Volume 3 No.

27 — ComPlImeNTARY
Published by ClIPPeR PRess –– a local, family-owned business oN THe WeB: www.pembrokexpress.com e-mAIl: editor@pembrokexpress.com AdVeRTIsINg: 781-934-2811 x23
FRIdAY, JulY 9, 2010
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“Sun is shining. Weather is sweet. Make you want to move your dancing feet.” — Bob Marley
Team effort at
West Elm Farm
By Becca Manning, express staff
Becca@peMBrokexpress.coM
Though the season got off to an uncertain
start — with the Town Landing beach closed
for state testing right before its offcial open-
ing — the local swim program is back in full
swing, and Director of Beaches Amy Hill
said she’s never seen Oldham Pond looking
so clear.
“We opened up a little over two weeks
ago, and it’s been clear like this ever since,”
said Hill, who has worked for the Pembroke
swim program for eight years, fve of them
as director. “I haven’t seen any of the blue-
green algae this year. It hasn’t bloomed.”
After an Oldham Pond resident contacted
Come on in,
the water’s fine
A KICK OUT OF SUMMER: Head lifeguard Sam Draper helps three-year-old Isabella Panaro
works on her kicks during a swim lesson Tuesday morning at the Town Landing beach.
After uncertain start, town beaches now
open and busy with lessons, recreation
USING HIS NOODLES: Danny Abban, 4, prac-
tices his kicking in Oldham Pond, supported
by noodle floats. continued on page 13 Photos by Becca Manning
By Becca Manning, express staff
Becca@peMBrokexpress.coM
For Christine Falk and
Matt York, the past year has
been one big growing season
as they worked to build a local
farmers market from scratch.
On Saturday, all that work
will pay off as the frst Pem-
broke Farmers Market opens
for business at 9 a.m. on the
Town Green. There, shoppers
will be able to fnd fresh pro-
duce, herbs, cut fowers, eggs,
lobster, breads, pies, cookies,
soaps, jewelry, pottery, hand-
bags and more as they visit the
20-or-so vendor booths set up
around the green.
Market time
Pembroke venture to open
Saturday on Town Green
PEMBROKE FARMERS MARKET
WHAT: Local farmers, grow-
ers, crafters and other ven-
dors, plus acoustic music,
kids’ activities and informa-
tion about locally grown and
organic food
WHEN: Saturdays,
July 10- Sept.
25, 9 a.m. to
noon
WHERE: Town
Green in front
of the com-
munity center,
128 Center Street
INFO: Find vendors list and
more information online at
pembrokefarmersmarket.org
continued on page 9
By Becca Manning, express staff
Becca@peMBrokexpress.coM
L
ike many business
ventures, West Elm
Farm started with a
dream. Well, two dreams.
Patrick Roll and John Ab-
batematteo were living in Ja-
maica Plain
at the time
and talking
about their
life goals.
Abbat emat -
teo wanted to restore an old
farmhouse. Roll wanted to
raise animals.
“I said, ‘Well, they kind
of go together,’ and that’s how
we came up with the idea,”
Abbatematteo said. “It kind of
took off from there.”
The pair moved to Pem-
broke in 2000 and spent the
next several years restoring
a 190-year-old farmhouse on
West Elm Street. Thinking
they’d start with goats, they
discovered Icelandic sheep and
fell in love with the animals,
Micro eco farm uses sustainable
practices to raise sheep, rabbits
continued on page 16
Friday, July 9, 2010 2
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By Mike tropeano, express contriButor
T
he great American
writer Walt Whit-
man once said, “I
see great things in baseball.
It’s our game — the American
game.” This spirit is alive in
Pembroke through the work of
many volunteers who over the
years have worked tirelessly
to ensure that the youth base-
ball program fourished. Cur-
rent Pembroke Youth Baseball
President Paul Mahoney is
overseeing the fnal touches on
the aggressive feld expansion
project started by his predeces-
sor, Steve Nagle. As a result of
their work and the help of oth-
ers, Pembroke will be hosting a
Cal Ripken League State Tour-
nament for the second time in
three years.
How did you get involved
in the program? I started by
coaching my son when he
was six and entering the tee
ball program. I became a divi-
sion director when he was in
the Rookie 8 program. When
Steve Nagle stepped down as
president in the fall of 2007, I
became president.
I had been involved in oth-
er things around town, starting
with the Government Study
Committee when we moved
from three to fve selectmen.
I have also coached basketball
for both my older daughter and
son. I wanted to get more in-
volved since moving to Pem-
broke from Weymouth in 1993
with my wife, after having
grown up in Hanover.
How large is the pro-
gram? We have over 600
players in the program, tee ball
through Babe Ruth. We start
players in kindergarten at the
age of six in tee ball and go all
the way to Babe Ruth, which is
13-15 years old. Our summer
program has eight teams and
over 100 players who continue
into early August playing in
summer leagues and tourna-
ment play.
How important has the
field expansion project been
for Pembroke Youth Base-
ball? It was big for us, al-
lowing us to centralize the
program into one location.
All of our games are played at
one place; we keep all of our
equipment and uniforms there.
It has allowed us to have our
opening and dedication cer-
emonies in one complex. We
are also building a new snack
bar building, which we hope
will be done by the end of our
summer season. It will have re-
strooms and meeting facilities
for our organization.
How did the project get
started? There was an obvious
need for additional felds be-
cause we did not have enough
for the program. The program
outgrew the original three felds
at Mattakeesett Street. Steve
Nagle looked into expanding
the complex. It was through
his work with the Board of Se-
lectmen, Conservation Com-
mission and other town boards
such as Recreation that got the
project going. He worked with
the engineers to develop plans
and organize the volunteer ef-
fort to get the land cleared and
leveled for no cost. Greg Han-
ley was also important to the
effort. We also got a huge boost
when we won the Granite City
Field of Dreams contest and
were able to light two felds.
What is the difference be-
tween the Cal Ripken League
and Little League? They are
very similar in style of play;
baseball is baseball. It has to
do more with the organization
and administrative way to run
a youth baseball league. Cal
Ripken League allows the local
league to run their program the
way they see best. They limit
the rules about how the local
program should be run. There
are also more opportunities for
the players who participate in
the summer program. Cal Rip-
ken has tournaments for ages
9-12, while Little League is
just 12-year-olds.
What is planned for the
Cal Ripken State Tourna-
ment? This is a big event for
our program. We are hosting 10
nine-year-old teams from East-
ern Massachusetts, including
our team coached by Jim Du-
chini. The opening ceremonies
will be on Saturday, July 17. It
will consist of a parade of all
players, a skills competition, a
home run derby and a cookout
for all the players catered by
Pat Gibbons and the Alumni
Sports Café. Pat has been a big
supporter of the program and
has always been there when we
needed him. Games will start
that afternoon and continue
throughout the week.
How does somebody get
involved in the program? You
can contact anyone presently
involved, whether it is a coach
or board member. The Web site
is the easiest place to get in-
formation, pembrokebaseball.
com. Just like every volunteer
organization, the more help we
get the better. It is really a year-
round effort between registra-
tion, planning, the spring sea-
son and our summer program;
we need a lot of people to keep
the program going.
A visit with Paul Mahoney
Youth Baseball president excited to host tourney
Pembroke Youth Baseball President Paul Mahoney stands near
First Lt. Brian McPhillips Field at the Mattakeesett Street com-
plex, where the organization will host the Cal Ripken League
State Tournament.
REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
7 Deveuve Lane, $217,151. Leo J. Banti and MERS to FNMA
37 Juniper Lane, $360,000. Charlette M. Preslar and Timothy S.
Nelson to Troy Albee and Krista Albee
32 Lilah Lane, $444,599. Debra A. Murphy and First Horizon Home
Loans to First Horizon Home Loans
27 N Boundary Road, $245,000. Bruce Noddin and Bonnie L.
Noddin to Casey C. Perry
547 Washington Street #B19, $205,000. Tracy L. Pulciani and
Tracy L. Maag to Andrew J. May
SUNRISE/SUNSET
Sunrise Sunset
Fri. July 9 5:15 a.m. 8:19 p.m.
Sat. July 10 5:16 a.m. 8:19 p.m.
Sun. July 11 5:16 a.m. 8:18 p.m.
Mon. July 12 5:17 a.m. 8:18 p.m.
Tues. July 13 5:18 a.m. 8:17 p.m.
Wed. July 14 5:19 a.m. 8:17 p.m.
Thurs. July 15 5:20 a.m. 8:16 p.m.
Fri. July 16 5:21 a.m. 8:16 p.m.
TIDES
Low High Low High
Sat. July 10 4:24 a.m. 10:37 a.m. 4:33 p.m. 10:46 p.m.
Sun. July 11 5:15 a.m. 11:28 a.m. 5:24 p.m. 11:38 p.m.
Mon. July 12 6:05 a.m. 12:19 p.m. 6:16 p.m. midnight
High Low High Low
Tues. July 13 12:30 a.m. 6:54 a.m. 1:09 p.m. 7:08 p.m.
Wed. July 14 1:22 a.m. 7:43 a.m. 1:59 p.m. 8:01 p.m.
Thurs. July 15 2:15 a.m. 8:33 a.m. 2:50 p.m. 8:55 p.m.
Fri. July 16 3:09 a.m. 9:24 a.m. 3:43 p.m. 9:51 p.m.
— These are the tides for Boston Light/Boston Harbor. For tides at
other local beaches, visit boatma.com/tides.
Photo by Mike Tropeano
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Cal Ripken team wins
District 3 championship
By Mike tropeano
express contriButor
The Pembroke 12-year-old
Cal Ripken team swept their
way to the District 3 champi-
onship in a tournament held
June 25-30 at First Lt. Brian
McPhillips feld on Mattakee-
sett Street.
The team came out of the
gate fast against Randolph
with a 7-0 combined no hitter
from Drew CaraDonna (5 IP, 9
K) and Justin Everson (1 IP, 3
K). Despite throwing their ace,
Randolph could only contain
the potent Pembroke attack for
three innings when the home-
town team put a single run on
the board to get the scoring
started.
The team continued the at-
tack, crossing the plate three
times each in the ffth and sixth
to break the game open. Of-
fensively, the team was paced
by Joey Birolini (2 runs), Cam
Deegan (2 hits, 2 runs scored)
and Trevor Hall (2 hits, 3 RBI).
Defensively, Drew Norton
contributed with two assists.
Weymouth North was the
next team in line in the quest
for the title. The team started
slowly, allowing the visitors
to jump out to a 1-0 lead after
two innings. The lead would
be short lived when the Pem-
broke bats came alive in the
third, putting up seven runs
on their way to an 8-1 victo-
ry. Christian Nashawaty was
impressive on the mound, get-
ting the complete game win.
He consistently kept the North
Weymouth batters off balance,
striking out six and helping
himself defensively on the f-
nal out of the game.
A date with three-time
defending champion South
Weymouth was now waiting.
This time, Pembroke wasted
no time in getting the offense
started, scoring two runs in the
frst on Austin LeBlanc’s two-
run double. The team kept the
bats alive with another three
runs in the second and two in
the fourth. Again, CaraDonna
was spectacular on the mound,
scattering fve hits for the 7-1
win. The team’s defense also
remained solid with its third
straight errorless game high-
lighted by web gems from
Ryan Tropeano. Michael Byrne
and Ricky Dahlquist also had
critical defensive plays.
The loss for South Wey-
mouth forced them into the
loser’s bracket of the tourna-
ment, making them defeat
Randolph for the right to meet
Pembroke in the championship
round, setting up another battle
between these rivals.
South Weymouth started
the game strong, putting up
four runs in the top of the frst
inning; however, this year, the
outcome would be different,
and Pembroke would avenge a
tough loss in last year’s cham-
pionship game.
The local team fought right
back, plating two runs in the
frst to cut the defcit in half.
They took control in a four-run
fourth when winning pitcher
LeBlanc’s ball fnally landed
for a two-run homer, and the
boys were en route to a 9-6
victory.
Defensively, Kyle Holland
fought a tough setting sun for
a key play in the ffth inning.
Offensively, Deegan (3 hits,
3 runs) and Tropeano helped
continue the torrid Pembroke
attack. Sean Feth returned to
the lineup and contributed with
two hits. A key assist for the
tournament should also go to
injured player, Sean L’Italien,
who attended all games and
maintained the statistics for
the team.
As a result of their victory,
the team moves on to compete
for the Eastern Massachusetts
State title in Bourne.
The team is coached by
Paul Birolini, Brian Deegan
and Mike Tropeano.
The Pembroke 12-year-old Cal Ripken team swept their way to the District 3 championship in a
tournament held June 25-30 at First Lt. Brian McPhillips field on Mattakeesett Street.
Pembroke player Justin Everson bats against South Weymouth in
the Cal Ripken District 3 championship game.
Grief support group offered
Beacon Hospice will offer a grief series and support group
for younger spouses and partners (in their 20s, 30s and 40s) who
have lost their life partner much too early in life. This group
will meet in Plymouth for eight weeks on Thursday evenings at
7 p.m. beginning July 15. This program is free of charge, and
all are welcome to attend. Registration is required by July 14
by calling Scott A. Ciosek, M.Div., bereavement coordinator at
Beacon Hospice, at 508-747-7222.
The Pembroke Gridiron Boosters Club’s third annual
Titans Youth Football Camp will be held the week of July
26-30, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day. Taught by Pembroke
High School football coaches, the camp will feature a week
of non-contact football instruction for kids entering third
grade thru ninth grade. Cost is $150 per player, with a fam-
ily discount of $25 for each additional camper. Families
may register by e-mail at pembrokegridiron@yahoo.com.
All proceeds will beneft the Pembroke High School foot-
ball team.
Gridiron Booster Club to host
youth football camp July 25-30
Courtesy photos
Friday, July 9, 2010 4
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
By JiM MccolluMn, solid Waste &
recycling coMMittee MeMBer
Not much progress to re-
port from the Solid Waste &
Recycling Committee. We
had two different guests pres-
ent options to those of us who
were at last
Wednesday’s
me e t i n g .
One is called
WasteZero,
which is a
c o m p a n y
that sets up and
runs a pay-as-
you-throw pro-
gram. Their claim
is that they reduce the solid
waste tonnage by 43 percent
in the towns they serve. If they
could reduce our 7,000 tons by
3,010 tons, that would save us
$331,100 a year — imagine
what that savings would do to
our trash bills.
Now, I’m sure they are
projecting their very best im-
age and that there is a cost to
this program. Their cost sav-
ings is due to signifcant in-
creases in recycling. There
are signifcant costs associ-
ated with recycling, but there
are still signifcant savings for
Pembroke residents to a pro-
gram like theirs.
There are other details to
work out, such as how much
must be paid as a fee and how
much would be paid for each
bag. Several members of our
committee are great supporters
of PAYT, but others are not, so
we don’t have a consensus. I’m
a strong proponent of PAYT.
There are issues that need to
be dealt with, but at least 130
Mass. towns have managed to
deal with those issues.
The second guest was
a Pembroke resident, Gordon
Martin, who has managed the
Wellesley solid waste system
for 31 years. He told us there
are lots of ways we can im-
prove our solid waste and save
money in the process. Martin
pays close attention to the recy-
cling materials prices and liter-
ally bids out every load to the
highest bidder. In Pembroke, I
can’t even fnd out how much
we were paid for most of the
recycling materials. I fnd
minimal information regarding
what it cost us to haul it away,
but nothing as to what the re-
turn was. I asked for those fg-
ures at the very frst meeting
we had way back in February
and still have not seen it.
