

Accommodations/adaptations:
 English Language Learner (ELL): Student will be
accommodated through flexible school scheduling for use of
extra time for quizzes and exams, access to a dictionary,
modeling, and use of illustrations.
 Speech Impairment: Student will be accommodated through
oral presentation, directions repeated, copied directions to the
student, and through verbal encouragement.
 ADHD: Student will be accommodated through previously
determined guiding clues and preferential seating to keep the
student on task.
Attachments/Appendices:
None.
Plan B:
If this lesson is too easy students will silent read while mind
mapping for both identity and gender. If this lesson is too hard
students will read as a class. If this lesson is too short the teacher
will mind map with the students on the board after finishing the
chapter.

Day 6

Standards:
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives:
 SWBAT make connections between society in The Gender Games and in
our own society.
 SWBAT analyze how character identity develops over the course of a
chapter.

Texts:
 The Gender Games

Activity Outline:
 Newspaper Connection: students will share their articles that they brought
in for homework and will share with a classmate how they relate to the
novel. This will be collected.
 In class reading of chapters 7 and 8. Students will answer questions as
they read.

Product expected:
 Informal assessment: Teacher will monitor student understanding of the
big ideas through participation in discussion while reading.
 Formal assessment: Teacher will collect student homework of newspaper
articles with one paragraph explaining the connection between the article
and the text to assess student’s understanding of parallels between the
novel and the society we live in.

Day 7

Standards
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
o SWBAT analyze how character identity develops over the course of a
chapter.
o SWBAT explain factors that contribute to creation of identity.
Texts
o Short film on identity
o https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikGVWEvUzNM
o The Gender Games

Activity Outline
o Reader response in journal to short video on identity
o In class reading with Cornell notes focus on identity

Product Expected
o Student’s Cornell notes
o Student journal responses

Day 8
Standards
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
o SWBAT analyze how character identity develops over the course of a
chapter.
o SWBAT explain factors that contribute to creation of identity.

Texts
 The Gender Games

Activity Outline
 Reader’s theatre
 Students track big ideas, specifically identity, in the text with Cornell notes
while reading

Product Expected
o Student Cornell notes

Day 9
Standards
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

LAFS.910.W.1.1Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive
topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Objectives
o SWBAT analyze how gender develops over the course of a chapter.
o SWBAT explain how gender impacts both of Violet’s worlds.

Texts
o The Gender Games
Activity Outline
o Partner reading
o Mind mapping the idea of gender with partner
Product Expected
o Mind map

Day 10

Standards:
LAFS.910.W.1.1Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive
topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
o SWBAT analyze how character identity develops over the course of a
chapter.
o SWBAT explain factors that contribute to creation of identity.

Texts
o The Gender Games
Activity Outline
o Teacher reviews the assignment and the rubric for students
o Group discussion on identity in the novel
o Silent reading
Product Expected
 Participation in group discussion
Homework:
 Outline of student paper

Day 11
Standards
LAFS.910.W.2.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising,
editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience.

LAFS.910.W.3.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.910.W.2.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development,
organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Objectives
o SWBAT explain factors that contribute to creation of identity.
 SWBAT analyze how gender develops over the course of a chapter.
Texts
 The Gender Games
Activity Outline
 Students write and draft their paper (30 minutes)
 Reader’s theatre with teacher led questions about big ideas in the novel
(20 minutes)

Product Expected
 Rough draft of paper

Day 12
Standards
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
o SWBAT analyze how gender develops over the course of a chapter.
o SWBAT explain how gender impacts both of Violet’s worlds.

Texts
 The Gender Games
o https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=381belOZreA
 Buzzfeed video: Gender Roles

Activity Outline:
 Students watch and respond to the Buzzfeed video (10 minutes)
 Reader’s theatre (40 minutes)
 Students track big ideas in the text with Cornell notes while reading

Product Expected
 Journal response to the Buzzfeed video
 Student Cornell notes
Day 13
Standards

LAFS.910.W.2.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising,
editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience.

LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

Objectives
o SWBAT explain factors that contribute to creation of identity.
o SWBAT analyze how gender develops over the course of a chapter.

