DRAFT SUMMARY

A Curriculum for an Innovative School

QBE Schools, England

Prepared for Will Sutherland Director

Team Dennis Yuzenas Iain Barraclough Jeff Hutt Leslie Lott Maria Brown Steve McCrea (Assembler)

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In Gratitude John Vornle Bahman Azarm Jeremy McWilliam Erik Friedl Raymond Merz Debbie Keiter Deborah Volberg Noel Thompson Arthur von Wiesenberger Faith Conger And others

Thanks for your comments and suggestions.

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Contents

A. Introduction to the School

B. Introduction to The Curriculum

C. The Curriculum

D. ³The Readings´ Supporting ³Key Quotes´ (to guide teachers, students, parents and staff)

E. Reference Books

F. Comments by the Curriculum Team

Appendices Florida Sunshine Sate Standards

IB

New York Regents

Background (History of John Corlette¶s influence on Education) A Digital Portfolio A Digital Library More About John Corlette

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A. Introduction to the School

The following pages are taken from QualifiedByExperience.com where the Director, Will Sutherland, describes the aims of the school. His experiences as a housemaster at Aiglon College for 18 years imbues the spirit of QBE Schools.

OUR MISSION
Our mission is to provide innovative courses, where all student develop the academic, workplace, life and citizenship skills, for post Secondary School or College success. To teach how to learn, to teach how to teach, and to lead by example. Future Aspirations: As yet this project is NOT connected to, or approved by Aiglon College. It is hoped in the future our boats will be used in various venues for reunions, fund raising, and recruiting events. There is also the possibility of introducing students, who do our short courses, to Aiglon and the idea of attending the school, and of course the school using them to promote their own summer sailing programme. We intend to be in Rome for the summer 2011 reunion. It is clear that a couple of Historic Pilot Cutters sailed by, obviously competent, young students, arriving in any port of call, having crossed open sea, is going to attract attention and will be an impressive sight. Modus operandi: Our sailing boats are floating learning centres, accommodation and transport, which will visit ports of call relevant to the projects the student crew members are studying. Our courses are dynamic, deep enquiry, project learning based, and practical enabling the student, of whatever age to learn through firsthand experience and achieving tangible goals. Study and Travel Courses: One week to twelve week courses are possible over the spring and autumn terms enabling students to live aboard, and study their academic school work and projects through links on the internet and their laptops. The benefit of interaction with experts in the ports of call will be invaluable to their learning process and will motivate them to complete projects. The routes will be designed to take the students on a tour of destinations relevant to the projects they are

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studying. Summer holiday Courses: 7 day courses will be used to take youngsters for taster motivational voyages. Teachers short holiday courses will be used to demonstrate to other educators how our 3Rs system works. Transferable Skills: The foundation will work with the students on their return to help them identify and adapt the skills they have learned at sea to beneficial use at school or college and at home. The Programme: Students are free to request customised programmes to suit their individual study requirements. A suggested programme of courses will be made available by the end of July 2010.

Additional Remarks
We want to nurture and produce motivated young people who show leadership qualities, are flexible and so are able to turn their mind to anything, and are very quick to pick up new skills. Having learnt how to learn they will realise they need to continually pursue self-development if they are going to succeed in modern life. Rigor, Relevance and Relationships: By replacing the original 3Rs with Dennis Littki s 3Rs, which were adopted by Bill Gates, Rigor, Relevance and Relationships and incorporating the values and thinking of Kurt Hann, John Corlette, and other prominent educators, and of course our own, we intend to provide opportunities for all students to benefit from the new concepts and systems. To be of use to the younger generation, any education system has to be flexible enough in its aims and aspirations to keep up with human and technological development whilst preserving the arts, and the foundation values, which make man.

OUR TOOLS ARE MIND AND PEOPLE!
How do we bring this about?: By creating the right environment and giving the students the right to use their own minds to select and complete project based learning opportunities, both in academic and sports curriculum time. Modern teaching methods and styles break down the barriers between teacher and student, and create an informal but structured learning environment. This allows more one to one time and fosters a sense of enquiry and team work to accomplish a common goal. The growth mind set is All is possible, yes we can! so the peer pressure is for everyone to succeed. Each individual is motivated to go to college and on to greater things. Of all the delivery methods I have studied in the Western World I feel the High Tech High system and work by Dennis Littky and Dennis Yuzenas are the most effective and logically relevant to the 21st Century. Introducing these into European education systems will not be easy as there is little

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room to manoeuvre in the set ways of the hierarchy who will defend their positions at the top. The quickest way to convince people is to demonstrate it works. So we have to get on and set up ways of demonstrating project based learning in all spheres of the educational process. This combined with the ideals and ethics behind the original Aiglon philosophy will produce a unique International College and centre for learning. I wish to use the sea to bring all the elements of majestic beauty, discovery, and expansive usable space to our project, in the same way Aiglon uses the mountains.

I HEAR AND I FORGET, I SEE AND I REMEMBER, I DO AND I UNDERSTAND

Confucius.

Small Beginnings: At the outset, in the absence of buildings, we aim to use sailing boats as floating learning centres, accommodation and transport, which will visit ports of call relevant to the projects the student crew members are studying. The possibilities are numerous. For example the Eden Project in Cornwall for Bio-diversity, Oc anopolis in Brest for ocean studies, the Barrage of the Rance for sustainable energy projects, and cities like London, Dublin, Edinburgh, Rouen, Lisbon, Rome, Marseille, and even across the Atlantic to New York and the eastern cities of America. They are all, each and every one of them, centres of research rich with expertise and culture, offering our students, tangible, educationally rich, experience opportunities. Modern technology makes all this possible. By supplying the students with the latest electronic communications equipment they need never be out of contact with their teachers and tutors. Projects and assignments can be chosen to fit interests and to cover relevant parts of exam syllabi. Assessment can be made by presentation and demonstration of new knowledge and skills. Most important is that the students learn how to learn and are encouraged to assist each other to achieve high standards and to be motivated to succeed.

Our students will be qualified by experience.

The 3Rs project at sea: Going to sea even for short periods of time will take our students into a new environment and all pre-conceived ideas, prejudices, and misconceptions fall away, as everyone realises they are new players on a level playing field. They will start with a clean slate, and all learn to work together, get to know each other, and to play their part in a working team.

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Sound friendships will be forged, but most important of all are the life skills lessons we can learn at sea. Every voyage requires tolerance, caring, sharing, tenacity, self-confidence, and self-worth, planning, organisation, leadership, camaraderie, and above all, regard/love for our neighbours. Courses: One week to twelve week courses are possible over the spring and autumn terms enabling students to live aboard, and study their academic school work and projects through links on the internet and their laptops. The benefit of interaction with experts in the ports of call will be invaluable to their learning process and will motivate them to complete projects. The routes will be designed to take the students on a tour of destinations relevant to the projects they are studying. Summer holiday, 7 day courses will be used to take youngsters for taster motivational voyages, and to demonstrate to other educators how our 3Rs system works. Transferable Skills: Our new school foundation will work with the students on their return to help them identify and adapt the skills they have learned at sea to beneficial use at school or college and at home. I DO, I UNDERSTAND, I NEVER FORGET W.S.