I did have a chance to visit
with some Pembroke friends
who we only see at holiday
parties and had some inter-
esting conversations. Several
claim that they don’t recycle
any more because of the lay-
out and setup of the current
recycling center. I have com-
plained about the layout, too,
with little response. I did a test
run early on in the new cen-
ter and, if I adhered to all the
rules, I walked approximately
140 yards. Then, if I had yard
waste or large metal objects to
leave, I had to lug them over
a 4-foot-high fence. I’m pretty
healthy and strong, so I could
manage most of that, but there
are lots of people who simply
cannot do what they are ex-
pected to do.
So, my hope is that some
of you are in the business of
laying out logical, effcient
“traffc” pattern systems and
can sketch out a modifed plan
for how we could make our
recycling center more inviting
and user friendly.
Please help us. Members of
the Solid Waste & Recycling
Committee are not experts
—we are just dedicated people
wanting to do a good job.
Jim McCollum is a mem-
ber of Pembroke’s Solid Waste
& Recycling Committee,
which meets every Wednes-
day at 6:30 p.m. at Town Hall.
Residents are encouraged to
participate in the discussion
online at pembroketalkintrash.
blogspot.com.
School Street home
broken into through
basement window
A School Street resident reported last Fri-
day that someone broke into his house through
a basement window and made off with a bag of
coins valued at $100, a couple of valuable beer
steins and some CDs. According to police re-
ports, the resident left his home around 8 a.m.
on Friday, July 2 and returned around 8 p.m.
He discovered someone had entered through
an unlocked window in his basement and, fnd-
ing the door to the upstairs locked, kicked the
door in. None of the neighbors reported seeing
anyone. Police are investigating.
Man accused of
assault, kidnapping
A Pine Tree Lane man who allegedly kept
a woman from leaving his home after an argu-
ment has been charged with assault and battery,
intimidating a witness and kidnapping.
John D. Young, 31, of 40 Pine Tree Lane was
arrested Monday night after the woman man-
aged to get away and called police at a nearby
home. The woman said Young had been drinking
when they got into an argument and he slapped
her in the face, hit her in the head and knocked
her to the foor. Young then allegedly told her
she could not leave, preventing her from calling
police and cornering her in a room for about 45
minutes, according to reports. When he walked
away at one point, the woman left the home and
went next door to call police.
Young was held on $5,000 cash bail at the
Plymouth County House of Corrections and ar-
raigned Tuesday morning in Plymouth District
Court.
Family member may
have taken guns
Police believe a family member may be the
culprit in a break-in reported at a Woodbine Av-
enue home. According to reports, the resident
called police around 3 a.m. on Monday, after
returning home to fnd two guns missing from
a locked safe. Police said there was no sign of
forced entry to the home or to the safe. Items
taken include a .22-caliber Remington rife and
a .380-caliber pistol. Police are investigating.
Pembroke police log
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THuRSDAY, JuNE 24
10:25 a.m. Dog complaint re-
ported on School and Mattakeesett
streets. Referred incident to animal
control offcer.
12:19 p.m. Dog complaint
reported on West Elm Street. Re-
ferred incident to animal control
offcer.
4:15 p.m. Suspicious activity
reported on Captain Torrey Lane.
4:15 p.m. Sex offenses report-
ed on Oak Street.
4:41 p.m. Threatening report-
ed on Furnace Lane.
7:02 p.m. Suspicious activity
reported on Riverside Drive
7:21 p.m. Police arrested Mi-
chael P. Cobb, 31, of 142 Indian
Trail on a default warrant for fail-
ure to appear.
8:57 p.m. Motor vehicle crash
with over $1,000 in damages re-
ported on Mattakeesett and Grove
streets.
9:10 p.m. Larceny/shoplifting
reported on Church Street.
10:07 p.m. Suspicious vehicle
reported on Taylor Point Road.
FRiDAY, JuNE 25
1:26 a.m. Noise complaint re-
ported on Littles Avenue. Verbal
warning given.
3:22 a.m. Suspicious activity
reported on Jessica Circle.
8:08 a.m. Missing or lost prop-
erty reported on Forest Street.
9:35 a.m. Suspicious activity
reported on Center Street.
10:25 a.m. Motor vehicle
break-in reported on Church
Street.
11:00 a.m. Fraud reported on
Valley Street.
12:30 p.m. Motor vehicle
break-in reported on Church
Street.
4:12 p.m. Motor vehicle com-
plaint reported on Oak Street.
5:09 p.m. Motor vehicle com-
plaint reported on Church Street.
6:25 p.m. Suspicious motor
vehicle reported on Oak Street.
Departmental action taken.
7:33 p.m. Noise complaint re-
ported on Tara Drive. Verbal warn-
ing given.
8:28 p.m. Annoying phone
calls reported on Washington
Street.
11:20 p.m. Animal complaint
reported on Antilla Court.
SATuRDAY, JuNE 26
9:20 a.m. Animal complaint
reported on Center Street. Re-
ferred incident to animal control
offcer.
11:25 a.m. Bicycle larceny re-
ported on Mattakeesett Street.
11:46 a.m. Residential vandal-
ism reported on Oldham Street.
1:45 p.m. Annoying phone
calls reported on Grace Ann
Road.
2:53 p.m. Disturbance report-
ed on Mattakeesett Street.
6:01 p.m. Dog complaint re-
ported on Gorham Avenue. Re-
ferred incident to animal control
offcer.
7:41 p.m. Vandalism reported
on Merrick Way.
8:16 p.m. Disturbance report-
ed on Brick Kiln Lane.
9:00 p.m. Animal complaint
reported on Lyon Road.
9:16 p.m. Noise complaint re-
ported on William Avenue.
SuNDAY, JuNE 27
2:05 a.m. Non-aggravated as-
sault reported on Warren Terrace.
6:53 a.m. Residential vandal-
ism reported on Standish Street.
9:15 a.m. Suspicious activity
reported on Antilla Court.
9:35 a.m. Suspicious activity
reported on Forest Street.
12:15 p.m. Motor vehicle
theft reported on Harvard Street.
5:37 p.m. Suspicious activity
reported on Columbia Road.
6:57 p.m. Suspicious activity
reported on Center Street. Dis-
persed gathering.
7:13 p.m. Motor vehicle crash
with over $1,000 in damages re-
ported on southbound off ramp.
Referred incident to State Police.
7:26 p.m. Highway/Water/
Tree Department call reported on
Center and Mattakeesett streets.
8:29 p.m. Noise complaint
reported on Wampatuck Street.
9:02 p.m. Noise complaint
reported on Mattakeesett Street.
9:06 p.m. Noise complaint
reported on Plymouth Street. Re-
ferred to other police.
9:12 p.m. Noise complaint
reported on Center Street.
10:47 p.m. Suspicious activ-
ity reported on Edgewater Drive.
MoNDAY, JuNE 28
10:50 a.m. Domestic issue re-
ported on Kerri Lane. 209A order
placed on fle.
2:03 p.m. Motor vehicle crash
with over $1,000 in damages re-
ported on Church Street.
4:34 p.m. Vandalism reported
on Forest Street.
7:09 p.m. Suspicious activity
reported on High Street.
TuESDAY, JuNE 29
11:47 a.m. Motor vehicle
theft reported on Church Street.
2:09 p.m. Residential break-
in reported on Hamilton Drive.
4:42 p.m. Motor vehicle
crash with over $1,000 in dam-
ages reported on Hobomock and
Center streets.
7:32 p.m. Larceny reported
on Pleasant Street. Referred to
state police.
8:35 p.m. Suspicious vehicle
reported on Dwelley Street.
11:22 p.m. Dog complaint re-
ported on Ferndale Avenue.
WEDNESDAY, JuNE 30
2:01 a.m. Suspicious vehi-
cle reported on North Boundary
Road.
7:49 a.m. Suspicious vehicle
reported on Mountain Avenue.
9:05 a.m. Commercial van-
dalism reported on Captain Tor-
rey Lane.
4:29 p.m. Animal complaint
reported on Country Club Circle.
Referred incident to animal con-
trol offcer.
5:12 p.m. Motor vehicle theft
reported on Fernace Lane.
8:18 p.m. Threatening report-
ed on Furnace Lane.
9:53 p.m. Domestic issue re-
ported on Center Street.
THuRSDAY, JulY 1
7:05 a.m. Residential vandal-
ism reported on Standford Hill
Road.
12:12 p.m. Fraud reported on
Pleasant street.
1:44 p.m. Motor vehicle crash
with damage over $1,000 reported
on Church and Oak streets.
8:05 p.m. Fire incident re-
ported on Fieldstone Drive. Fire
Department notifed.
Talking
Trash
A quick look at pay-as-you-throw
5 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help Support your Hometown newSpAper. pleASe tell our AdvertiSerS you SAw ‘em in tHe expreSS!
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'10.AH-Do Everything:Layout 1 5/6/10 10:51 AM Page 4
Stop & Shop Plaza • Kingston
781.422.9999
Fine Wine • Beer • Liquor • Cigars
Artwork, photographs
sought for Arts Festival
T
he 43rd Pembroke
Arts Festival will
take place on Aug.
7-8 under the big pink-and-
white striped tent on the
Town Green. All area artists
and photographers are wel-
come to enter this juried show,
which recognizes outstand-
ing achievement in numer-
ous categories including oil/
acrylic, watercolor/gouache,
pastel/drawing, mixed media/
printmaking, sculpture, fber
arts/fne crafts, and color and
black-and-white photography.
Submissions, which must
be the original work of the
artist and may not have been
previously exhibited in the
Pembroke Arts Festival, will
be accepted at the community
center in Pembroke Center on
Friday, July 23 from 7-9 p.m.
and Saturday, July 24 from 9
a.m. to noon. There is a $12
nonrefundable fee per entry,
and no limit on the number of
pieces that may be entered.
Flat work must be framed,
wired and ready to hang.
Sculpture and 3-D work must
be accompanied by their own
pedestals.
The festival also features
a separate Young Artists exhi-
bition. Young artists in grades
preschool through high school
are invited to submit their orig-
inal artwork and/or photogra-
phy. Each student may enter a
maximum of two pieces in the
combination of their choice.
There is no fee. A maximum
of 180 entries will be accept-
ed. Entries may be left at the
Pembroke Public Library from
Monday, July 12 through Sat-
urday, July 24. Blank entry
forms will be available at the
main desk. The pieces must be
ready for hanging: framed with
hooks and wire on the back.
Judges for this year’s fes-
tival include: T.A. Charron,
an artist and curator for the
Attleboro Arts Museum, with
more than 90 national awards
for excellence in both paint-
ing and drawing; Bob Packert,
a commercial photographer
based in Boston who special-
izes in shooting people, fash-
ion, sports and lifestyle in stu-
dio and on location and whose
honors and memberships in-
clude Graphic Photography
Annual, Communication Arts,
Art Directors Club of NY, The
One Show, Tokyo One and the
Ad Club of Boston; and Anne
Belson, a Cape Cod artist with
a studio in East Falmouth,
whose paintings have been in-
cluded in national exhibits in
Pennsylvania and Rhode Is-
land. She also is a juried gal-
lery artist at South Shore Art
Center and the Cape Cod Art
Association. She holds signa-
ture memberships in the New
England Watercolor Society,
the Pennsylvania Watercolor
Society and the Rhode Island
Watercolor Society.
The Arts Festival is also
looking for volunteers to as-
sist in numerous ways before,
during and after the festival.
Help is needed with taking in
entries, setting up panels for
the artwork to hang on, donat-
ing and serving dessert at the
Friday night reception, serving
as a host at the tent entrance
during the festival and helping
with the children’s crafts.
For more information
about the festival, submitting
artwork in either the juried
show or the Young Artists Ex-
hibition or to see a compete
list of volunteer opportunities,
visit pembrokeartsfestival.org.
Entry forms may be down-
loaded from the link that says
“Artists.” Volunteers are also
welcome to call Rita Ouellette
at 781-294-8191 for more in-
formation.
On June 6, Emma
Cushing, 5, had
a haircut she will
always remember. Her
appointment was at All
About You hair salon
on Mattakeesett Street,
cut by Donna. Emma
has had long, thick hair
her whole life, so when
she asked to have it
cut, the first thing that
came to mind was
where do to donate it.
In the end, Emma was
able to donate 8 inches
to Beautiful Lengths at
Pantene. Emma just
graduated from CNK and will be headed to kindergarten at
Bryantville Elementary School in the fall.
A cut above ——————
A Pembroke Arts Festival visi-
tor looks at the gallery of art-
work submitted in the festival’s
2009 juried show.
Red & blue ——————
Pembroke
resident
Becky
Coletta
campaigns
for Josh
Cutler of
Duxbury,
who is run-
ning against
Webster for
the Sixth
Plymouth
District seat.
T
hough Pembroke was quiet over the Indepen-
dence Day holiday, with no town events sched-
uled, several local faces appeared in the Fourth
of July parade in nearby Duxbury on Sunday.
Pembroke
residents
Mike Flanagan
(left) and
Dan Wandell
campaign for
State Rep. Dan
Webster (far
right), also of
Pembroke.
Friday, July 9, 2010 6
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
SEND AROuND TOWN ITEMS
including birth announcements,
weddings, engagements,
promotions & anniversaries to
beverly@pembrokexpress.com.
Photos are welcome.
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Located Off Route 106, East Bridgewater, turn on South St. at the E.B. YMCA
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Children welcome under adult supervision
No pets. We supply containers. Call for conditions
Recently, ➢ Matthew Hoar
and Chelsi Pugliese earned their
degrees from the College of the
Holy Cross in Worcester. Be sure
to congratulate Matthew and
Chelsi when you see them around
town.
Congratulations also go out ➢
to Derek Keough, who has made
High Honors for the second se-
mester at Thayer Academy in
Braintree. Derek is in the Class
of 2012.
Some Red Hat ladies recent- ➢
ly had an outing to Hingham and
Norwell. The ladies saw “Show
Biz III” at the Performing Arts
Center at Linden Ponds. After
the performance, the ladies went
to the Strawberry Fair Restaurant
for a late afternoon lunch. I hear
Carole Lesieur had a dish called
Lobster Mac and Cheese. Carole
said the meal was delicious.
On Sunday, Sept. 12, ➢ Mary
Bower will participate in the
26.2-mile Boston Marathon
Jimmy Fund Walk. This will be
Mary’s 17th year doing so. Mary
walks in memory of two former
students and in honor of all the
children and adults fghting can-
cer. Last year, Mary collected
just over $2,800, and her goal
this year is $3,000. If you would
like to help Mary reach her goal
and at the same time join in the
fght against cancer, you may
send your contribution (checks
payable to BMJFW) to Mary
Bower, 10 Misty Meadow Road,
Pembroke, MA 02359. If there is
someone you would like Mary to
walk for, just send the name along
with your contribution, and she
will pray for that person and for
you while she is walking.
It is time to go down to the ➢
library to bid on those silent auc-
tion items on display. Some of the
items up for bid this year are a
Dooney and Burke purse, Royal
Worcester bowl, handmade jew-
elry, antique rug beaters, fve
Danbury mint plates, guest DJ
with Liz Raven and $300 toward
Certa Pro painting, to name just
a few. Be sure to check out all
the items. They will be up for bid
during the month of July. Carol
Watches and the Friends of the
Library are still accepting dona-
tions.
Local skater ➢ Nora Vascon-
cellos, who recently took ffth
place in the women’s vert compe-
tion in Boston, is competing at the
X-Games in California at the end
of July. Nora will be spending a
week competing in women’s vert
and street competitions. Donna
Cannone, member of the Pem-
broke Skatepark Committee, re-
ports that the committee has set
up a fund to help with the expens-
es of sending Nora to the com-
petition. Any donation is greatly
appreciated. Please make checks
payable to “Go Nora” and mail
to Rockland Trust, 147 Center
Street, Pembroke, MA 02359.
