BEYOND BASICS

K ITHWYATT

Editor: Aaron Stang
Additional Text and Music Examples: Colgan Bryan
Ar1Jst Pho!Ography courtesy of Ebet Roberts
Art Design: Joseph Klucar

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CONTENTS
Page# CD Track#
Introduction...................................................... .................................................................. 3...........................................
Tuning notes ........... .... .............. ........ . ........................... ....... .. ........... ................. . . . .. ................................................. ......... 2
)

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION TO ACOUSTIC BLUES . ... .................... ................ �
Preface.................................................... ..... ......... .... . .. ..... . ...................... ....
BASICS: Open Posti i on Chords......................................................... .......... 6
., . .. , .

�!!H�t�� :::. ::. : ::�J ;rs : :ssLi
Example 6: Combine All Three Chords .................................................... 9................................. -..... . 8
Example 7: D & D7 Chords ...................................................................... l0........................................... 9

=�:: �� w�::��::::�::::::::::::::::::::::::::�::::::::::::::::::::::::�:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Example I 0: G and G7 Chords ...... . . � . . . .
. .. ........ .
: ::::::::::::::::::�::::::::::::::::::::: :?
. .. ..... .................... ....... ... l l.................. .. ........ .. ... ... ... l 2
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CHAPTER I BLUES PROGRESSIONS ...................................................................... 1 4
Example II: Bass-Chord Pattern ............................................................... l4......................................... 13
:

Example 12: Blues Progression In E.......................................................... l4 ................. ......... ............... 14

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�·::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::�::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: L::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: �
Example 15: The Quick-Change Progression..... ..... . _ ....... ....... .. ...... . 16......................................... 17
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. . ..

CHAPTER 2: RHYTHM ................................................................................................. 18
Example 16: The Shuffle Groove................................................................ IB. ..........................-........... 19
Example 17: Left-Hand Embellishments ................................................... 19......................................... 1 9
Example 18: A7 Embellishment .................................................................. 19......................................... 20
Example 19:Whole Progression ................................................................ 19......................................... 21
Example 20: E7 Varfatlon.............................................................................. 20......................................... 22
Example 21: Quick-Change In E ... .... ..... ......... ... ...... .... ... .. ............... . 21......................................... 23
. . .... . ..

CHAPTER 3: BASS-LINES............................................................................................. 22
Example 22A E7 to A7 Bass-llne.. .... ........ ........... .......... .............. ... ...... 22 ................. ......... ... ...... ... .. . 2..
Example 22B:A7 to E7 Bass-llne ....... ............ ...... .. ... .. . ................... ...... ... 22 .. ...... .................. .. ............ 2S
. ....

Example 12C:Anot:her A7 to E7 Bass-llne.............................................. 22......................................... 26
. . .

Example 22D: 87 to A7 Bass-line.............................................................. 23......................................... 27
Example 22E: The Whole Bass-line Progression.................................... 23... ...................................... 28
Example 23: The Jimmy Reed Progression .............................................. 24__............ ........................ 29
Example 24: Up-Strokes and Accents ....................................................... 25......................................... 30
Example 25: Blues Rhythm Uck .. . . ..... .... _ ........... . .. ..... .... ........ ..... ........ 25 ... ... .......... . ..... .. ...... .. . .. ... 31
2 1
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��l:s f7:2J : ��.�.����-�::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::�::::::::::::::::::::::i7"��t::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::3·j·�u
Example 29: Blues In ETumaround ..................... ...................................... 29........... ...... ..................... ... 3S

CHAPTER 4: BLUES IN A .. .......................... .......... . . . . .............. . .... ....... ....... ........ ......... 30
Ex;�mple 30A:A7 Embellishments ... . . . . . . . .......................................... ......... 30......................................... 36
.

Example JOB: D7 Embellishments ............................................................. 30......................................... 37
Ex.:lmple 30C: Blues In A.............................................................................. 31......... ........ ...... ...... ... ....... ..38

���:: �g�=�:,�r�:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::�l::::::::::::::::::�:::::::::::::::::::::�
Example 3 I: Blues In A Turnaround .......................................................... 33......................-................41

SECTION II: SOLO ACOUSTIC BLUES GUITAR.................... -....... ................... 34
CHAPTER S: BLUES UCKS .............................................................. ,........................... 35

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Example 32F:TumaroundYarlation........................................................... 37......................................... 47
: I!
Example 32�:Whole Progress lon ... ............ .. ... ... ...... ... ............ ............... .. 38.........................................48
: : :: �
Ex<lmple 33. More Blues Bass-llnes........................................................... 39.................................... ..... 49

CHAPTER 6: SLUES CHORD SOLOING................................................................41
Example 34: E7 lnverslons........................................................................... 41......................................... 50
Example 35: Chromaticism .................................... .....................................42......................................... 51
Ex ample 36: Blues Chord Solo I .............................................................. .42......................................... 52
Example 37A;A7 Inversions .......................................................................43. ........ . ..... ....... ... ........ . ... 53
Example 37B:A7 Inversions with Chromat1cs........................................ 43.......... ... . ._......... ........... 5-4
. .. .

Example 37C: Chord Solo Turnaround .................................................... 43.. ... ...... - ....................... 55
. .. .

Example 37D: Blues Chord Solo 2 .. ... . . ..... .. ... ........ ....... ......... .. ... .. ...44.... ....... ............. ... .. ........ 56
.. .
.

Example 37E: Blues Chord Solo 3 . . . .... ........ .... ...... . "........................... 45......................................... 57
.. .. . . . . . . ..

. .. .. ..

CHAPTER 7:THE BLUES SCALE ............................................................ -................. 47
Examples 38A-381: E Blues Ucks 1-9................... ..................... -.......47-51 ................................... 58-66

CHAPTER 8: FINGERSTYLE BLUES................................................................. -....... 52
E:lamples 39A-39H ................................................................................. 52-55................................... 67-74
Example 391: Muddy Waters Progresslon.- .......... ................................. 56 ..................... . . . ............ ..... 75
Example 39J: Muddy Waters Tumaround................................................. 57......................................... 76

CHAPTER 9: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER.......................... ,............................... 58
Examples 40-42 ....... ... ........................ .. ..... ... .. . ...... .. .. .... .. . ....... . ......... ..58-62................................... n.79
. .. .

progressions. Sect i on II focuses on sol o-sty le blues guitar. In the 1920's and 1930's. The style and infl uen c e of these pl ay e rs esta bl i s he d a tradition that to this day still app e als to everyone from casual listeners to professional mus1c1ans. demonstrating musical examples. Section I covers all the basics you will need to know regarding the acoustic blues style: chord shapes. then you are ready to go to work. strum patterns. If you love the blues. bass-lines. such as Lonnie Johnson. the shuffle groove and turnarounds. This book presents traditional. roots oriented blues with contemporary training methods that wil l allow you to immediately understand and ap ply these useful versatile concepts to . melodic patterns. scales. licks and fingerpicking. chord embellishments. . there were some great players. your style. have an acoustic guitar and two h ands. Introduction 3 INTRODUCTION Welcome to Acoustic Blues Guitar. Blind Lemon Jefferson and Robert Johnson.

KEITH WYATT co 0 SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION TO ACOUSTIC BLUES This section is designed to provide you with the fundamental tools and techniques needed for the acoustic blues style. . Make sure you take the time to learn the examples of basic chord shapes. bass-lines and turnarounds in this section before you start on the next section: Solo Acoustic Blues Guitar. rhythm patterns. It will be your guide to interpreting the music examples contained in the book. embellishments. Remember to tune your guitar to track 2 on the CD before you play with the recording. Take advantage of the included recording. progressions.

Later.. While you might find one of t hese techniques easier than the others. • Finger-picks are also available. This technique is used more for banjo than guitar . A pick gives you the option of playing single-note melodies with your fingers and bass-lines with your pick. The most important thing to consider when choosing a technique is the sound. There are a few simple tools and devices that you might like to keep in your guitar case: extra strings. and you will need to experiment until you find the sound you like. PREFACE One nice thing about acoustic blues is that you do not need expensive and complicated tools or devices. • A thumb-pick is primarily designed for down-strokes to play fingerstyle bass-lines. This technique is better for solo style where you combine bass-lines and melody. • Using a pick will give you a wider range of volume and it is easier to play single-note lines and melodies. you should still practice the technique that will give you the best sound even if it takes a little longer. try not to leave the same set of strings on any longer than a month. to be combined with the thumb-pick to get a brighter sound. picks. shapes and materials that affect the sound and feel. Picking Techniques: There are different techniques for striking the strings that you should experiment with as you learn the examples in the book: • Playing fingerstyle (without a p ick) produces a warm sound. but it's not as clear and you have to work harder to produce a wide range of volume. but they are a little awkward for playing single-note melodies. Playing fingerstyle wit a flat-pick is often called hybrid-picking . but you have to train weaker fingers to play fingerstyle melody-lines. lighter strings will enable you to learn the valuable technique of "bending in pitch" a lot sooner. The main thing you need is a guitar that is set up well. . Flat-picks come in a variety of sizes. You might want to use light or extra-light strings to reduce muscle fatigue and sore fingertips. experiment with different thicknesses and different materials to learn their effect on the sound. When using a flat-pick. Strings: It is amazing what a fresh set of strings can do to bring out the best sound of a guitar. After you learn this technique correctly. If you play regularly. slides (glass or metal) and a capo. you might want to experiment with using heavier strings. Different gauges (thickness) of strings have a different sound quality.

ha nd. CD 0 Example 2: The E7 Chord In bl ues. BASICS: OPEN POSITION CHORDS Acoustic guitar players.. the less you will need to push to get the right sound. Th e fourth n ote is 0. a fou rth note is added to the basic triad to create a dominant 7 chord (indicated as E7)... CD 0 Example 1: The E Chord The first chord is an E m ajor chord and is a triad because there are only three different notes in the chord: E: E G# B Major T riad: 1 3 5 E 0 0 0 4t 4. Be careful not to touch the open stri ngs Do not push so har d that you are cramping your . Make sure that all strings are ringing c learly by placing the fingertips ri ght against t h e fret.4t 2 3 1 �" t) n u . spend m ost of thei r time in open pos i tio n (close to the nut) to make use of the open strings. in any style. The more developed your calluses are. which is the b 7 interval of E.. The open strings resonate m ore than fretted notes and bring o ut the richness of the instrument.. .

.. . ..... :.. " .... ! A _ft g . .:.. .: g . 3 l 2 I I l � ' t. CD 0 Example 3: The A Chord The following are different fingerings for the A chord.. .... Even though the notes are the sam e . - -& -e -& -e 'T" . :...0..: . the choice of fingerings is different. ..�-�t 2 I 3 l . .. ... A: A C# E Major Triad: 1 3 5 A A A A X 0 0 X 0 0 •. E7: E G# B D Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 The following fingerings are the most common E7 fingerings that apply to the blues: E7 E7 E7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 •• 4• 4t 4t 4• 2 2 I 4 2 3 I 4 �" tJ :H: H: n u u u " .

2 J 2 3 4 I I I 2 -'" 0 0 1-(· � ::::::. A7: A c� E G Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 A7 A7 A7 )( 0 0 0 X 0 0 X 0 4t 4• 4t t• 4..� � � " � � .. � -. ... . (j) CD Example 5: The 87 Chord There is one primary fingering used in acoustic blues: 87: B D� F� A Dominant 7: 1 3 5 �7 2 I 3 4 r-'"1\ .-.. g .::... .- . or add the G to the first string.fl. There are two places to add a G to the open A chord: either take a finger off the 3rd string to expose the open G.0 CD Example 4: The A 7 Chord To turn the A chord into a dominant 7th chord....:. & -& -e- " .. � ::::::.� tJ � 'T' " � A :.. add the G (b 7).

n u u .. are the IV an d V chord of the key of E. I I. The Roman numerals I. I I I I. If you play a blues in the key of E.. "" The blues progression is a specific pattern of chords that relate to a key..f'. I 17 I -. the I chord will be the E7.f'. I I I j·v7 Il. we will be learning some rhythm patterns that involve these chords.. The A is the IV chord of E because it is built on the 4th note of theE major scale.f'. -� j I I I :1 . Two other chords. and 87 is the V chord because it is built on the 5th note of E major. I I B7 A7 E7 B7 flt V7 'T.. ffl. I :1 I I I I A7 # E7 ��# FIV7 I....l. A7 and 87. The I. I 1 I I I IV7 I I . of the major scale. but the one that's the most popular is the " 1 2-bar" blues. or root. Later..f'. I � . Practice changing from one chord to the other to get used to making the transitions. .l.f. we can play a blues. I I I I I I I 17 :1 I I I I I I I I I I I.f'.f'.f'. co G) Example 6: Combine All Three Chords Now that we have three chords. I I I I. I I I I :1 I I I.f'. There are several different blues progressions that are popular.. . I I fl . I.f'.�. �7 A7 87 E7 0 0 X 0 X 0 0 0 2 3 I 4 I I 1 2 2 I 3 4 2 3 I 4 �� 0 J. IV and V identify the relationship of the chords to the notes of the major scale: E F# G# A B C# D� E II Ill IV V VI Vll The I chord is built on the first note.f'. - H � n: . J. E BLUES E7 ��bt 17 I 7 I I I.. IV and V chords are always arranged in the same sequence within these twelve bars.

_p Memorize the blues in A using chord symbols and Roman numerals. 07 and E7.... You already know how to play both the A7 and the E7.. The second most common open key is the key of A.l -I I I I I I I I I I I .10 Basics: Open Position Chords The Key of A The other common keys that you hear on the acoustic guitar are the "open keys.:..l 07 I IV7 ll I I I I A7 I 17-.(. A BLUES A7 lb#t 17 I I I I I I I I I .. " .. IV and V chords in an A b lu e s are A7.. A � v . so the only new chord is 07. I I 17 I� � I Il I I I � I -� I 6J # E7 f'.. " . I I I I I I I l I I I I 7 I I I 1 . v . You g et a 07 by taking an open 0 triad and lowering the higher octave 0 t a C: co 0 Example 7: D and 07 Chords D: D F# A 07: D F# A C Major Triad: 1 3 5 Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 D D7 X X 0 X X 0 4• 4� 4• I 3 2 2 1 3 ��� Jt � u v u u ". The I.I r I I » 07 A7 .�# rv7 - I. II I I I I IV7 l I Il I I II ." so called because they use a lot of open strings. � .v 7 E7 Il Il .

