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EAST

meets

W EST
- a so ur ce bo ok of be
au ty tr en ds -
- a sourceboo k of beauty trends -

‘East Meets West: A Sourcebook of Beauty
Trends’ aims to showcase current beauty
trends surrounding British and Japanese
cultures, showing a contrast within a broad
and multifaceted industry that is growing on
a daily basis.

Eastern cultures denotes youthful and
playful trends, keeping their childhood
alive and prolonging the aging process,
whilst Western cultures denotes a series of
trends whereby one often wants to recreate
aspirational looks from a range of celebrities,
bloggers and vloggers.

This sourcebook collates such trends, and
aims to both educate and stimuate thought
within those whom are interested in the
beauty industry.
WITH KYLIE JENNER
Kylie Jenner is a Western Reality TV Star, Style Icon
and Entrepreneur whom has 87.1m Instagram
followers, being one of the most followed
cultural icons on social media. In addition, Kylie
is one of the most ‘desired’ celebrities in regard
to the public wanting to look like her and achieve
her image.

In 2016 ‘Kylie Cosmetics’ was launched, boasting
a following of 11.9m (March, 2017), and allows for
fans to buy a piece of the Kylie enterprise whilst
being able to recreate her most recognisable
and ‘liked’ looks with her own makeup range.

Each item is self-branded and shades are named
after family members and friends (often seen
on KUWTK; Keeping Up With The Kardashians),
allowing for a personal connection to be created
with those purchasing products. In addition, Kylie
uses the ‘Kylie Cosmetics’ Instagram platform
as a marketing base, whilst sharing recreated
looks from fans.
Tanning in Western societies
is often seen in the media in
full force. Going on holiday is
a sign of affluence, and hard
work, whilst tanning gives one
a ‘healthy glow’.

St. Tropez are the leader in
self-tanning (‘fake tan’) products,
and have both an Instagram
account and website that
showcases a selection of their
followers and customers whom
have used their range of products.

Furthermore, various Western
magazines and social media
platform YouTube are often
filled with reviews, tutorials and
advertisements on recreating
the ‘perfect tan’, whilst often
showing various celebrities
and socialities boasting their
‘post-holiday’ tans.
YOUTUBE Ravndahl
WITH the first fashion blog launching online in 2003, over the past
14 years, the blogging world surrounding the beauty and fashion
industries has taken off. The 2016 National Blogger Survey stated
that 77% of all bloggers are female, and within this 27% of those
are bloggers within the beauty and fashion industries. In response to
increased blogger demand in recent years, Vlogging has since taken
of with Samantha Ravndahl leading the way with 2.4m YouTube
subscribers and followers. Ravndahl is known for her video tutorials
on how to achieve various make-up looks making makeup artistry
accessible to all, whilst achieving a celebrity and beauty icon status
for herself.
LUXE LUST
With consumer culture on the rise, and luxury products
being more accessible and well-known internationally
due to marketing and advertising strategies, fashion
houses have taken to the beauty industry to gain a share
in a ever-growing market. Luxury brands such as YSL,
Christian Louboutin, Chanel, Dior and Burberry have
all released their own cosmetics lines, allowing for
more people to buy into the brand name. These brands
are often endorsed by Western icons, celebrities and
magazines in order to generate further sales and a
sense of belonging in an often non-attainable consumer
market of desired goods.

dOES BEAUTY
Anastasia Beverly Hills was founded in 1997 by beauty
entrepreneur Anastasia Soare. Since, ABH has cultivated
an industry-unique relationship with its core customer,
focused on product education and response to delivering
the ‘ultimate polished look’ for which the brand is known.

ABH is known for establishing the now everyday staple
beauty routines of brow-shaping, contouring and highlighting.
Brand fame was ignited within the industry in 2015, being
popularised through social media and relationships with
many of the world’s most iconic faces — Naomi Campbell,
Kim Kardashian, Heidi Klum and Penelope Cruz, to name a
few; allowing for the everyday female to achieve flawless
‘camera ready’ looks.
@patrickstarr

Male MUAs
A rise in Instagram use, YouTube Vloggers and Blogger
Culture have allowed for male makeup artists to be more
recently appreciated and credited for their work in a female
dominated industry. Furthermore, male MUAs have also
being taken on board by International brands in Western
marketing campaigns and PR stunts, further elevating them
to the same level as that of a female artist.