Texts
 The Gender Games
Activity Outline
 Students Workshop essays in groups of 3 (20 minutes)
 Silent conversation: In groups of 5 students participate on silent
conversation about the novel and the big ideas of the unit (15 minutes)
 Silent reading with Cornell notes (15 minutes)

Product Expected
 Silent conversation sheets (1 per group)
 Student feedback on essays
 Cornell notes tracking themes

Day 14
Standards

LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
o SWBAT explain factors that contribute to creation of identity.
o SWBAT analyze how gender develops over the course of a chapter.
Texts
 The Gender Games
 Discussion questions for each student small group
Activity Outline
 Reader’s theatre with mind mapping (30 minutes)
 Students participate in small group discussions (20 minutes)

Product Expected
 Mind mapping notes
 Participation in discussion

Day 15
Standards

LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
o SWBAT analyze how gender develops over the course of a chapter.
o SWBAT explain how gender impacts both of Violet’s worlds.

Texts
 The Gender Games


Activity Outline
 Students journal in response to a picture
 Partner reading with mind mapping
Product Expected
 Mind mapping notes from students tracking gender
 Journal responses from students
Day 16

Standards

LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
LAFS.910.W.2.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising,
editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience.

Objectives
o SWBAT explain factors that contribute to creation of identity.
o SWBAT analyze how gender develops over the course of a chapter.

Texts
 The Gender Games
Activity Outline
 Students workshop their essays with a partner (15 minutes)
 Reader’s theatre with teacher questioning while reading

Product Expected
 Student participation in discussion
 Student peer edits

Day 17

Standards
LAFS.910.W.1.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive
topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
 SWBAT create persuasive posters
 SWBAT analyze the impact of gender on society
Texts
 The Gender Games
Activity Outline
 Students create a persuasive billboard to convince people to move to
either Patrus or Matrus (20 minutes)
 Silent reading (30 minutes)

Product Expected
 Persuasive billboard from students

Day 18
Standards
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
 SWBAT criticize how gender influences society
 SWBAT analyze impacts society has on identity
Texts
 The Gender Games
Activity Outline
 Reader’s theatre (finish book)
 Group discussion on the novel- relating big ideas, answering essential
questions
 Begin She’s the man with worksheet making connections to the text
Product Expected
 Participation in group discussion
 Begin worksheet on She’s the Man

Day 19
Standards

LAFS.910.W.3.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and research.
LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
 SWBAT criticize how gender influences society
 SWBAT analyze impacts society has on identity

Texts
 The Gender Games
 She’s the Man movie
Activity Outline
 She’s the man movie with worksheet and discussion points
Product Expected
 First half of worksheet completed
 Student participation at discussion points

Day 20
Standards

LAFS.910.W.3.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support
analysis, reflection, and research.

LAFS.910.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in
detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and
is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.

LAFS.910.RL.1.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Objectives
 SWBAT criticize how gender influences society
 SWBAT analyze impacts society has on identity

Texts
 The Gender Games
 She’s the Man movie
Activity Outline
 She’s the man movie with worksheet and discussion points
Product Expected
 Completed worksheet
 Student participation at discussion points

FIIA Part 2

When preparing to teach a unit on The Gender Games for a 10th grade honors

classroom there are many things that I find valuable that are relevant while planning this

unit. I need to know information about the school and the surrounding community and

find out information that is relevant and valuable for preparing to teach this unit. I am

preparing to teach this unit at Florida State University Schools (FSUS), which functions

as a lab school requiring students to apply for admission. I began asking the questions
that are important to know in order to teach this unit: What are the demographics of this

school? What are the requirements to receive admission to FSUS? What types of

communities do students come from? Where do students live?

Knowing this information will assist in helping me assess the instructional

strategies that I will use when teach this unit. I first wanted to know the demographics of

this school. This is extremely important because of the way diversity impacts the

classroom. In the report, “How Racially Diverse Schools and Classroom Can Benefit All

Students,” Wells, Fox, and Cordova-Cobo argue that there is a necessity of diversity in

the classroom, claiming that in a diverse classroom students can learn how to better

navigate the adult world in a diverse society (Wells, Fox, & Cordova-Cobo, 2016).

Knowing the demographics of the school is an important assessment for how to teach this

unit, keeping diversity in mind and using diversity as a tool for learning throughout this

unit. In addition, knowing the demographics of this school is important because it gives

me an idea of student background, potential access to technology at home, and will help

for culturally relevant teaching. While I wanted to know about diversity in the classroom,

the most specific thing from the demographics that was important for me to know was the

gender breakdown of the school and of the classroom. Because this unit contains the big

idea of gender, gender is something that is going to be heavily discussed and knowing the

gender demographic breakdown of this class is important so that while planning I can

structure the unit so that gender discussions do not end up extremely one sided.