. The I. . Basics: Open Position Chords 11 The Key of C Another common open position key on the guitar is the key of C. u w CD @ Example 9: F7 The F7 is an F triad with an Eb added to the second string: F: F A c F7: F A c Eb Major Triad: 1 3 5 Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 F7 Fl X 3 2 I I 3 2 4 I T 3 2 4 I -'II I I t) - - -e 4 'T . .. .. .:...... D .. .. IV and V chords in a C blues are: C7. ! n 4 � .. CD @ Example 8: C7 The C7 is a C triad with a Bb added to the third string: C: C E G C7: C E G Bb Major Triad: 1 3 5 Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 c C7 X 0 0 r-'11 tJ � e..:. F7 and G7. - :'.t I .. w :'.... A . .

I l ¥N7 F7 C7 l. " v Memorize the following blues in C the same way you memorized the other keys. u 4• "T" �• 4 ! J. At this point you should be able to hear the similarity betwee n the keys._ u " � The second ex a mp le makes it easier to turn the G into a G7. The G7 is a G triad with the first string root lowered to an F: G7: G B D F Dominant 7: 1 3 5 177 G7 r-'_tl 0 0 0 �• ._. I I I 17 I I I I I . I I I I I I I .... CD @) Example 10: G and G7 Chords There are two common fingerings for G: G: G B D Major Triad: 1 3 5 2 l 3 �l'l n n . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I:t. 7 -� I I I I IV7 I I I I F f 17 I� . tt tt "T" • A __.l I I I lv7 I I l I I II . . c BLUES C7 �� I 17 I I I � I I I I I j I I :t. I ll Il I I I I j :t..:: .. 1\ ._..z I F7 C7 7 ��.

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.. A .. - g " . .. :. 87. 7. CHAPTER 1: BLUES PROGRESSIONS CD @ Example 11: Bass-Chord Pattern This first example is a 1 2-bar blues in E. . ! ... . ... • .. This part of the progression is called the turnaround because...\ 4*b l I I-l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I -� I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II Notice the last chord. � = �· 111 111 111 hold throughow " . " v I> v ... The rhythm pattern is called the bass-chord accompaniment because you alternate between bass notes and full chords. There are two benefits to this pattern... ... as the word implies ... it brings out the full sound of the instrument and is easier to move from one chord shape to another. . E7 0 " g �*bt 2:11 4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I Il Il I I I I I I I I I I I I Il I I Il A7 E7 xo 0 0 a I I 12 g 2314 fb I I 87 I I I I Il I I I A7 I I I I l I I I I E7 l I -� I c I I I I I I I B7 I I " 0 XO e 21 � • 111'2 • � 3 I. 7.. " '"" CD @ Example 12: Blues Progression in E Play the following blues in E with the recording while employing the bass-chord pattern. it turns the progression "around..� WI 213 . .." back to the beginning. £7 7 E7 �I\� it b. . = lll = 111 -:J. is only played on the last two beats of the last measure while all of the other chords have at least one full bar each. "'P' A . you have more time to finger the rest of the chord shape resulting in a smoother sounding transition. . Since you only have to play one or two notes for the bass.

In the previous examples. Il I 1 I I jl I I I l I I I I I I I Il Il I I I I l I I l I F7 C7 )O< " " 1m 3241 m l2J I 4 I I I I I -� .4 I I l I I I r I 1 I I I I I. F7 and the G7 chords. Now play the following progression using the same bass-chord pattern as the previous examples. # • 213 ill1112 jt .@ co Example 13: Blues in A This is the same progression as the previous example but transposed to the key of A. 7 • frt . 2 l � I I II I -I I . I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 07 A7 E7 b im 1112 • 1. I I I I I I I I I Il I Il I I I I l l l I l I I Il l G7 F7 C7 07 "'" " 0 000 1m �o\) m 3 24 I ml . 07 and E7 chords and apply the bass-chord pattern to the following progression. C7 >( 0 g 3��1 !t I . 1?# I I I I I I 7 . Notice that this example uses the I chord to end the progression. I I I I I I I I I I I r I 1 I I II @ CD Example 14: Blues in C To transpose the blues progression to the key of C. Review the A7. I . I I Il I Il Il I Il I I l Il I I Il 7 . I II 2 jt I I I I I I I I I I I t jt I I j I I I I I I I I I 07 A7 D-11. the V chord was used to "turnaround" the progression back to the beginning. I I I I I . start by reviewing the C7.

I I I i I I I 87 A7 E7 87 • hi • • � #I I I I ll lJH 21} • =P. I I I I I I I l I I I r I . The rest of the progression remains unchanged. Quick-change E7 A7 n hi Ill� #�-##� � I"" � I I I I Jt I I r r . # " " I I I I I I I r I 1 I I I I I r I I . CD @ Example 15: The Quick-Change Progression The previous examples start off with four bars of the I chord. I I I I I 7 I I I I A7 E7 #• '=:!f(l oli' Ill! • 2)14 r I I ." is to replace the second bar with the IV chord and return to the I chord in the third bar. This is called the "slow­ change" blues. A variation on this progression. the "quick-change. I I I I I Y I I I I II .

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' 1 2 3 1 2 3 I 2 3 1 2 3 It is very important to emphasize the down beat [the first part of the beat) to give the groove more depth.-J� . you will see an indication such as "shuffle" or "blues feel. .h beat: 1 2 3 4 COUll/. but played only on the first and third part of the beat. The shuffle is a triplet. changing the right-hand rl1ythm pattern while playing the same exact chords covered in the previ ous chapter." or you will see this symbol which tells you to interpret eighth notes with a triplet or "shuffle" feel: . The shuffle groove is fundamental to blues. giving it an uneven. CHAPTER2: RHYTHM It's amazing what a little bit of rhythm will do to make those chords sound good. lopsided effect. and it is left to the player to interpret the feel to have the first half of the beat to be longer than the second. J J J J J J J J be01: 1 2 3 4 count: I 2 3 1 2 J 1 2 3 1 2 3 At the beginning of most son g s.hJ j)� J1J . A shuffle is usually written in straight eighth notes. J . to find the melodies. This is how you can start building your rhythm patterns. starting with the full chore s hap e and breaking them down. - -. CD @ Example 16: The Shuffle Groove The rhythm patterns demonstrated throughout this book are called shuffle grooves.-J-. .-3-. bit by bit.

....��:' I l I I I 1 - tJ = .. I ... X I • ..... ...... .. .. .. ... I t) � � � i1 . F # and G notes o n the 1 st stri n g . S h ume • A7 - """' '\ . ... .. = = ")II 11 "II hold througftrtllf " _n T X " n ..-=--.... can make a simple open chord shape sound like the blues. " _ii ii :i. I :.- tl 4}. c n " v n "- . Since the 87 ch ord only lasts fo r one bar.. v ..... g v " " " 1'1 " " i\ " .. s h u rn(' (n =J )) E7 """ " � . The fo llowi n g exa mple is an E7 embel lished by adding the b 7th (D) to the 2nd string with the 4th finger to create a melody. it will sound fine if you just maintain the bass­ chord pattern. Th i s ...... " . " 1'1 . .:... CD @ Example 18: A 7 Embellishment Th e fol lowing exa mple em bellishes the A7 chord by creati ng a melody with th e E .. ' i ! i : i � = = = 11 "II ... v . � " " X " " X " . . X I v '! '... (l'J J ) ) .. .. ::. .. hold throughout v i1 v .... v i'l v i'l v i'l v v i1 v etc. - ! 'i ...t � � I I .... Sbutne (l:J J Jl ) = E7 - . Chapter 2: Rhythm 19 CD @ Example 1 7: Left-Hand Embellishments When you e m bellish a chord by adding or removin g notes . o. . .. ::. � j -. " .t ': ':: v Jl ...It ! b..J -. Remember to maintain th e sh uffle groove th rou ghout... . .. v v v v v v v v .. combined with th e shuffle groove and the bass-chord strum patte rn .[ '! v Jl .. h.. A ::. Continue to use the sh uffle groove and the bass-chord pattern . v i1 v . 'i - . X X ::... ... n � .:.. . . .. "' v " " v T X ::..j � '. n g v CD @ Example 1 9: Whole Progression The followi ng blues in E incorpo rates left-hand e m bellishment and the ba ss-chord strum pattern . .1 -. v .. ::... you are adding some melodic movement.

- lll 111 . � �7 2 " _l'l_ ! . X X . "T" .... � " -"F.... :... \. . .. . . � v v -- E7 B7 �""'""- I - � � 1t I I 1. ..... _.._ It should sound ful l .... - -- - A7 E7 B7 E - . .. 2 2 � 2 � a 9 ... � � .._/ . ... • ��i} " � • 4 .. .. .=.. _1f 1t b• .. 2 � .. X X A ).:> . v . A7 L-..i�'1 lll u • - .. � � � � ..j ... . r. .I - • • � lll '1· -..... . v ri v ri v 1' /f'..�P � � . A ........ . . • • lll "I • n: � "iJ '1 . .. 1\ " t'\ " -" _.. . CD @ Example 20: E 7 Variation This em b e l l i s h m ent for E7 u ti l izes the s a m e interva ls as the previ ous A7 e m b e l l ishment exa m p l e : the 5th (B)...__ ... �-(--. "'. A . - �... A . . ..... n "' " " " n . . _.... 6th (C# ) a n d b 7 [D) on th e 2 n d stri n g . your r ig h t hand struggling or yo u r left hand struggling. ... Shuffi e <n J Jl ) = E7 � l'l . ..........1t 4t _ __i I I I - b... A ::.. . .. - " '::_ ': ': ':' ":: ': • ': ':' . .. ! • - • . ..... X " .:. . . .. -- g n n . _......... .. . X A A A . ... A A A A A ... ". " " .J I I "'"' /':\ ll . ... just s l ow it down . ... X 2 2 - A . n 1'\ . . h ave some groove to 1t and fe el relaxe d . u .. . - - n " v ...._ I • -... . • . :: .. n ::n_ � u .lf i \ I I tJ = - 'i �i .... ...: ....... X ::. .. � " v . .J =:. • • • .... . A J... :.. 1 I - b• - .. If you find yourself tig hteni ng u p ... Ta ke yo u r time and work on the fi nge r ing s . � . ..:... - :. .......

... :::: i ii u . ... �.....{ �. ! � = I I I .-. " u ..__ .. . v v 1""1 v M v .� .D. ... . . �... . u " � ...... 11: b. � �� ii: -... :. " . fl'a � 'S � . '-/ . n n...... <!' .. v f'IC..... " . . :...:. :.1 --.. . - &...... � .... � :. .. . .. .. ' " u u :: :: .. T . " " :. �.. ... . rhyth m i c and melodic movement to provide a full m usical statem ent.... � ... X .. I A7 !"""_/ " II U !. .:. � 2---.. " ii n I � :... ... - rio " .. - � '--" '--" 2---::t---.:.. • • • • • 9. .. A7 E7 E - .. :.. .. it can a l so stand alone a s a ful l solo I nstrum enta l . n " v . v . .: . X '. " u " u .. '... - ... - . :- 4 . . Wh ile this p rogress i o n can b e used to acco m pany a voca list or soloist._ ...I :.•. -"' -"' 'T .. .::: " . r.. . 9 a . . I b.:.. .:.. L'l. " " . .:... 1'\. It conta i n s harm o n i c . .. <n J ) ) r......{ 4 .I " " " v - I b.. " u " " ..... ::... b• I I I I I I r. .. . � � " n .. . . �. " � A !io . -" 1'\..) • • 9 • �j • = = .. Shume E7 A7 E7 � '\ » 1t __41 \. :. v ... @ co Example 2 1: Quick-Change in E Apply the previ o u s E7 variation to a qu ick-change blues p rogression i n E . &. .. " T " " . L\ u . v v . . . . .. ! -:: t 't . u ... .. .. . " " g E7 87 - !"""" I'! � Jt I I I I L I .. . " " . T X .. .. ... . L\ " " ...... .. ::: " " . " :.... » tt.{ � ': '.. .. I ': ': ': '. . � .. - ..{ ... .:.. L\ u . :. " " _ .. .: u "' u . I I I I I I I ...:. ... � ..

.. 22 Chapter 3: Bass-Lines CHAPTER 3: BASS-LINES So fa r we have looked at chord s u s i n g melody n ote s as embellish ments . ! _ . Another way to dress up th e chords a n d l i n k them to gether is with bass-runs . " " . 41 � t) .n .... - _. _ . �..._ " -� " "' � . -.... .:..__ co @ Example 22C: Another A 7 to E7 Bass-line You can also walk stra ight down fro m th e A 7 to the E 7 . . .. � � - - u .. Sh uffle (•r:l = J Jl ) A7 - 7 -' I! ... E7 1':\ � �� � it b. .. ::: � ! .!.. You can approach b ass-r uns as a va riation to the bass-chord pattern by si mply a d d i n g m ore bass n otes . CD @ Example 22A: E7 to A 7 Bass-line The bass-l i n e should lead to the ro ot of the next ch o rd . " "T' . ' �. n .:.. . I b.. " " i\ 11 .. "' T_ :'1 .- -X- A ._ . � � ::.. . g n . - = = . llll " n ... it b. g -" ... � ::: ::.......... . ... .. . . �... .. " . . ::. �- A " . _ t'l -. ::.. � � � D - � = .. ... " - v . - .I -.... " .-J-.. t) � ---.. .. Shuffie (/:J J Jl ) = A7 .. Notice h ow the bass n otes at the end of the E7 bar sound like they are "steppi n g u p " to the A7 chord . The first choi ce is to continue the upward move ment and jump down to the low E at the beg i n n i n g of th e n ext bar.1 --..._ CD @ Example 228: A 7 to E 7 Bass-line Th ere a re a couple of choi ces fo r bass-l i nes th at lead from A7 to E7 . S huffie cJJ J Jl ) = E7 A7 � �� � � r--. v n . .�.. - � ..