Young Teachers: We are coaching and mentoring young teachers/skippers in ways to teach students how to learn by giving the student the responsibility of going to sea, and leading an expedition with set destinations and well defined, tangible goals. Sailing with the right mindset can bring out the best in people, and on reflection, most realise many of the foundation values and skills learnt are transferable to real life ashore. Two identical Pilot Cutters: In talking to our young skippers in the UK and France it was generally agreed, for a multitude of reasons, pilot cutters are the boats most suitable to start the project. Apart from all the other pluses they are renowned for their seaworthiness, they will make a very steady and predictable teaching platform, and they have lots of bits of rope to pull, are very beautiful, and have historic links with the founders of the project in Dartmouth UK in the West Country and in Saint-Malo. The key to the development of the concepts and spreading of the ethos is providing a living demonstration and using it to coach other Teachers, Mentors, and Lecturers and encouraging them to adopt this concept as one of their teaching methods. The Pilot Cutter Project is just a beginning. As with all projects, when it is successful it will have many fathers, exponents, and supporters. We know that one size does not fit all but for many there is enough flexibility in our methods for most students to benefit greatly from the programme. Key to the delivery is non segregation. Finding a mix of cultures, ideas, points of view, upbringing, and basic education, will enrich the experience for all and foster the maximum benefit from the 3 Rs. One of the areas in education we wish to address is the dropout rate. So many talented young students are leaving school or college before they have passed their exams because they are bored and see no relevance to what is being taught. There are a multitude of reasons these students find themselves in these circumstances, but they all could be avoided. We can motivate and set high standards which our students want to achieve. We have done it before and we can do it again.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010
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A view of "what's needed in schools" in the UK (and around the world)
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We all agree that every child is different and their needs are different, so why do we think they are all going to fit into the same educational box? I see a very big need for children to be taught the basics (a general Liberal Arts Programme) and then taught how to learn and what to learn. They need to understand there is no such thing as a free lunch. They also need to understand they have to be of use to society in order to happily fit into society, and to earn a living. They can do anything they want to do provided it is going to lead to an income stream for themselves and their families. They need mentoring from someone who cares about them and who can help them deal with family or their personal environment problems. Talk to today s students and they will tell you they do not understand the logic of their education or where they are going, but they know what interests them. ====================== My ongoing research into the effects of Aiglon college (and the philosophies of Kurt Hahn and John Corlette www.JohnCorlette.com) on the lives of the Alumni is revealing the basic student needs and ways of meeting them. ====================== In summary the reformers cannot get out of their minds the traditional image the word School conjures up every time they use it or hear it. What the 21st Century students need is a new concept education media centre: A resource for the whole community and everyone in it. Within this there needs to be a core framework which provides a balance between academic learning and life skills, discipline, appreciation, respect and tolerance for others, sports and physical exercise etc. We only know and are influenced by what we know. Therefore the programme should encourage enquiring minds, to develop innovation and experimentation. Expeditions and cultural excursions have become extinct due to health and safety restraints. This problem needs to be overcome in one measure or another.

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Above all, a path for future development, a light at the end of the tunnel, has to be presented to students and parents which satisfies their needs and aspirations. A lot of what Tony Blair say is not actually happening in the UK and he introduced the most teacher-controlling regulations -- he has knocked the stuffing out of our good teachers and the new system leaves them totally disenfranchised. Central control and bureaucracy takes up more than half a teacher's working time and preparation hours have increased beyond any sensible measure. The results are lower standards and a weaker society. Will Sutherland Director QBE Education.

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B. Introduction to The Curriculum
The general curriculum (draft) can be found on QBESchool.com. The goal of QBE Schools is to perpetuate John Corlette¶s vision for education while adapting it to ³modern times.´ The following themes are important:

Delayed gratification Planned hardships Small discomforts, such as showering with small towels Good healthy food Plenty of time outdoors in small teams Meals seated in assigned places at a table with a master and some kids that annoy you« An inner life, a time of quiet in the morning before the school day starts Plenty of inspiring words (spoken, on a rotating list displayed on a computer screen, posted on walls) to build character
These are elements of a good curriculum. Academic subjects are part of the overall whole-person curriculum.

Each part gets roughly 20% of the focus of the day.

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Academics (most traditional schools put most of their time into this category) Traditional Curriculum Training the Mind (to harness the emotions and the physical body) Emotions (anger management, psychology) Spirit (an inner life, the ability to look inside) Physical Body (exercises, stretching one's perceived limitations)

Every class can have something in the lesson plan to include these five areas:
In addition to asking students to explore academic topics in small groups... ...why not discuss snopes.com (critical thinking, train the mind) then discuss the downsides of getting angry about a situation, then talk about the Infinite (what does this situation look like from Alpha Centauri?) then stand up and do the John Gray shaking exercise ========================= Products: - Students will produce an autobiography (similar to the Littky requirement), either 75 pages long or at least 30 minutes of edited interviews - Students will have a record of every internship (notes and video records) - Students will have a list of life skills that they have learned - Students will have a collection of licenses and certificates that they will earn - Students will ... ? - Students will build a CV (resume) with descriptions from internships performed during the school year - Students will accumulate a list of letters of recommendation from mentors - Students who start a new business - Students who participate in a school-operated business or schoolsponosred business -- and their participation will translate into shares of future profits.

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C. The Curriculum
An Integrated Curriculum
"What a gift He would gi'e us, to see ourselves as others see us." -- Robert Burns ´Here's why school should be a wider experience than academics.

EXAMPLE
Spirit Emotions Mind Body Academics Five parts, each part gets roughly equal time, ... the curriculum invites integration of subjects, math with language with physics... even in a math class, there are moments when the teacher can: After teaching exponents (10 to 25th power or a one followed by 25 zeroes)... Spirit How many molecules are in the planet? Isn·t that incredible? (Ponder the Infinite) Emotions How does it feel to be decaying every minute? we are moving toward Chaos (the Laws of Thermodynamics, entropy and enthalpy) which are connected to big numbers (that·s why we Mind (Intellectual) -- Train the intellect... beyond the academics, what exercise can we use to influence and give the mind new perspective? perhaps a meditation (the piece about people who were born in 1993 have never used an 8-track tape player -- and how many pieces of ferrite are on a typical 8-track tape?)

Body Stand up, stretch, do the John Gray exercise for two minutes, feeling better now? Shake around the brain cells -numbering 1 followed by twelve zeroes

Academics Oh, yes, back to academics. What happens when I multiply 40,000 pounds (4 x 10^4) times 6.8 billion (6.8 x 10^9 number of people)? That·s the number of pounds of carbon dioxide that every person would indirectly generate if they all consumed energy at the rate of a typical U.S. person (20 tons per year)

Integration of the curriculum is inspired in part by the procedures at The Met Center in Providence, RI. See the list of ³sample guiding questions´ at http://www.themetschool.org/Metcenter/Applied.html

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Traditional Curriculum Source: NY Regents

The Arts
Standard 1: Creating, Performing, and Participating in the Arts Students will actively engage in the processes that constitute creation and performance in the arts (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) and participate in various roles in the arts. Standard 2: Knowing and Using Arts Materials and Resources Students will be knowledgeable about and make use of the materials and resources available for participation in the arts in various roles. Standard 3: Responding to and Analyzing Works of Art Students will respond critically to a variety of works in the arts, connecting the individual work to other works and to other aspects of human endeavor and thought. Standard 4: Understanding the Cultural Contributions of the Arts Students will develop an understanding of the personal and cultural forces that shape artistic communication and how the arts in turn shape the diverse cultures of past and present society.