Since my high school is a lab school and students have to apply for admission it

was important to me to know what the requirements are to get into this school. This is

important to know because it will tell me more about who my students are and will tell
me more information about the students in my classroom. In addition to knowing the

requirements for students to get in, it is also important to know the types of communities

that my students come from, the values of the communities, and the support that they get

at home. This unit is often going to be discussing values of communities as a whole, so it

is important to know students own experiences within their communities, what the norms

of their communities are, and how issues of gender and identity are valued in their

communities. Lastly, I think that it was important to know where students live location

wise so that I am aware of their commutes and the time they have out of school so I know

how much work I can reasonably expect them to do outside of the class.

This inquiry process came from understanding that the school I am interning at

meets very specific requirements to be considered a lab school and how those

requirements may impact student backgrounds and learning, making this process very

unique. When exploring the answers to my inquiry questions I found the information in

three ways: through the school’s website, speaking with my coordinating teacher, and

through looking at the student profiles in the schools system.

The demographics of this school are 50.2% female, 49.% male, 50.09% White,

29.25% African American, 12.14% Hispanic, 3.14% Asian, 5.21% Multicultural, and

10.9% of high school students are on free and reduced lunch (Florida State University

Schools, 2016). When learning about the requirements and admission process of applying

to FSUS I learned that “students are randomly selected by a computer according to

demographic information on race, gender, socioeconomic status, and academic ability

that most closely represents the public school student population profile of the State of

Florida” (Florida State University Schools, 2016). When learning about the types of
communities I learned that most students came from middle class communities and that

their values widely ranged depending on if they lived in more urban or rural areas. I also

learned that students live in all different parts of Tallahassee, and even towns outside of

Tallahassee all the way to Crawfordville.

I will use the information found from the inquiry process to continue to be

responsive while preparing and teaching this unit. From this information I have a better

understanding of student’s communities and the impact community may have on gender

and identity. This information has given me an insight into student lives and the

communities they are from and I will use this to create a unit that is centered on being

culturally responsive. The idea of culturally relevant teaching is crucial when it comes to

this unit, students will be asked to discuss and speak about aspects of identity, something

that community and home culture strongly influence. In line with NTCE’s beliefs and

theories by Johnson and Eubanks, “The idea of transformative, culturally relevant

teaching parallels with NTCE’s Beliefs about Teaching Writing in that literacy practices

are embedded in complicated social relationships that as educators we should invite the

ideas of our students to the center of our literacy curriculum” (Johnson & Eubanks,

2015). In line with these beliefs the most crucial way to use the information gained about

the school setting and location is to respond by creating a culturally responsive unit.

Reflecting on this information, my time interning at this school, and my own

experiences in school things are surprisingly similar. While I attended a public school

where the students did not apply and everyone lived within a 7-minute drive from the

school, the demographics of the two schools are extremely close making this school

setting very familiar to me. Living in a diverse community and going to a diverse school
has shaped my perceptions and interactions with my schools community as something

very familiar to me, but also something extremely positive. In the report by Wells, Fox,

and Cordova-Cobo they discuss the positive impacts a diverse classroom has on a child’s

future and I can agree with that because going to a diverse school and learning in a

diverse setting has helped me be able to navigate relationships with people who are

different than me, and because of this my perceptions and interactions with my school’s

community have been very natural and familiar to me, making it easy to create positive

relationships with students.

When preparing to teach a unit it is also important to know about the relationships

that students have with each other and the relationships that they have with the teacher.

When inquiring about this topic I asked the following questions: What is student’s

previous experiences having discussions in class? Do students feel comfortable enough

with each other and with the teacher to discuss topics that are controversial and

potentially emotional triggers? What are the norms of the classroom? Asking these

questions is extremely important to prepare for learning through discussion, which