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@ Example 220: 87 to A 7 Bass-line

You can walk u p to the 8 7 from the open A by playi n g th e n ote i n b etween th e o pe n A and
the second fret B . Th e n reverse th e pattern from th e 87 to th e A 7 . This little wa l k-up to the
8 7 is a l i n e you wi l l hear in n u merous b l ues songs .

r-1

Sbume (n J ) ) =

E7 87 !""""- A7
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-

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CD

@ Example 22E: The Whole Bass-line Progression

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@ Example 23: The Jimmy Reed Progression

A l ot of people call th i s the "Jimmy Ree d " patter n , n amed after the immortal Chica go blues
g u itarist. Jimmy Reed si m u ltaneo u sly played acoustic g uitar a n d h a rm o n ica on a nec k-ra ck ,
kind of a fo l k style , a n d wrote many fa bu lo us , i n fl ue ntia l b l u e s so ngs .

I n spite of its a c oustic roots , this pattern i s actu a l ly the most basic that electri c b l ues
p l ayers learn today because it leaves room for vocals a n d other i n struments . Play the blues
in E with a shuffle gro ove and use all down strokes .

.- J-.

Shuffle (J'J = J ))
E7

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n ,.., 1"'1 n 1"'1 1"'1 n v n n n n n n n n rc.

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Notice how this pattern sounds m ore " c o m pact a n d muted " c o m p a r ed to the b i g , open and
ringi ng s o u nd of the previous progressions . You can ac c omp l ish th is by muting the strings
with yo ur ri g ht ha nd . placi n g it lightly against th e strings near the bridge.

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@ Example 24: Up-strokes and Accents
You can dd rhyth m i c va ri ety a n d fl avor to the g ro ove by occasiona lly th rowi n g i n acce nted
u p-strokes . These acce nts s h o u l d not i nterru pt the g ro ove or re pl ace the acce nts on the
d own beat.

P J\t · · · · · - - - · - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - · �

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CD

@ Example 25: Blues Rhythm Lick

This m ove is a common b l u es cl ic h e . Tech n i cally, it i s th e IV ch o rd being thrown in q u ickly to
create more melodic m ovement. For the open E7 c h ord . add th e A tri ad by layi n g your
finger across the 2 n d , 3 rd a n d 4th strings at the 2 n d fret. Fol low this m ove with the same
three strings p l ayed o p e n , a n d f i n i s h with the E ch o rd .

r .f -,
hume (n J Jl > ==

E7
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-1 r"1 r"1 r-1 r"1 r"1 r"1 r-1 v 1'"1 v r"1 .._ . n: .. ! ! i � ! ! -'1 � ! iip -.. ... ..:.. t... .::: > = :! � � 4 � 4 � � � • � • 4 -.. " 0 e . .... J.=-. "'I ]I ]I "'I "'I �� ]I ]I .- 11.. " " " . _..... .... v """ .. " " ...... A _... . . i i ! !-1 '1 � = "ill .. " " � �� � �v . CD @ Example 26: Full Progression Apply the previous exa m ples to the fo llowi ng slow-change b l u es in E 7 !"""' fl � � � I � .... .. M ... - · ... -� n ! ..· . n: n: ti...... n: ti. .1 � ..... . v v v .... . .. " .. . .. . . ..... ---. . ... v v v . ._ " � " ::........ . "'I "'I ! � "11 P.A. ... ...:....... ...1 � v .Jv"il �. ... ti.:.. . ..M.. _. v n ._ .:..-1 2 f'l "T" " n .:.:.. v v v u A7 """" 'I � � t > ........ :::: .. P.- v v ·· -l T " v Ji 4 4 .. . X . ... v A7 7 B7 E !"""' _It� it r-1 . : : "'I - P.... .... A " .._ ..: a 9 ft . P. _ ...:: � v .. . � . " . M ........ · .:: 4 :. ·---------·---. ..... X .... r� ! 111 "'I "'I : 111 "II -.. ti. ..: ... :! ]I 'f � � � P M....'I � = � � :! "iJ...- ..M...:...::._ .: .. .. --.. ..· · ..:.• "'I � � .J /:\ • .. " . .. n: .. ... . v n: v � v ti.. X :0 .... • �:. :! � � ..· · · · .. ii: u P. . ::...:: " v n A . "'I "'I ]I .... .. A 1\ .. v v v .M... X :. � � -J � � � �:'1 ..... ti.. " . '� · . -1 P..:..· .. . . ... . r-1 1'"1 n v ere... . n n: n n v v v v v v v v v v v v v . .:: v ..... v -1 . . v n ... .... ... " ....:. .. 1.. . > "ill ...- T " � " • " .. -..... v . g ..... ti..:: :::: :::: :::: ::: f:::: A ::..- · .. " " ..:... ti.· .. E7 B7 - r-/L'LJ!r � l • • • • • • - tJ ]I :! -� ]I . v v v .... v .. ti.. M ..

jl ]I 1111 1111 ..:.... -:J..U.. ..... 1\ . ...: n . M .......: � � n u :.. -.... . .... ... ri..... :Jill 1111 - - ... . v v v � '"' E7 B7 ..... r ( P. ...3 ---.:... :../ u v " .. � 1111 � 1111 � n " . . � .:. .:. n v ii v ri v ri ii v ii ri v v v v 9--v g n .... 4 4 . .. . A ... !he bo .: ..: . . ri :. lj .: .. v g " . 1> ..t• • • :.. n. 1""\ 1':\ .A A.. v v v ..:... 4 .: .. .:.:.. � ! : � . . ...-.... � � 4 4 � � qi � �� • 1111 • '-' .. .... " ... .i.. " " " ii ii v � v v v "" A7 E7 B7 E J it I __._. ::. . . v v � v v � '"' � � 4-1 it I A7 .. � � � X v !o !o - 6-0--e " _1""11. n A " " A A " " � " . l. ... A ... .:. A A .:. . g. " " .. .... .. -lt I I J J J :! :! :! :! �p � ..: .. v v .... " " u .. string · throughout) I> T " � . . � v v v � v � . -=:: . 9 . u .:. . n. ............. T .. .. . ii " ii " I ':: .... T " "' " X � v v v . . .. " ri " v . �# . <n "" J ) ) . . . ! ! - 1111 . - - 1111 � 1111 � ... � -9 · � -:. A A .. I\ " I""" !-"l • . Shuffle ��� � it E7 A7 £7 .. .. @ Example 2 7 CD Now add bass-li n es .... . = ::> � = II . .. � � ...=: -=:: -=:: -=:: - .:. 4 4 � �� � = " '? � :: . :... .:. . . n.. 4 � �� � : � i i � i �� ::ii:: . . " .1 _I>_ -"' .

../ 'I � it t.. � :. ... = ..9. ::: . . " r.... " ... "II "II "II "II 'II "II "II . � 4 � � q:.. . . . you need to listen to oth er players to hear how th ey i ncorporate th ese ideas . ..1 "' � l:t I J J . ': A "' " "' "' .1 P. ..... � - .. . ..� P... .. v -"' v " w ... ..' w A � ..:. .. - · ..- � T � I .... hold ......::: ........ progressions . w " w " v � � 1i v " v A7 E7 B7 E r... muti ng and accents to come up with some of your own ideas . -...M . n n 9 9 9 G e A .... � g .. rhythm patterns.. .· · · · · .. 1111 1111 ll . . M .. J"L .. � � 4 4 �i�� :JI Y :! :! ....l "l � ii I t ]I i �� � If* � > � � ]I -==!- .) -. " ::: � .:. � � ! " i\ :..._j1111 • v• • • 'l • ii: u II P.· .. � ..... " X ti . -. • ]I ]I :! :! ]I "II 'JI tf4l �-- iP ]I ]I :! � ]I ]I . . • . � � w ... " .. .. .. " .: w Keep experimentin g with each of the elements covered up to t h is point: chord shapes .. . ...... M. 9 Q .. w " w " w .-io.. .... CD @ Example 28 This quick-chang e blues in E combines bass-lines to conn ect the chords and bi g chord embellishments. ......1 v . - r... M . :.0.. .... v .:: 4 . . .:.... . "' . w w w . . "II 'II P. . · · · .. . -..· . - ""r . You will notice h ow songs that mi ght have seemed compli cated to you in th e past can now be b r o k e n down into si mpler i d e as . ....J t. . � 1 - P.. A . � P.� P. :: � g ::.. _.. � .....: � Q 2 a 4 g . .. � � w .......... melodic embellishments . " A A " " n. " � " � E7 B7 _...:. A _:. " . ... .........::: - "II "II "II "II � ...� T .. bass-lines. A " "' . M..:. ::�� .. • . � #i. . l'vl .: v i\ � v .D. . More importa ntly.. . .. Shume <n = J Jl > E7 A7 E7 A7 _. M ...... ..: - A n.... - ...

..I . a little bass-run u p to the 87 chord i n the last measure : . hold � � T .. " . t:\ • • FiJ ::n t) ...: � .. � ::: • • :. .. ....__ lt is q u ite common to use variations on the last two bars to "tu rn the progression aro u n d " t o the begi n n i n g .... - ':: X X X X .. u J:J " v n v . :. v . .. !i • � :. ... Sbuffie (J1 = J Jl ) B7 !""""". . .._.. " . u u ...... " " g � u � .1 �� � � � � � - -....l b• • r-. .. " . "" E7 87 E 3 """' "' .. A7 r-"ll <f :!t ' tj*� • • • • -.... "'"_ "' � :...--.. � J --. I :. .: A • .D.. ..... " ......J • • � ft � � � T . ! " u " :0 :... .. Chapter 3: Bass-Lines 29 CD @ Example 29: Blues in E Turnaround So fa r we've been using one turnarou n d . h ume (n J ) ) = (E7 ) B7 l"""' fl <f 'li t..J ..:. Mem ori ze eve ry turnarou nd as a lick that you can p l a c e at t h e end of a p rogression at wil l . .. � . . A " " . I""" !'"'.. .. 4' •. tl: . �' p -. " .... u- .: X A • • • " . ri .... .

_.... A7 X 0 -" I\ • .. ...... r A . • I . � � T . CD @ Example 30A: A 7 Embellishments Hold the A 7 fi n g e ring with the 1 st and 2 n d fi ngers a n d use the 3rd and 4th fin gers to embellish th e chord on the 4th and 5th frets of the fi rst two strings . 30 Chspt:er 4: Blues in A CHAPTER 4: BLUES IN A Th e key of A i s pro ba bly the second most comm o n g u itar key for b l u es _ N ow experiment with the fo l l owi n g e m bell ishment ideas fo r both the A7 a n d 07 chord ...0. . � CD @ Example 308: D7 Embellishments A si m p l e way to embell ish the 07 i s to ba rre th e 1 st fret o n the first two stri ngs with the 1 st fi n gers .... I _A . The E7 wi l l use the same embellis h m ents used in th e key of E .. � -& � A . 07 X X 0 �-.... v g � .. � � u tJ " T .. I " .. ...

. . . . " v ... " ll . ... ...w. " .:. .. • b..:.. "' � "' ..... " .: .0. ll � " " " .. . . r-" fl ... " .. . J ... . . v " .. J L.. .. I . ......_ " _. .... " " " . . .. . ::: � ::: .. .. ..w. .... -" -".w.. " T • . . .:: .. . . . -:.jf � I . .w.... .....: . ... _.:....... � . @ co Example 30C: Blues in A A7 D7 A7 """" 'I . r. "'" . 1t � • b. II.. -- ... . . " .:... . .. v � 1. :..:: ::: .. .. . . ._ ..n v ...:. .1 --... :. . - . :. .. .....-. :: . 1t L J..: .. . v .... I � � � ... g . .. "' . . .. • b• � .:. . ..... .. . . .:...:. .. � . b. .:.. .... .. .w... . ! v ..:.l. . � " . v ! . . . " v " v .: .. ... .. . . .. .. 11: A 7 . . v " v .. I!" . .0. hold throughout "' "' .1 D .. J r--- 07 • ... . . � • l.. 1\ II. ... 4 .. � v • • " � . _.:: . -J. ::. . :. ::.. ::..:: � � � � J'lo .:...:. v " r-" fl . � ....If 1± . .. . �. - � �� t) i -- ... . • � b. . .. .. ... :. " v " v g 1\ ""' D7 A7 E7 -' A .:.. "' . • b• •• £7 -:. .:. - .. ::. . .. . :: . I .. ..:.. .

.. r-.. !_ . fo exa m ple .. CD @ Example 3DD: E7 to D7/F# There is a weak spot in the previous progressi o n ._ X X X X :..�Jl � ... Jl . . r. J Ji ) E7 D71f# A7 � ��u� it i'1 I r. the tra nsitio n between the fu l l sounding E 7 and the th i n ner sounding 07 .. = = e- 111 "II � 4 .. A " "' " v " - " - . As a so l ution . So . "' .. Wh ile the F� is i n the chord .:.. ::.. � --- I - "iJ... u se the l ow F# in the bass of the 07 instead of th e D .. it usua l ly is not in th e bass.1-... n � .. 1 v'1 1i v ...�1--- . .. .:. . "' . b. • • • � � � • b•. -" .. - . .. � • " "' "' ...II. . �-. A. • :.. .. • .r- ! ':: .. g " n 1'\ .:.. 7 07 A7 . r. making the tra nsiti o n sou n d and feel more abrupt. -- - � #i • • i � t ... Th i s w i l l smooth th e tran sitton between the two c ho rds by adding more fullness to th e 0 7 chord and reduc i ng th e distance between the b ass notes to a whole step . ... The l owest sounding 0 on the instrument is almost an octave higher th a n E..<.. ... . � .... .. the 07 c h ord with a n F# i n the bass i s i n d i cated a s 07 /F� ... .. When a note oth er than th e root is in th e bass ... 1\ ..ii . it is i n d icated in the ch ord sym bol by placing a s l ash after the c h o rd name .. c 1\ v v . .. ..P ) . . Shume (J:I . " X . ..l • S h u m e <n == J . ... ""' v v v CD @ Example 30E: Blues in A Play the whole blues i n A with a q u i c k cha nge prog ression incorporating the 07 / F# . .. fo l l owed by the n am e of the bass note . 2 . X X . X . .