(Other standards will follow a similar pattern)

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To be filled in«

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D. ³The Readings´
Supporting ³Key Quotes´ (to guide teachers, students, parents and staff)
The following items are a partial listing. More can be found at VisualAndActive.com then scroll down to ³The Readings.´

In the early 1970s I was placing student teachers in schools with ³open classrooms´. These schools had kids doing projects in small groups instead of the traditional lecture format. One of my student teachers said, ³This is great, Dennis, but when am I going to really learn how to teach?´ She was standing there in an exciting, rich learning environment, but she couldn¶t see it because it didn¶t match her idea of what teaching was, which was standing up in front of the room, looking out at quiet rows of faces, and pouring knowledge into them. Dennis Littky, The Big Picture, page 13

Trust. Truth. No Put-downs. Active Listening. Personal Best.
Seen at New City School in St. Louis, Mo.
Howard Gardner Alternative Methods of Assessment Key quotes from Gardner Multiple Intelligences is most usefully invoked in the service of two educational goals. The first is to help students achieve certain valued adult roles or end-states. If one wants everyone to be able to engage in artistic activities, it makes sense to develop linguistic intelligence for the poet, spatial intelligence for the graphic artist and sculptor, movement intelligence for the dancer and musical intelligence for the composer. If we want everyone to be civil, then it is important to develop the personal intelligences. The second goal is to help students master certain curricular materials. Students might be encouraged to take a course in biology so as to better understand the development of the living world. If individuals indeed have different kinds of minds, with varied strengths, interests and strategies, then it is worth considering whether pivotal curricular materials like biology could be taught AND ASSESSED in a variety of ways. Intelligence Reframed, p. 167

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Performances of Understanding When it comes to probing a student¶s understanding of evolution, the shrewd pedagogue looks beyond the mastery of dictionary definitions or the recitation of textbook examples. A student demonstrates or ³performs´ his understanding when he can examine a range of species found in different ecological niches and speculate about the reasons for their particular ensemble of traits. A student performs her understanding of the Holocaust when she can compare events in a Nazi concentration camp to such contemporary genocidal events as those in Bosnia, Kosovo or Rwanda in the 1990s. ³Measures of understanding´ may seem demanding, particularly in contract to current, often superficial, efforts to measure what students know and are able to do. And, indeed, recourse to performing one¶s understanding is likely to stress students, teachers, and parents, who have grown accustomed to traditional ways of doing (or NOT doing) things. Nonetheless, a performance approach to understanding is justified. Instead of mastering content, one thinks about the reason why a particular content is being taught and how best to display one¶s comprehension of this content in a publicly accessible way. When students realize they will have to apply knowledge and demonstrate insights in a public form, they assume a more active stance to the material, seeking to exercise their ³performance muscles´ whenever possible.

More Readings are found on www.VisualandActive.com

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E. Reference Books
Guiding Principles
Here are seven key principles selected by John Corlette, founder of Aigon College:
Seven Principles for guiding educators

1. Education of the whole person

2. Systems of reward

3. Instilling self discipline

4. Leadership

5. Responsibility and maturity

6. Healthy lifestyle

7. Religion

Join the Facebook page "Seven Principles"

Some of these books and websites are mentioned in the videos that appear on QBESchool (the youtube channel).
Abraham Fischler The Student is the Class (blog) TheStudentIsTheClass.com Annette Breaux 1001 Answers for Teachers Dan Pink Free Agent Nation A Whole New Mind Dennis Littky The Big Picture: Education is Everyone's Business

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How do Littky's schools integrate the curriculum? The link to ACADEMICS on MetCenter.org
Dennis Yuzenas Portfolios DVD Classroom Methods for the Project-Based Curriculum (DVD) Edward Hallowell Answers to Distraction Howard Gardner Intelligence Reframed Lois Hetland Portfolios: Educating for Understanding Malcolm Gladwell The Tipping Point Blink Outliers

Mel Levine various books

Thomas Friedman Hot, Flat, Crowded The World is Flat Thomas Hoerr Multiple Intelligences School Thomas Lickona Character Matters Thomas Toch Foreword by Tom vander Ark

Tom van der Ark EdReformer.com

Vander Ark's blog edreformer.com/2010/06/auto-tune-education/

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He talks of prep schools http://edreformer.com/2010/04/sponsored/

Two Million Minutes (the documentary) Search on YOUTUBE http://www.2mminutes.com/ Robert Compton's effort to focus attention on good schools.

Magazines Men's Health National Geographic Psychology Today Smithsonian

Learning Outside the Lines Jonathan Mooney

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F. Comments by the Curriculum Team
Leslie Lott
Kids today will be adults working with technologies not even developed yet-- in settings much more individualized than those in today's workforce. They will need their individuality and will need to learn throughout their lives. They will need to make decisions on their own and will need strategies to do that successfully. Adults of the future will need to have big-picture thinking abilities for issues such as problem recognition and solving, prioritizing, etc. Given these facts, education would best serve students if it aimed to teach them to be good learners rather than to swallow whole whatever is spoonfed to them. Wouldn't it be great if education encouraged children to investigate and make their own decisions based on that investigation-- rather than requiring them to sit quietly in neat little rows all doing the same thing at the same time just because that is easier for the teacher? Many of the things that tend to be socialized out of young students through the very example given in the practical, organizational structure of traditional school settings are qualities that could actually help these children thrive as adults. Very little about the future will be traditional. Why do we think we serve children by "educating" them in schools that are?

Maria Brown (notes from a telephone conversation) There needs to be strong leadership from director, but also a student council and a teacher council. While there needs to be democracy, that's all very well, but somebody has to be the leader and the final word. EXPECTATIONS OF PARENTS... they experienced top down leadership, so they also expect it. In Norway, the school work is play-orientated, where they explore and question everything. Learning is geared where they are from their personal level of development. If they want to know about numbers and letters, they are given but the effort is about learning to cooperate with each other through creative play. Point: the Steiner program has better results at every level, how they deal with stress, personal stress, less likely to commit crimes. In short, staff should listen to students. I believe that children learn not according to their age but according to their current level. Those who are able are not held back in this type of school. The benefit: you learn for learning¶s sake, not learning to pass an exam

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REWORD the key points... not "Don't Lead The Students" negative... the phrase should be: ³follow the student´

we don't inspire with a

Let the student lead the way, listen and then point to the doors. People are driven toward the academic side. We learn through experience. Respect is paramount. Respect for each other,for standards , work, teachers, each other. ± according to Margaret Williamson, former school inspector and school principal Maria made reference to Rudolf Steiner and Waldorf Schools.

Iain Barraclough His extended comments appear in the CD that accompanies this document.

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Appendices

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Examples of what most people expect in a curriculum appear below.