T
his year, the garden came into
bloom earlier and in rich abun-
dance. The chipmunks, squir-
rels and moles came in great abundance,
too. These little creatures seem to have
taken over both the front and rear
lawns. We have tried everything to get
rid of them, shy of shooting them. But
they keep coming back! I was horri-
fed a few years ago when they dug so
many tunnels under the brick walkway
that the walkway collapsed — with a
neighbor on it. The walkway was rebuilt
three times during that summer and fall. This year seems to be
worse. We have tried to smoke, soak and pepper them out, but
to no avail. We bought Critter Ridder because it was guaranteed
to work. However, I’ve seen the squirrels romp and sun in this
peppery mixture. No matter what we try, they still seem to have
control of our grounds. They are brazen and bold. They now dig
their tunnels in full view of us as we stand helplessly by. Some
of their tunnels start near our deck and end under the deck where
we have no access and where they know they will be safe. They
appear to have all that is necessary to succeed in life — they have
a plan, a strategy, stick-to-itiveness, a backup plan, confdence
and frm resolve never to give up. And now let’s see what’s going
on around town.
Around Town
With Beverly o’connor
Beverly@peMBrokexpress.coM
BASKET CLASS: Susan Blaauw, lightship basket weaving instruc-
tor (second from left), led her final class of the season last Friday
for Rick Bennett, a former Nantucket lightship sailor, and Marie
Dowling and Paula Smith, both with 10 years of class experience.
FARM STAND SEASON: Dave Nash and his niece Cheryl Nash
operate Uncle Dave’s Farm Stand, 43 Mattakeesett St., where
they have an early crop of farm fresh vegetables. They will be at
the Pembroke Farmers Market on Saturday.
NEW ADDITION: Allison and
Linwood “Donnie” Stone of
Fir Road recently welcomed a
baby boy. Linwood Christian
Stone was born at 4:05 p.m.
on June 25, weighing in at 6
pounds 8 ounces and measur-
ing 19 1/2 inches long.
GARDEN VARIETY: Bob Karas cleans cellars, attics and yards. On his
business card, he refers to himself as The Junkmaster. That is prob-
ably why Bob is in the habit of recycling everything he gets his hands
on. Even Bob’s gardens, both flower and vegetable, have been cre-
ated from seeds or plants that were found in his travels or that were
leftovers and given to him by friends. Bob decorates his property for
every holiday. His decorations have all been recycled. If you drive by
Bob’s house at 249 Mattakeesett Street on any Saturday or Sunday,
you can shop at one of his weekly yard sales.
7 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help Support your Hometown newSpAper. pleASe tell our AdvertiSerS you SAw ‘em in tHe expreSS!
The Pembroke 300th An-
niversary Committee is look-
ing for help. Pembroke will
turn 300 in 2012 and prepa-
rations are underway. Help is
needed in these areas:
• Historic House and Gar-
den Tour (Sunday, May 20,
2012). As part of the celebra-
tion of Pembroke’s 300th anni-
versary, the committee is plan-
ning a tour of historic homes
and gardens in town. The
committee is looking for any-
one who is a proud owner of
a piece of Pembroke’s history
to consider sharing their his-
toric home. Also, volunteers
are needed to work on a com-
mittee to organize this event
and to share ideas. Contact
Judy Parks at parksjuditha@
gmail.com or 781-826-6073
for more information.
• Volunteers for Parade/
Fundraising Committees and
other subcommittees. These
subcommittees need help:
Fundraising, Kick-off Event,
Fireworks, Historic House
Tour, Colonial Ball, Aviation
Weekend, Parade, Road Race,
Colonial Encampment, Closing
Event, Carnival, North River
Cruises, Golf Tournament, Ca-
noe Race, Memorabilia, Cable
Show, Town Quilt, Antique Car
Show, Brick Walkway, Amaz-
ing Race, 300 Trees, Offcial
Time Capsule, Booklet, Town
Gift, Treasurer, PR.
Learn more by attending
the 300th Anniversary Com-
mittee meeting every third
Tuesday of the month at the
Pembroke Country Club at 7
p.m.
• Quilters wanted. The
committee is looking for quil-
ters interested in developing a
quilt of Pembroke history for
the anniversary. Interested?
Contact Deborah Wall at the
library at 781-293-6771.
• Old Pembroke photos.
The committee is looking for
old photos of Pembroke for
possible use in postcards, a
book or some other display.
Drop them off at the library,
Attention: Director, or in the
selectmen’s offce at Town
Hall.
Also, the new Pembroke
300th Anniversary patch is
now on sale at the Pembroke
Public Library and in various
offces at Town Hall, including
the selectmen’s offce, DPW
offce and building offce. The
patch features the Pembroke
300th logo and costs $5 each.
Proceeds will help fund the
anniversary events in 2012.
Residents can follow the
Pembroke 300th Anniversary
Committee online at Face-
book or at Pembroke300.com.
To be added to the e-mail list
with updates, call Janet Fahey
at 781-293-5620.
Call today for a
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2008.SNFRehab.ad: Welch Nursing.ad 5/4/09 11:05 PM Page 11
Beware the
ghost nets
By skip cornell, express coluMnist
skip@peMBrokexpress.coM
H
ot Spot of the Week: Stellwagen Banks for tuna —
the bite is red hot!
Tip of the Week: Remember, no possession of
striped bass while on Stellwagen Bank or more than three miles
offshore. Past three miles is federal waters — no bass permitted
in the E/E/Z Zone.
Coastal Report: Happy Fourth of
July! Fireworks, tuna, sharks and bass!
Early in the week, there was a good bite
for tuna on Peaked Hill Bar. Live mack-
erel on a kite or balloons are the best bets
to land a tuna. Trolling squid bars in pink
and black have been producing some 68-
to 72-inch tuna. Slow-trolled Shankas in pink or lipstick have
also been hot.
The Southwest Corner has also been good for tuna fshing,
with live mackerel on kites and balloons. There are many large
bass hitting the live mackerel — but remember, they must be
released if caught on Stellwagen Bank or over three miles out.
Over at the Race at Provincetown, there was a mob scene
on the weekend. Lots of bass in the 28- to 30-inch range, caught
mostly on wire line jigging with black and purple jigs. In the
deeper water off the Race, umbrella rigs with red worms were
taking some larger 36-inch-plus bass. Fishing near the Bath
House and the Race has been really bad for the fshing gear (lots
of ghost nets). These ghost nets have taken all kinds of fshing
gear — jigs, umbrella rigs and swimming plugs.
Over in the Plymouth and Duxbury Bay area, bass fshing
has been good. Live bait used in the most popular holes has been
producing some nice keeper bass. As usual, there are plenty of
feeding schools of small bass and bluefsh popping up all over
the place. The bluefsh are real small — 3 to 5 pounds (great
tuna bait). Flounder fshing in the channels off Duxbury has
been good — lots of nice keepers. Pogies are hard to fnd, but
they are around the mooring area near the Duxbury Harbormas-
ter’s offce.
Over at High Pines, live lining mackerel will get some nice
keeper bass. Just outside Green Harbor, founder fshing is great
— lots of keepers. Live lining mackerel from the harbor has been
good, with an occasional large keeper. There are still mackerel
at Farnham’s Rock. Make sure you get there early.
At the mouth of the North River, bass fshing is just OK —
some small keepers. There are small bass, just over or just under
keeper size all the way up the river to Damon’s Point. Trolling
small umbrella rigs from Fourth Cliff to First Cliff has been pro-
ductive for some small bass in the 12- to 15-pound range. In the
deeper water, it’s getting harder to fnd mackerel.
The word from Captain Dan on the Papa Too is “Go East.”
Over the weekend, Dan picked up six tuna on live mackerel —
all in the 68- to 72-inch range.
Congratulations to the crew of the Polar Bear on landing a
400-pound Thresher shark. Captains Rob and Stan Glaskin and
angler Dave Vetelino — what a catch!
Got a fsh tale to share? Send local fshing news, tidbits and
photos to Skip Cornell at skip@pembrokexpress.com.
Gone
Fishin’
Young
angler Chris
McNiff shows
off a great
catch aboard
F/V Tom’s Toy.
Seamstress
on premises
270 Main Street
s)NDIAN(EAD0LAZAs(ANSON
781-294-0588
HOURS: MON.-THURS. 7AM-7PM
º FRI.-7AM-6PM º SAT.-8AM-3PM
Dry Cleaning and
Alterations
Volunteers needed for 300th committee
Friday, July 9, 2010 8
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Having watched several
Celtic playoff games while sa-
voring the selections from the
new menu, let me make a few
recommendations.
Soups: The soups are a
strong category. Have conf-
dence in the soup of the day se-
lections. Chicken Florentine is
a prime example, starting with
well-made broth — smooth
and nearly creamy — with gen-
erous chunks of roasted chick-
en, the appropriate amount of
greens to serve as a fresh foil to
the meatiness of the soup, and
modest seasoning to comple-
ment and fatter its fellow in-
gredients.
Black bean and beef soup
delivered on the promise inher-
ent in its name. Good soup al-
ways starts with the stock. This
is beefy and thick, the ideal ve-
hicle for long-simmered black
beans studded with plentiful
chunks of savory beef (soup
prices: $4-cup, $5-bowl).
Potato Chips: It’s im-
possible to describe exactly
how addictive these crispy
little beauties are. Seems like
a small thing; it’s a great big
thing. Powers says sea salt is
the secret. You’ll be stomping
the foor, slapping your knee,
making funny faces — and
continue to munch them down
till they’re gone, then ask for
more ($5).
Duxbury Oyster Tues-
day: Stunning. Having actu-
ally traveled repeatedly to the
northwestern united States
and Brittany and Normandy in
France, as well as consuming
endless quantities from all the
recognized oyster-producing
regions of the world, I like to
think my oyster palate is well-
educated. Duxbury oysters are
tied for frst place with only
two others in the entire world
(More to follow in weeks to
come; $1.50 per oyster).
After I had enthused end-
lessly about the oysters, Pow-
ers told me I’m not alone.
“We’re selling 300-400 a night.
We have customers calling in
advance saying, ‘We’ll be in at
6. Could you have 100 oysters
ready for us?’ Then fve or six
people show up.”
I want to meet those people
— and eat some oysters with
them. Those are my kind of
people.
Chicken Carbonara:
Heart-warming comfort food.
Pancetta adds a spike of salty
favor; sweet peas adds col-
or and textural contrast; the
creamy sauce is creamy as can
be (Imagine that!) and the pas-
ta is precisely al dente ($15).
Steak Tips: Hearing my
request for a red meat recom-
mendation, the server never
hesitated: “The steak tips are
exceptional. I’m not trying to
bump you up in price; they’re
just fantastic!” Exceptional
advice; fantastic tips. And
they’re not expensive given the
amount of perfectly grilled red
meat satisfaction they deliver.
Sautéed zucchini and summer
squash, a nicely baked potato
and the rich accompaniment of
whipped butter and sour cream
played as a well-rehearsed en-
semble.
Service: Powers is a con-
tinuation of a long line of
customer-friendly institutions.
Certainly The Winery 53 and
Bobby Hackett’s emphasized
the concept. He also told me
about his father’s family store
in South Boston: “My father
told me that ‘Every single
customer who ever comes in
is right. There has never been
a customer who was wrong.’”
Powers emphasizes that with
his employees.
I experienced it frsthand
and completely unknown to
the staff: One night you will
fnd servers so helpful and
encouraging that they will
not only recommend the most
delicious dishes on the menu,
they will also insist that you
take home a generous platter
of the best homemade potato
chips this side of Idaho, Maine
or Dijon. They might even
insist on staying open for an
extra few minutes so you can
watch the end of an exciting
Celtics playoff game.
Wine list: Every dish I
tasted was matched with a
delicious, perfectly suited
wine that seemed to be well
thought-out and supportive.
Don’t fret that the list is a bit
shorter. Powers said there were
many redundancies or wines
that were rarely ordered. Still,
I’m begging for a Muscadet to
go with those oysters! (See my
dish-by-dish wine suggestions
at pembrokexpress.com.)
Beer list: There are some
exciting craft brewers the de-
voted fan will appreciate. A
few good names: Chimay, Hoe-
gaaden, Julius Echter, Long
Trail, Newcastle, Ommegang,
Sierra Nevada and Wachusett.
Pianist: Friday and Sat-
urday nights, Jamie Conway
entertains at the piano. His
strong suit is “pop music” that
everyone loves, from the Beat-
les to “Sweet Caroline.” Sing-
a-longs encouraged!
Overall assessment: Go
and enjoy yourself! The owner
and staff have made a diffcult
and realistic decision as an ad-
justment to the current econo-
my as well as your specifc re-
quests. Let’s all support them.
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Winery gets new name, look
T
he newly renovated and renamed Brimstone Tavern
(formerly The Winery 53) is now open and thriving.
The most recent incarnation by owner Jim Powers
in this well-established restaurant location
showcases a convivial tavern atmosphere, a
wide-open room and a family-friendly food
philosophy in a menu featuring a variety of
well-executed dishes by chef Gil Baretto.
The spacious room is the most striking ren-
ovation, the previous version having a clear-
cut division between the tavern section and a
more formal dining room. Now it’s one big,
happy social gathering place.
Owner Powers explains the renovation
and concomitant shift in approach: “So many
of my customers came in saying they wanted
to go to the tavern but it was often flled. When we offered them
a seat in the dining room, they said they would prefer the tav-
ern section. In addition, the dining room was closed Sunday,
Monday, Tuesday; that’s a lot of down time and wasted space.
Now everyone, especially
families, can come in and
enjoy themselves.”
As for the name
change, Powers says: “There were also some people who were
scared off by the name. Now the neighbors who live across the
street are coming in with the whole family. We want folks to
come in wearing shorts and a T-shirt looking for a great pizza
and a couple of beers to feel comfortable here. Now they are.”
Powers acknowledged that the economy has been a real in-
fuence. Every dish on the menu is now under $20, and most are
signifcantly lower. And don’t fret about the wine list; it’s been
trimmed back slightly, but I can personally report that there are
many wonderful options well-suited to the menu and priced to
please.
Arts & Entertainment
in and around Pembroke
The
Good Life
By Mark leighton
Brimstone Tavern server Danielle Ducharme and bartender
Melissa Ellis get ready to work a Monday night shift in the newly
renovated restaurant.
Pembroke resident Colleen
Finn will be joining the cross-
country JettRide for the third leg
– 700 miles of bike riding from
Kansas City, Mo. to Cincinnati,
Ohio, Aug. 2-15. She is looking
for help in meeting her fundrais-
ing goal of $10,000 and will be
holding a fundraiser on Sunday,
July 11 from 12-7 p.m. at the
Dairy Twist on Route 53. Finn,
22, works for the Jett Foundation
as well as at Dairy Twist. The
event will feature hot dogs and
hamburgers, raffe items, a 50/50 raffe, face painting and
backyard games. Donations also can be submitted online at
frstgiving.com/cmfnn. The JettRide is raising awareness
and funds for the Jett Foundation, an organization started
by Pembroke residents Christine and Stephen McSherry to
help fund research for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and
support families living with the disease. For more infor-
mation, call the Jett Foundation at 781-585-5566 or e-mail
info@jettfoundation.org.
Dairy Twist fundraiser to help
local JettRider prepare for trip
Colleen Finn
9 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help Support your Hometown newSpAper. pleASe tell our AdvertiSerS you SAw ‘em in tHe expreSS!