.. ::.:.:. . .:.. -.II .-& ._ :. .. . L � l _II . . ....<> :: . -"" v v "' n -. it . • b. A i. .. A :..:> "' :..J -... .:.:.: . . .J 4 I J . n " " n .. v 07/F� A7 E7 A7 . " -... .. - i i #i . .. - . . ! ...::. .. ... .:. !'l . .. - .. ii. r-� . ..... tt A7 � b. �� - v & - � . ill " t � :. . ..· -. ...: . �:#i lwld thrnughour .. . .. !bo ... ....' .:... qi � . . b. � �. .I "' . ... . I I I t... . - . .. . .10 1!: .. -_ ..J :.... lii: #i . � . ...o�. " . -... Start on the second beat and use th e sa me fingering for each chord whi le shifting dO\tvn one fret at a tim e . " " . Shume (n = J Jl ) E7 07/FP A7 E7 A7 ..:..::: . � .. . · - . ... .. - CD @ Example 31: Blues in A Turnaround Here is a simple turnaround fo r the key of A... :.::..... .. . . -. .. .:. . '"" 1--&- " .:.. .:.. n n T .. .... .. . . A A " " " ...:.. . :: -..:.. -.. . . - ::: g A v v " " " . " .. ..A � . � :- . .. .. . P"l - !. '"" . X :: v . ..� #i....0.. T " "' "' � X � II. i... T ..... i.. ft..:. . i.. . :..n .: I I -- .:.:. ...:... D7 -' � . . .. - v . i.. . v v . ... ::::. • v :: .. ... . • _b.... . " .oj... i.. ... I • • • t.. " " 'T' . A .._ _:"> :"> . . . . • I. :..1 --. .. ·- X �vc- .. i. li .. � . .:...: ... ..: :! X X X X X �...:. v . . i..._ •.. ......... .' -v �-.... .. . .- ::.... '--" t � r = -:J • • = = � .. i. .. . - "' i-ii v ID -"� "' .:.. � � � ri I t... .. - g " " " v " v . .:. i. . E7 _...

In the first section . the art of pl ayi n g unaccompanied b l ue s g u itar . Yo u sho u ld sti ll conti n u e to m a in t a in th e tools and ideas from Section I as you a re l e a rn ing the fol lowing examples. . SECTION II: SOLO ACOUSTIC BLUES GUITAR This section concentrate s on solo blues guitar style . finger-p icks or fin gers without a p1ck inste a d of trying to match the recordi n g . This is called hybrid-picking . Li ke th e first se ctio n the ex amples on the re cording a re demo nstrated us i n g a flat pick for the ba ss­ . wh ile th e fingers strike the chords and embellish m ents . different optio n s for right h a n d technique were pointe d out. n o tes and single-note leads . You will soon see how both secti o ns com p l i ment each othe r . It is o kay to use a th umb-p ick.

th e te c h n i q u e is slig htly different. "' . . but it is pl ayed as a s i n g l e-n ote lead p attern .. r· 3 --..P oft - � � I 3 " . CD @ Example 32A: E7 Blues Lick I f.. we wi ll co nce ntrate on the chord tones to find out what n otes c a n be used for melody a n d solo i ng .n " . When we l e a rn ch ords a n d we l earn h ow to e m bellish chord s . you want to p l ay a m e l ody o r to s o l o a g a i n st a n E ch ord .. try l o o k i n g at the n otes of th e chord to see what you can get out of it._ ... for exa m p l e . as i s the cu stom when l e a rn i n g electric guita r .. The o p e n c h ords a re especi a l l y i m p o rta nt because they b r i n g o ut t h e ri c h .--. ful l chara cte r of the a coustic g u ita r... � ! .. Notice th e curved l i n e b etween the th i rd a n d fou rth note . I t uses the o pe n A7 c h o rd shape plus embellish ment note s ... sou n d i ng th e open E string i n the pro cess . J -. The followi n g l i ck is a very common b l ues p attern util i zi n g o n ly the n otes of an E7 c hord . we a re rea l ly creati n g m e l o d i e s u s i n g n otes that b e l o n g t o t h e chord a s we ll as n otes bu i lt around the c h ord . The trick is to hold th e o p e n E 7 c h ord shape w h i l e m a ki n g i t sound like a si n g l e-note melody.. This tech nique a dd s some swi n g a n d p h ras i n g to the lick.0.._ CD @ Example 328: A 7 Blues Lick While this l i ck h a s the s a m e s el ecti o n of n otes as th e e m bell ishment examples i n the previous secti o n . Rather th a n learn scale p atterns u p a n d down the neck. Sh uffie (J"'J = J )) E7 � '\ J. scale tones. It i s called a slur a n d it indicates that the F� on th e 2nd fret is to be stru c k a n d the n " pu ll e d-off" to th e o p e n E .. .. CHAPTER 5: BLUES LICKS A l ot of the great s i ngle-l i n e solos that you h e a r a re rea l ly n ot as diffe rent from the ch ord parts as you might i m a g i n e .. - T I � . " v g -. The best way to em ploy th is tech nique i s to strike the F# and pull a cross the str i n g with your 2nd fi n ger . ¥ " . i n stead of ju st playi n g a n E s c a l e . D -. _A - . Shuffie <J"'J J J> ) = A7 � � 1l: IJ � -· � J � .

'" � #� . .... Y o u stretch the stri n g by p u s h i n g or p u l l i n g the stri n g toward a n ei gh bori n g stri n g . it is a l so common to use q uarter bends .. .-. A --.. CD @ Example 32C: 87 Blues Lick At th e B 7 chord .. while the left hand h o lds the chord s h a p e . This works because it sta rts with a n E a n d fi nis hes with E7 ch ord to n es .3 -... Bending is t h e technique o f stretching t h e stri n g to raise the p itch of a note ...4 . � - �v v v v v ro .---. 2 2 " .: ! .:... . ... this l i ck is the same as some of the previous A7 l i c ks . With the exce pti o n of the o p e n E . t:\ . Notice the q u arter bend on the 3rd fret of the 1 st stri ng : .3 ----. " ./ E7 "" I\ � � ri:J � � I I 1 . which are o n ly slight bends that add some spice to the fretted n ote i n ste ad of taking it all the way to the n ext note . _! � "'"' � A � g v - CD @ Example 32D: E7 Lick One of the m o st n otable s ty l i sti c blues trade m arks yo u ca n get from a g u itar is th e be n d . . � � r. .. 3 - hold . S h u iDe (n J ) ) = 1/. I n bl u es . notice the si ng l e-n ote pattern that uti l i zes the ri g h t h a n d only .-..J-. 3 i 1...-... .. .--.j ... " n ./ . 1\ n v v . Bending " i n p itch " means the note is bent far e n o u g h to sound l i ke a n a ccu rate n ote or pitch above the fretted n ote. Shuffie (n J ) ) = 87 _.. - t) = 3 I I .

io.__ ... v ..... ·" " " . 11: • • b. -.. " -•... � � '':t . By starti n g a n d e n d i n g on E. . . but it re ally i s n't ne c e s sa ry ... . u " .. = � #� .J -. - A / ': � . - A ..:..... � � :.- ! A .. . �· . ! /. - _1. The primary reason for u s i n g a d ifferent c h ord shape l i ke th is is that thi s shape sounds h i gh er and th inner th a n the o p e n fi n g eri n g . "' n " . - � :4j .1 co @ Example 32F: Turnaround Variation This turnaround should l o o k fa mi li a r since it is basically o n e of th e turnarounds from Secti on I..J . r-' 1\ .. Starti n g the l i ck with a n open A a nd a llowi n g it to ri n g through out ma kes th is s i n g l e-note pattern s o u n d fu l l er. n ... Sbumc (n = J ) ) ""' E7 B7 E r. Y o u can l a b e l these ch ords with d ifferent n a m es wh e n m ovi ng down t h e fretboard i n half ste p s .J . ... . . Shume <n J ) ) = A7 _..il......... " " - C' � .. • • ... E7 X X X 4• t• ·- " 2 I . .. A s i n gle-note scale p attern by itself wo u ld n o rmally so u n d too thin for solo style g u itar ..:..:. ol ... co @ Example 32E: A 7 Lick This lick a ctually spells out an A blues scale. There is one c h ord s h a p e that is d ifferent from the open ch o rds that we have been usi n g . � - ... ._ _. . v g n - " .A A _. . 11: J b� I I J b.. It i s better to treat th is movement as a m e l od ic idea since it d oesn 't re a l ly change the overall ch ord progression ..... T � ..::. ': . the chords i n b etween sound more like a tra n sitio n than a series of d ifferent chord s . . .) -' 'I ito t) T :. T ... ...:.. . ii ii i\ ..1 '1 ..----� � • ' . This allows for m o re melo d ic m ove ment a n d va riety . . . .::.1 -.

. _. v v v . . . " " g v .....:.. 3 ....... L " v " 4 ....... i1 ...t\ " ... "'3 -r.... = - . v - �- "" A7 E7 87 E � " J.. . " . " A A .. /A '...... l _l 3 J • � 3 . _4 e . "' - v "" .. . . - ... " - " _. " " v v . :... - . :.:.. - 3 3 3 .--. . .. I I 4 3..J -.... i �P ... ... -· I I I I �p - .:. . CD @ Example 32G: Whole Progression Now let's put together all fo ur o f the previous licks to create a com plete progression .... ::. " - " -" - v !_ - " v A ... _..n. . "' -.. .. v - " .. .. . .....li i rr.. u "" /'""'. - v . " " " " ! " v " - t\ v " - - . A7 -"II� it � � � � - . .... v_ .. 3 = ...... " v - " .. ... .. .. 4 . a - .3 -...A " £... .../ . g t\ " " v ..l it :a_ � -· ...--.. - " -"' " -- - ..... . v � . I\.:.. -_ .:......... = I I -. • tJ . . 3 hold throughow " -" � - " -' " . J 1':\ .... . A v ..... .. . .. . ..... n: lll -3 . .. 6 ... . " " " " " " " <i <i <i ... . E7 87 � J � it f�· r...J � ._ - _. Shuffle <n "" J ) ) E7 A7 E7 ........

. .J . . ........ �F1111 • . 2--Q " n Jl .. ...l' t._ I • ii .:( ': . ':: ..._.....F• � . __o_ v . .. � v ... n . ::.. there is sti ll some empty space .... 11 _. - ... Jl v. . _. "' .J ib.....J_ " . . ii . " "' E7 B7 """' " � -!! . .. A n . " .J q. . :c • � -.J 3 � � 3 .... ... v " v ...---.... 7 b. :.J � 3 = -.. n " v v ... . � L.. A7 ib.. � � J J t. g - .. . . " v " .J :..._ I .. ... . . ... .J - """' l't � � I I I . .J .. .. " v A "' - ... ........ ii il - .... :.i � 7 . . "' - ... . 1t I I � � I J � �·� . - .1 -. ..l � I ..... .. ... . �p 111 3 111 D'II i - 3 3 1111 n n n . -� A p... " .... .. . ...... ...... . Sbume A7 E7 ... n ...-.. . .. Chapter 5: Blues Licks 39 CD @ Example 33: More Blues Bass-lines Even th ough th e previous exa mple sounds full harmonica l ly and melodically. ... T • � .. .:( " .-. ... - "- I A . n .. -...D. - ..1. Ll " ... <n � J ) ) r. Here is another opportun ity to apply bass runs to make it sound like a complete piece of m usic ..r...... - :.. ... .. .. - = i � 111 ' .... .. .v . "' . � • • • b• • • /":\ II t.. - "T .. v - T .... ft . .ii: 1111 rr /""'\ .. - v 1 -l _ft..(""". "' Ll .. ......... . .. v "' A7 E7 87 E .. --...-I I\ � � rb. . n " ....:( .. " <> ::.:( . ..... :c ..... lti #i t.

A .

� ":' . � ...:: "" . the o rd er of th e n ote s ... of th e open E7 is E-8-E-Gn-D-E . The o rd e r of the notes of the next inversion .0. . . For exa mple . io -..:: .:.. "7 :.. d ifferent notes end up on top of the chords and o n th e b ottom .." . Clrapter 6: Blues Chard Soloing 41 CHAPTER 6: BLUES CHORD SOLOING In order to maste r the p owerful technique of soloi n g with cho rds .1/J. you n eed to m e m orize certain c hord i nversio ns ... CD @ Example 34: E 7 ln11ersions Now ta ke th is a ste p further and le arn the inversions that wi ll place the re m a i n i n g n otes of the chord i n the melody . . at the 2 n d posti o n . A" A . -.. P l ay the fol l owing shapes forward and backward in the order that they occur a n d it will sound l i ke a scale of ch ord s .. . but they also provide va luable visual refe rences that will help yo u to travel the fretboard . .. v ... .. � - tJ _1:1.. " g :.. The melody n otes a re either 0 or E . you a re actu a l l y re-a rra n g i n g th e sam e n otes into a different order.... E7 E7 0 0 X X E B E Gd D E E B D G# � fl. :.. is E-8-D-G� .. :.1 :a u " A T _.. 7 E E7 E7 E7 E a m M M"· tmr mr 2 2 1 1 3 2 -1 2 . When yo u i nvert a ch ord .. . v . 3 1 4 l A l l 2 1 -e 1 1 4 I'""" I\ 11:n 6T hl. C h o rd inversions a r e n ot only a great way to add melodic movement to your chords. fro m the low string to the h i g h stri n g . 0 and the higher octave E. . " . .. " ! . This places G# i n the m e lody. _ii _.B . By re-arra nging th e n ote s .