Materials that traditional schools use...
MATH http://everydaymath.uchicago.edu/ Everyday Mathematics is a comprehensive Pre-K through 6th grade mathematics curriculum developed by the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project, and published by Wright Group/McGraw-Hill. It is currently being used in over 185,000 classrooms by almost 3,000,000 students. The federal government's What Works Clearinghouse gave Everyday Mathematics the highest rating of any commercially published elementary mathematics curriculum.

http://www2.edc.org/mcc/

Character Education Textbook: Role Models: Examples of Character and Leadership serves as the textbook for the curriculum. We believe kids need positive role models to look up to and emulate. Unfortunately, many kids today report they do not have role models. Other times, the

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role model is, at best, a curious choice. The Role Models textbook highlights 17 individuals who exemplify the different character traits covered in the curriculum. This book offers a mix of historical figures that have stood the test of time like Amelia Earhart, Booker T. Washington and Helen Keller, as well as contemporary figures who are worthy of our admiration, such as Pat Tillman, Christopher Reeve and Oprah Winfrey. Quizzes and vocabulary lists accompany each chapter.

====================== http://www2.edc.org/mcc/pubs/mguide.asp

Choosing a Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum by Lynn T. Goldsmith, June Mark, and Ilene Kantrov Choosing a Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum is a guide for the selection and implementation of instructional materials based on the NCTM Standards. This guide is intended for use by assistant superintendents, curriculum coordinators, mathematics supervisors, lead teachers, department heads, and other educators responsible for the curriculum review and selection process within a district. This 182-page guide describes a process for considering and reviewing standards-based mathematics programs and raises questions and issues for readers to consider in their own processes, such as setting appropriate evaluation criteria, assessing district needs and resources, piloting materials before selection, and planning professional development and teacher support to facilitate implementation. To view excerpts from the guide, click below (Adobe Acrobat required): Table of Contents Chapter 1: What Is a Standards-Based Curriculum? Chapter 2: Getting Started: The ³Big Ideas´ of the Selection and Implementation Process Chapter 6: Developing and Applying Selection Criteria

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Chapter 9: Teacher Support Chapter 11: Implementation Rollout Appendix: Sample Selection Criteria Choosing a Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum is available from Heinemann, Inc., at a cost of $24 (plus shipping and handling).

http://www2.edc.org/mcc/default.asp The K±12 Mathematics Curriculum Center aims to help teachers and administrators make thoughtful, informed decisions about mathematics curriculum and instructional materials. Our projects explore and analyze how curriculum decisions are made in K±12 mathematics programs, provide resources that support good curriculum selection and implementation, and connect research and practice in mathematics instruction. Funded by the National Science Foundation since 1997, the center is based at Education Development Center, Inc.

Sunshine State Standards (Florida) http://www.fldoe.org/bii/curriculum/sss/ Example: a standard for Geometry and points: http://www.floridastandards.org/Resources/PublicPreviewResource8383.aspx If you are looking for a point-by-point description of what will be taught at QBE Schools, you can look here. Some part of the curriculum will cover this point.

Cambridge Materials http://www.cie.org.uk/qualifications/syllabus_materials If you are a teacher working for a registered CIE Centre, you may have access to our Teacher Support website. The Teacher Support website contains all available syllabus material together with a host of other resources that teachers at registered Centres can use to assist them in their teaching. http://www.cie.org.uk/qualifications/academic/middlesec/igcse

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The International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) is the world's most popular international qualification for 14-16 year olds. It develops successful students, giving them excellent preparation for their next steps in education, including progression to A and AS Level study, and equips them with skills for immediate employment. Cambridge IGCSE is recognised by universities and employers worldwide.

Florida Sunshine State Standards
Downloads: Floridastandards.org/Downloads.aspx

IB
The International Baccalaureate® (IB) is a non-profit educational foundation, motivated by its mission, focused on the student. Our three programmes for students aged 3 to 19 help develop the intellectual, personal, emotional and social skills to live, learn and work in a rapidly globalizing world. Founded in 1968, we currently work with 3,000 schools in 139 countries to develop and offer three challenging programmes to over 837,000 students aged 3 to 19 years. The Diploma Programme for students aged 16 to 19 is a demanding twoyear curriculum leading to final examinations and a qualification that is welcomed by leading universities around the world.

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The IB is unique. We offer a continuum of education, consisting of three individual programmes. We span the years from kindergarten to a pre-university diploma. While we are traditionally known for the Diploma Programme, IB World Schools increasingly offer all three programmes. We are proud of our reputation for high quality education sustained for over 35 years. Our curriculum represents the best from many different countries rather than the exported national system of any one. Our challenging Diploma Programme assessment is recognized by the world's leading universities. We maintain our high standards by actively training and supporting teachers, and by authorizing and evaluating IB World Schools. We encourage international-mindedness in IB students. To do this, we believe that students must first develop an understanding of their own cultural and national identity. All IB students learn a second language and the skills to live and work with others internationally²essential for life in the 21st century. We encourage a positive attitude to learning by encouraging students to ask challenging questions, to reflect critically, to develop research skills, and to learn how to learn. We encourage community service because we believe that there is more to learning than academic studies alone. We ensure that our programmes are accessible to students in a wide variety of schools²national, international, public and private²in 139 countries. These IB World Schools form a worldwide community in which there is no such thing as a ³typical´ school (more than 50% of IB students are in state-funded schools). IB World Schools cooperate

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in curriculum development, student assessment and the governance of the IB, making this a unique international collaboration.

http://www.ibo.org/diploma/ Life in the 21st century, in an interconnected, globalized world, requires critical-thinking skills and a sense of internationalmindedness, something that International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Programme students come to know and understand.

The IB curriculum IB Diploma Programme students study six courses at higher level or standard level. Students must choose one subject from each of groups 1 to 5, thus ensuring breadth of experience in languages, social studies, the experimental sciences and mathematics. The sixth subject may be an arts subject chosen from group 6, or the student may choose another subject from groups 1 to 5. In addition the programme has three core requirements that are included to broaden the educational experience and challenge students to apply their knowledge and understanding. The extended essay is a requirement for students to engage in independent research through an in-depth study of a question relating to one of the subjects they are studying. Theory of knowledge is a course designed to encourage each student to reflect on the nature of knowledge by critically examining different ways of knowing (perception, emotion, language and reason) and different kinds of knowledge (scientific, artistic, mathematical and historical).

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Creativity, action, service requires that students actively learn from the experience of doing real tasks beyond the classroom. Students can combine all three components or do activities related to each one of them separately.

Over the course of the two-year programme, students: study six subjects chosen from the six subject groups complete an extended essay follow a theory of knowledge course (TOK) participate in creativity, action, service (CAS). Normally: three of the six subjects are studied at higher level (courses representing 240 teaching hours) the remaining three subjects are studied at standard level (courses representing 150 teaching hours). Subjects, other than languages, may be taught and examined in: English French Spanish. http://www.ibo.org/diploma/curriculum/ =================

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New York Regents

Insert links to Regents website

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Background
(History of John Corlette¶s influence on Education)
John C. Corlette was born John Hubert Christian Corlette on 21 June 1911[1], and died 9 December 1977. Corlette was an English architect who, in 1949, founded the private English-style boarding school Aiglon College in Switzerland. The school is registered as a not-forprofit charitable institution, with an international student intake. Corlette was a former pupil ("Stoic") of Stowe School in Buckinghamshire, and a former teacher at Gordonstoun, a private school in Scotland - he included some of the latter school's educational ideas in the formation of Aiglon. Corlette's death in 1977 came after an extended illness. His legacy is the school that he founded.