Elizabeth Kahn states is something extremely important to majority of English teachers,

saying, “Most English teacher’s enter the profession wanting to engage young people in

stimulating discussions of literature like those they experienced in their best high school

or even college English courses“ (Kahn, 2007). Like these teachers, I value teaching

students through discussion and using discussion to engage students with literature,

which makes it essential to ask these questions in order to prepare this unit.
This information is important to know because it gives me an idea of how to plan

the group discussions for this unit. It is important to know student’s previous experiences

with group discussions because it gives me insight into how comfortable students feel

having discussions as a class, in small groups, and in partners. Knowing this information

will help me plan what type of group discussions we should be having when discussing

heavier topics in the novel, as well as helping students practice and learn to feel

comfortable having all types of conversations. In addition, it is important to know about

student’s comfort level with one another and with the teacher because of the topics some

of these discussions will be focused around. Since the big ideas of this unit are gender

and identity, hot topics surrounding gender equality, formation of identity, and how we

should run society may prove to be emotional triggers for students. Knowing how

comfortable students feel with the other people in the classroom, will help me prepare

and plan for when conversations may get controversial. Knowing the class norms is

important because one of the topics we will be constantly discussing is norms of society,

norms of identity, and norms of gender, as well as the norms that we see in our dystopian

societies in the novel. By knowing the norms of the classroom I can use them as an

example and connect the novel to the world that we live in.

My inquiry process for learning about the relationships taking place in the

classroom stemmed from knowing that talking about gender and identity and how that is

shown throughout our novel and in our own society can get controversial at times, with

students having strong opinions about these topics. In order to be able to have this

discussions in a meaningful and enriching way it is important ask these questions. While I

think the inquiry process was extremely helpful in assisting me in planning the
discussions for the unit I would of liked to look deeper into student’s discussion

experiences from previous years and had the opportunity to speak with their previous

teachers about this topics. Answering these questions was pretty straightforward and I

was able to answer them based on the time I spent observing in the classroom as well as

speaking to my coordinating teacher.

I discovered that student’s previous experiences with discussion were limited to

more of a question and answer format used as a whole class. Students had little

experience in small group discussion in this classroom and often didn’t go super deep

into the topics that they were discussing, tending to stick closer to surface level

conversations. I learned that student’s are extremely comfortable with each other since

they have mostly all known each other since Kindergarten. I also observed that students

had a very positive relationship with the teacher where mutual respect was abundant and

students often came to her for help in school and with personal issues. When learning

about the norms of the classroom, students completed a bell-ringer that discussed the

norms of the classroom. Students shared that they felt the norms were much like any

other high school classroom, where you are expected to act a certain way. Students did

mention that there were certain gender norms and personality norms and roles that also

contributed to the class norms.

In Kahn’s article she states, “A growing body of research provides an answer:

Discussion – based instruction, in the context of high academic demands, significantly

enhances achievement in reading” (Kahn, 2007). I used the information I found to engage

with this research and ensure that students would engage in the highest quality of

learning. I used this information to structure how I want to use group discussion in this
unit. I used this information to make sure that we were having discussions that were

question and answer based during the reading process, to make sure we mix up the type

of discussions by including, both whole class, partner, and small group discussion to this

unit. In addition, I wanted students to experience a new type of discussion that they may

not have been previously exposed to, and added a silent conversation to the discussion

plans. I used this information to gauge where to start student conversations, and decided

to first start the discussion for this unit by doing an agree/disagree activity where students

could begin to think about controversial themes found in literature before diving in and

discussing these topics in the novel without assistance. I know that discussion is an

extremely important part of student growth and I wanted to use the information gathered

to ensure that students are learning to their full potential.

My own experiences participating during group discussion in the classroom were

all extremely negative until my senior year of high school where I took one class where

all we discussed were controversial, personal, and emotion triggering topics. Previously I

hated group discussion, and dreaded having to share my ideas with an entire class of

people. However, once a safe space in the classroom was created I didn’t mind sharing or

defending my ideas to a classroom full of people. My experience is similar to many

students who don’t feel comfortable speaking in class, but also different than the

discussion experience that I hope to give students, an experience that contains a variety of

formats for discussion.

The final thing that I needed to know in order to teach this unit was about my

students as ELA learners so that I could learn and build off their background knowledge.
To investigate this topic further I asked: Have students ever read a book using a gender

lens? What are student’s reading scores? Where are students as writers? All of this

information was important so that I could assess where students were in the English

Language Arts development and determine what background knowledge students had that

would help prepare them for this unit, as well as telling me what background knowledge I

needed to give them in order for them to complete the work. As _ claims, “Knowing what

is known is the beginning place for new learning” (Lapp, Fisher, & Frey, 2012). In order

for this learning to begin, it was important for me to ask these questions to determine

what students already know.