... ..A 4 1:: -"' _I:: 4 J! �r.... � i> . .. .__ tJ - .. If yo u c ompare this E b 7 fin g ering to A7 . t . � ... ... :: . ... � . . • ....... n - . . thus al lowi ng the Eb 7 ch ord to act as a substitute .. Since th i s fi ngering omits the root (E b ). .:: . .:j .... b. .J:../ " � 1t . :.. -'' :: - . � . .... r.ft b.. .... _i! l :t . ... .. . as long as you return to th e actu al ch ord . .:' l A .. '. .....I . 11: ... .. :. i• Ill....J .J ..<'I · -- g .. . v :... .I . . . _! '::' � � A . it d o e s n ot clash with the E of the A7 chord ... • • • • • b._ . __.. � t...... .. 1"\ "' " � T .1:: "' n T' " ft 4 ':' ft " ...... . "" .. De cending Ascending E7 � '\ 4t 1!: • 1::. ill.... ir-- .. .t A A.._... .. :.J -"""- _. � Ill.. " v 1"\ v "' "' E7 B7 3 3 ... I ba.. q!ll... v " A7 3 J """ ..... implies a qui ck-change progress i o n . This half step movement is ofte n descri b ed as chromatic movement or chromaticism ._ . ... . . -. ::: .... ..... � n . .. ': l ....... :... ."'!"""'" .. A . for th e second measure . Th e B b is com pati ble with the A7 chord ...... g n .. . " . . ...:. ... . ShufJle <n = J )) E7 A7 E7 .. ..JJ 4 4 1\. .! C. Ill... .. Notice h ow taking th is E 7 fi n g eri n g down o n e fret to E b 7 . v . . . g 1:0 @ Example 36: Blues Chord Solo 1 This chordal technique 1s used by cou ntry blues gu ita r pl ayers to solo without losing the feel of the rhyth m .J J .... :.. . " " " .J • . "7 � . A" l t E �. ...... .. �r-r-"'· _. � · · -· = -"'.. co @ Example 35: Chromaticism Yo u can a d d m o re m e l o di c o pti ons and m ore te nsion to dominant chord i nversions by taking a ny i nversion up or down a half ste p ... � . " .. you wi ll find that the re's o n ly a on e note d i ffere nce ..... -... b r� b. . ... .I . . 4 " " l t .. " .... .... " --. . t he B b in ste ad of the A. �· .. ..: � ::. - _.. b. .. "..r� • � . . � � ::: ::: " � _!_ .

b.. 4 . y y ': ': . y A .: X � :.... . ._v 4• . .... • ...: .:. / .... II » tt � �. � � .... u .. - � - ll n u .::: . @ co Example 3 7A: A 7 Inversions Now transpose E 7 i nvers i o n s to A 7 . .._ . £ n . J::. " y I A l . I �� • i i .. : ' � . y y · ..... � •• � � .... . " A "' " . " ... n n � ii ii e . u . � .... .: . h' ���... . 0 " rn .. � � . .. . .:._ ... A7 A A7 A7 X 0 X 0 X X 0 X X 0 X 8 fr l O fr I I 2 2 2 1 3 2 I 3 A7 . I I �#� -...:..:... u " . .:. A ... T .:l! Q#: � A7 _. ·.. g " " y - u .. A ::.<:.... n .. y B ::.. . 4 =. @ CD Example 3 78: A 7 Inversions with Chromatics L. u .:!Sl- t) I "' . 1'1 � it b.. • -. .. A E7 B E I""' � . .... n - g n .. .. .:.. y .:. - """ ii ..#!... n "' " T ::: ::: " . " " .J i - '-"L. . .. � it I I I • • b• ....: ! "" y � i> u y •Y i'i ·- A rl> g @ CD Example 3 7C: Chord Solo Turnaround Apply i nversions an d chromaticism to a turna round .. � �· • .::.J LJ. Shuffle en = J 'J> ) E7 B7 E � '\........ b� t) .. ... ii ''-'' I t..� I · I JJ b• • .. " . " .. .... " 2 � T :::. . .. n.

... . " � . whi l e descending patterns te nd to decrease th e te nsion and excitement.. .:: � . &. A7 7 87 E �fl � it b... -""'" '" -" T __. . ......:.. . v -. .... . .. ... I v v A .. �fl .:: .:.... ii it. " " .. :D: u .. . T � 8 a ! a n n n n � � � � � � n " " _A n.:. '. n .. I 't 't .. c<n. "' v ... . � . . .: . .:.. ::.:. _ ...:.._ .:... T " " " " t'\ " A A " " .. ... A7 r-" ____/1 fir tt . ... ... .. ......' '. .. " -.:: t. "- � -.......... . _ .. . . I .. _ 'A _. " " .._ n A .. lit.. �-" . . _.� " " no no no ..... ... .... .. :'.......J ..:.... • • • I .. )( ..:. .J .. . .:: . .... _...... :::: :::: .�.. ..:: . _ '> n. T' _i " . _:.J . . b.. .. . - A � v v :J .... :. ...._ X_ -" . E7 87 �lit. . .. • tt. .. ... :. _....:: . . ...... ...(. • J�J ...� � " i\ .:. :..I � . r. � - � i ._ " .. ': '.. lilt..:.... . 44 Chapter 6: Blues Chord Soloing CD @ Example 3 7D: Blues Chord Solo 2 N oti ce how th e ascending patterns that ta ke you u p the fretb oard increase th e te nsion and the excitement. � � � e----+-r' � " ¥ ..v ·... .. .-"- . - A . � rJ- • • t) = = . -ft _I{ � � .J .... v it.:. � � .J -· • • �... v . . .. .J � ....... __. . . :. _ _ .J . " " " :.. .:: ..' ':: :. ill- .... • • • I I I • • b._ .. " " it.. ... • t) � - i -- i �#� . � " . �� � . .......... .. . .. .... .. _. . ::. � -:... . .... . ��hi�:: �:: �hi�� �bJ#: �... � ..:: " .. . ..' � . ._ . S h u ffle (l':J = J )) E7 A7 . v v v v v v t'\ . .. " " ..:. � � . • • ...._ • .: . .:.... � � � .:: . .....J ... .. :..

:. . • .... .. .... _:...: ..: h· �': .. -"..l • • • • � -. � � � X X � A .u +i -._ ._ . ... . try combining them in exactly the same order..: � � .. . ::: ::: '.." .:: .. . .... _.::! ':: ':: ':: ':: � � � :'..: X ..:. ..._ . _ ro.... � "' � ... 1 �� 1 4 �9--lr &---9--4 � "P' _.. 2 and 3 . _... :.. .:: . �.:.:.: . ::.. . :! :: ::: ::: � ::: :: � � � X � :-. ... .'- " . As a result . .. :'... -.:.: . .� .:. .J = .I�V .: -� I ::: ::: . "' v " ._... � '. "...:.._ . E7 ..: .._ � '> g n v - .... ::.:.... . . "' � A7 E7 87 E ._� . � . • . . ' �' C:blq' ._ !..: 19 I . .. .. .:._ ' ' ' �. .J . . 87 � � � � �If_ If_ � !: If_ � ..: D "' . ..: .: . fl . " A7 b' .. � "'" ...l r_- - ...l .b..-J-... -"' __.. ......:: .:. .. :.:..:..L'I....- tJ . ..l . -r . -.... _. .. _. :. Chord Solo 3 spends the most time in the higher register of th e neck.#:: ' � ' t. :. .. on -"..::! .... � l • . " D " . .:. co @ Example 3 7E: Blues Chord Solo 3 After learn 1ng Blu es Chord Solos 1 . ... .J .u ft • .: .: . . "P' :. .J • • • • b...l b._ ..! . � � .:. .... ::. .:. � .q' ' L. g .:._L......:...:.:.. 4 :! -� .: .. � :.. . " .. ... . • n: -.. - i· :..._ 0 "1 8 .... . � .... - i i i '"' '"' ' "' '"' '"' &---9 ---1 �2 H! ':. U' "' <> � . the first two solos will soun d like they are building to a climax i n Solo 3 .. i �p -.l . ':: '. "' " " .. ....... ..... _. .. � � . :._ .. :'... .. J /':\ t.:: ..:." v .... . . . ..:..: . ....:.l .:.: . .q.! ::: v ::: -� .:: .. . 1.. " � � �' C:h. . Shume <n = J ) ) E7 A7 E7 ...._ �b�� �� : � � :: � _. :.. .. . . fl .. .. . .

. . KEB M O .

.... lr. " ..... - .... - � .. v r. ..-/ n i .. " � k®� G . .. ...� E7 .J I I 3 - tJ 1..� • • .. I f y o u want to learn a l l of the fin g e rings for the entire fretboard . CD @ Example 3BA: E Blues Lick 1 Notice th e effect of the bends and th e sh uffle groove . " " ..... .� _! ..J = 1-JW .. there is a more obvious source to help yo u cho ose notes that g ive you the blues sound .J I I 3 I I ... . "' � y y y These notes can be fou nd a ll over the fretboard . .. " . Th e first five notes of the E blues scale are known as the E m i no r pentaton ic : E-G-A-B-0 .. . The blues scale has five notes and an extra note in it that people use a lot./ lt-4 � 1\ . v r. v r. c " " n � " " ""' .. r.. �#" . v n v i"1 v i"1 v n v i"1 v n v n v n v r. which can be enough to change an otherwise dry sounding scale i nto a musical statement. . " 1"\ " 1 11 . Publications .. but i n acoustic blues you will find that a thorough knowl edge of the open positi on wi ll be enough for the majority of yo ur p layi ng ./ Ib. " . - - tJ - - .. " n � A . CHAPTER 7: THE BLUES SCALE In addition to using chord shapes . [.-... available from Warner Bros ..... which is techn ically described as the b 5 or "blues" 5th .. The extra note i s B b ... the blues scale..... '4 .. - ...jj.. 'l . ..... v r..1 - -. I . � Ib.... - :.. you m ight want to check out the UBS Blues Guitar B as ics book ( UBSBK 1 03CO) . - = i - . � T' 3 I " . " " c . v " " y "'" �...... ! �� 0 � . - .... ·.. � " ....

. .. .. . - J J i ] � v J v j rt ¥ . ... Sh uiDe (l':J : J ) ) E7 r.. . > 1111 - J v v . .....3 ---.. "' g . Shu_me (n J )) • = E7 ·� """ " � it: > > - >) >I ... "' .. " . ... -.I I > - 1111 - 3 3 T " " ... . " " . " v v """ co @ Example 380: E Blues Lick 4 Combine the previous licks. ..... . " . .. """ 't .. ...... _A .. � 'I » It I I I . .j -... . . . .. "' .3 ------. t >--....... .. . " . '• � 1'1 � -lt r--1 > > 3 >) >J ' t) = >--- = 1111 3 3 111 J lA J J -r "' "' .... .. .--. . . .-.. - --= ..:..... - I "' 4 ::.. ....... ! l l l l l A v v .... -.. IJ . .!>c . n A .. . ..... _! . Shume (l':J J Jl ) = lA E7 _. � ..a. . . . ... - . ..J I I r.. v " n - . / " - . g " v """ CD @ Example 38C: E Blues Lick 3 Each slide s h o u l d be acce nted " o n the be at" to give it more drive .. .!':\ t) - lA . CD @ Example 388: E Blues Lick 2 The combination of ha mmer-ens and pull-offs give this lick a lot of spic e . - . .. """ A � it b. ....

....... .... " - ./ r...... ! A A A A ':t 'A " ... ... - c . • • • tJ ..3 -----..J - •J > � • !r¥ ��� �. " " " '"' . ill . .. � ........ •...� ·-...�·.J lrl' > . -"- ... .. 4 .. � p -.� ·-. .� - qi � • -. � 1\ � � 'I• -o /""'o. ... � � _T ...._. -- = - � - ? 3 lA . u ""' co @ Example 3BF: E Blues Lick B (n J ) ) . . ...o ... y.. 1 T A v - .__ ' �- � f. �. ... � " " . .. .] -. " " . ..... ft.. " " . ... are i n th e style of Chicago blu es players like Muddy Waters.. � - .....� •. • " / _U " .... - . •A = 111 = . I . . l\ " � " . .. " I " g .. "' " . " ...... .. . "' v v ..�-.. . 1 .. n v . .._. playe d in th e low register . � r-/ � 41: it t..... '\ � it �·J ·� y 9• t.11_ r-1 > > J b� I I ... " � ... v v n . .. Shume = -< 7 � . ....�·'-" i �� � ..� li > > ·--s ·--s • y �J � - i i - . 11• �� � - - u 'A I "T" ! � � � � A ...../ .. . 11 - A " .. .... co @ Example 3BE: E Blues Lick 5 The next two licks.. ... '"' ... " v - " v ./ I v ..... -.... ! A u ....

. 1f: . - ....... - - J . ¥ u ...-' 'I .3 ---..L • � #"t ll T+· � •.. . (h. 1 J .. A .. .. L_ -� . I n " " I � . I - � "T 0 ....l fl . � ..1 _fl . -"' .a.._ ........ 1f: r · J � �. . L . . . . " v ..... �... .... " . ...� •. � ::.. - . .:.. " ..... .. . v..� •.. ._. Shume (l':J J ) ) = •.. v 'T" - ...: ..3 � ... . .. ..._... -" ...._.. I I I I 1 ... . !.... .. . " . v - � �·. 'T" -! u " v � - " u -....... ..... There's a fa m o u s tu ne that uses this l i ck in th e i ntro called "That's Alright. ' " ./ -" I""' " � � bJ I I r....� •.....l. I... x ! A " .. . - t) = ll •A � � ...... Y o u n e ed to keep your' first fi n ger o n the 1 st stri n g wh i l e th e second finger bends th e 2nd string slightly. v .� E7 ... . 1/• - 14 - .. - .. ....� n.. A _ -"- " " � . r._..... 1. J (\ 87 a/ �...... "' . � � . - .��JJJ .. r...... � n � "" E7 87 E .... . .. .f-.. " n v -. I-. " .......1 - - ll �·. ' ft .J. . 2 2 2 ..:. . Sh uffie (n = J ) ) 87 A7 . - . . co @ Example 38H: Double-Stop Turnaround The "double-stop" bend during the A7 lick is a l ittl e tricky .. ·o e n " . . .. .� � -:. . v . � ·"' " i>... -..... .... 'T" � A " 2 e ....... lrir"--':. " and it was written by M u ddy Waters ' guita r p l aye r ..! A _n "' . 3 � � v .. J i mmy Ro gers . i ._. co @ Example 38G: E Blues Lick 7 You can u s e the co m b i nati on of low-note and high-note m e l o di e s to create a call-and· response effect that is o ften refered to as question-a nd-answer p hrasing . ..