“I think it’s actually turned
into more than we hoped
for,” said Falk, who founded
the market with her brother,
York. The two will operate as
co-managers for the season.
“We’ve been doing this since
August, when we frst met with
the selectmen. It’s been almost
a full year. A lot of our ven-
dors are people who came to
our very frst meeting at Town
Hall. Without the vendors, we
wouldn’t have a market. It’s a
great group of people.”
The market will run every
Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon
on the green, through Sept. 25,
with the exception of Aug. 7,
when the Pembroke Arts Festi-
val will be underway.
“I’ve really been taken
aback by how much support
we’ve gotten from the town
and how excited people are for
it,” Falk said of the market.
Falk frst got interested in
creating a market when she
began looking for ways to buy
locally grown food to feed her
two young boys. During the
process of building the mar-
ket, Falk said she has learned
a lot about eating fresh, locally
grown food, and she hopes to
share that information through-
out the season, with lessons on
gardening, making baby food
at home and other topics.
“It’s kind of changing the
mindset of what we’re eating,
too,” she said of the market. “A
lot of this will be about educat-
ing people.”
Falk also plans to have a
children’s activity each week,
such as craft projects, potting
plants or an observation area
where kids can smell differ-
ent herbs. On Saturday, July
17, Youth Services Librarian
Jessica Lamarre will stop by
for a special story time on the
green.
“We’re just trying to get
people to come down, buy
fresh, local food and just sup-
port other people in the com-
munity. We also want to make
it a nice place for people
who have the time to linger
and hang around,” Falk said.
“We’re hoping it’s going to
be a really nice environment
that’s nice for strolling. Since
it’s early, people can grab their
coffee and come down and do
their weekend shopping.”
The market also will fea-
ture local acoustic acts on the
Town Green bandstand, orga-
nized by York, who has dab-
bled in music himself.
“It will be acoustic or blue-
grass — no electric guitars or
drums. We want to be really
quiet so we’re not bothering
anyone,” York said.
Though most of the season
is booked, there are a few spots
in early fall open. Musicians
interested in performing for
free can contact York through
pembrokefarmersmarket.org.
And York, too, might take the
stage one weekend.
“I’ll probably do one at
some point,” he said. “The
Matt York Experience will be
in full effect.”
Like his sister, York said he
was impressed by the commu-
nity’s response to the market.
“The town has been awe-
some; everybody at Town Hall
and everybody at the Recre-
ation Department has been su-
per supportive and has helped
in every way possible,” he
said. “Everywhere I go, people
are asking me about it and are
excited about it.”
For some vendors, this will
be their frst farmers market —
or even their frst foray into
the business world. For others,
Pembroke’s event will be one
of several they do throughout
the season.
Taproot Garden business
partners Shawn Dufour of
Whitman and Adam Mackey of
Pembroke will be making their
market debut on Saturday. The
duo will be selling fresh veg-
etables, herbs, eggs and other
items grown and raised in their
backyards, as well as hand-
made birdhouses.
“Adam got the idea to do
the market and he didn’t feel
like he had a big enough area to
do it by himself, and he knew
that I did a lot of gardening, so
he asked me to do it with him,”
Dufour said. “We’re just try-
ing it; it’s just for fun mostly.
I never really expected to do
more than just vegetables for
our own table.”
Dufour said he has had
to adjust to growing for more
people, tripling his garden-
ing space this year. Among
the items Taproot will bring to
the table, if everything goes to
plan, are peaches, a variety of
tomatoes, yellow peppers and
eggplant.
“I’m trying to provide stuff
that people buy anyway, like
the eggplant and tomatoes,”
he said. “Then I’m doing some
more unusual stuff, like brussel
sprouts, because I like them,
and maybe someone will buy
them.”
Pembroke’s market will
be the second for Sally Carver
of The Carver Farm in Marsh-
feld.
Carver, who makes pies,
breads and other baked goods,
got her start at the Marshfeld
Farmers Market several years
ago. She showed up thinking
she might sell extra tomatoes
from her garden only to dis-
cover she couldn’t quite com-
pete with local farms and their
truckloads of produce.
“The market people said,
‘What we really need is some-
body that makes pies and
bread,’ and I said, ‘I could do
that,’” she recalled. “Now it has
multiplied so much that I can
barely keep up with it. But it’s
a fun thing. I love to bake.”
When she heard Pembroke
was starting its own market,
Carver was eager to help out.
“I thought it would be fun
to see it from the ground up,”
she said.
On Saturday, she will be
selling homemade pies in fa-
vors like strawberry rhubarb,
apple and blueberry and oat-
meal, whole-wheat and cinna-
mon breads.
The Pembroke Farmers
Market is a member of the Mas-
sachusetts Federation of Farm-
ers Markets and accepts WIC
and senior food vouchers.
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local farmers market to open Saturday
continued from page one
•  Acorn Canning Company:
Jams, jellies, preserves
•  Billingsgate Farm/Grandpa
Tom’s Farm Stand: Natural and
certified organic vegetables,
fruits, herbs and cut flowers
•  Blue Goose Cottage: Swedish
woven afghans, table runners
and totes
• Boathouse Lobster: Lobster
•  Bogberries & Anne-Made
Jewelry: Handcrafted, beaded
and wire-wrapped jewelry
• The Carver Farm: Breads, rolls,
cookies, pies, fudge, jellies and
shortcake
•  Cottage Garden Dahlias:
Dahlias, dinner plate dahlias and
bouquets
• Deb King’s Garden: Organically
grown heirloom tomatoes, heir-
loom green beans, basil and
oregano
• Grandpa Jim’s Garden: Plants,
ground cover and more
•  Green 101: Sustainable prod-
ucts and toys
•  Pembroke Cookie Company:
Cookies
•  Pottery by Kathleen:
Birdhouses, birdfeeders, plant
stakes, pots
• Renaissance Cooking: Pickles,
jams, barbecue sauce, rubs and
chutney
•  Saxs by Suzan: Handmade
handbags, totes, tissue holders
•  Taproot Gardens: Vegetables,
flowers and birdhouses
•  Uncle Dave’s Farm Stand:
Vegetables
•  West Elm Farm: Free-range
eggs, goat’s milk and lanolin
soap, beeswax candles, wool,
taking orders for rabbit meat and
pork
PEMBROKE FARMERS MARKET VENDORS
“I’ve really been taken aback by how much support we’ve
gotten from the town and how excited people are for it.”
— Christine Falk on bringing
a farmers market to Pembroke
Friday, July 9, 2010 10
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
The joy of juggling
Kids have a ball at library’s first summer show
Henry the Juggler opened the summer performance series at the
Pembroke Public Library on Wednesday, June 30 with a comical,
interactive show for all ages.
Amanda Dupree, 6, returns a tossed hat and
becomes part of the show.
Three-year-old Zachary Grow has his hands full
learning to juggle.
The Curran family enjoys the antics of Henry the Juggler.
Henry the Juggler performs a balancing act.
Haley Peck, 11, becomes part of the show when she
returns a ball tossed into the crowd.
photos By denise haWes
Five-year-old Madison of Curran is full of giggles over the antics
of Henry the Juggler.
The kids get a lesson in juggling starting with balancing act.
Janet Stephenson of Maine and daughter Lindsy, 4, watch the
show intently.
11 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help Support your Hometown newSpAper. pleASe tell our AdvertiSerS you SAw ‘em in tHe expreSS!
Friday, July 9
Council on Aging Activities. Every
Friday: Line dancing class, 9:15 a.m.;
games, 12:30-3 p.m. For information,
call the senior center at 781-294-
8220.
Getting-To-Know-You Group.
12:30 p.m., at the Council on Aging
building, 144 Center St. Led by Anna
Wallace. Sign up at the senior center
or by calling 781-294-8220.
saTurday, July 10
Pembroke Farmers Market Opens.
9 a.m.-noon, on the Town Green. For a
list of vendors and more information,
visit pembrokefarmersmarket.org.
Market will run every Saturday
through early fall.
sunday, July 11
North River Community Church
Services. 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sunday
services. Located at 334 Old Oak St.,
Pembroke.
Pembroke Assembly of God
Services. 9:30 a.m. Christian
Education, 10:30 a.m. worship, 7
p.m. Renew, at 786 Washington
St. For information, call Pastor Joe
Quaresimo at 781-826-2247.
JettRide Fundraiser. 12-7 p.m., at
the Dairy Twist on Route 53. Hot
dogs, hamburgers, raffe items, 50/50
raffe, face painting and backyard
games. Colleen Finn is raising money
to participate in the third leg of the
cross-country Jett Ride. Donations
also can be made online at frstgiving.
com/cmfnn.
Entertainment on the Green. 6-8
p.m., at the bandstand on the Town
Green. Performer: Above Ground.
Free show. Any family-oriented bands
willing to donate their time and talent
to perform on the Town Green can
contact Susan at the recreation offce,
781-293-3249.
Monday, July 12
Drop-in Summer Story Time. 10:30
a.m., at Pembroke Public Library.
For ages 2 and up. No registration
required.
Board of Selectmen Meeting. 7 p.m.,
at Town Hall.
Conservation Commission Meeting.
7:30 p.m., at Town Hall.
Tuesday, July 13
Sit and Be Fit Exercise Class. 10
a.m., at Council on Aging. $5 per
class. For information, call the senior
center at 781-294-8220.
Walking Group. 10:30 a.m., at the
Council on Aging, 144 Center St. For
information, call 781-294-8220.
Drop-in Summer Story Time. 10:30
a.m., at Pembroke Public Library.
For ages 2 and up. No registration
required.
Entertainment by Jack Craig at
the COA. 12:30 p.m., at the Council
on Aging building, 144 Center St.
Sponsored by the Friends of the COA,
with refreshments and raffes. Sign up
by calling 781-294-8220.
Diary of a Wimpy Kid Party. 1 p.m.,
at Pembroke Public Library. Come
celebrate the Wimpy Kid with games,
crafts and prizes; for ages 7 and up.
No registration required.
Seniors Living with Chronic
Illness. 1-2 p.m., at Council on Aging
building. Sandy Putney, LICSW,
a clinical social worker, leads this
support group every Tuesday for
seniors living with conditions such as
arthritis, diabetes, cancer, MS, lupus,
heart disease, COPD and others.
Caregivers Support Group. 2-3 p.m.,
at the Council on Aging building. Led
by Sandy Putney, this free group is
for all caregivers of spouses, parents,
children, other relatives, friends and
neighbors. For information, call the
senior center at 781-294-8220.
PCYA Summer Tuesdays. 3-5
p.m., at the community center. Led
by the Pembroke Community Youth
Alliance. Every Tuesday through
Aug. 24. Open to students entering
sixth, seventh and eighth grade this
fall. Sign in upon arrival. Enter in
the back of the community center
near the bingo hall entrance. High
school PCYA members will lead
unstructured games on the ball feld,
basketball and tennis courts and in the
gym. Parent volunteers will be on site
to supervise.
Wednesday, July 14
Dull Men Meeting. 10 a.m., at
Council on Aging building. Always
open to new members. Stop by the
senior center, 144 Center St.
Walking Group. 10:30 a.m., at the
Council on Aging building, 144
Center St. For information, call 781-
294-8220.
Baby Lap Sit. 10:30 a.m., at Pembroke
Public Library. For ages six months to
two years. No registration required.
For information, call 781-293-6771.
Learn to Skate. 10:50-11:40 a.m. or
4:20-5:10 p.m., at Hobomock Arenas
in Pembroke. Pilgrim Skating Club
will offer these weekly classes through
Aug. 25. The remaining seven weeks
cost is $105 per skater or prorated $15
per class. An additional $15 annual
registration fee is required. For
information, visit pilgrimskatingclub.
com or call 781-294-7575.
Dollar Day Lunch. 11:30 a.m., at
the Council on Aging building, 144
Center St. Sign up by calling 781-294-
8220. Charlene Allen will entertain
on the organ. After lunch, the movie
“Blind Side” will be shown.
Thursday, July 15
Walking Group. 10:30 a.m., at the
Council on Aging building, 144
Center St. For information, call 781-
294-8220.
Recyclable Crafts. 1 p.m., at
Pembroke Public Library. Make a
duct tape wallet. For ages 7 and up.
Registration is required. Sign up at
the youth services desk or call 781-
293-6771.
Friday, July 9
Council on Aging Activities. Every
Friday: Line dancing class, 9:15 a.m.;
games, 12:30-3 p.m. For information,
call the senior center at 781-294-
8220.
upcoMing
Pembroke Farmers Market.
Sat., July 17. 9 a.m.-noon, on the
Town Green. For a list of vendors
and more information, visit
pembrokefarmersmarket.org. Market
will run every Saturday through early
fall. Acoustic music from 10:30-11:30
a.m.
Special Summer Story Time. Sat.,
July 17. 10:30 a.m., at Pembroke
Farmers Market on the Town Green.
For ages 2 and up. No registration
required.
Tiny-Bean Softball Tournament.
Sat.-Sun., July 17-18, at men’s softball
feld on Reed Street in Hanson. One-
pitch, double-elimination tournament
in memory of Pfc. Matthew Bean and
Scott W. “Tiny” Petitti. Proceeds go
to Pfc. Matthew Bean Scholarship at
Silver Lake Regional High School. For
information, e-mail tinybeantourny@
yahoo.com or call 781-733-6548.
Cardboard Tube Battle
Tournament. Sat., July 17. 1 p.m.,
at Pembroke Public Library. Open
to ages 10 and up. Come in “battle”
costumes and challenge friends to a
duel. A duel is over when one tube
breaks. All participants must sign a
waiver that is available at the library
and on the Web site. Themed prizes
will be awarded for winners. For more
information, see tubeduel.com.
Entertainment on the Green. Sun.,
July 18. 6-8 p.m., at the bandstand on
the Town Green. Performer: Cover
Me, Porkins. Free show. Any family-
oriented bands willing to donate their
time and talent to perform on the
Town Green can contact Susan at the
recreation offce, 781-293-3249.
Vacation Bible School: Hero
Headquarters. Mon.-Fri., July
19-23. 9 a.m.-noon, at High Street
united Methodist Church, on the
Pembroke/Duxbury town line.
Elementary school–age children will
enjoy games, snacks, crafts, songs
and Bible stories all under the theme
of Hero Headquarters. To register or
learn more, visit vacationbibleschool.
com/highstreetumc. Cost is $25 per
child. Call Kate Nugent at 781-826-
3102 for more information.
Drop-in Summer Story Time. Mon.,
July 19. 10:30 a.m., at Pembroke
Public Library. For ages 2 and up. No
registration required.
Drop-in Summer Story Time. Tues.,
July 20. 10:30 a.m., at Pembroke
Public Library. For ages 2 and up. No
registration required.
Pokémon Party. Tues., July 20. 4
p.m., at Pembroke Public Library.
Ages 6 and up can come trade
Pokémon cards, play Bingo for book
prizes and watch Pokémon episodes.
No registration is required.
School Committee Meeting. Tues.,
July 20. 7:30 p.m., at North Pembroke
Elementary School library. See agenda
at pembrokepublicschools.org.
Pembroke
Communi ty
Calendar
Pembroke
Communi ty
Calendar
Send calendar i tem
s by
noon Tuesday to events@
pem
brokexpress.com
.
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Calendar i tems are published on a space available basis.
Preference is for non-commercial Pembroke-based events.