Since one of the big lenses that we will be looking at this book through is gender,

it was important for me to find out if students had any experience using a gender lens

when reading a novel. By knowing this I could either give students background

knowledge on how to do so or build off of what students already knew. It was important

to know student reading scores before entering this unit because we will be doing a lot of

reading with a somewhat long book, it was important to know if students would be able

to handle the novel, as well as how much students would actually be able to accomplish

reading in a set time frame. Because the assessment for this unit is an essay it was

important for me to find out where students are as writers. I needed to know where they

stood on writing in general, reflective writing, and writing using textual evidence. This

information was important so that I knew how much time I needed to spend on helping

students learn how to write this essay.

During my inquiry process I gathered information based on knowing what I

wanted to expect from my students in this unit. This was difficult because I was so set on
what I wanted to do with this unit and then I had to go back to see if student’s

background knowledge matched what I wanted to do, and it was frustrating when I had to

change some things around. The hardest thing for me was beginning to introduce this unit

because that is when I needed to know student background knowledge the most and is

what I ended up having to revise the most in my lesson plan. When finding out this

information I did a lot of observing in the classroom, reading student essays, speaking

with my coordinating teacher, and looking at student reading scores in the student’s files.

The consequences of the ways that I gathered this information is that it can be very biased

by the things I am seeing when I am there and that I might miss out on something from

the days that I am not in the classroom.

When researching my questions I found out that students were not familiar using

gender to analyze a novel, but they have used specific themes and ideas when reading a

novel so they were familiar with how to do so. I learned that students are all on grade

level in their reading scores, and that since they are honors students they are capable at

reading at a quicker pace than general 10th grade students would be able to read. Through

reading student essays I learned that students are capable writers, and my coordinating

teacher said a lot of that is because of workshop days, students are able to connect ideas

and provide evidence for their arguments in writing.

I used this information as a way to assess the background knowledge that students

had before entering this unit and preparing for how to teach it. When looking at the use

of background knowledge as a way of assessment, and a foundation for growth many

teachers realize that, “in addition to designing instruction that builds and activates

appropriate background knowledge for their students, they must also model and provide
opportunities for their students to learn how to actively support their own inquiry,

learning, and subsequence independence” (Lapp, Fisher, & Frey, 2012). This is the goal

of the inquiry process, to find answers to the questions about student background

knowledge so that I can create a unit that fills in the gaps in background knowledge and

builds off of that knowledge, helping students to learn new skills in English.

As an English Language Arts learner myself I think background knowledge and

building off of it is how I continued to learn and grow. My background knowledge gave

me the experience to connect ideas and grow from the new material that I learned. When

teachers did not make those connections or build off my background knowledge I ended

up not learning what I was supposed to be learning. My students are engaged as ELA

learners and when the teacher makes connections between the new information and their

background knowledge you can see the light go off in their head that they get it. My own

experiences will shape how I teach these students because I want to make those

connections so that they can see how something new can relate to something old, making

the material relevant to previous learning.

Bibliography:

Florida State University Schools. (2016). Retrieved December 10, 2016, from
http://fsus.schoolwires.net/Page/60

Johnson, L. P., & Eubanks, E. (2015, December). Anthem or Nah? Culturally Relevant
Writing Instruction and Community. Retrieved December 10, 2016, from
http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/VM/0232-
dec2015/VM0232Anthem.pdf

Kahn, E. (2007). From the Secondary Section: Building Fires: Raising Achievement
through Class Discussion. English Journal, 96(4), 16. doi:10.2307/30047157
Lapp, D., Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2012, September). Background Knowledge: The
Instructional Starting Line Begins with What Students Already Know. Voices From the
Middle, 21(1), 7-9. Retrieved December 11, 2016, from
http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/VM/0201-
sep2012/VM0201Editors.pdf

Wells, A., Fox, L., & Cordova-Cobo, D. (2016, February 15). How Racially Diverse
Schools and Classrooms Can Benefit All Students. Retrieved December 10, 2016, from
https://tcf.org/content/report/how-racially-diverse-schools-and-classrooms-can-benefit-
all-students/

FIIA Part 3:

Lesson 1 - Introduction to The Great Depression

This lesson was focused on introducing the novel Of Mice and Men by William

Steinbeck. The learning objectives for this lesson were for students to gain background

knowledge on the great depression. This learning objective was useful in guiding my

instruction because I had a very general idea of what my students needed to know, and

was able to determine what was important about the great depression that they would
need to know before reading Of Mice and Men. For this lesson we did a photo gallery

walk and used instructional strategies of teacher-led instruction while engaging students

with questions throughout the PowerPoint. The texts students were expected to work with

was the image “Scream”, the image “Migrant Mother” and various other photos from the

great depression, and a short video about the image “Migrant Mother.” The assessment

for this unit was a piece of paper that students filled out where they observed, reflected,

and analyzed each photo. The lesson did run out of time and I was not able to collect the

assessment. However, the lesson plan did not ask that the worksheet be turned in. The

assessment wasn’t that useful in helping me understand student’s learning because it was

filled out as a class and was not turned in by students. Going back I would revise this

lesson and assessment so that students are filling out the first few images together as a

class and then have the rest of the images hung around the room where students can

observe, reflect, and analyze the images and then turn the worksheet in as an assessment

that the teacher can see.

The data from today will inform my instructional approach about how to really

assess student learning and how to make a more interactive teacher-led learning. The data

from today will impact my instructional interaction with students tomorrow by first

finishing the lesson and second having students complete the worksheet on their own and

turn it into me for an assessment. The ways that I provided feedback to students was

verbal, both through praising students when they were right and going off of students

comments and turning them in the direction that I was looking for. I managed the learning

environment through walking around the room, listening to students, and using Popsicle

sticks to call on students so that everyone was paying attention. I am lucky enough to be
at FSUS where the students are used to student teachers and were more than

accommodating to focus and be well behaved while I taught. Students had good reactions

to me teaching them and were all very responsive when working on the activity as a

class. The role that I enacted during this lesson was the role of teacher or information

giver, I was at the front of the classroom with the microphone going over the slides on the

PowerPoint and asking students questions. I put my students in the student role where

they are the information receivers as well as participants in their own learning process.

Other “events” that will inform my decision making tomorrow with my students was the

level of engagement that they had with the lesson, their level of questioning, as well as

my own experience teaching and seeing their faces. Tomorrow I would make this activity

more engaging because of these things. One “critical moment” that happened during the

lesson was when I messed up what I was saying because I was so nervous, the students

stepped in and started raising their hands and participating more actively. Although this

was something small it was critical in knowing that both my students and my CT

understand that this is something new for me and that this really is a learning process on

all sides. I think overall this was a good lesson and it did go well minus the time

constraints. I think it is important for students to interact with a text and look at in

multiple different ways, and I think the modeling that I did of this for them was an

excellent learning tool for students to use to begin to do this themselves.

Lesson 2 - Discussion questions on Of Mice & Men

The lesson I lead was a review of chapter two of the novella Of Mice and Men.

The lesson focused around a discussion worksheet where as a class we would review and
go over the questions asking students to use information they have read to answer and

make predictions. The learning objective for this lesson was SWBAT connect Of Mice

and Men to The Great Depression. This learning goal was not useful to the lesson and

really didn’t have anything to do with what we were reviewing. This learning objective

could have been useful in guiding instruction had instruction focused on the aspects of

The Great Depression shown in the novella instead of the content of the novella itself.

Since this was a review, I used students’ background knowledge to build ideas up to

answer the questions and make predictions, so that they could begin to make connections

between the novella and the time period. The texts that students were using were the

novella Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. The assessment for this lesson was a

worksheet containing 17 questions that we went over as a class, students had to answer

each question in a complete sentence to earn credit. The assessment helped me

understand student’s strengths and weaknesses by allowing me to see how well they are

following along and understanding the novella. I would revise assessment so that the

questions being asked focus more on connections to the time period, since that is the

learning objective. I would also change this so that students are working alone or in

partners to answer the questions because assessment fails when it isn’t measuring

student’s progress on a more individual level.