..... _3 ...4 u "' -:! ..... � � � �:w I) I I i -3 3 111 1. - .. "' ' . . J:l " .__. . ii v ii v ii v ii v ii v ii v ! . . .. " . v • n ........ - 3 .../ .f..J -. r. " " " v A - ...J I I _. " ... .... n: "' n: . " ........... n v . ...<l - . /. . ...4 b� � _hJ J J A7 . th e A7 and the 87 . .J . _ . When playi ng through a blues progression ....}_ I I I �.... . Shuffle E7 1"""' 1\ � 11: i-1 > > ...y.. (J1 = J ) ) r..- ! .: " .4 B7 -' 11 � 11: . .. - .. / ' - i �F - I) "II "Ill 3 i 3 y.... The bea uty of the b lues scale is th at you do not have to play a d ifferent scale fo r each chord . " .. .. - "��� • ii: ]"" i �P I) � 1.. _. "' __) _/ __) . .. - . g .4 ..4 'A 'A J.. ..... i n this case . . " "' - y .. you should b e ab le to see how the E blues scale ca n fit an E7 chord ... ..-. ... .) . "' "' . - .... - " " . -". v v v v v � v v v . �7 1... ..A " - . - '.. " J "' " " "' ...4 "r' � n n n � � J - "" -"· ·"'-.J J . . - ... .0 'A . ...../ ... .. ... . .... " v A " ..... .4 A7 _...) _.... " "' - Iii 1>.! 7 B7 E -" 11 � 11: b.. " . v "' "' ! . . v ...a v . "' A . "" 1._ - ' ' --- I) = "II 7 7 � 7 7 7 1. L>. > > ..3 � I"""'_jj_Jit it . ........ . v .....---....... "' g " n v .. .. v " v . CD @ Example 381: A Progression Of Licks At thi s point ....-.d i _.... 1.:. . . you now have to deal with relating the sca le to two other chords ...

Do not push so h a rd that you stop the n otes fro m ri ng i ng . ... .t � .. .. . v v v v v v u . then grad u a l ly increase the speed... . ...... . :....r:l "" J �) 7 r-'ft � 1t ' � = . .. i. You will fi nd that the m e lo d y notes are either p laye d at th e same time as a bass note or in between the b as s notes . . When done correctly .. ... . . co @ Example 39A Start with a si n g le - n ote sh uffle in the bass u s in g the open E. The best way to le arn th e i n d e pe n d e n c e that is necessary for this te c h n i q u e is to start with an even bass p attern a n d add eac h m elody note one at a t im e . 52 Chapter 8: Fingersty/e Blues CHAPTER S: FINGERSTYLE BLUES Fingerp icking is a great way to ke e p "ti me " for yourself with bass n ote s wh i l e sim u lta ne ou sl y playing the m e l o d y n otes . .. .. • .= - . th e muted bass notes will co ntrast the ri n g i n g mel ody notes in such a way as to create the i l l u s io n that more th a n one instru ment is playi ng at the same ti m e . . it should al most sound a s if two peop l e are playi ng i n stead of o n e . . . . i - .. ... . .. :. . . ....- �M . .. .. . :. Later . .= :. I A - u A � � � � n n � A n n ft A ft ft ft ft ft _1\ _h _. . As yo u a re memorizi n g th e pattern s . . .. You sho u ld m ute the bass notes to c ontra st the ri n g in g m e l o d y n otes . . . Emphasize the down beat . -"' "- .. M a ke s u re you p ractice every patte rn very slowly at first... i i - iii ... and use the palm mute t e c h n iq u e by p l acing the rig ht-h and palm lig htly agai nst the strin gs near the bridg e .- i li i i i i i li . . .J-1 Shuffie (.. · . :.. . " " " � � � � � � � v � v v � v � � v � v � v v . = =i = :::]-. .... make su r e you m e morize which n otes are playe d on t h e b eat a nd w h i c h ones a re n ot. . . i . .. . .. . . when yo u begi n a d d i n g melody notes to th e pattern . . . . :. "'I ..-:t -:.... r. .. just hard enough to get a m uffl ed sou nd .... ... .- -.. .. .

...- ..- - - - - ...- i " " " " " " .... ...1 -._ _n.. .. . .. .. .... . i " . " "" CD @ Example 39D Now play th e melody i n sync with the bass notes by playing the exa ct same sh uffle in the melody that is in th e bass .. " v v .. .- - - - - . . Th is is a great exercise of pinches throu ghout .. n a a 9 n n n n n. T ! A .- .. . ...- rrr r rrr r rrrr rrrr rr r r rr r r rr r r rr rr P. .. .. . . ...- . ..- - - - - . - ""' .. .- .. .. .. ... .. r. ... . ... .... .. . . . . .. . .. . . v n v n v n. . - . . ...- . .. ... v n w n v "' �- T - ! 4 . .. .- . .- . .- .......... a n d remember to mainta in the palm mute.. " w " v " v "' w n. n " n n n v "' " " " n n n " " .. . .- . ... . .. ...l-.... . .. .. You will have to strike the first string with yo ur middle fi nger wh ile striking the bass note with the pick... . ... . ... .. .. ... .. .. v " w n v v " w n v " . Be careful not to break tempo .- .. ..- .--.. . . ...o.. .. . . · . ........ . . . . v n..- .) -.. . .. n n n v n... . .. .- - - .· .. .- - - - - . . .. .. ...- - - . .. .. . ShuNle = ?:7 !"""' " .... . S h uffle (n = J ) ) E7 I"""' II � It I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I tJ . " CD @ Example 39C Play a melody note on every beat.. v n v n v " v n v n v " w " v w . .- r r r r r r r r rr r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rrrr rr r r �M... y T ! 4 g .. .. . .... . .- - . n.- .. ..- .... . ..... M ... ... . . ..... This pattern alternates between p i nching the bass and mel ody notes on every beat and playing a bass note i n between each pi nch . v ... . . .. · ... .. . . .. . . ..- ... it I I I I I I I l tJ .... . . This moveme nt is often described as a pinch . .- .. .... . ...- . . · .- . .. ... .. " v . .. .... ..... . . <n J J> ) ...- . ...� " " v .. · . v . · .. . . · . � Jot it I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I ... .... . v -"' v 1\ v " v n.. . . . . ..- . n n n " n " . ....- .. . .. .... ... ... ...- . . . . . v ... v n.. . � - " n . .. . n n v n. . n. · · · · · .. . .... .- rr r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rr r r r r r r �M. .- - - - - ... . . ... CD @ Example 398 Now add a melody note on the fi rst and third beats of each measure.. n. . .. .. .. . . g "" . . .. Sh uffle (n = J )) E7 _.. ..- - - - - .... . .. .... ..

..... . . " " .. . .... . t\ I � �.. . .. . .. .- . . .. .- .. .. . ..- . .. n . " n " . .. . " . . . .. t\ I � � 1 .. I tJ - - .. .. . . . ....� I . . p l ac i n g a mel ody n ote i n b etween the uneven bass n otes will sound l i ke a solid triplet... .... .- - - .. n .. .. . .- .. ... .. .. I . " " n " " ..1\ .... . " n. n n n n n " .. . r J -.-..� '"' . .. . ... . 3 --. r .. .. " v " " .- ....--. .. �I � ..... n " n .. . . r J -. .. (" ...- ...t\ 1 t\ � L-..... . w I . .. ... .� L �.... � I . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . I .- .. I -" L .. ..- - r rr r r rr r r rr r r rr r r r r r r rr r r rr r r rr r P M.. - - r r r r r: r rr L: r r r �· r: r r r r rr r r r r " v n v .. ... I .- . .. .- .- .. ..... ..- . . .... .- ..- ..11 .. t\ -� t\ .. .. I jl! I.. ..Mo if: 1. .- ... """' � . . . When p l ayed corre ctly . . .- . j � I . �.. "" " n n "" n . .� I .. tJ - - - - - - - - - - - ..:. I � I .. ... .? -.rt " n n n .- . .. v v . .- .t\ I I � - t) . . .. v " v v r 11 � � " " . " ... .. ... . Shuffle (/':J J )) = E7 r J -...- - - - - ..- .- .. I .. . . . " u " u ......... n. v . .. v 1'\ v n n.. J fi .... .. . .. � . ..�. . r-J-. .... " " """' u u CD @ Example 3SF Altern ate betwe en p l a cing mel ody n otes on the beat with the bass note s a nd off the beat in between th e bass n otes .. ... v v v v .. I . ... . I t\ .. . ... .... . n " t\ t\ " " n n n " n ...... -' IL�Jt ft .... . .. .. ..- ... ...- - - - - . . .. . . -:> " " " ... .- . v v v v . A. v " v n " " v n v n..J--:1 Shu me <n = J Ji ) E7 r. - r i: r r r: r r r L: L:: r: r L: r: r: r r " n.. I . 54 Chapter B: Fingerstyle Blues CD @ Example 3SE P l ay the melody n ote on th e opposite part of the beat as th e b ass n otes. . .

.-!__� _.. . t\.. . ? -.. .... .. " "'" .../ r. ! v .. M ... . .. . . .._ n v 1\ v -" � r I.. . .� .. . D ... 'I Mo 1t � � t\ .... " v G " v ..D... .. - rr r r t rr r rr � r r rr r � r r r r'r r IJ. ..J I _r... S h u rn e (�"1 J )) ·� = . v . v v '> v .I � 1t I I I l I I I b.. 'b:"t 3 . .. bll r---1 I I L bJ _r.. ...L r::"'L. . . . .. .f"i t\ ... ... 1\ 1 "r-1 I 1\ I .- r � r r � t t r t t t r t I r r '4 It� . . .J E7 """" � ./ . -=- . v 1\ l'l n v 1\ v 1\ l'l " Bas on ly.. ...... .. . ��-l1b.. 1t ..... v ... . . b... . . .. v . . n " .. - r r:: � r tr� r t' r l:: r t r � r � r r r � r � r '.. . CD @ Example 39 Now let's re place the on e-note pattern In th e melody with an E bl ues sca le in open positi o n .J _) " " .. n n n u " " . " " " " " " ..... v v v v . . .r!.... v v v "' v l'l v .{_ !':h �. A rl3 .. .. ....... . v ... - - . .... . . " v v v v ! . . . .. .�-l1b1:'1 �-l-. .. . .. "' . " ..�-.!i r\ i-... ... .. . " n .. ... ...4 'A I / " " ! " j_ _L'l i" 3 n n.4 � .. - .. . ."' n v n v v n v .. ._ " -0 " """ v v v v v v v v ... a " v " ... . - ..l'l . - h v ... - "1 t � r r r r -� r r � r r r � r r r. .. .. - =. v v "' " . b_ I ..J ---. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - ·- - -. . I o..... . v .. ... -. v. """ co @ Example 39H Gra d ua l ly i n corporate th e E b l ues l i cks from Chapter 8.......... - . . v v ...... . . .. . . . - ... ... . -�I t\_ l�J"j J II . . . . Lhroughout . I .. .... . ...J "'" ! w " v 0 '> . . '4 14 * P . n... ... ... .. . -" . . - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- - - - .. v J'l v J'l v J'l v J'l v a v . ........ . .. _ft _k 7 b. v v v v v v v v_ y -"- "' v " u .. ... . .. ... . . .. .! . . . u " "' " v " v " n v v .... v 1\ v .. .. - - - .J ". . . .... ·� r.

I\ n "' n ... . A " A ..11 .. ...... "' v " v " v 1\ " "' v " v " v r. 1..�� t\ I . . fi r. . .- . _. v � . A 2--e... .h 1 -.J'\ v " v A . - - . . v ... r r r r. .. . .. . .. " "' " "' " " " " " n " n . . r--. r r r r r r r r r ·- A " A " A 'T . .3 --. _A . h... r r r: r.. - .. - r: r r. . . " . . Sbuffie (J':l � J )) . . .. .. .. . 0 � .. . .. r r: r. -.! r r r.. .. . -... .. - . ..3 ---.. . .. . " v .. - g . . Wh i l e Muddy Waters didn't i nvent this styl e .. 0 .. . . v " v 1\ . . . . v v v . .. g .. . I ---- r: .. .. ... v ... . - . . - f ... . .J ---. r... X ft . .. . .. . .!T "' " n " ... :\ v /"'. A ..:. . ..__ -. .. __/ I tl � l �I �I � 1'"""'-1 .. .. . . Make sure you practice this progression very s lowly to m e m orize which melody n otes a re on the beat and which notes a re i n betwee n . � h_ L 'r-1 1. .... 'I . . . " " " . . ::. r. . ...-1 E7 � � � I � I � r. ' - rrr r rr r r -. ..? �� A7 . .... v " . .. .. r r: -� r r r r. . Jl .J -. n v i\ v ! . .. r. . . . - � - . .-.·· r::'l.1 r r.> - - . . .1 "'Jj. � � .. - X v .! - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- .. . . . . � . -� .. .... r r r r rr " " / " " " " /v .! =. r r r. .. . r 11... .. .. . .. v v v v v v v --.... . r: r r: r: r � --- � " J A _.. - r r r r r: r r.. ft.. . ... he did p o p u l a rize it.. . �� I 'ii - � I � r--. . v "' . .� ..... .. � .. v .. - .. r-.. CD @ Example 391 : Muddy Waters Progression A great way to sum it a l l u p i s with th is "M uddy Wate rs-styl e" progressi o n . . . " " A . ..ft I I I I ii . . . .. ... . . " A .=. " . . " " 'T" u v v v u v v I " .. ..3 ----. X . r.. . . . . .. -" -{)-- '9" . . .1 "' Jj. v " v " v n v t\ " n " " .. � ... ---...-- � . - r: r r.... . v " v " v n u n. . .. . b)hll -�� n":.4 .. . . ..... . .. - 1. J --..:. -It ... . . . - . . r. . . . .� - " v v v . . - .. . � n " " " " . - rrr r rrr r II..