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COMING TO A STAGE NEAR YOU: The band Cover Me, Porkins
— consisting of Pembroke Express Sports Editor Dave Palana,
his brother Joe Palana, Express General Manager Justin
Graeber and friend Matt Vears (not pictured) — will bring
their talents to the Pembroke stage with a free outdoor show
at the Town Green on Sunday, July 18 from 6-8 p.m. The
show is free but posters will be sold to raise money for the
Pembroke Skate Park. Look for an exclusive interview with
Cover Me, Porkins in next week’s Express.
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Friday, July 9, 2010 12
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Summer
swimmers
Nicole Clement uses a noodle to teach two-year-old
Reilly Logan-Cobbett, 2, how to paddle on Oldham.
James Coner shows brothers Jack, 6, and Gavin
Houghton, 4, how to use their noodles in Oldham Pond.
Sarah Winn sits in the shallows with a group of young
swim lesson students at the Little Sandy beach.
Amy Hill, director of beaches, keeps watch as lifeguard
while her staff members lead swim lessons at Oldham.
Students at Little Sandy work on their kicks.
Paul Coner shows three-year-old Tommy Guthro how
to kick using the paddle board at Oldham Pond.
Swim instructor James Coner works with Benjamin
Dufour, 5, of Whitman in Oldham Pond.
Two young
swim-
mers get
a briefing
before
jumping
in for a
swim to
the other
dock in
Oldham
Pond.
Melissa Collin hangs onto the paddle board as Gillian
Canniff, 8, works on her kicking in Oldham Pond.
Samantha Collin holds onto her young swim student
during a lesson Tuesday morning at Oldham Pond.
Cam Draper teaches a swim lesson at Oldham.
photos By Becca Manning
13 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help Support your Hometown newSpAper. pleASe tell our AdvertiSerS you SAw ‘em in tHe expreSS!
the Mass. Department of Pub-
lic Health, concerned about
possible health effects of algae
she photographed on the pond
this season, state offcials
came out to test the water on
June 16. The Board of Health
elected to close the pond until
results were returned.
On Friday, June 18, results
came back showing that while
there were traces of E. coli and
blue-green algae present in the
water, both were well below
the level that would pose a
hazard.
The Town Landing and
other town beaches reopened
as scheduled that Sunday.
Board of Health member
Tommy Driscoll said state
offcials have not provided
further information about the
tests, but they probably will be
keeping an eye on the ponds in
the future.
The local board tests the
ponds weekly for E. coli lev-
els and would alert the public
if there were any concerns,
Driscoll said.
To help keep bacteria lev-
els down, Hill said she and her
staff try to discourage beach-
goers from feeding the wild-
life.
Meanwhile, Hill and her
lifeguards have shifted their
attention onto a different as-
pect of public safety: Teach-
ing children how to swim and
making sure they are being
safe in the water.
A new season of swim
lessons started Monday, with
classes offered for all skill lev-
els and at fexible times likely
to ft anyone’s schedule.
Lessons are offered for
a half hour Monday through
Friday, for an hour each on
Tuesdays and Thursdays, or
for an hour on Saturdays. The
session lasts fve weeks, with
makeup lessons available af-
ter that for anyone who has
missed a class. The staff also
offers a Mommy and Me class
for parents and their young
children.
Cost is $75 per fve-week
session for the half-hour class
or the Tuesday/Thursday les-
son, and $50 for the Saturday
class. Lessons start around
10:30 a.m. and are offered at
both the Town Landing beach
on Wampatuck Street and at
the Little Sandy Bottom Pond
beach off Woodbine Avenue.
Classes start from very
young — as long as the child
can separate from his or her
parent — and go up to the
Level 6 class, which is a ju-
nior lifesaving program.
“There are three years to
it, and by the time they’ve
passed all three, they’re about
14 1/2 and they’re doing the
lifesaving program. You can
be a lifeguard and take the test
at 15,” Hill said. “Then we’ll
hire them here, especially if
they’ve gone through the pro-
gram.”
Lifeguards are on duty at
both the Town Landing and
Little Sandy beaches seven
days a week from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., now through Labor Day
weekend.
For Hill, a certifed water
safety instructor and lifeguard,
safety is key.
“I’m pro safety here. I
don’t let them go out and get
in trouble. The little ones can
go up to the belly button. The
next level, to their chests. The
other ones can go up to their
shoulders. They have to be a
really good swimmer to be
able to go past their shoul-
ders,” Hill said.
Students in the Level 5
class, usually ages 8-10, work
on building endurance, with
their goal to swim out to the
“little island” in Oldham Pond,
about a quarter-mile swim.
Older students work toward a
half-mile swim to the “big is-
land,” Monument Island. Both
swims are part of a series of
fun contests and games of-
fered at the annual Fun Festi-
val at the Town Landing.
This year, the festival will
be held on Saturday, Aug. 14
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Hill makes sure lessons
don’t get too big; however,
there are plenty of spots still
available.
“We try to keep a hand to
every child,” she said. “All the
instructors get in with their
students. They’re very active
with them; they play with
them. I think it’s a great pro-
gram. That’s the only reason
I’m here. I won’t have any-
thing less.”
Hours: Monday – Friday - 8am – 5pm
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Swim lessons underway
continued from page one
Swim instructor Dana Rosner works on kicking with his students
during a lesson offered Tuesday morning at the Little Sandy
Bottom Pond beach off Woodbine Avenue. Lessons are taught
daily at Little Sandy as well as at Oldham Pond. Photo by Becca Manning
SUMMER SWIM LESSONS
Town lifeguards offer swim lessons for all ages at the Town
Landing beach on Oldham Pond (off Wampatuck Street) and at
the Little Sandy beach off Woodbine Avenue. Lessons range from
Level 1 (children must be able to separate from parents) to Level 6,
a three-year junior live-saving course. There are several five-week
programs:
• Monday-Friday, half-hour sessions each day, $75
• Tuesday/Thursday, one-hour sessions each day, $75
• Saturdays, one-hour sessions, $50
• Mommy & Me parent-child lesson, Saturdays for one hour, $75
Sign up at the Town Landing or call the lifeguard house at 781-
293-3082.
EVERY TUESDAY EVE. &
SUNDAY AFTERNOON
LIVE
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SEISIUNS
781-447-7333
open daily at 11:30
7 days a week!
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Come in for Great Food, Cool Drinks & Lively Entertainment!
See our website for upcoming events
& daily specials!
July 8: Music of The Guys Upstairs 9pm
July 9: Music of Mike Kostas 9pm
July 10: Trivia w/ Morgan White Jr. 9pm
Every Monday : Half Price Wing Dings 6 PM till Closing

Mondays-Thursdays : Early Bird Specials
mcguiggan’s pub
546 WASHINGTON ST., WHITMAN
WWW.MCGUIGGANSPUB.COM
Summer volleyball clinics
Pembroke summer volleyball clinics offer a great way
for children to learn the sport of volleyball or to improve
their current skills. Sponsored by the recreation department,
clinics are flled with both instructional volleyball and fun
games and will be held at the Pembroke High School gym-
nasium during the week of Aug. 2. Clinics are geared toward
both girls and boys entering grades 5-12. Cost is $125 per
player, due by July 10 (late registrations cost an additional
$10). The session for grades 5-8 will be held Aug. 2-6 from
9 a.m. to noon each day. The session for grades 9-12 will
be held the same week from 1-4 p.m. For information or
registration forms, call Sue at the recreation offce at 781-
293-3249 or e-mail instructor Jen Hall at jenniferhall_@
hotmail.com.
Friday, July 9, 2010 14
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
I
just read in the Pem-
broke Express the opin-
ion column entitled,
“On the eve of another July 4,
America still has far to go.”
To begin, I would agree
that there is always room for
improvement in any life, or-
ganization or government, but
I wonder if the writer is aware
that we have been making ad-
justments for 235 years, which
by the way is the oldest and
longest form of government of
any nation in the world today.
This form of government
was originated and established
by those “affluent white men”
who risked everything for their
concern for the people of the
colonies. Let’s not forget they
did not seek power for them-
selves, changing the language
from “subjects” to “citizens”
— we the people, of the people
and by the people.
I wonder if the writer, while
forming his opinion, had time
to research what happened to
these men and their families.
Five signers were cap-
tured by the British as trai-
tors, and tortured before they
died. Twelve had their homes
ransacked and burned. Two
lost their sons serving in the
Revolutionary Army; another
had two sons captured. Nine
of the 56 fought and died
from wounds or hardships of
the Revolutionary War. They
signed and they pledged their
lives, their fortunes and their
sacred honor.
What kind of men were
they? Twenty-four were law-
yers and jurists. Eleven were
merchants; nine were farmers
and large plantation owners —
men of means, well educated,
but they signed the Declaration
of Independence knowing full
well that the penalty would be
death if they were captured.
Carter Braxton of Virginia,
a wealthy planter and trader,
saw his ships swept from the
seas by the British Navy. He
sold his home and properties to
pay his debts and died in rags.
Thomas McKeam was so
hounded by the British that
he was forced to move his
family almost constantly. He
served in the Congress with-
out pay, and his family was
kept in hiding. His posses-
sions were taken from him,
and poverty was his reward.
Vandals or soldiers looted the
properties of Dillery, Hall, Cly-
mer, Walton, Gwinnett, Hey-
ward, Ruttledge and Middleton.
At the battle of Yorktown,
Thomas Nelson Jr. noted that
the British General Cornwal-
lis had taken over the Nelson
home for his headquarters.
He quietly urged General
George Washington to open
fire. The home was destroyed,
and Nelson died bankrupt.
Francis Lewis had his home
and properties destroyed. The
enemy jailed his wife, and
she died within a few months.
John Hart was driven from his
wife’s bedside as she was dy-
ing. Their 13 children fled for
their lives. His fields and his
gristmill were laid to waste.
For more than a year, he lived
in forests and caves, return-
ing home to find his wife dead
and his children vanished (re-
source: wallbuilders.com).
They risked and many sac-
rificed their lives, and we en-
joy the benefits. Were they per-
fect? No. But do we truly feel
they deserve the denigration of
someone superimposing their
assessment on their motives
235 years later? Remember:
Freedom is never free!
Additionally, a casual
reading of the Declaration of
Independence would have re-
vealed the reasons they gave
for their action. I have summa-
rized them for sake of space.
They were addressed to King
George.
1. He didn’t enforce neces-
sary laws.
2. He refused to establish
needed laws.
3. He conducted affairs
without representation.
4. He purposely manipu-
lated them.
5. He refused to consider
their requests.
6. He made no attempt to
improve their society.
7. He resisted growth in the
colony.
8. He refused to set up
courts.
9. The judges he did ap-
point were corrupt.
10. He established harass-
ing police.
11. He sent the army to en-
force his capricious rule.
12. He granted power, au-
thority, privilege and ability
to foreign governments that
caused abuse and destruction
of the colonists without re-
course.
Additionally, they believed
that God Almighty was behind
what they were about. I’m
proud to be a realistic Ameri-
can. Criticism has its place,
as well as giving credit where
credit is due.
Joe Quaresimo
Elm Street
q u e S T i o n o f T h e w e e K By vanessa phaM
Letter to the editor
Send us your letters!
The Pembroke Express welcomes all views.
Thank you letters will be accepted if concise.
Anonymous letters or letters published in
other publications will not be considered.
E-mail: opinion@pembrokexpress.com
Mail: P.O. Box 1656, Duxbury, MA 02331
how did you spend the fourth of July?
I
cannot believe the size
of the new CVS. It is
way too big for the pla-
za space.
What is even more disturb-
ing is the position of the store.
The back of the store faces di-
rectly to the four corners. That
means we see the drive thru, un-
loading area and the Dumpster.
This will not be a pretty view. I
can’t imagine what architectur-
al frm or planning board would
make those approvals.
It will not be a good look
for the revitalizing of the his-
torical area. And while we are
at it, let’s demolish the old
school in the center and add
brick sidewalks.
John Callahan
Carriage House Lane
I
am a senior citizen
who has lived in Pem-
broke for 40 years. I
am wondering why the town
of Pembroke sends out both
the real estate tax bill and the
trash bill at the same time with
a due date together. This is a
hardship for us seniors on a
fxed income. It would be nice
if they staggered the bills with
separate due dates.
Jane Rose
Bonney Street
Patriots sacrificed much for independence
Doubled-up bills a hardship for
Pembroke seniors ————
New CVS building is wrong for
town’s center district ——
Jenn Halloran
Lional Lane
“I hung out with my friends and
went to the beach for
bonfres and freworks.”
Chris Carter
Center Hill Road
“On the Fourth, I went
into Beantown on the boat
and partied hard.”
Sheila Landy
Oakland Square Drive
“I brought my family to my
brother’s house to spend the day
with our large extended family. It
was a day of food, fun in the pool
and freworks at night.”
Joe Tupper
Valley Street
“I hung out with my girlfriend,
watched freworks and had a
great time with some friends.”
Janet Rivera-Jones
Montclair Ave
“I spent the Fourth of July sailing
with my husband, daughter
and her boyfriend. It is very
relaxing, and I wish I could
do it more often.”
COOLIN’ OFF: Three-year-old Shelby Houghton cools off in the
shallows of Oldham Pond as her older brothers participate
in swim lessons at the Town Landing on Tuesday morning.
Temperatures hit the high 90s on Tuesday. Photo by Becca Manning
15 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help Support your Hometown newSpAper. pleASe tell our AdvertiSerS you SAw ‘em in tHe expreSS!
The Sun “Rises” Again in Duxbury
Brought back to its original glory by former owner Lawrence P. Friedman
Come back to good food, good drink and good friends at the Sun Tavern
Restaurant and Bar. Enjoy food and drink next to the fireplace in our
cozy bar or in one of several dining rooms.
NOW OPEN!
500 Congress Street, Duxbury
781-837-1027 – Fax 781-837-1109
www.suntavernrestaurant.com
Dinner Service begins at 5pm Tuesday-Saturday and 4pm on Sunday
Private Dining Room for Parties & Special Occasions
Ken Wisneski, Executive Chef
WHITMAN CENTER • RTE 27
781-447-4971
Many New
Charms!
Rocco’s!
Hours:
Closed Mondays
for the Summer
Tues.–Sat.
11am–8pm A little taste of Italy in Hanover
CAFE PORTO BELLO
PIZZERIA AND TAKE-OUT
1143 Broadway
Hanover, MA 02339
781-826-5637
Pasta • Gourmet Pizza
Sandwiches • Salads
It’s no secret
that it’s a North End
Feast at Rocco’s
everyday... and there’s
always parking!
COMPUTER DIAGNOSTICS
712 Monponsett St., Hanson
Phone: 781-293-2355 Fax: 781-293-3558
Banner’s Automotive Service
COMPLETE SERVICE FOR AUTOS & TRUCKS!
FREE Tire Rotation w/ Oil Change
EXP. 7/31/10
LANDSCAPE & DESIGN
FULLY LICENSED & INSURED
Ray Tremblay 781-844-8930
WOODLAND
Turn your property
into a vacation retreat.
Hearthstone Designs,
Patios & Sidewalks
Congratulations to Jasper Sciacca, Anne Kelly, Fred Doyle and
Otis Hathon for correctly identifying Camp Pembroke, historically
known as the Oldham Farm site, as this week’s mystery picture.
oldham family home
now Camp Pembroke
By karen proctor, express coluMnist
history@peMBrokexpress.coM
O
ldham Street today is often thought of by Pembroke
residents as an alternate route to Hanover or Hanson.
Its name comes from the Oldham family — early
settlers and prominent residents of our town — who lived on the
shores of Oldham Pond for many generations.