The data that I collected from today will inform my instructional interactions

tomorrow by knowing students level of comfort and progress in the novella. By having

students answers to these questions I am able to understand if they know the dynamics

between Lennie and George and the types of relationship it is, as well as many other

important aspects of the novel. Knowing this I will know if students need more review
the following day or if students are ready to move on to chapter three. I provided

feedback for this lesson through using classroom Google to comment on student

worksheets online that is accessible to both students and parents. I managed the learning

environment through circulating the classroom and using proximity to keep students who

tend to get off task focused on the discussion questions. During this lesson I acted as the

role of the teacher, but more importantly the role of the reviewer. I was not giving them

any new information in this lesson but was refreshing it and reviewing it with them. The

students were positioned as the information givers, giving me the information to prove

that they have learned and understood it. Other events that will inform the decisions that I

make tomorrow are the level of student engagement with the material and participation in

the discussion questions. After teaching this lesson it was clear to me that the next day

needs to be a lesson that connects the novel back to The Great Depression so that students

are fulfilling the learning goal. I also would teach something more engaging the next day

where students are making their own product on a smaller scale so they have more

creativity in the learning process. One “critical moment” that happened during this lesson

was that I made a comment about Curley’s hand and how he keeps it soft so that he could

pleasure his wife - it was the language that I specifically used that had students start

laughing, cracking jokes, and becoming inappropriate. For me this was something where

I realized how many filters I need to go through in my mind before I say something to

students, and understanding how important it is to know student’s maturity. This lesson

was important for students because it engaged them in the material that they have been

covering, encouraged them to reflect during the learning process, and encouraged them to

make connections and predictions with the text.
Lesson 3: Archetypes

The lesson that I taught was a lesson teaching students the basic concept of

archetypes as well as the different types of archetypes, connecting them to popular

movies as well as Of Mice and Men. The learning objectives for this mini-lesson were

SWBAT understand archetypes and SWBAT apply archetypes to Of Mice and Men. The

learning objectives for this mini-lesson were extremely useful guides for instruction and

learning. Students knew exactly what they should be looking for and learning was made

straightforward. I used a PowerPoint presentation to walk students through the ideas of

archetypes and the different types of archetypes that we see around the world. While

going through the slides students took notes and answered questions identifying common

characters like Disney princesses, star wars characters, and other common movie

characters by their archetypes. This instructional strategy was supported student growth

towards achieving the learning goals because they were having archetypes explicitly

stated to them so they could get a full understanding, while still having to constantly

apply the knowledge as we went through the PowerPoint. The text that I expected

students to interact with in this mini-lesson was Of Mice and Men. After going through

the PowerPoint on archetypes in groups students completed a short activity where they

had to match the character from the novella to their archetype. This served as the

assessment for this mini-lesson to see if students could apply what they had just learned

to what they have been doing in class. This informal assessment helped me understand

student’s strengths and weaknesses by seeing what characters and archetypes they were

struggling with so that I could further improve both their understanding of that character
and of the archetype, knowing what to review in future lessons. The one way that I would

revise this assessment in order to generate more information would be to have this

assessment as an exit ticket done on an individual level, so that I could see who was

struggling with what.

The data gathered today will inform my instructional interactions with students by

knowing what to review and what characters to further dive into. Tomorrow I will review

archetypes with students and review them with how the character from Of Mice and Men

fits in with this archetype and why. The way that I provided feedback to students was

verbal while we were going through the PowerPoint slides and students were answering

questions. To give feedback to students on the assignment, we reviewed it with the doc

cam as a class so students could get feedback on archetypes in the novella. The way that I

would provide feedback for students and parents would be to collect the worksheets and

write feedback on the bottom so both parents and students can see students strengths and

areas that need to be improved. Modifications made during this lesson was repetition of

concepts that were to be filled out in the notes, more time given during certain slides, and

filled out notes as needed.

Students responded really well to this lesson and ended up having a lot of fun

learning about archetypes and applying them to their favorite movie characters. They

responded well to me and asked me questions about other movies that they had seen and

archetypes they had seen in those movies. Because students were enjoying the lesson

managing the learning environment was not difficult, students were willing to participate.

When students did get too out of hand and excited when talking about movies I reminded

students that they needed to be taking notes and that they had only 30 seconds or so to fill
out the notes from that particular slide and it brought students back in. The role I enacted

during this lesson was the information giver, I was giving students information about

archetypes and they were in the role of absorbing the information. By taking on this role,

students were looking to me to ask questions about the lesson and about archetypes

instead of asking their teacher.

In addition to the assessment, other events that happened during class that will

inform my decision making tomorrow is the participation throughout the entire

presentation, student questions about archetypes, and students level of engagement when

learning this. One “critical moment” in which something wonderful happened is when

students began to ignore their teacher being in the room and solely focusing on me to

give them the answers that they were looking for. Students began to look at me as the

authority figure in the classroom who was teaching them and making them learn

something and that was amazing. I imagine from my students perspective it is when they

had finally had me teach them enough so that they respected me in the role of teacher.