.:. v ... - I .J _. - v . r-"fl �t ft: :... .. . - r L: r u .. ..j..... . .. " "' .. .. v ...... -.... . . . . .. .. . .J � Shume • E7 J J 3 B7 t:\ r J --. . . . ... " " . " v . v . . .... � n . " . ... . " . " . - � n -"' J'L -"' " " . .. " 1\ v " .: .. . - .. - rr 4t) rr r r rr - .. ...... . ... . - A .. T li n.. v ... ... _. .. ... . . 11 � � I r::1 r. " " " " " " . " J'\.. . i\ v . . "' � 'l A: :.. - l"'o .. . . - " " " v . v v v . . .. .... .. . v v w E7 � � -1--. - ...1 '1..... . - trr t .:... .. � ... . . r r: r r r r: r r r!T rr - . . .. .. .. n. " � � r--'1 �\ Jl� � I B7 l'l J n""' � J A7 bj) _A-.:. . :: A 4 . n.. .:........... . n v n. .. � -"' _. "' . ... .. . . . . . --.. ... . " " " . .. . ... ._ .. . .J I I "' . - . . .. . .. v @ co Example 39J: Muddy Waters Turnaround All this progression needs is a great turnaround l ike this : en J ) ) . . .. . " . . . . " .... A ·.-. L I I J I I l I I I }_ t. . - t r L: r L: r .1'1.:.... - D. . " ... . 'l " " g . . n n - i\ - " ! .. " . . . . n. . . 1\ . ... - . ..l � • • �r �'r r r r �r�� L___ 1 � r#f r#· - - = '11 L_ J __j L_ J _j L_ j _j 3 . . - 'A 1.. .. n v .:. c L>...... ��..:...:. - r r r r r r r i r r .: ::. .. - • .. . . v " 1\ v " "' v " v " v " v c .. .. .. . ... . .. - 3 _.. . v " v . " .. . E7 r. . I n r: r r r u r& r: r r r r: r r r .. " " .3 --. . . ... flo tt � r--1 --� . ...... " . . .. . j) I . . " " .._j 1'1 "..I ..4 -! -! 3 /""""'....ft I I I I II t .... " " " . _. . .:. v I . . ... .:. " ./ i J... . . ....

.. " v " v " v v "'"' . ... � It oft'II... " .. .. . These variati o n s are i m p rovisations that wil l k e ep the p rog ressions i nteresti n g . . - u u . . .... .._ .1'> .. . - � ... - r i u " ... �� t) .. CHAPTER S: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER It i s im portant to fi nish by usi n g progressions to apply th e ideas a n d conce pts that have been discussed th ro u gh o ut th is boo k : he shu ffle groove . . Remember to hold th e chord shapes as you play th e melody .. T "' .. .. . muti ng a n d turnarounds . 1\ . ..... . . � ..1 .. - t � . ... b)) }) J b� . b a s s-l i n e s . !1.. - ·r r . ... 7 E7 � fl.._�. " .. .. " " .:. - t v � v v � ... . ... ... . i .n � t!f � i u tJ .. S h uffie (J"'J J ) ) = E7 ..0. '"f "1 1>. ... " " v . . Full n e s s will come from emphasizing the ba ss-li n e ... L .r. . . embellishments . . " . bass / chord pattern s ... ... .. - t � t ...: . .. accents . ..... .. -"-- "' .. - n n " " " v " "' " - •All down temmed nole' P. . N otice th e va riations betwe e n th e two choruses ( repeats ) . - i � r u i o.._ \ •I � t b� J I r I � I 1. .. . Do n ot try to fi nger th e melo dy-l i n e one note at a ti m e ... I � I I r-i ii � J . " n " " " n "' " "' " v " v �� g .J-..:. u " � . CD @ Example 40 This p ro g ress i o n is a quick-c hange blues in E.. " _. � E7 87 r-"'_� It . " .. ::.... _ -• I .. * . .n. r r r r r . M . . .. T . "' r lJ . lJ 'T" " . 2 ' ·t2- D..r:��� J A7 I"""' 1'\ 4t it I r-1 � I .. _g_ - .. .. ...... � ! - A . .ll •L . .. :\ . ._..

:. .... g . . . � " . . v n_ v v g "' " n . . - .. 'I .J b. ... . t) "1 "1 � "1 "1 � "1 � r � � tJ* .. �. v A :. . . . . .. ... .."' .. .J... .. 'T' . 1\ " v "' -"- v _n. - r "l... :: v .... I.. " " n v . - "1 "1 I "1 � . n � 'T' . . .... " ... . _..J o�t:. .. n . �"' n.. . � � . �'> n n T . � . - Lr � --. � .J n"� ..:.r-J B7 it E7 . .. .. v <> ::: . . .. . . . � . � g ..'i . .. . 'T' L_ . . "" E7 A7 E7 . I!! v ....... ..J I � E7 .. ..J ... .. . "- v . v " " " " v " v " .J b. " n . " - .. 't A.. v " . r • r t.. ." " " ... . . ... ... n r n ..J J L J 1 "" j � � I � - � 1t• "l- .. - " . A �. A ... . I'\ .. ..:. .. ... rit. r "" ...... - �u � i � u � . u '--/r t .. . . <> " " " .. 1\ .. . ... . � A7 b..£1 .. I. . .... .:. - A . . "' "" I � I I r-1 ri J .J 1l I b. r r. - u u "1 � r " " .. � :... "1 . " v " v ..... "' � 1'1 » -lt bJ ...0..... ! ::.. .J .. . . " " .. .. " .. it . .. b. .. . - �· u r -. .n. . .. .. - "1 . v � .....J b. h it. � ..:..... I I I tt j 11r i t) "1 r r .J jj I - t t = � t.. ... . A7 E7 87 . . A .. A7 - . . it � b.. . .. - � . . ..J . . n . � " � " � n . - ! A "' .ii . - i r i ... .... " v " v " v . . v . - � " � . ��..

... Shuffie (n = J ) ) _/ A7 E7 -' fl #lo � � � �__U� Al >' - �.. . . 4 I 4 1 4 3 I \ 3 I 3 2 • 1 . tJ I . i: .. It is very common to use a turnaround for th e intra since the turn arou nd's main fu n ction is to lead to th e beg i n n i n g of the p rogressi o n ._ � w . - "II 3 3 3 •• r. �· I I .... ... � .. --5 g v � - -..i> v v " "' "7 .... 7 _p 0 .. The shuffle feel i n th i s exa mple should be v e ry strong .... A . open str i n g s are a n i m portant part of the fingeri n g . yo u r first fin ge r has to play all of the notes that yo u o ri gi n a l l y learned to play as open: The A Blues Scale ['. CD @ Example 4 1 Thi s example is a lick-o ri ented blues ·n A.. In t h e key o f E.. "' .......J -. It sta rts off with a two b a r i ntra th at i s actually a turn arou n d . ./ .. . __. I n th e key of A.._ _I _I �I .. A � w v v ..� E � G >g( � ��A I� v �(@� A 0 v XII Flnger1ng: 1 2 3 4 �-h -�... � . v � n . . . � w . � .. v "' � ... except i t i s pl ayed i n th e key o f A ... . Do not i n crease the s peed u nti l you are c e rtain that yo u are pl ayi n g the correct rhythm for each note... . ... At first it wi l l b e a l ittle tricky to m a i nta i n the sh uHie . Th e i ntra li ck i n the fi rst measure i s based on the s a m e b l ues scale fi ngering covered i n Ch apte r 8 ... Make sure you play the exa mple sl owly at first..II: . 4 r I ...... since th ere i s a vari ety of rhythms found in both the bass and melody...

. "' . ! - Q. " v v - v .. I"""" II JO ft I b.. .. A - v . .. J J J J I J b� tJ I I I 'I I r· p I I 'I r � - r - -& 1_ 3 ----l � I " v 1! v "' v "' v v .:... .. I � I � I � • i � . ..-.- _n " n v g v v " - . �---. .. v . r u r rrr ... - T -.. r-" fl ��r.. - n n . - r u r r r !i v tl u r r u r . - ..... A7 D/F# A7 . .. .._ . � n n n . - t � ...o ....10 a � ""'-.-. n ... A � - DIF# I I I I I I I I I r rL___ 3 __j r tJ i �3 J "' .. .. - r r �3 J r r �3 J r r - "'" v " DIF# � �� r.. - v'--'i '1 = [__ J __J --" " n n "' ... " v n v " v " n g v v . ... .. .-:::. . - . ...... - "' v -� ... - . . j __l [____ 3 __j n .. .l JJ1 b. --. ft .J J � r1 E7 � -It I I 3 . . - n v . "' n . . .. . r vvi r � . - L... " " _ n n � -= n --....... ! " "' v . . ':: ':: ::::: _"'" ... ... .J. .. . -.. ."'..J Jl . A7 JJ .- A7 i I . v . : '" -.� . ....J ----... r . .. _ _ _ _ _ _ �. " ' - A ""- v . . . v A n . . - ..J -l L... .

... " ...:.0...... ... . " . -.. ......... � #i • J .-... n .. ........ ... " � -"' . • • • • • • • - t) . ...l ...- .. . '. : ':' .... n . CD B Example 42 This entire example can be pl ayed using only a fl at pick..... � . . . l . ... ...: '. . :::.... = .. ro "" 1!..... . ..' v "' - . .. " 1\ v "' . Th is progression wou ld be a great exercise to experi m e nt with d iffe rent rig ht-h a n d tec h n i q u es . . ... ". " . It i s i m p ortant t o hold the necessary chord sha pes a n d ma i nta i n a strong shuffle groove thro u ghout the progress i o n . ... "' .. A .. .. .. � ... � I rr...- . � " " " . 1\ . It � it • • • • • • • • b.... ...... A ::: AI .. A7 r-"' 1\ .. " . ........ -: - /.. .. .... .. � . .... :... ... ... n " A .. .... " � � _. . t) l l - 3 - . A v ..... u 1\ u . .J --._ 2 2 � �. A :.. D7 E E7 Eb 7 07 E 87 r-'ll � it ..0... " / .. . ...... ..o 4---4 :::. . .... " .. " " "' " A A A � '. .. .... -: • ::: X ..J b..... - 3 " .. The first three mea s ures of the intra start with th e 17 chord and shifts d own chromatically (in 1 / 2 ste ps) u nti l th e c h o rds reso lve on th e n ext inversi on . � 3 /""'\ 3.. .. Q � ....... . . . v ... " ..... . . down in the open pos ition .v v v ..: ::. . .. • .3 t) -. . " n . " . . .... .. - . r. - 7 7 � �! �· #i . Measure s 4 a n d 5 a re a tu rnaround in E .. .. � � ::... A .::..Jl) =- E7 E� 7 _.. S h uffle (J":J J . n v " v . .. . v .. :. . n - E A7 E7 r-"' It� � I � -� � _.. ri " • .. . r-] -...... n " " " " X n. r-1 � i -- - :p "ll t "11 i . . .j J /""'\ "'" . u . AI ...

.. ......... ... . :..i:p - t) :iJ ]""" """'-' - � J... r. _.. _._tut it ri \ """"""' IT. " � . ..'_h f+ -It � � b. :'....... . . -r- 1. - n " � "" A7 E7 Eb7 07 E7 .. = ... I .. ... '> " n "' � " I � � � � � � v A " .. ':t � A .... """ y TAJ MAHAL . D . - " J " " � " T r. . :. _/ . • �� ' - t) _. i ."'-'-" - ... "' -" . ...� B7 .... . T ..... " " . E7 1 .. _... " D . �.. J b......-.....L'. :... rit. I � '1 ':: ':: :'. .. � ....-- � .. ::\ -" 4 4 " � y � � y y .. .. - . ....J .. .4 .

either a · · ay Kenn Chipkln and Aaron Stang downstroke ( -. RHYT H M S LASHES ACCENT: Notes or ST R U M chords are (' I N DICA­ to be played TIONS: ® ® ® ® ® ® I N D ICAT I N G with added 5� 3• . .. Very often single notes are i n corporated I n to STROKES a rhythm parL The note name Is AND UPSTR OKES: i n dicated above the rhythm slash Notes or w A half step is the smallest interval in with a fret n u m ber and a string chords are to Westem musrc: 11 1s eq ual to one fret i ndication. Only the . attacked). n -J J ) . FIOOda 330 1 4 lntemaJionaJ Copyrl ht SeaJred Made I n U. .SA All R h iS Reserved . · 1 LEGATO . . - TA BLATURE EXPLA N ATION A RTICU LATIONS R E A D I N G TAB L A T U R E : Ta blature I ll us trates the s 1 x stnngs o f t h e g o 1 ta r Notes and chords are 1nd 1ca1ed by the placement of fret n u m bers on a g1ven stn n g(s ). open 3 1 r ope Strum With S I N G LE em phasis. .'nu . (Only then release to first note IS the original note. v '"'"'' I 't2'1h f t rt A t"" Choot Cl>o•rll A�I "a. Only the first note is aHacked..____. n I. ) or upstroke ( v ) of the pick. 1990 Beam M Up Music C/o CPPIBelwtn. be played with A whole step equals two frets. 0 H A M M ER ON: -/fl --:a ___. PULL OFF: Play h1gh er note. � then "hammer � • on" to h1gher tJ u note w1th another finger. attacked. USING RHYTHM The chord voicings are found on the first page of the transcription SLASHES: DOWN underneath the song title. H ALF S T E P : Play the note and bend stn ng one half step. SLIDE: Play note and slide to ' P R EBEND A N D the R E L EASE: Bend followmg the string. then "pull off' to BENDING NOTES lower note w�th J another finger. Inc Miam1.. play iL no te. � Play lower note. notes are muted by the palm of the p1ck hand by llg hUy touching the string(s) near the bridge.. ·I W H OLE STE P : Play t h e note and PALM MUTE: end string one T he note or whole step.... � ·- ·� T • first note is ! · - e A ov -� 1 . - -9 .. A G F E A md1cated NOTES rhythm..

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C 1 997 WARNER BROS PUBUCATIONS
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contained In this oollectiOn requ res the wnnen consent of the Publisher.
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CONTENTS
Page# CD Track#
Introduction...................................................... .................................................................. 3...........................................
Tuning notes ........... .... .............. ........ . ........................... ....... .. ........... ................. . . . .. ................................................. ......... 2
)

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION TO ACOUSTIC BLUES . ... .................... ................ �
Preface.................................................... ..... ......... .... . .. ..... . ...................... ....
BASICS: Open Posti i on Chords......................................................... .......... 6
., . .. , .

�!!H�t�� :::. ::. : ::�J ;rs : :ssLi
Example 6: Combine All Three Chords .................................................... 9................................. -..... . 8
Example 7: D & D7 Chords ...................................................................... l0........................................... 9

=�:: �� w�::��::::�::::::::::::::::::::::::::�::::::::::::::::::::::::�:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Example I 0: G and G7 Chords ...... . . � . . . .
. .. ........ .
: ::::::::::::::::::�::::::::::::::::::::: :?
. .. ..... .................... ....... ... l l.................. .. ........ .. ... ... ... l 2
. . .