Thomas Oldham, son of the Thomas Oldham who was an
early settler of Scituate, purchased from Jeremiah, “Indian of
Mattakeesett,” and Abigail, his wife or “squa,” a tract of land
consisting of about 100 acres
on the north shore of what
was then known as Monu-
ment (now Oldham) Pond. He
paid 14 pounds silver for the
land in 1693. The land was one-tenth of the “Thousand Acres”
— land set aside in 1662 by Josiah Wampatuck, Sachem of the
Massachusetts Indians, for himself and his heirs. Mattakeesett
was the name given by the Native Americans to the land, which
eventually became Pembroke.
It appears from the records that Thomas never settled on the
property. In 1695, he gave half of his land “at Mattakeesett” to
his brother Isaac Oldham, who, it is believed, built a dwelling
and soon after married Hannah Keen of Duxbury. Pembroke re-
cords indicate the couple had three children.
Isaac worked the farm for 40 years, until his death in 1736.
Isaac’s son Isaac inherited the homestead and lived in his fa-
ther’s house with his wife Mary (Stetson) and their four children
until he died in 1796. Mary died in 1808. By this time, the origi-
nal dwelling was in a very poor state of repair, and it was left to
David Oldham Jr., the great-grandson of pioneer Isaac, to tear
down the original dwelling and rebuild on the family’s ancestral
Pembroke land when he inherited it in 1804.
David Oldham Esquire was a man of prominence in Pem-
broke. He was a member of the Board of Selectmen for 18 years.
He also served as town moderator and held many offces as a
member of the First Parish Church in Pembroke. He was married
to Deborah Barker, a descendant of frst Pembroke settler Robert
Barker. David and Deborah raised eight children in the home.
David Oldham died in Pembroke in 1857. His cause of death
was listed as “debility.” Deborah died in 1861 of “infuenza.”
After their deaths, the Oldham Farm passed out of the family.
More recently, the property has been used by Catholic Chari-
ties as a boys summer camp and is currently known as Camp
Pembroke, a summer camp for girls of the Jewish faith. This
seems a ftting use for a property that has seen the growth and
development of so many generations of Pembroke families with
children.
Karen Proctor is research director for the Historical Society.
For details about these images, call 781-293-9083.
Historical Society
plans spaghetti
dinner fundraiser
The Pembroke Histori-
cal Society will be having an
Italian dinner on Saturday,
Oct. 2. Bring the family or a
friend and enjoy a dinner of
spaghetti and meatballs, sal-
ad, bread and desserts. Din-
ner will be served between
5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Enjoy
a glass of wine beforehand
and then settle back to feast
on a wonderful meal.
Tickets are $10 and
can be bought in advance
on Sept. 28 at the museum
building between 4:30 p.m.
and 7 p.m. or by calling
781-293-9083 (leave name
and phone number and the
number of tickets required).
Tickets also can be pur-
chased at the door the night
of the dinner. The Pem-
broke Historical Society has
just fnished a project at the
museum building supported
by Community Preservation
Act funds, and they are ex-
cited to share this with Pem-
broke.
This particular fund-
raiser is to support the Adah
Hall House on Barker Street.
The Adah Hall House has
just had a project completed
that was also supported by
Community Preservation
Act funds. The Pembroke
Historical Society member-
ship feels strongly in the
preservation of these vital
historic sites and appreci-
ates the support shown by
residents through the Com-
munity Preservation Act
fund.
For more information,
call the Historical Society
at 781-293-9083 or event
chairwoman Beth Dwyer at
781-829-2157.
free yoga
workshops for
teens, ’tweens
Pembroke resident Becky
Paul is leading a free yoga
workshop for teens and
’tweens. Yoga can help young
people cope with unique issues
and stresses they are faced
with every day. Join Paul this
summer at the Hanson Holistic
Center, 56 Liberty St., Hanson.
Classes offer many benefts
including: building strength,
fexibility and balance; learn-
ing the benefts of focus, disci-
pline and relaxation; and cul-
tivating kindness, compassion,
acceptance and gratitude.
Teens Yoga is offered
Tuesdays, July 20 and Aug. 24
from 4-5 p.m. ’Tweens Yoga
is offered Tuesdays, July 27
and Aug. 31 from 4-5 p.m. To
register for a free workshop,
e-mail Becky Paul at becca-
paul@msn.com or call 781-
293-2447. More information
available at hansonholistic-
center.com.
PwA raffling off kayak, prizes
The Pembroke Watershed Association will again be raf-
fing off a new kayak and other prizes to raise money for
pond treatments and their annual scholarship fund. Tickets
cost $2 each or $10 for a book of six. The top prize is an
Old Town kayak with paddle; second prize is $150 cash; and
third prize is $125 cash. There will be three mystery prizes
drawn as well. The drawing will take place at the Watershed
Association’s Oct. 21 meeting. Ticket-holders need not be
present to win. For tickets, call Ray and Diane Holman at
781-293-5568.
Photo courtesy of Pembroke historical Society
Friday, July 9, 2010 16
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
an old breed but relatively
new in the united States. They
later added chickens, ducks,
Pilgrim geese, pigs and, most
recently, rabbits to their fve-
acre farm, growing a dream
into a thriving little business,
West Elm Farm.
On Saturday, West Elm
Farm will be among the ven-
dors at the frst Pembroke
Farmers Market, selling their
handmade soaps (with sheep
lanolin), beeswax candles,
eggs, rabbit meat and pork.
“I was very excited [about
the Pembroke market], be-
cause it
would be
right in
town and
also because
it was going
to be Satur-
day morning when I would be
free,” Roll said. “I’m hoping it
does well, because Pembroke
needs something in that cen-
ter to bring in the community
more than just a strip mall.”
West Elm Farm also has a
table at the Cohasset Farmers
Market and sells products at
several fairs around the area as
well as at a store in Duxbury
called Sugar, shops in New
Hampshire and Colorado and
online at westelmfarm.com.
“It pays for itself and
makes a small proft at this
point, but it took as a while to
get there, about seven years,”
Roll said of the business.
West Elm Farm is what
Roll calls a “micro eco farm,”
meaning they are small and use
sustainable methods, compost-
ing animal waste, feeding the
animals grass instead of grain
(except for the chickens), and
not using chemicals. Though
they’re not certifed organic,
they use organic methods —
almost everything is recycled
back into the land.
“There’s a whole move-
ment of micro farms – even
in the city – where people are
taking small plots and produc-
ing a lot of food on their small
plots,” Roll said.
He said the Pembroke
Farmers Market will help
draw attention to the many
micro farms in the area.
“This gives people an
awareness that you can buy
food locally, at least during
the summer,” he said. “Now
there’s a place they can go;
they don’t have to just random-
ly stumble upon somebody.
This brings all these people
together who have been doing
this for a long time.”
Roll said he and Ab-
batematteo learned about
farming from the Internet,
books and by becoming in-
volved in the farming com-
munity.
“When we frst started
raising sheep, there was the
North American Icelandic
Sheep Breeders Association,
and people were really help-
ful,” Roll said. “You could
put a posting on the board and
say, ‘Help — I’ve got a sheep
down,’ and instantly people
would contact you. And every
time an animal dies, you learn
something from it.”
“It was a little bit of trial
and error,” Abbatematteo
added. “And we also went to
sheep and wool festivals and
learned a lot. People were re-
ally helpful. They want to tell
you everything.”
The small farm communi-
ty is a good example of people
supporting one another, Roll
said. He trades duck eggs to
local goat farmers, who in
turn share goat’s milk that
Roll uses to make soap. At
markets, Roll often is given
bruised or damaged produce
that can’t be sold from other
farmers to bring back to feed
his pigs.
Teamwork is also big on
West Elm Farm itself, where
the animals help out in lots
of little ways. In the barn, the
pigs turn up their bedding,
essentially helping to break
down the materials and create
compost that Roll uses on his
pastures.
The chickens not only pro-
duce eggs but also help clean
up the pastures, eating para-
sites that may affect the sheep
and helping to reduce the fy
population.
Manure from the rabbits
also is composted and used in
fowerbeds or given away.
Rabbits are the farm’s
newest addition. Roll breeds
and raises New Zealand and
Californian rabbits on site but
sends them to New Bedford to
be processed, along with lamb
and pork.
He and Abbatematteo
made a commitment when
they started the farm that noth-
ing would be killed on site.
At the market this week-
end, Roll will be taking or-
ders for rabbit meat as well as
pork.
“Rabbit has been around
for a long time. I’m Italian, so
I grew up on it,” Abbatematteo
said. “It’s mostly been popular
with people from ethnic back-
grounds – Portuguese, Ital-
ians. It’s very nutritional. It
has less fat than chicken. An
average serving size is about
3.5 ounces, and that has about
200 calories and only about 8
grams of fat. It has no choles-
terol. And it has 30 grams of
protein.”
The two got into rabbit
breeding after discovering
that the meat was hard to get
around the area.
“We went to Whole Foods
and they said they rarely get it,
but they were really anxious if
we knew someone who had
them, and no one was raising
them. So we said, ‘Let’s start
raising rabbits,’” Roll said.
“They’re very sustainable,
have a very low carbon foot-
print. You can produce a lot
of meat for a family in a very
small space.”
Also unique is West Elm
Farm’s line of soaps made with
goat’s milk and lanolin from
sheep wool and Betty’s Balm,
which also uses lanolin.
The balm is named for
Betty, one of the farm’s old-
er sheep that Roll and Ab-
batematteo bottle fed in their
kitchen when she was a lamb.
“As we were handling Bet-
ty, we noticed our hands were
really soft. Wool has a lot of
lanolin in it,” Abbatematteo
said. “That’s how we came up
with the idea of Betty’s Balm
for working hands. We named
it after her.”
Also doing her part is Sto-
ry, the farm’s guard llama.
“With dogs and coyotes,
she will confront and chase
where sheep will run. She
herds them up and stands be-
tween them [and the threat],”
Roll said. “It’s nice because
she eats the same thing as the
sheep, and she’s sheared like
they are.”
Several months ago, Roll
and Abbatematteo were alert-
ed by the llama’s loud, high-
pitched braying. When they
ran outside, they discovered
one of the sheep with its horns
stuck in the feeder. Story had
herded the rest of the panicked
sheep off to the side.
“If she hadn’t alerted us,
the sheep would have been
dead the next morning,” Roll
said.
For more information
about West Elm Farm, visit
their Web site or stop by their
booth at the Pembroke Farm-
ers Market.
PEMBROKE: New to Market! Room for all in this spacious
4 bed home located in desirable Pembroke neighborhood.
Home boasts large MB, oversized garage and in-ground
pool surrounded by manicured yard and mature plantings.
Stop by 50 Warren Terrace, Pembroke. $409,000
JACK CONWAY REALTOR 1-781-294-1147
50 Mattakeesett Street, Pembroke, MA
www.jackconway.com
OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3PM
At West Elm Farm, everyone pitches in
continued from page one
Patrick Roll and John
Abbatematteo moved to
Pembroke in 2000 and operate
West Elm Farm at their home on
West Elm Street.
In the barn, pigs help
clean up by rooting through old
bedding, turning it up and help-
ing to reduce the materials to
compost, which is used on the
farm’s pastures.
Story the llama keeps watch over several Icelandic sheep as they all try to keep cool on a hot sum-
mer morning at West Elm Farm. The llama will confront a threat and attempt to scare a predator
away while herding the sheep to safety. Among the sheep is Betty (far right), whom Patrick and John
raised from a lamb and who inspired their lanolin-infused Betty’s Balm. Photos by Becca Manning
WEST ELM FARM
Features: Handmade goat’s
milk soaps, Betty’s Balm,
beeswax candles, eggs, grass-
fed lamb and rabbit, pork
Location: 65 West Elm Street
Phone: 781-826-3581
Web: westelmfarm.com
17 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help support your Hometown newspaper. please tell our advertisers you saw ‘em in tHe express!
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CLASSIFIED DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT NOON
Weekend
Scavengers
Vendors Needed
The Wampatuck Lodge of
Freemason's is hosting its annual
Flea Market/Craft Fair on August
7 and 8 at 38 Franklin St. on the
E. Bridgewater/Hanson line.
Vendor space is available for this
event. To rent, email
cgalvinteach@yahoo.com or call
508-272-2422. All are welcome
to attend.
Yard Sale
41 Chandler Mill Drive, Duxbury.
Sat., 7/10, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Books, home furnishings,
weights, tools, items for college
dorm, TVs, radios, electronics,
lawn/deck furniture, much more.
Huge Garage/Collectibles Sale
July 10 and 11. 9-2. 769 Center
St., Pembroke. Includes sports
cards and collectibles, sheet
music, postcards, ephemera,
vintage furniture and tools, oil
lamps, books and movies,
porcelain dolls, household items
and more
Reed Hollow Barn Sale
Annual tent clearance sale.
Everything under the tent $5 or
less. July 10 and 11, 12-6. Rain
or shine. Plus, a sale in the
barn. 476 Center St., (Rte. 36)
Pembroke. 781-294-7063.
reedhollowthriftyantiques.com
Charity Yard Sale
to benefit the Susan G. Komen
3-Day Walk. Sat., July 10, 9-2.
Rain date, July 11. 7 Keenes
Brook Lane, Duxbury. (near the
intersection of Keene Street and
Union Street). Some of
everything and something for
everybody. No early birds.
Garage Sale
Sat., July 10 and Sun. July 11,
9-3. 7 Colonial Dr., (off Union
Bridge Rd. Duxbury). Collectibles,
books, puzzles, household items,
wicker, kids clothes & toys,
changing table, car seats, skis
and boots, golf clubs/balls, foot
massager, walker and more.
Treasure
Chest
Breathtaking Antique Sofa
82" upholstered, walnut sofa.
Off-white damask. In perfect
condition. Truly exquisite.
Picture does not do it justice.
Must see. Asking $875. Please
call 781-361-5146
For Sale
Side-by-side refrigerator, butcher
block kitchen table, two electric
treadmills, push lawn mower,
needs tune-up. Also, baby stuff:
changing table, Bjorn carrier,
Medelia pump, carseats, and
stroller. Moving, must sell. Call
781-234-4473.
Rose of Sharon For Sale
4-6’ height. Pale pink and
lavender with red centers.
Hummingbirds love these. $20
each. Kousa Dogwoods for $15
each. Call 781-585-8937.
Treasure
Chest
Piano For Sale
1970's Kimball Console with
matching bench. Walnut wood.
Original owner. Well maintained.
I am a piano teacher and am
upgrading my piano. $1,200. or
best offer. Gina Pasquale,
781-934-6143.
Kitchen Table and Chairs
Solid birch table top on
decorative steel pewter base with
four solid birch matching chairs.
Your price, $280; Jordan’s
Furniture price, $1150. Good
shape. Emailed photo available
upon request. Call 617-875-1990.
Toy Cars and Trucks
Automotive models, literature and
books and more from a 60-year
collection for sale due to illness.
Thousands of rare models
including Dinky Toys, Corgi,
Tonka, Tootsie Toys and more.
Some one of a kind. All
reasonably priced.
781-244-3563.
Anderson Sliding Doors
New in cartons, 400 series.
French wood. Storm watch
protection. 5’ 11.5” wide x 6’ 7.5”
high. High-Eco Excel energy
performance. Pine interior,
off-white exterior. High
performance glass, doors only.
Four doors (eight panels). Retail,
$1701/per set; asking $900/per
set. Accessories extra.
781-934-7515.
Wonderful Estate Tag Sale
Thurs, Fri, Sat., July 15, 16, 17,
10-5. Meeting House Road, off
of Prior Farm Rd., Duxbury.