Early years
Corlette was the son of an architect.[2] As a teenager, he attended Stowe School, in Buckinghamshire, England. Because of ill health (he had contracted pneumonia five times), he was advised to find a healthier environment, and it was recommended that he attend a school in Switzerland where the high altitude and drier air might assist his recovery - the same reasons that Switzerland was at that time renowned for its sanatoriums for people recovering from pulmonary infections and diseases. This is how he came to go to school in Chesières.

University Life and his First Decade of Employment
Corlette attended ??? university to study ???, and after graduation he commenced working as an architect. He later commenced teaching at Gordonstoun but decided to return to university after working at Gordonstoun for xx years, whereupon he graduated with a degree in education.

The Start of Aiglon
In 1949 Corlette opened his school in Chesières, the same village where he had gone to school as a teenager. Like his mentor Kurt Hahn, John Corlette wrote no books to guide future generations in the creation of a curriculum. His speeches, like those of Kurt Hahn¶s, are peppered with

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phrases that can guide the reader away from a focus on curriculum and textbooks and toward the use of philosophy and environment to improve the behavior of ³the whole man.´ The following extracts from a speech given by Corlette at Aiglon's end-of-term ceremony in July 1973 help illustrate his vision for the school. At the time of delivering this address, the school had expanded to nearly 300 students and had introduced co-education. However, the precepts that guided the early years of the school were still present 25 years after its foundation in 1949.[3]
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Education should be more than academics. We believe that the goal of education is, or should be, the development of the spiritual man, that is of that part of each one of us which, with development and training, is capable of a vision or direct apprehension of the purpose of life, of the true nature of ourselves, of the world in which we live and of such other worlds or states of being as may exist besides. Standards of behavior should be set by the school. Another of our basic principles is that we believe that it is the business of those who direct the school, first to set the standards which they believe the students should be aiming at, and state them in no equivocal fashion, and secondly that they should provide a method of grading for each aspect which will enable the student to know what progress the school authorities think he is making. This grading should, if necessary and where possible, be accompanied by explanations which will help the student to understand his assessment and plan his future progress. In other words, ³tolerance of the beliefs of others´ does not mean that there is a relativistic ³any standards will do´ approach to teaching. Multiculturalism does not connote a lack of universal standards. Education requires teachers to look beyond academics, even if the judgments might be regarded as ³subjective.´ This is no reason for teachers to avoid the responsibility of judging their pupils' work and progress, moreover this is precisely how promotion is accorded to us in real life outside school. A rank system or similar structure that rewards good behavior is central to the school¶s method. It charts the course of the development of the boy or girl as regards his character, sense of responsibility, maturity and general development in relation to the basic standards of conduct and morality which we lay down and which are derived, as far as we are able to understand them, from the teachings of Jesus Christ and other great teachers. This assessment has come to be known here as the Rank System, and is absolutely basic to the idea of education at Aiglon. Note: Corlette did not like the word ³rank´ as it held unintended military overtones. A system of rewarding merit outside the classroom is needed. We get promoted in our business or occupation and our salary increased precisely as we are able to convince our superiors in the hierarchy of our merits with reference to their requirements. The exception to this is of course if we are members of a trade union, in which case, as things are today, our salaries are increased, not according to our merit, but according to the seriousness of the

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threats with which we are able to menace our employers. There have been attempts by students in some schools to follow this example by threatening the school authorities in various ways if they do not give them what they want. This could not happen at Aiglon for the very simple reason that we would rather close the school than abandon our principles. Education includes developing appreciation for and a relationship with our environment. Intimate contact with nature, too, is important, and a realisation of our living relationship with it. Hence our adventure training programme. Learning to live with others and maintaining good relations with people is part of an education. Absolutely essential too is a positive and loving relationship with all other people regardless of their origin, background or beliefs, and a positive and loving relationship with everything in the world and in the universe around us. The education which we offer is designed to go far beyond [passing your exams or getting a better job. It aims] to develop the whole of you and not just a part, to help you to become truly and intensely alive, to help you to a knowledge of and understanding of that part of you which I call the spiritual part, by attention whose dictates you can attain to much more than success in examinations and a good job, that is to lasting happiness. Note: This theory of education goes further than a typical school¶s mission.

Round Square
The beginnings of Round Square: http://www.roundsquare.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=25&Itemid =58 Corlette met and became friends with Dr. Kurt Hahn of the Round Square organisation. Dr. Hahn maintained that it was crucial for students to prepare for life by having them confront it, to develop courage, generosity, imagination, principle and resolution. He felt that this would result in young people becoming better equipped, developing the skills and abilities to become the leaders and guardians of the future.[4] Aiglon College became a member school of the Round Square association in 19xx, and followed these same precepts, giving the school an additional respect and regard in the educational community. The Round Square web site notes that, ³Unlike all the other twentieth century educational innovators, Hahn wrote no books. His testimony and legacy rest in his schools and other programmes he initiated.³ Like Kurt Hahn, John Corlette left behind a school that he had started.[5] A tribute to Corlette: "John Corlette of Aiglon...was our most powerful personality and he was the only one to own his own school. He was urging expansion and development long before I felt we were ready for it. He insisted that there must be an association journal but it was not until 1982 that the enthusiasm and driving energy of Margaret Sittler got ³Echo´ going. John was an original and this showed itself in his creation

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Aiglon and its most characteristic custom: the morning Meditation. He collected art and had a weakness for Jaguars (petrol driven). He was a master of publicity and used this much to the benefit of his school. During the first American conference at Athenian in 1972, Aiglon gave a reception in San Francisco and a very fine film of the school was shown with a commentary by the best of the B.B.C. announcers. It began with the camera swinging through the arc of mountains between Aiguille Verte and the Dent du Midi. Then it swept down into the Rhone valley and one saw the distant road zigzagging up towards Villars. A small object driving up the road grew into a familiar streamline shape and the voice of the B.B.C. chimed in: ³John Corlette had a dream´. There was a chortle of joy from the assembled Heads, which John took in good part." The above is an extract from The Muscles of Friendship - a valedictory speech by Jocelin Winthrop Young, Founding Director of Round Square, on the occasion of his retirement, October 1992 (made at Bishop¶s College School, Lennoxville, Quebec, Canada). There is generally a mood of antipathy in academia toward most articles on Wikipedia. The contents of this article are accurate (the Curriculum Team knows the team that assembled this article). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Corlette

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Corlette¶s speech www.johncorlette.com (emphasis added to aid of the reader) THE GOAL OF EDUCATION AT AIGLON An Address by the director given at the graduation ceremonies and prize giving in Exeter Hall, 3 July 1973 --------------------------------Some of you probably without thinking too much about it, will have assumed that the goal of education is the acquisition of a body of knowledge which will enable you to pass the examinations set by universities, technical colleges or other such bodies. You believe that success in these examinations may enable you to earn a better living and make more money so that you can more effectively satisfy your physical needs and desires and such other needs and desires as can be satisfied by these means. Whilst we agree that the ability to earn a good living is a necessary and important accomplishment we do not regard this as the goal of education but as a by-product of it. We believe that the goal of education is, or should be, the development of the spiritual man, that is of that part of each one of us which, with development and training, is capable of a vision or direct apprehension of the purpose of life, of the true nature of ourselves, of the world in which we live and of such other worlds or states of being as may exist besides. If we are able to achieve such illumination, the business of everyday life and its problems will be taken care of as a by-product, and such physical wealth as we may need for our passage through this life will follow the spiritual wealth which we have worked to achieve. Hence, although we can and do and should work to equip ourselves as efficiently as possible with the tools necessary for earning our living, we shall do this with the more success, and at the same time achieve for ourselves lasting happiness and peace of mind, if we set as our primary goal the acquisition of spiritual wealth or the development of the spiritual man. The organisation and practice of any educational establishment should therefore be such as to recognise this as the goal, and such as to contribute towards its achievement. So, if an educator is to have any success in the accomplishment of his mission, he must take into account not only the basic aim of the development of the spiritual man, but also the nature of man and the practical means whereby he may help him towards his goal. Now, man's nature is complex, but for the sake of simplicity and to provide a practical basis for action it can be divided into four main aspects, each of which influences and reacts to all the others. They are the physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual.