CHAPTER I BLUES PROGRESSIONS ...................................................................... 1 4
Example II: Bass-Chord Pattern ............................................................... l4......................................... 13
:

Example 12: Blues Progression In E.......................................................... l4 ................. ......... ............... 14

��:: l �� �:�� :�
�·::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::�::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: L::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: �
Example 15: The Quick-Change Progression..... ..... . _ ....... ....... .. ...... . 16......................................... 17
.
. . ..

CHAPTER 2: RHYTHM ................................................................................................. 18
Example 16: The Shuffle Groove................................................................ IB. ..........................-........... 19
Example 17: Left-Hand Embellishments ................................................... 19......................................... 1 9
Example 18: A7 Embellishment .................................................................. 19......................................... 20
Example 19:Whole Progression ................................................................ 19......................................... 21
Example 20: E7 Varfatlon.............................................................................. 20......................................... 22
Example 21: Quick-Change In E ... .... ..... ......... ... ...... .... ... .. ............... . 21......................................... 23
. . .... . ..

CHAPTER 3: BASS-LINES............................................................................................. 22
Example 22A E7 to A7 Bass-llne.. .... ........ ........... .......... .............. ... ...... 22 ................. ......... ... ...... ... .. . 2..
Example 22B:A7 to E7 Bass-llne ....... ............ ...... .. ... .. . ................... ...... ... 22 .. ...... .................. .. ............ 2S
. ....

Example 12C:Anot:her A7 to E7 Bass-llne.............................................. 22......................................... 26
. . .

Example 22D: 87 to A7 Bass-line.............................................................. 23......................................... 27
Example 22E: The Whole Bass-line Progression.................................... 23... ...................................... 28
Example 23: The Jimmy Reed Progression .............................................. 24__............ ........................ 29
Example 24: Up-Strokes and Accents ....................................................... 25......................................... 30
Example 25: Blues Rhythm Uck .. . . ..... .... _ ........... . .. ..... .... ........ ..... ........ 25 ... ... .......... . ..... .. ...... .. . .. ... 31
2 1
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Example 29: Blues In ETumaround ..................... ...................................... 29........... ...... ..................... ... 3S

CHAPTER 4: BLUES IN A .. .......................... .......... . . . . .............. . .... ....... ....... ........ ......... 30
Ex;�mple 30A:A7 Embellishments ... . . . . . . . .......................................... ......... 30......................................... 36
.

Example JOB: D7 Embellishments ............................................................. 30......................................... 37
Ex.:lmple 30C: Blues In A.............................................................................. 31......... ........ ...... ...... ... ....... ..38

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Example 3 I: Blues In A Turnaround .......................................................... 33......................-................41

SECTION II: SOLO ACOUSTIC BLUES GUITAR.................... -....... ................... 34
CHAPTER S: BLUES UCKS .............................................................. ,........................... 35

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Example 32F:TumaroundYarlation........................................................... 37......................................... 47
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Example 32�:Whole Progress lon ... ............ .. ... ... ...... ... ............ ............... .. 38.........................................48
: : :: �
Ex<lmple 33. More Blues Bass-llnes........................................................... 39.................................... ..... 49

CHAPTER 6: SLUES CHORD SOLOING................................................................41
Example 34: E7 lnverslons........................................................................... 41......................................... 50
Example 35: Chromaticism .................................... .....................................42......................................... 51
Ex ample 36: Blues Chord Solo I .............................................................. .42......................................... 52
Example 37A;A7 Inversions .......................................................................43. ........ . ..... ....... ... ........ . ... 53
Example 37B:A7 Inversions with Chromat1cs........................................ 43.......... ... . ._......... ........... 5-4
. .. .

Example 37C: Chord Solo Turnaround .................................................... 43.. ... ...... - ....................... 55
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Example 37D: Blues Chord Solo 2 .. ... . . ..... .. ... ........ ....... ......... .. ... .. ...44.... ....... ............. ... .. ........ 56
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Example 37E: Blues Chord Solo 3 . . . .... ........ .... ...... . "........................... 45......................................... 57
.. .. . . . . . . ..

. .. .. ..

CHAPTER 7:THE BLUES SCALE ............................................................ -................. 47
Examples 38A-381: E Blues Ucks 1-9................... ..................... -.......47-51 ................................... 58-66

CHAPTER 8: FINGERSTYLE BLUES................................................................. -....... 52
E:lamples 39A-39H ................................................................................. 52-55................................... 67-74
Example 391: Muddy Waters Progresslon.- .......... ................................. 56 ..................... . . . ............ ..... 75
Example 39J: Muddy Waters Tumaround................................................. 57......................................... 76

CHAPTER 9: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER.......................... ,............................... 58
Examples 40-42 ....... ... ........................ .. ..... ... .. . ...... .. .. .... .. . ....... . ......... ..58-62................................... n.79
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progressions. Sect i on II focuses on sol o-sty le blues guitar. In the 1920's and 1930's. The style and infl uen c e of these pl ay e rs esta bl i s he d a tradition that to this day still app e als to everyone from casual listeners to professional mus1c1ans. demonstrating musical examples. Section I covers all the basics you will need to know regarding the acoustic blues style: chord shapes. then you are ready to go to work. strum patterns. If you love the blues. bass-lines. such as Lonnie Johnson. the shuffle groove and turnarounds. This book presents traditional. roots oriented blues with contemporary training methods that wil l allow you to immediately understand and ap ply these useful versatile concepts to . melodic patterns. scales. licks and fingerpicking. chord embellishments. . there were some great players. your style. have an acoustic guitar and two h ands. Introduction 3 INTRODUCTION Welcome to Acoustic Blues Guitar. Blind Lemon Jefferson and Robert Johnson.

KEITH WYATT co 0 SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION TO ACOUSTIC BLUES This section is designed to provide you with the fundamental tools and techniques needed for the acoustic blues style. . Make sure you take the time to learn the examples of basic chord shapes. bass-lines and turnarounds in this section before you start on the next section: Solo Acoustic Blues Guitar. rhythm patterns. It will be your guide to interpreting the music examples contained in the book. embellishments. Remember to tune your guitar to track 2 on the CD before you play with the recording. Take advantage of the included recording. progressions.

Later.. While you might find one of t hese techniques easier than the others. • Finger-picks are also available. This technique is used more for banjo than guitar . A pick gives you the option of playing single-note melodies with your fingers and bass-lines with your pick. The most important thing to consider when choosing a technique is the sound. There are a few simple tools and devices that you might like to keep in your guitar case: extra strings. and you will need to experiment until you find the sound you like. PREFACE One nice thing about acoustic blues is that you do not need expensive and complicated tools or devices. • A thumb-pick is primarily designed for down-strokes to play fingerstyle bass-lines. This technique is better for solo style where you combine bass-lines and melody. • Using a pick will give you a wider range of volume and it is easier to play single-note lines and melodies. you should still practice the technique that will give you the best sound even if it takes a little longer. try not to leave the same set of strings on any longer than a month. to be combined with the thumb-pick to get a brighter sound. picks. shapes and materials that affect the sound and feel. Picking Techniques: There are different techniques for striking the strings that you should experiment with as you learn the examples in the book: • Playing fingerstyle (without a p ick) produces a warm sound. but it's not as clear and you have to work harder to produce a wide range of volume. but they are a little awkward for playing single-note melodies. Playing fingerstyle wit a flat-pick is often called hybrid-picking . but you have to train weaker fingers to play fingerstyle melody-lines. lighter strings will enable you to learn the valuable technique of "bending in pitch" a lot sooner. The main thing you need is a guitar that is set up well. . Flat-picks come in a variety of sizes. You might want to use light or extra-light strings to reduce muscle fatigue and sore fingertips. experiment with different thicknesses and different materials to learn their effect on the sound. When using a flat-pick. Strings: It is amazing what a fresh set of strings can do to bring out the best sound of a guitar. After you learn this technique correctly. If you play regularly. slides (glass or metal) and a capo. you might want to experiment with using heavier strings. Different gauges (thickness) of strings have a different sound quality.

ha nd. CD 0 Example 2: The E7 Chord In bl ues. BASICS: OPEN POSITION CHORDS Acoustic guitar players.. the less you will need to push to get the right sound. Th e fourth n ote is 0. a fou rth note is added to the basic triad to create a dominant 7 chord (indicated as E7)... CD 0 Example 1: The E Chord The first chord is an E m ajor chord and is a triad because there are only three different notes in the chord: E: E G# B Major T riad: 1 3 5 E 0 0 0 4t 4. Be careful not to touch the open stri ngs Do not push so har d that you are cramping your . Make sure that all strings are ringing c learly by placing the fingertips ri ght against t h e fret.4t 2 3 1 �" t) n u . spend m ost of thei r time in open pos i tio n (close to the nut) to make use of the open strings. in any style. The more developed your calluses are. which is the b 7 interval of E.. The open strings resonate m ore than fretted notes and bring o ut the richness of the instrument.. .

.. . ..... :.. " .... ! A _ft g . .:.. .: g . 3 l 2 I I l � ' t. CD 0 Example 3: The A Chord The following are different fingerings for the A chord.. .... Even though the notes are the sam e . - -& -e -& -e 'T" . :...0..: . the choice of fingerings is different. ..�-�t 2 I 3 l . .. ... A: A C# E Major Triad: 1 3 5 A A A A X 0 0 X 0 0 •. E7: E G# B D Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 The following fingerings are the most common E7 fingerings that apply to the blues: E7 E7 E7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 •• 4• 4t 4t 4• 2 2 I 4 2 3 I 4 �" tJ :H: H: n u u u " .

2 J 2 3 4 I I I 2 -'" 0 0 1-(· � ::::::. A7: A c� E G Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 A7 A7 A7 )( 0 0 0 X 0 0 X 0 4t 4• 4t t• 4..� � � " � � .. � -. ... . (j) CD Example 5: The 87 Chord There is one primary fingering used in acoustic blues: 87: B D� F� A Dominant 7: 1 3 5 �7 2 I 3 4 r-'"1\ .-.. g .::... .- . or add the G to the first string.fl. There are two places to add a G to the open A chord: either take a finger off the 3rd string to expose the open G.0 CD Example 4: The A 7 Chord To turn the A chord into a dominant 7th chord....:. & -& -e- " .. � ::::::.� tJ � 'T' " � A :.. add the G (b 7).

n u u .. are the IV an d V chord of the key of E. I I. The Roman numerals I. I I I I. If you play a blues in the key of E.. "" The blues progression is a specific pattern of chords that relate to a key..f'. I 17 I -. the I chord will be the E7.f'. I I I j·v7 Il. we will be learning some rhythm patterns that involve these chords.. The A is the IV chord of E because it is built on the 4th note of theE major scale.f'. -� j I I I :1 . Two other chords. and 87 is the V chord because it is built on the 5th note of E major. I I B7 A7 E7 B7 flt V7 'T.. ffl. I :1 I I I I A7 # E7 ��# FIV7 I....l. A7 and 87. The I. I 1 I I I IV7 I I . of the major scale. but the one that's the most popular is the " 1 2-bar" blues. or root. Later..f'. I � . Practice changing from one chord to the other to get used to making the transitions. .l.f. we can play a blues. I I I I I I I 17 :1 I I I I I I I I I I I.f'.f'.f'. co G) Example 6: Combine All Three Chords Now that we have three chords. I I I I. I I I I :1 I I I.f'. There are several different blues progressions that are popular.. . I I fl . I.f'.�. �7 A7 87 E7 0 0 X 0 X 0 0 0 2 3 I 4 I I 1 2 2 I 3 4 2 3 I 4 �� 0 J. IV and V identify the relationship of the chords to the notes of the major scale: E F# G# A B C# D� E II Ill IV V VI Vll The I chord is built on the first note.f'. - H � n: . J. E BLUES E7 ��bt 17 I 7 I I I.. IV and V chords are always arranged in the same sequence within these twelve bars.

_p Memorize the blues in A using chord symbols and Roman numerals. 07 and E7.... You already know how to play both the A7 and the E7.. The second most common open key is the key of A.l -I I I I I I I I I I I .10 Basics: Open Position Chords The Key of A The other common keys that you hear on the acoustic guitar are the "open keys.:..l 07 I IV7 ll I I I I A7 I 17-.(. A BLUES A7 lb#t 17 I I I I I I I I I .. " .. IV and V chords in an A b lu e s are A7.. A � v . so the only new chord is 07. I I 17 I� � I Il I I I � I -� I 6J # E7 f'.. " . I I I I I I I l I I I I 7 I I I 1 . v . You g et a 07 by taking an open 0 triad and lowering the higher octave 0 t a C: co 0 Example 7: D and 07 Chords D: D F# A 07: D F# A C Major Triad: 1 3 5 Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 D D7 X X 0 X X 0 4• 4� 4• I 3 2 2 1 3 ��� Jt � u v u u ". The I.I r I I » 07 A7 .�# rv7 - I. II I I I I IV7 l I Il I I II ." so called because they use a lot of open strings. � .v 7 E7 Il Il .

. The I. . Basics: Open Position Chords 11 The Key of C Another common open position key on the guitar is the key of C. u w CD @ Example 9: F7 The F7 is an F triad with an Eb added to the second string: F: F A c F7: F A c Eb Major Triad: 1 3 5 Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 F7 Fl X 3 2 I I 3 2 4 I T 3 2 4 I -'II I I t) - - -e 4 'T . .. .. .:...... D .. .. IV and V chords in a C blues are: C7. ! n 4 � .. CD @ Example 8: C7 The C7 is a C triad with a Bb added to the third string: C: C E G C7: C E G Bb Major Triad: 1 3 5 Dominant 7: 1 3 5 b7 c C7 X 0 0 r-'11 tJ � e..:. F7 and G7. - :'.t I .. w :'.... A . .

I l ¥N7 F7 C7 l. " v Memorize the following blues in C the same way you memorized the other keys. u 4• "T" �• 4 ! J. At this point you should be able to hear the similarity betwee n the keys._ u " � The second ex a mp le makes it easier to turn the G into a G7. The G7 is a G triad with the first string root lowered to an F: G7: G B D F Dominant 7: 1 3 5 177 G7 r-'_tl 0 0 0 �• ._. I I I 17 I I I I I . I I I I I I I .... CD @) Example 10: G and G7 Chords There are two common fingerings for G: G: G B D Major Triad: 1 3 5 2 l 3 �l'l n n . I