Signs posted. 18th, 19th and
20th century furnishings
including period dated 1720
signed Pennsylvania tall
grandfather’s clock; period
secretary; two Penn. nine
spindle Windsors; marble top
furniture; great early children’s
chairs; iron patio set. Many
chairs including: Victorian
grape carved, rose carved,
ornate Gothic, walnut, oak hall,
rocking, etc. End tables,
Victorian walnut dropleaf table,
seats 10; early hair wreath
table; Acrosonic piano; three
sofas; upholstered furniture;
good books; oils; prints;
excellent gilt mirrors; sterling
and silverplate; much good
glass, china; early singing bird
in brass cage; country; Lladro
doctor; Christmas, household;
oriental rugs including: three
room size, thirteen scatters and
runners, braided rugs, jewelry
and clothes; many lamps
including: tall, ornate banquet.
Two stair chair lifts, good
linens, good books, and much,
much more. Questions, call
781-585-8043.

Friday, July 9, 2010 18
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
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Climbing the
Career Ladder
Medical Transcriptionists
Busy local MT company looking
for experienced medical
transcriptionists to type daily
notes, reports, IME’s, etc. on a
daily basis. Transcriptionists
are needed for 12-24 hour
turnaround. Work is
home-based, and files
transferred through secure
ftp/email. Diane, 339-933-2976.
Real Estate Career Opportunities
I am seeking career oriented
individuals to join the top real
estate office in Duxbury.
Licensed or wanting to be - call
or email Dorrie Arnold, Manager,
Coldwell Banker Residential
Brokerage.
Dorrie.Arnold@nemoves.com or
781-934-6995
Town of Pembroke
Custodian
The Town of Pembroke is
accepting applications for two
full-time custodian positions.
Qualifications include: general
knowledge of cleaning materials
and methods; thorough working
knowledge of maintenance
techniques and procedures related
to building grounds maintenance
and care; knowledge of building
and safety codes. A Class D
Massachusetts driver’s license is
required and at least a five year
good driving record. Starting salary
- $37,626. Resumes with three
references to Edwin J. Thorne,
Town Administrator, 100 Center
Street, Pembroke, MA 02359 by
July 26, 2010. AA/EEO Employer.
Hairstylists and Managers
for great new salon in
Pembroke. Outstanding
opportunity with immediate
clientele and great pay. Call
Mike at 781-789-5474.
Homeward
Bound
Pembroke Studio for Rent
Must see. Charming studio apt.
Newly renovated. Close to town
center. Non smokers/No pets.
Cable ready. Utilities incl. $700/
Mo. Call 781-293-0391.
Relocating/Renovating?
Desire Duxbury? Rent beautiful
4BR/2 bath oceanfront home.
Scenic views from multi-decks.
Fully furnished and appointed.
Washer, dryer (wireless internet,
cable available). No smoking, no
pets. Available August 29, 2010 -
May 15, 2011. Shorter terms
considered. Call Jim,
508-651-2740.
Gurnet Beachfront Cottage
For sale. Rustic, great views, one
bedroom, enclosed porch
accommodates extra sleeping.
$275,000. Dotty, 774-454-0457.
Homeward
Bound
New Home - Duxbury
4 BR, 2.5 bath 2 car garage. 2932
s.f., w/o basement. Walk/up attic,
Electrolux appliances, granite and
cherry kitchen. 3 season room on
rear deck. $729,900. Call Ron
McGann, Molisse Realty Group
781-837-5600.
At Your
Service
Michael’s Windows & Gutter
Cleaning
A local service. Windows start at
$5 each. Also, repair loose and
leaking gutters, and can install
gutter screens. Also, repair
window and door screens. (A
great gift idea!) I answer my
phone. Cell 508-523-9927.
The Paint Saint
Professional interior/exterior
painting, gutter cleaning, power
washing and window washing.
Best prices and service always
with a smile. Will paint your
home like it was our own. Call
Andrew for your free estimate.
781-264-3628.
Music Lessons
Guitar, bass, piano & drums. One
on one lessons. Dedicated
teachers, experienced in all
styles. Gift certificates available.
Located in the Priority Music
complex, Hanson on Route 27.
Call 781-293-8378.
House Cleaning
Residential cleaning. Great local
references. Call 774-268-9505.
At Your
Service
Elementary Grades Tutor
Recent college graduate with a
degree in English and Elementary
Edcation is willing to tutor
students grades 1-5 in all subject
areas. Please call Caitlin Larkin at
781-264-0714.
Sewing For Your Home
Former Boston Costume designer
is now available to sew your
window treatments, home
furnishings and alterations at
rates you can afford. Call Hilary to
discuss your project.
617-869-6499 or visit
www.h2sew.org
Cleaning Service
We can make your office or
house shine while you relax.
We come every week, every
other week, or once a month.
Move-ins and move-outs. Try
us before anyone else. Great
references. Call Elaine,
508-718-8159.
Refrigeration
Restaurant and marine equipment
sales and service. Fully licensed
and insured. Call Keith at K. B.
Guidetti Mechanical,
508-747-2180 or 508-989-1099.
Serving you since 1989. Visit our
website, www.kbguidetti.com
SAT Prep and Tutoring
Dartmouth College student to
tutor SAT I/II, HSPT/SSAT,
mathematics, chemistry, etc.
Received perfect score on SAT,
700+ on all subject tests, and five
scores of 5 on AP exams. Contact
Jake at 781-585-9559.
At Your
Service
Patio & Walkway Restoration
If you have a weedy, sunken
patio/walkway, I can make it
look new! By powerwashing,
lifting sunken areas and
poly-sanding, I can bring your
patio/walkway back to “like
new” condition. Call Jonathan
Hopfgarten, 781-706-7031.
Cleaning - Home or Office
Three years experience,
references available, free
estimates. I do windows. Call
508-840-6131
Brick Steps Repaired
No job too small. All masonry
work. 508-690-2220.
Tasks for Tuition
Clean-ups, yard or home. Dump
runs. Small construction /
destruction. Father/son team. Call
781-447-7214, ask for Michael or
leave a message.
Odd Jobs
Eagle Scout and DHS grad
willing to do odd jobs around
your home or office. Dump
runs, auto detailing,
landscaping, photography, or
anything else. Call Graeme,
617-688-5206 between 8 a.m.
and 8 p.m.
Landscape Construction
Small scale design and
construction specializing in
walls, walkways, patios and
plantings. One man operation
to make sure the job is done
right the first time, every time.
Young, reliable, experienced
and fast. Call Jonathan
Hopfgarten, 781-706-7031.

Plantation Shutters and Blinds
Hunter Douglas blinds and
shutters. Specializing in
plantation shutters in real wood,
composite, and vinyl. Free
in-home consultation, free
installation. Call for in-home
quote. We offer lowest prices on
shutters/blinds. 781-985-5480
Frugalblindsandshutters.com
Summer Babysitter
20 year old college male who
loves kids, willing to babysit your
children older than five. Has car.
Call Jamie, 781-264-8216 (cell).
Handyman/Powerwashing Svc.
We powerwash houses, decks,
patios, walkways, etc. We also
specialize in carpentry, painting,
landscaping and any other
handyman projects you may need
done around the house. Great
prices, free estimates. Licensed
and insured. Call Paul at
781-422-6500.
Air Conditioning
Residential and Commercial Mr.
Slim ductless systems by
Mitzubishi. Factory trained and
certified Diamond Dealer. Fully
licensed and insured. Call Keith at
K. B. Guidetti Mechanical,
508-747-2180 or 508-989-1099.
Keeping you comfortable since
1989. Visit our website,
www.kbguidetti.com

19 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help support your Hometown newspaper. please tell our advertisers you saw ‘em in tHe express!
Your car, truck, or boat gets premium exposure with our
Guaranteed Auto Deal. Your package includes full exposure in
all of our award-winning publications and website. Best of all
you can put a photo of your vehicle right in your ad. There’s no
better way to sell your car, truck or boat. We’re so confident
you’ll agree that we guarantee to run your ad until the
vehicle is sold!
GUARANTEED WHEEL DEAL!
GUARANTEED AUTO PACKAGE WITH PHOTO
$39
95
GUARANTEED UNTIL IT’S SOLD!
INCLUDES PHOTO
Customer must supply photo. May be digital or print.
At Your
Service
Air Duct Cleaning Service
Air Conditioning. Air Duct
Cleaning Service. Watch us clean
your A/C ducts on our color TV
with our remote camera system.
Also available, record cleaning
and duct condition for home
inspection/appraisal mold
prevention products. System
tune-ups. Energy Field Services
LLC. Licensed and insured. Free
estimates, 774-454-4204.
Window And Gutter Cleaning
Let local firefighters brighten your
day! Residential and storefront.
Pressure washing - house, patio,
deck, etc. Free gutter cleaning
with every full house window job.
Reasonable rates. References
available. Fully insured. Keith
McWalter. 781-340-5183 or
cell-781-690-2000.
Culture Club
Travel (around the world). Tues &
Thurs mornings, 7/13 - 7/27,
8:30-10. Ages 6-10. Explore
Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe,
Latin America and Asia with
stories, music & crafts. 170
Monroe St., Pembroke. $60.
Charlotte Simpson,
781-293-3341 or
charlottesimpson@comcast.net
Painter & Handyman
Interior-exterior painting, light
carpentry, small & larger jobs,
meticulous neat work, excellent
references. Reliable & honest. We
are local. Please call Gerry,
617-538-5353 or Jim
617-689-1906.

Graphic Designer
Let me design your business
cards, advertising, brochures,
posters, newsletters and
invitations. I am experienced in
Photoshop, InDesign, Quark,
and Illustrator. References
available. For more information,
call 781-635-2350 or email
lindsey@beechwoodgraphics.c
om
Painting Etc.
$300 off Exterior Painting of
any job $1000 or more.
Specializing in interior/exterior
painting, power washing,
gutters, carpentry, dump runs,
and window washing. Free
estimates, best prices
guaranteed. Fast and reliable
service. Please call Mike,
781-789-3612.
House Cleaner
Offices, houses and apartments.
Seven years experience. Available
anytime on the south shore. Local
references available. Call
781-556-3520.
Lawn Mowing
Looking for new weekly, and
bi-weekly customers who
appeciate attention to detail, and
reliablity. Call Steven Shaevel,
508-889-1198. We also do yard
cleanups, and power wash.
Landscaping...Lawns
Tee-Time landscaping, a small
family yard care service.
Mowings, cleanups, fertilizing,
trimming, pruning, edging,
mulching, clean-outs, handyman
services. Small moves, also
engine repair 4 mowers and
more, tuneups etc, no wait. Call
Tommy, 508-889-3010.
www.teetimelandscaping.com
At Your
Service
Junk Busters
Junk removal, specializing in
cleanouts of basements, garages,
attics, yard debris, odds and
ends. We also specialize in
carpentry, painting, gutter work,
and window washing. Best
prices, free estimates. Please call
or leave a message for Mike,
781-789-3612.
Gutter and Yard Cleanup
We specialize in raking and
removing leaves, small trees,
branches and yard debris. Any
and all junk removed, inside and
out. We also clean gutters, install
gutter guards, and wash
windows. Please call Mike at
781-789-3612.
Computer Help Etc.
Personalized computer help and
solutions. In-home and small
business. Free same day service
assessment and system
diagnostic. No job too big or
small. Lowest prices guaranteed.
Call 339-832-4242 or
www.ComputerHelpEtc.com.
Repairs, Virus and Spyware
Removal, Networking,
Customized Tutoring.
‘06 Rockwood Freedom Camper
Excellent condition, well cared
for, winterized and covered.
Refrigerator, heater, king-queen
pullout, electric brakes. Asking
$6300, am negotiable. Call
781-293-3219.
1995 Range Rover LWB
The biggest, best and last of the
Real Frame Range Rovers.
Excellent condition. Only 65K
miles. Loaded, sunroof, CD, etc.
Spring Conversion. $9,500. Call
781-934-2137.
21' Doral
1995, 4.3 L Merc I/O, cuddy
cabin, low hours, great condition.
Includes trailer, skis and more.
Regularly maintained and locally
serviced. Inside winter storage,
ready for this season. $5900 or
best offer. Call Paul at
781-389-7448 or 781-934-8188.
Planes, Train
& Automobiles
4 Sail
1988 Hunter 23 - $3,200.
Affordable Sailing! Sail for
season! Boat in Duxbury Bay. one
gas outboard, Nissan 8.9; three
sails; boat stands (Note: electrical
not working). Call Kevin,
617-620-9479 or Ron,
781-724-1270.
2004 Armada 4WD SE SUV
This off-road SUV with third row
has been well maintained, has a
clean and clear title, just one
owner and runs perfectly.
63,467 miles, green exterior and
gray leather interior. Asking
$15,999. Call 781-934-1552.
2007 Honda Civic LX
$13,750 Gray, manual 5 speed,
4dr, only 38k miles, CD player
with MP3 hook up/built in
Navigation screen, rear spoiler,
power windows and power moon
roof, great on gas! Call
781-223-4274.
99 Seaswirl 23 Walkaround
99 200HP Ocean Pro + 04 trailer.
Low hours. GPS, VHS,
depthfinder, sink, stove, potty.
Full enclosure. New plugs,
thermostats, water pump,
batteries. Many extras. Very good
condition. On Duxbury mooring.
Ready to go. $22,900.
781-585-8886.
Boston Whaler
1988 17’ Montauk in great
condition. 100 HP engine.
Moored in Duxbury Bay, available
for a test drive anytime. $9800 or
best offer. Call 781-964-6770.
Planes, Train
& Automobiles
2006 Four Winds Travel Trailer
8’ x 24’, sleeps 4. Like new. A/C,
heat, refrigeration, stove,
microwave oven, stereo system,
awning etc. $8600. Call Colin,
508-291-0017.
25' O'Day Sailboat
1978 25 ft. O'Day sailboat.
Excellent centerboard bay boat
sleeps 5, newer genoa and jib,
new stays and antenna wiring,
9.8 hp motor, ready to sail. Can
be moored on flats, asking
$4950. Call 791-934-9189.
Com-Pac 16xl Sloop
1993 microcruiser with outboard
(w/alternator), trailer, plain sails,
Port-a-Potty, grill, awning. In
good shape. Stub keel - draws
18”, 1100 lb. displacement.
Many extras. $3000. Call cell,
781-361-2546 after noon.
2002 25’ Rinker Express
I/O 350 MPI Bravo 3. Very low
hours, professionally maintained.
All the options, enclosed head,
shower, microwave, fridge,
stove/oven, large swim platform,
depth, fish, windlass, 6 CD
changer. Family boat sleeps 4.
$26,900. Call 781-585-7911.
2004 GMC Yukon SLT
$19,500/bo. Fully loaded, 6-disc
CD player, rear seat DVD
entertainment system, heated
leather seats, power driver and
passenger seat, third row seat,
power moon, roof luggage rack,
power mirrors, premium wheels,
4 wheel drive. Call 781-826-4075.
Marshall Sandpiper
1974 Marshall 15’ catboat with
trailer. Very good shape. Green
hull w/ green sail cover. Great bay
boat. $4800. Call 781-883-6454.
Planes, Train
& Automobiles
16' Crestliner
16' Crestliner Angler Aluminum
boat with live well, custom
canvas cover, custom trailer, 9.9
hp, 4-stroke Honda electric start
motor, additional electric trolling
motor, ship to shore radio,
lawrance fish finder, 3 life jackets,
3 anchors. $7400 or bo. Call
781-934-2349.
At Your
Service
Professional Window Cleaning
Prices start at $2.00 We are fully
insured. No job too big or small.
10% off when you mention this
ad. Please call for free estimate.
Mike 781-789-3612
Robert Reardon Stump Grinding
Stump cutting specialists. State
of the art equipment. 12” below
grade. 40 years experience. Call
781-826-4774 or 617-694-7233,
cell.