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Each of these four main aspects, if well nourished and well exercised, can help us to develop our spiritual side, help us to perceive truth which, as we approach it more nearly, will bring us closer to perfection or closer to the Eternal One, to identity with cosmic intelligence, cosmic energy, creative principle or Ultimate God according as you like to describe it. This is the ultimate destiny of us all and the reason and purpose of our lives here on earth. It follows that any education which helps to prepare man to fulfill the purpose of his life on earth, must nourish and exercise all four aspects of his nature and regard them of equal importance in the development of the whole man and in the satisfaction of his profoundest aspirations. The joy and happiness which all men seek can be attained only in this way. This is the path to self-realisation and through this to god-realisation which is our ultimate goal. All other satisfactions are either a means to this end or are a mistaken attempt to attain happiness by concentrating un one of these aspects, or perhaps two, and neglecting the others. This results in imbalance and dis-harmony and dis-ease. So, how, in practice, and in a school, and with the material, human and otherwise at our disposal, do we set about this task? Nothing, or very little, we do at Aiglon is haphazard, or done because other people do it or somebody has said it ought to be done that way. Everything we do has been carefully thought out with reference to our basic aim and developed from first principles, and whenever new problems or questions arise, we seek their solution within the same context. We ask ourselves, "Is the solution proposed consistent with our basic aim and principles?" Since this point is not always well understood by those associated with the school, be they parents, staff, students or outsiders, it is perhaps worth giving a few examples of how it works out in our practice here. For example, taking the physical aspect, we start from the premise that the body is the temple of the spirit. This can be stated in different ways. It is the house which "we" inhabit during the short span of our life on earth. It is not "us." It is an instrument which "we" use to express or manifest the various aspects of truth as "we" perceive them. Therefore, the more perfect the body is as an instrument for this purpose, the greater will be its contribution towards the attainment of our goal. We should therefore learn to care for it, nourish it, and exercise it in a way which will help it to function in the best possible way for this purpose. So we have Morning PT, so called. This should be a few minutes gentle jog-trot or the equivalent whose purpose is to stimulate the circulation of the blood after a night of relative stagnation, so that it may carry away for elimination some of the toxins accumulated during rest, and at the same time, circulate fresh oxygen from the lungs to all the cells in the body, thus helping to keep them in optimum condition. Summary DRAFT Curriculum 36

Then we have the cold shower. The skin is one of the major organs of elimination of toxic wastes from the body, and also acts as a kind of thermostat or controller of the body temperature. To fulfill these tasks the skin must be kept in top condition. Owing to the artificial kind of life that man today leads and the clothes he wears, the skin does not have the constant practice of having to respond to the forces of nature such as heat, cold and wet which in more primitive societies kept his skin healthy. It is therefore necessary to do this deliberately, hence the cold shower to stimulate the operation of the thermostat for the control of body temperature, to stimulate the irrigation of the glandular and lymphatic systems and to stimulate the circulation of the blood. With regard to Sports, games and expeditions. Because of their value in developing and training different aspects of the character as well as for their value in the development of the body and the maintenance of health, every student is required during the course of the year (unless some medical reason prevents it) to: a) Take part in at least one team game. b) Ski during the winter and take part in ski expeditions. c) Take part in expeditions on foot when snow and climatic conditions permit. d) Follow a course of gymnastics appropriate to his ability. These physical activities contribute also to the intellectual, emotional and spiritual development of the student. Intelligence is required to perform physical activities well. Considerable emotional satisfaction can also be had from them, from the physical pleasure of doing, as well as from the satisfaction derived from successful performance, and from the companionship with and service to others. All the foregoing plus the contact with nature also make their contribution to the spiritual development of the individual. Now Food and Drink. This is of the greatest importance, but owing to the bad feeding habits of modern civilisation and the resultant falsifying of natural instincts it is very difficult to handle correctly. quite apart from the difficulty of finding good produce, and cooks and housekeepers who understand what is required and are able and willing to carry out the policy. Ideally all the raw materials for meals should be fresh and biologically grown without the use of pesticides or chemical fertilisers. They should then be eaten raw where possible or conservatively cooked in such a way as to preserve the maximum amount of the nutritive elements in the food, especially in relation to vitamins, mineral salts and trace elements.

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All refined foods such as white bread, white rice, white sugar, and anything made with or containing them should be eliminated from the diet as well as stimulating or toxic materials such as coffee, tea, chocolate, alcohol (including wine or beer) and "soft" and carbonated drinks, all of which contain sugar or chemical compounds of various kinds. Efforts should be made to dissuade students from absorbing these things and candy and chewing gum, etc. between meals and when not in the school. Since most children are brought up to value those unhealthy substances, the task is not an easy one. A pure blood stream is the greatest defence against disease both of body and of mind. The old tag "mens sana in corpore sane" - a healthy mind in a healthy body, has a great deal of truth in it. Another of our basic principles is that we believe that it is the business of those who direct the school, first to set the standards which they believe the students should be aiming at, and state them in no equivocal fashion, and secondly that they should provide a method of grading for each aspect which will enable the student to know what progress the school authorities think he is making. This grading should, if necessary and where possible, be accompanied by explanations which will help the student to understand his assessment and plan his future progress. And so we have our different grading systems concerning the activities which are designed to help in the development of the four aspects of man's nature. First we set standards for the students to aim at, then by grading, we let them know how we think they are doing. The object of grading is not to stimulate Competition with others but to let the student know what progress he is making. Hence we have a grading system for studies, academic and artistic and practical, another for sports, games and the adventure training programs or expeditions, and a third for "the whole man." This last is of course the key one and combines all the others in its assessment. It charts the course of the development of the boy or girl as regards his character, sense of responsibility, maturity and general development in relation to the basic standards of conduct and morality which we lay down and which are derived, as far as we are able to understand them, from the teachings of Jesus Christ and other great teachers. This assessment has come to be known here as the Rank System, and is absolutely basic to the idea of education at Aiglon. The term is, I think, unfortunate and misleading, with its military overtones, and perhaps someone can think of a more felicitous way of describing it. It may be objected that an assessment of this kind must necessarily be subjective and therefore unfair. Of course it is subjective, but so are all our judgements, except possibly in the case of mathematics where it can be argued that two will make four regardless of what anybody thinks about it. Summary DRAFT Curriculum 38