From my CT’s perspective I imagine her thinking that I was doing a really good job with

her lesson plan seeing that students were learning and focused on me instead of her. The

theory that is most important that took place in this lesson is making things relatable to

students. Once I was talking about archetypes in batman or romantic comedies students

could instantly relate because they knew what I was talking about and how they saw it in

their own world.
FIIA Part 4:
This mini-lesson was a discussion based on Chapter four of Of Mice and Men by

John Steinbeck. The teacher asked the students questions and students discuss with

teacher the questions while answering them on a worksheet as well. One objective for

this mini-lesson is SWBAT review chapter two of Of Mice and Men. The standard for this

mini-lesson is LAFS.910.RL.1.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support

analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. This
standard was implemented into the mini-lesson through having students be required to

use textual evidence to support their answers, as well as questions asking students to

make inferences about the text based on evidence. The way that instruction was

implemented was directly relating to mastering this standard, ensuring that students were

learning.

The learning trends for the class as a whole were positive, showing that students

had mastered the material, were able to discuss and reflect on the chapter, as well as

making inferences and using evidence to answer the discussion questions. These learning

trends were seen strongly in the discussion that occurred during this mini-lesson, with

students actively participating in the learning process. These trends can also been seen in

the worksheet that students turned in on the discussion questions, as seen below in

student samples A and B:

Student Sample A:
Student B:
Student sample A shows the learning trends that were demonstrated throughout

this mini-lesson. Throughout all of the discussion questions student A has showed

mastery of the material and the basic facts of chapter three by answering all factual

questions on this worksheet. Student A continued to follow the learning trends and

showed ability to reflect on the chapter, specifically seen in question six, reflecting on

why this answer might be this way. In addition, student A shows that they can make
inferences based on evidence from the chapter, as shown in discussion question eight

where student A inferences why Curley does not have Lennie fired.

Student sample B continues to show the learning trends of the class. Student B

shows mastery of the material though answering the factual questions correctly,

specifically looking at question three where student B used factual evidence from the

chapter to answer why George stopped playing tricks on Lennie. In addition, Student B

continued to show the ability to reflect on a chapter through reflecting while answering

the questions and reflecting on questions, like question nine, where student had to reflect

on why Lennie thinks his punishment will be. Student B continues to show the ability to

make inferences throughout the discussion questions, but specifically looking at question

seven where student B has to infer why Curley attacked Lennie.

The day’s instructional plans responded to assessment of student learning both on

an active level and a future level. While leading the group discussion, I was able to assess

if students understood the questions and the discussion during the activity. By being

assessing students understanding of the chapter during discussion, I was able to evaluate

if students needed to go back to the chapter as a class and reread and discuss what

students were missing. Through using the class discussion as well as the worksheet as an

assessment tool I was able to respond with instructional plans based on what students

needed to review: key parts of the chapter, relationships between characters, and how to

use evidence to support an answer. By being able to assess these, I was also able to

measure student’s comprehension of chapter three and was able to determine if students

were ready to move on to the next chapter in Of Mice and Men.
Students experienced a positive instructional impact as I’ve described for many

reasons. The first is the context of my school. Teaching at a lab school students have

many resources that are available to them at the school, such as Google classroom that

helps to keep them engaged in the lesson. In addition, students come from families who

encourage them to work hard in school and pay attention, encouraging students to learn

from the lessons being taught. Based on the goals and instructional practices of this mini-

lesson students were engaged with reviewing the chapter and participating in discussion

that gives them more self-control in their learning experience.

If I were to change this focus lesson and teach it to the same group of students

again, I would change the discussion questions and the format of the discussion. First I

would change the discussion questions so that they are less fact based and focus more on

the use of evidence and interpretation, still containing a few factual questions to check

students’ general comprehension of the chapter. I would also change the format of the

discussion so that it was think, pair, and share so that students have time to reflect on

their own, discuss and share with a partner while analyzing and interpreting, and then

having time to reflect as a class using everything that they have discussed with their

partner. I feel that using this model will hold students more accountable for their own

learning since it is on multiple levels of thinking and learning. I expect outcomes from

these revisions to be students engaging in higher level thinking while continuing to meet

the standard that this unit is based on. The revisions for this mini-lesson are supported by

both Vygotsky’s theory of small group learning and by Dr. Frank Lyman's creation of

Think-Pair-Share.