2017 saw Maybelline announce its new advertising
campaign for its best selling “Big Shot Mascara by Colossal”
with Manny MUA as the cover guy. Manny boasts 3m
Instagram followers alone, falling in line with credentials of
Patrick Star, a beauty YouTuber and Instagram icon.

By taking away these boundaries, more people are being
able to become who they feel they truly are, opposed to
what societies stereotyping has told them to be, which in
turn is a positive reaction to self-perception issues and raised
awareness within social media.

the stars of instagram
@mannymua
W EST EAST
PRINCESS
kawaii
As luxury brands dominate the West, Japan
sees a‘kawaii’or‘cute’trend taking
over in regard to their cosmetics packaging
and advertising campaigns, appealing to
the youthful culture of women in the East.

Playing on a chld-like culture, packaging
and products are heavily inspired by the
desire to be a Disney princess, infused
with a Harajuku-led obsession with colour,
jewels, Floral pattern and cute kittens
(often used in marketing and packaging
illustrations).

Brands such as CanMake and and Jill Sander
adopt this approach frequently.
DECORA BEAUTY
A well known Japanese proverb states that, “the
nail that sticks out, must be hammered back
in”, pushing conformity and standardisation
within their unique culture. Decora
beauty has derived from the Harajuku
fashions subculture, rebelling against such
standardisations in an aim to be unique and
show ones underlying true identity.

This is often depicted through a mix
of youthful colour, glitter, print and
pattern, mixing bold with delicate for a
juxtaposition of a “us and them” culture;
known as, Decora.
anti-aging 101
With child pornography only being banned in
Japan in 2014, there is still a huge culture of using
Western and Japanese babies alike for a range of anti-
aging skincare products in a bid to promote youthful,
baby soft skin. Products featuring placenta are the
most common to use this marketing strategy in an aim
to showcase such end results, coupled with copywriting
claiming one will have "babyish" skin by using such
specific products. In addition, Western women
are often used alongside babies in campaigns
and advertising strategies promoting the
application and the 'ideal' skin; light
in colour whilst being soft to
the touch.
The Collagen
Collagen is a key product in Japanese skincare
and beauty culture, with Shiseido leading the
way with innovative products, adding a range
of anti-aging products to their extensive line
of specialist formulations.

‘The Collagen’ drink can be found in various
formations, available as a drink, a powder and
as tablets taken as daily supplements. The
products do not claim to contain ‘collagen’,
however include ingredients which are
specifically created in order to stimulate
the production of collagen cells in the skin.
This range of products are a bestseller in the
East, with consumers buying such products
at ages from 16 onwards in order to prevent
the aging proess.
pikikura
Pikikura or ‘Sticky Pix’ as commonly known in English,
are a range of specifically created photobooths
designed to manipulate ones facial and bodily
appearance to look virtually ‘doll-like’.

The Barbie version however, takes this to the next
level whereby one can create their ideal Barbie doll
box, superimposing the user as a real-life doll in a
range of fully customisable Barbie boxes, bringing a
child-hood fascination into reality.
SKIN-LIGHTENING
Stemming back to historical roots of Japan
and the tradition of the Geisha, inflused with
Western ideals raised through magazines
and consumer culture, skin-lightening
remains a heavy beauty trend in Eastern
cultures, particularly Japan.

A 'us and them' dichtonomy, emphasises
rich and poor social classes in Japan,
underpinned with racial undertones,
whereby light skin is deemed affluent and
'ideal', mimmicking that of Western icons
and celebrities. These icons are often seen
gracing the cover of high-end magazines
and beauty campaigns, adding pressures
to conform. As a response Western brands
such as Chanel, have had to adapt to Eastern
trends in order to gain a share of the market,
keeping up with Japanese brands such as
Shisiedo and SU:M.
- a sourceboo k of beauty trends -

‘East Meets West: A Sourcebook of Beauty
Trends’ aims to showcase current beauty
trends surrounding British and Japanese
cultures, showing a contrast within a broad
and multifaceted industry that is growing on
a daily basis.

Eastern cultures denotes youthful and
playful trends, keeping their childhood
alive and prolonging the aging process,
whilst Western cultures denotes a series of
trends whereby one often wants to recreate
aspirational looks from a range of celebrities,
bloggers and vloggers.

This sourcebook collates such trends, and
aims to both educate and stimuate thought
within those whom are interested in the
beauty industry.
EAST
meets

W EST
- a so ur ce bo ok of be
au ty tr en ds -