However, this is no reason for teachers to avoid the responsibility of judging their pupils' work and progress, moreover this is precisely how promotion is accorded to us in real life outside school. We get promoted in our business or occupation and our salary increased precisely as we are able to convince our superiors in the hierarchy of our merits with reference to their requirements. The exception to this is of course if we are members of a trade union, in which case, as things are today, our salaries are increased, not according to our merit, but according to the seriousness of the threats with which we are able to menace our employers. There have been attempts by students in some schools to follow this example by threatening the school authorities in various ways if they do not give them what they want. This could not happen at Aiglon for the very simple reason that we would rather close the school than abandon our principles. I hope these examples will give you some idea of how we arrive at the various practices which we employ at Aiglon. Given our aim of the education of the whole man and our belief that the lynch pin of this is the development of the spiritual man, we believe that the solution of this problem ultimately rests in the development of the spiritual life of the individual, This can be nourished through many channels. First and foremost of course come the various world religions, the various denominations of the Christian Church, Judaism, Buddhism, Mohammedism, Janism, Hinduism -- to name some of the principal ones. Then there is today an increasing number of groups all seeking the spiritual life along more or less independent lines, some owning allegiance to or at any rate inspiration from, one of the great religions or great Masters, others owning no specific allegiance but drawing inspiration from the wisdom of the ages wherever it may appear. Other means for the development of the spiritual man lie in such techniques as contemplation, meditation, prayer and the growing insights of psychology and parapsychology. Intimate contact with nature, too, is important, and a realisation of our living relationship with it. Hence our adventure training programme. The development of sensitivity to and the practice of art in all its forms provides a very positive channel for the development of the spirit; that is through music, painting, sculpture and all forms of craft -- to all of which of course we attach great importance here. Absolutely essential too is a positive and loving relationship with all other people regardless of their origin, background or beliefs, and a positive and loving relationship with everything in the world and in the universe around us. Summary DRAFT Curriculum 39

This was after all essentially the message which Jesus Christ brought to us. At Aiglon we try, imperfectly no doubt, but always trying to do better, to put these ideas into practice. So, next time you think something we do is stupid and won't help you to pass your exams or get a better job, just stop and remember that the education which we offer, whilst it does this, is designed to go far beyond it, to develop the whole of you and not just a part, to help you to become truly and intensely alive, to help you to a knowledge of and understanding of that part of you which I call the spiritual part, by attention whose dictates you can attain to much more than success in examinations and a good job, that is to lasting happiness. ****** J.C. Corlette 3 July 1973

A Digital Portfolio
A Digital Portfolio contains:
Photos Videos of Performances Interviews that the student has conducted (with pre- and post-interview videos or notes) one-on-one meetings with the student's advisors (which can be private or made public, with the agreement of the student and advisor) videos of the student in an internship scanned writings (essays, digitized images of tests and quizzes) Any lists and plans that the student makes The Digital Portfolio allows the student to look back at past work and see, "Yes, that's when I first became interested in xxxxxx. You can see my first paper about xxxxx."

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See Also DIGITAL studied)

LIBRARY (the collection of items that the student has

EXAMPLES

(to be placed here: examples of students who have "performed their understanding")

A Digital Library
This Digital Library is an example of a personal system of collecting information. In the days of Plato, a strong memory was essential (because there was virtually no way to "look something up"). Even after Gutenberg, books were too rare to be available "at your fingertips." In the Digital Age, the skill of memory is helpful but rarely essential. To be financially successful people, we no longer need the ability to reproduce mathematical formulae and spell complicated words (can you find the errors? recieve believe stationary stationery responsable defence defensable menter adviser wierd Phillippines advisor inalienable unalienable )... Just look for the wiggly red line under the word (Spellchecker, please!). We know dyslexic politicians and authors (who have millions of copies of their works in print) and people who don't remember lyrics or who can't name the signers of the Declaration of Independence... and yet many of those people are financially comfortable.

QBE Schools believes that most students will find it important to develop an annotated bibliography of "books that are important to me and my career and chosen fields of expertise." A mentor who can describe a method of collecting this list is John Vornle, whose list of Business Books is worth $20,000 (read it and you'll have an MBA) SBS = Selected by Steve

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Business Skills Entrepreneurial videos and files (SBS) Marketing Marketing files (SBS)

Charity Charity in Action -- Marla Ruzicka and CIVICWorldwide.org What can one person do?

UNHRC -- one of our friends works there and he has agreed to be a mentor.

Geography The Black Sea has virtually no oxygen at depth (learn about the benefits of the dead zone" -- described by Robert Ballard) Could this be the origin of Noah's Flood?

History What was Kristallnacht like? What memories does someone who grew up in Vienna have? Source: Kurt Wagner, doctor

What happened in 1099? Karen Armstrong, Guardian

Holocaust Memorials

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Humor We love to laugh... Dick van Dyke, Mary Poppins

How can we use music to stimulate a change in mentality?

Internet and Computer Skills makeuseof.com/makeuseof-downloads/

Language What is the power of Language? John McWorter

Learning Differences LDoline.net a source of infomration that The Gift of ADD and ADHD and Dyslexia Touched by Fire Howard Gardner's Theory about Multiple Intelligences

Museums Hermitage Louvre MOMA

Smithsonian

Politics

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Can you duplicate the arguments on a variety of sides? Can you represent the central concerns of a variety of political parties? Ben Stein on the right Bill Maher about Religulous William F. Buckley, articulate evisceration of leftist ideas. Karl Marx, Surplus value of Labor "Surplus-value and the rate of surplus-value are... the invisible essence to be investigated, whereas the rate of profit and hence the form of surplus-value as profit are visible surface phenomena" - Karl Marx, Capital Vol. 3, Pelican edition, p. 134

Psychology Brain Research

Quotations (how to motivate myself and others with quotations) "Never regret. If it's good, it's wonderful. If it's bad, it's experience." - Eleanor Hibbert, British author

Religion What are five important tenets of different ways of viewing the Eternal or looking at explanations of "why things are"? See Karen Armstrong's History of God, especially the chapter on Islam.

Social Skills How to Bully (and how to identify bullying) See the testimony of an alumnus of Aiglon College How to use Facebook and Youtube and other social networks to prepare for being an effective human

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More Schools and Articles
These excerpts from other websites are included to inspire teachers who read this document to explore other possible influences that could improve this curriculum. America's 'quiet crisis'
'The other team is preparing a lot more aggressively than our team.'
By John Beifuss Saturday, February 23, 2008

A documentary film produced by a Memphis multimillionaire is helping to galvanize a national debate about the quality of U.S. education in an increasingly competitive global marketplace. But if venture capitalist Bob Compton now has the ear of both John McCain and Barack Obama thanks to his provocative movie (and to the access that his wealth provides), he admits he's "not a popular guy at home." Compton's teenage daughters, Elizabeth and Meredith, are straight-A students at St. George's Independent School, yet their father has hired tutors in math and science in hopes of elevating their education to an even higher level, to make them better able to compete for what he calls the "high-pay, highgrowth jobs of the 21st century." "They've not been too happy I went to India and China," says Compton, who experienced a radicalizing epiphany about education while visiting schools in countries that have emerged as America's top economic challengers. "I looked in the eyes of 13-year-old girls in India and saw the face of my daughters' competitors," he said. "And I saw the other team is preparing a lot more aggressively than our team. And how they are educated will ultimately affect the economic future of each country." Produced and financed by Compton on a budget of about $500,000, "Two Million Minutes: A Global Examination" is a 53-minute film that follows six top students in the U.S., India and China to determine how they spend the roughly two million minutes contained within their four years of high school.

=========== http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8yk5O9lY6c win in china 10 minutes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3mezNB0dEg bob compton 9 minutes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eu6RHuLPXrQ ============= articles from the BASIC school website.... http://www.basisscottsdale.org/ReasonInnovators2008.pdf ======== This article appeared in a Russian American education journal... Russian american education forum http://www.rus-ameeduforum.com/content/en/?task=art&article=1000731&iid=6

BASIS Schools: Good Teachers, High Expectations and a Little Bit of Tension
Olga V. Block

DESCRIPTORS: charter schools; Arizona BASIS; a rigorous and well tested curriculum and increased expectations; a different approach to teachers; teachers¶ training; an offer of the best education in the country. SYNOPSIS: The author is the founder of one of the most successful charter schools in the nation, and because of that her story of school¶s way to success, her selfanalysis and readiness to evaluate the school are so challenging. She attributes school¶s success to a rigorous and well tested curriculum and increased expectations on students, as well as to the work of dedicated teachers who are experts in their disciplines, and also to the freedom allowed to charter schools in the state of Arizona. 1 Olga V. Block, Ph. D. in Economics, co-founder of the charter school BASIS, Tucson, Arizona.

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==========

http://www.rus-ameeduforum.com/content/en/?task=art&article=1000723&iid=6 =====

http://www.basisscottsdale.org/

Avon Old Farms, Conn.
The school was established with training for boys to learn a trade... and she had specific prohibitions against sports (which she saw as a distraction) and she made the following stipulations Self Knowledge Attention shall be given at Avon to the study of adolescence [i take this to mean that the students themselves will study the processes that they are going through as teenagers]. Each student shall receive aid in solving his own problems by having opened to him, for inspiration and encouragement, a vision of the possibilities of his moral and intellectual development. Educational Policies The academic work shall be directed toward deepening and enriching the thought processes of the students that they may be able to appraise existing situations and those which will confront them in later life. Efforts shall be made to develop in the students the ability to think in the abstract.

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Bullying
It is recommended that the school issue a policy about bullying.
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Over half of students said that bullies are a problem at their school (55 percent)

(from the article below) ====================== "Middle and high school students live in a world of customization, instant gratification and feedback, so real-time, one-on-one learning is what makes sense to them," said Dr. Caprice Young, President and CEO of KC Distance Learning, which owns Aventa Learning, and former President of both the California Charter Schools Association and the Los Angeles Unified School District. "Our data shows that more than half of the students said that the easiest way for students to learn something new is by practicing and watching, which is one of several critical reasons why we need to re-wire our educational approach." With students constantly competing for attention in the classroom ± a mere 18% said they get the attention and the help they need all of the time ± online learning has been gaining momentum in overcrowded and underfunded schools across the U.S. Instead of being bored or falling prey to distractions, which nearly 50 percent said they were, online learning has helped more teens get the individual, immediate instruction and mentoring to allow them to consistently practice and watch what they need to learn. "The last time we made a radical shift in education was when we moved from a one-room school house to individual classrooms," Young continued. "The iGeneration is challenging the current system and we need to listen ± after all, they are our future." In fact, teens are already voicing their need for a change in the traditional school day with nearly 90 percent saying that if they were in charge of their school, they would offer more electives, allow students to take online classes and pick the time of day they took classes. And, they revealed that potentially adding back in drama/music, foreign language, Advanced Placement® and writing courses to the curriculum might help increase the popularity of "being in class" as the favorite part of their day. Teens are College-Bound, but Are They Ready for the 21st Century? The good news for parents and teachers is that nearly 90 percent of teens said they are planning to enroll in a four-year college, community college or technical program when they graduate from high school and 43 percent ranked going to college at the top of the list when asked if they could do anything when they graduate.

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But as the number of classrooms shrinks and the student population grows, middle and high schoolers feel like they are being lost in the shuffle. Sixty percent said that when they fall behind in their classes, they have to ask for help or don¶t get the help they need to catch up, and more than one-third confirmed that they have to ask to be challenged when they are doing well. Preparation for "21st Century" skills is limited as well, as a majority of students are using technology for online research or to use PowerPoint and Excel, but not much else. "Ninety percent of the teens surveyed said that their schools have computers that are connected online, yet teens are only directed to take advantage of what¶s at their fingertips at a very basic level," Young continued. "The potential to take the activities that students are using on a daily basis, apply critical-thinking skills and turn them into age- and generationally-appropriate learning opportunities is limitless." Schools Offer Online Learning as a Solution In addition to maximizing how and when teens use technology to create an enhanced learning environment, when social factors like bullying (55 percent of respondents confirmed it is an issue) enter the picture, school administrators and teachers are turning to online learning resources like Aventa to help pave a new path. Young believes that online learning is the "great equalizer" because it ensures that teens in every location have access to high quality teachers and consistent curriculum. Programs like Aventa, which in conjunction with school districts, give students new options to learn at their own pace and have a one-on-one relationship with educators whether they¶re in need of more assistance, looking for more accelerated classes or simply prefer to learn in a medium that they have grown up with. For more information about online learning, visit www.aventalearning.com. Survey Results at a Glance
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Classroom boredom (42 percent) and distractions from other kids (48 percent) topped the list of daily challenges of students Teens are voicing their need for a change in the traditional school day o More than half said that the easiest way for them to learn something new is by practicing and watching o Nearly 90 percent said that if they were in charge of their school, they would offer more electives, allow students to take online classes and pick the time of day they took classes. Teens are college-bound, but are they ready for the 21st century? o Good news for parents and teachers  Nearly 90 percent of teens said they are planning to enroll in a four-year college, community college or technical program when they graduate from high school  43 percent ranked going to college at the top of the list when asked if they could do anything when they graduate

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But overcrowded classrooms have left teens feeling like they are being lost in the shuffle  60 percent said that when they fall behind in their classes, they have to ask for help or don¶t get the help they need to catch up  More than 1/3 confirmed that they have to ask to be challenged when they are doing well o Student interaction with technology is limited to a very basic level  Despite 90 percent of students having computers that are connected online at school, the majority are using technology for online for research or to use PowerPoint and Excel, but not much else

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Over half of students said that bullies are a problem at their school (55 percent)

Download our "Beyond the Classroom" Survey Results Charticle Fill out a brief form to download the Full "Beyond the Classroom" Survey summary About the Survey The Aventa Learning "Beyond the Classroom" online survey was designed and analyzed by Ketchum Global Research Network and fielded by Braun Research. The survey was fielded to a national sample of 500 children age 13- to 17-year-olds from April 20-24, 2010. The survey has a margin of error of +/-4.4%. About KC Distance Learning, Inc. KC Distance Learning, Inc. (KCDL) is a leading provider of online learning programs for middle school and high school students including core, Foreign Language, Honors, and AP® courses. Since the first programs were introduced in 1974, the company has enriched the lives of more than 260,000 students through high quality online education programs.

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(DRAFT) Mission Statement
http://www.rbmaritime.org/Mission_Statement.html
(This is a maritime academy in Florida)

QBE schools give students a rigorous five-part hands-on education, including life skills and career exploration.

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End of Draft Report

Send comments to QBESchool@gmail.com +1 954.646.8246

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