781-934-2811
Whether you’re in Pembroke,
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PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED ORDER ON OUR WEBSITE ANYTIME OR CALL DURING REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS...
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If your garage sale, craft
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95
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BEAT THE ELEMENTS WITH
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Your package includes full
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You may change prices, wording or
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PHOTO!!!
Climbing the
Career Ladder
Medical Transcriptionists
Busy local MT company looking
for experienced medical
transcriptionists to type daily
notes, reports, IME’s, etc. on a
daily basis. Transcriptionists
are needed for 12-24 hour
turnaround. Work is
home-based, and files
transferred through secure
ftp/email. Diane, 339-933-2976.
Real Estate Career Opportunities
I am seeking career oriented
individuals to join the top real
estate office in Duxbury.
Licensed or wanting to be - call
or email Dorrie Arnold, Manager,
Coldwell Banker Residential
Brokerage.
Dorrie.Arnold@nemoves.com or
781-934-6995
Town of Pembroke
Custodian
The Town of Pembroke is
accepting applications for two
full-time custodian positions.
Qualifications include: general
knowledge of cleaning materials
and methods; thorough working
knowledge of maintenance
techniques and procedures related
to building grounds maintenance
and care; knowledge of building
and safety codes. A Class D
Massachusetts driver’s license is
required and at least a five year
good driving record. Starting salary
- $37,626. Resumes with three
references to Edwin J. Thorne,
Town Administrator, 100 Center
Street, Pembroke, MA 02359 by
July 26, 2010. AA/EEO Employer.
Hairstylists and Managers
for great new salon in
Pembroke. Outstanding
opportunity with immediate
clientele and great pay. Call
Mike at 781-789-5474.
Homeward
Bound
Pembroke Studio for Rent
Must see. Charming studio apt.
Newly renovated. Close to town
center. Non smokers/No pets.
Cable ready. Utilities incl. $700/
Mo. Call 781-293-0391.
Relocating/Renovating?
Desire Duxbury? Rent beautiful
4BR/2 bath oceanfront home.
Scenic views from multi-decks.
Fully furnished and appointed.
Washer, dryer (wireless internet,
cable available). No smoking, no
pets. Available August 29, 2010 -
May 15, 2011. Shorter terms
considered. Call Jim,
508-651-2740.
Gurnet Beachfront Cottage
For sale. Rustic, great views, one
bedroom, enclosed porch
accommodates extra sleeping.
$275,000. Dotty, 774-454-0457.
Homeward
Bound
New Home - Duxbury
4 BR, 2.5 bath 2 car garage. 2932
s.f., w/o basement. Walk/up attic,
Electrolux appliances, granite and
cherry kitchen. 3 season room on
rear deck. $729,900. Call Ron
McGann, Molisse Realty Group
781-837-5600.
At Your
Service
Michael’s Windows & Gutter
Cleaning
A local service. Windows start at
$5 each. Also, repair loose and
leaking gutters, and can install
gutter screens. Also, repair
window and door screens. (A
great gift idea!) I answer my
phone. Cell 508-523-9927.
The Paint Saint
Professional interior/exterior
painting, gutter cleaning, power
washing and window washing.
Best prices and service always
with a smile. Will paint your
home like it was our own. Call
Andrew for your free estimate.
781-264-3628.
Music Lessons
Guitar, bass, piano & drums. One
on one lessons. Dedicated
teachers, experienced in all
styles. Gift certificates available.
Located in the Priority Music
complex, Hanson on Route 27.
Call 781-293-8378.
House Cleaning
Residential cleaning. Great local
references. Call 774-268-9505.
At Your
Service
Elementary Grades Tutor
Recent college graduate with a
degree in English and Elementary
Edcation is willing to tutor
students grades 1-5 in all subject
areas. Please call Caitlin Larkin at
781-264-0714.
Sewing For Your Home
Former Boston Costume designer
is now available to sew your
window treatments, home
furnishings and alterations at
rates you can afford. Call Hilary to
discuss your project.
617-869-6499 or visit
www.h2sew.org
Cleaning Service
We can make your office or
house shine while you relax.
We come every week, every
other week, or once a month.
Move-ins and move-outs. Try
us before anyone else. Great
references. Call Elaine,
508-718-8159.
Refrigeration
Restaurant and marine equipment
sales and service. Fully licensed
and insured. Call Keith at K. B.
Guidetti Mechanical,
508-747-2180 or 508-989-1099.
Serving you since 1989. Visit our
website, www.kbguidetti.com
SAT Prep and Tutoring
Dartmouth College student to
tutor SAT I/II, HSPT/SSAT,
mathematics, chemistry, etc.
Received perfect score on SAT,
700+ on all subject tests, and five
scores of 5 on AP exams. Contact
Jake at 781-585-9559.
At Your
Service
Patio & Walkway Restoration
If you have a weedy, sunken
patio/walkway, I can make it
look new! By powerwashing,
lifting sunken areas and
poly-sanding, I can bring your
patio/walkway back to “like
new” condition. Call Jonathan
Hopfgarten, 781-706-7031.
Cleaning - Home or Office
Three years experience,
references available, free
estimates. I do windows. Call
508-840-6131
Brick Steps Repaired
No job too small. All masonry
work. 508-690-2220.
Tasks for Tuition
Clean-ups, yard or home. Dump
runs. Small construction /
destruction. Father/son team. Call
781-447-7214, ask for Michael or
leave a message.
Odd Jobs
Eagle Scout and DHS grad
willing to do odd jobs around
your home or office. Dump
runs, auto detailing,
landscaping, photography, or
anything else. Call Graeme,
617-688-5206 between 8 a.m.
and 8 p.m.
Landscape Construction
Small scale design and
construction specializing in
walls, walkways, patios and
plantings. One man operation
to make sure the job is done
right the first time, every time.
Young, reliable, experienced
and fast. Call Jonathan
Hopfgarten, 781-706-7031.

Plantation Shutters and Blinds
Hunter Douglas blinds and
shutters. Specializing in
plantation shutters in real wood,
composite, and vinyl. Free
in-home consultation, free
installation. Call for in-home
quote. We offer lowest prices on
shutters/blinds. 781-985-5480
Frugalblindsandshutters.com
Summer Babysitter
20 year old college male who
loves kids, willing to babysit your
children older than five. Has car.
Call Jamie, 781-264-8216 (cell).
Handyman/Powerwashing Svc.
We powerwash houses, decks,
patios, walkways, etc. We also
specialize in carpentry, painting,
landscaping and any other
handyman projects you may need
done around the house. Great
prices, free estimates. Licensed
and insured. Call Paul at
781-422-6500.
Air Conditioning
Residential and Commercial Mr.
Slim ductless systems by
Mitzubishi. Factory trained and
certified Diamond Dealer. Fully
licensed and insured. Call Keith at
K. B. Guidetti Mechanical,
508-747-2180 or 508-989-1099.
Keeping you comfortable since
1989. Visit our website,
www.kbguidetti.com

Friday, July 9, 2010 20
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
CONTRACTORS CONTRACTORS
CONTRACTORS
Complete Electrical Service
Audio Visual Sales &Installation
Master’s License #A7402
Serving Duxbury Since 1969
0,!#%9/52!$).4(%
3%26)#%$)2%#4/29
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ELECTRICIANS
AWNINGS/TENTS
AWN¡NGS
Retractable
Residential
Commercial
Tents
Tables &Chairs
230 Oak Street, Pembroke, MA02359
781-826-9001
Architectural Design & Construction
Property Management · 781-934-6141
Archiahomes.com · blog.archiahomes.com
ARCHIA
HOMES
ArchiaSD2_26_10.indd 1 3/5/10 9:23:35 AM
GOOLEY
CONSTRUCTION
L.L.C.
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Fine Homes &
Renovations
Duxbury
781.934.2130
Lic.# 048048
CARPENTRY
s 2EMODELING
s&INISH#ARPENTRY
s 7INDOWSs$OORSs$ECKS
s 7OOD4ILE&LOORS
781-974-9017
,ICENSED &ULLY )NSURED
Over 20 Years of Experience
IRRIGATION
CustomDesign&Installation
NOW SCHEDULING FOR SPRING
START-UPS & INSTALLATIONS
shorelineofduxbury@verizon.net
NewCustomers Welcome
HANDYMAN
LANDSCAPING
AIR CONDITIONING
1996 Jeep Cherokee Sport
6 cyl, automatic, full power, 4WD,
very clean. Great second or beach
car. $3900. Call 781-248-3383
(cell).
2000 Mazda B4000
4WD SE CAB plus 4D, 137,000
miles. Auto, well maintained, tow
package, bed liner. $3995 or best
offer. Call 781-696-1879.
Everything Else
Under the Sun
U-Pick Blueberries
T-Farm. 279 High St., Duxbury.
$2 a pint. Daily 9-4.
781-585-3272.
Legal
Notices
TOWN OF
PEMBROKE
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING
The Pembroke Board of
Selectmen will hold a public
hearing on Monday, July 12,
2010 at 7:30 p.m. in the
Pembroke Town Hall, Veteran’s
Legal
Notices
Hall, 100 Center Street,
Pembroke, MA, for the purpose
of inviting public input for an
outdoor recreation project
application under the Division of
Conservation Services. The
project includes improvements to
the Mattakeesett Street
Municipal Ballfields Complex.
Interested persons are invited to
submit comments to Edwin J.
Thorne, Town Administrator,
100 Center Street, Pembroke,
MA 02359.
Planes, Train
& Automobiles
Planes, Train
& Automobiles
Legal
Notices
TOWN OF
PEMBROKE
Town of Pembroke is seeking
proposals from interested and
experienced agencies for the
collection of Personal Property
Taxes. Those interested should
submit their written proposals on
or before July 22, 2010 to: Town
of Pembroke Attn: Kathleen
McCarthy, Town Collector, 100
Center Street , Pembroke, MA
02359.

21 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help support your Hometown newspaper. please tell our advertisers you saw ‘em in tHe express!
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ROOFING
Professional Residential & Commercial
Landscape Maintenance & Construction
s3PRING#LEAN5PSs,AWN-OWING
s%DGING-ULCHINGs,AWN)NSTALLATION
s3HRUB4REE0LANTINGS
Licensed and Fully Insured
markizzi@comcast.net
www.markinvernizzilandscaping.com
iaínIínu - iaµcr Hanuínu
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- Líccn¬cH CarµcnIcr - CGn¬I. MuI.
LxIcríGr L¬IímaIc¬ IGr ¬µrínu 2t1t
781-585-5227
wadsworthcd@comcast.net
PAINTING
PAINTING LANDSCAPING
ADVERTISER OF THE WEEK
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WOODCHUCK WOODCHUCK
I N D U S T R I E S
ª Tree RemovaI
ª Stump Grinding
ª Lawn InstaIIations
ª Debris RemovaI
FULLY INSURED
Chuck Teravainen
781-582-9512
Duxbury, MA
WE ENLARGE BACKYARDS
Residential & Commercial
Asphol| º Roll º Wood
º Robbor º Siding
º Windows º Go||ors
FREE Estimates
Promp| Rolioblo Sorvico
Folly Liconsod & lnsorod
MA Lic. #142º12
“Talk with the guy who actually does the work”
Local - Çn£‡Ó™Î‡£™££UÊToll Free - 800-617-9677
www.ridgebros.com
GODFREY
LANDSCAPE

Spring Clean-ups
• Weekly Maintenance
• Bobcat Service
• Walkways & Patios
781-831-5181
• Seasonal Clean-ups • Gutter Cleaning
• Brick/Stone Walkways• Mulch/Stone
John Montosi
– Free Estimates –
– SPRING CLEAN-UPS –
· Landscape Construction
· Bluestone Patios
· Fine Brick Work
· Granite Steps
· Cobblestone Aprons/Edging
· Landscape Design
· Stone Walls
· Spring/Fall Clean Ups
· Property Maintenance
781.934.2001 Chad Frost
Specializing in All Phases of Design & Installation
s )RRIGATION3YSTEMS
s (YDROSEEDING
s 7ALKS0ATIOS
s 2ETAINING7ALLS
s 0LANTINGS
s 7ATER&EATURES
(781)585-6182
Michael Bouchie
Serving the South
Shore since 1986
ALAN HURLEY
ROOFING
781-826-1601
alan@alanhurleyroofing.com
SUMMER SPECIAL
UP TO $500 OFF ON
COMPLETE NEW ROOF
U SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 2ÊU
We Accept Credit Cards!
WINDOW CLEANING
Let your local firefighters & crew
Brighten your day!
BELLEW WINDOW
CLEANING
781-603-6088
"Best prices guaranteed"
Gutter Cleaning, House Wash
& Power Washing
FREE ESTIMATES INSURED
LANDSCAPING
LANDSCAPING
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FOR ALL YOUR LANDSCAPING NEEDS
781-934-5010
www.oconnorlandscape.net
9345010@oconnorlandscape.net
Let Us Help Make Your
Dreamscape a Reality!
5lone Wolls * Wolkwoys * 5leps
Patios/Pool Patios U Drivewoy Aprons
Woler Feolures * 8obcolJ8ockhoe 5ervice
Iolol Properly Moinlenonce
Fully lnsured
Roof & Gutter
Cleaning
Bill Sullivan
Telephone: 781-294-8727
Cell: 781-718-4415
Free
Estimates
SULLIVAN PAINTING
* lnlerior & Exlerior
* Power Woshing
* Fully lnsured
SAWYER SCAPES
LANDSCAPING
Over 15 Years Experience... Quality Work at Reasonable Prices
º Spting CIean-Ups º 8dging â MuIching
º Shtubs â Topiaties Ttimmed
º PIanting Design â instaIIation: Shtubs,
Ttees â PetenniaI ßeds º Lawns instaIIed
CaII Kevin Sawyet - Ownet
ó17-504-1347
s,AWN-OWING
– 1st Mowing Always Free –
Fully Insured & Free Estimates
781-264-5595
Let your local firefighters & crew
Brighten your day!
BELLEW WINDOW
CLEANING
781-603-6088
"Best prices guaranteed"
Gutter Cleaning, House Wash
& Power Washing
FREE ESTIMATES INSURED
Friday, July 9, 2010 22
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help support your Hometown newspaper. please tell our advertisers you saw ‘em in tHe express!
Post 143 battles Bridgewater
Brendan Fitzgerald grabs a fly ball in cen-
ter field.
John Hanley connects for a sharp single to right field in the third inning against Bridgewater on Friday.
Luke Nagle hustles up the first base
line.
Derek Staples crosses the plate on a RBI double
by Conor Noonan.
Catcher Zack Perry scoops a pitch out of the dirt.
Conor Noonan fires
to the plate after
coming on in relief in
the sixth inning.
Photos by Dave Palana
Evan Morris
rounds third
base and heads
for home.
Adan Simpson
puts some spin
on a pitch dur-
ing the second
inning.
23 Friday, July 9, 2010 Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
Help support your Hometown newspaper. please tell our advertisers you saw ‘em in tHe express!
FRIDAY NIGHT
7:30-9pm
PLEASE JOIN US FOR
MEAT RAFFLE
FUNCTION HALL AVAILABLE FOR RENT
Frozen Ropes Training Center
Pembroke, MA 02359
frozenropes.com/pembroke
Duxbury
Kingston
Dates: Mon. July 12-Fri. July 16 (9am-11:30am)
Mon. July 19-Fri. July 23 (9am-11:30am)
Price: $160 per player/wk., or $285 per player for 2 weeks.
Location: Tarkiln Field, Duxbury
Dates: Mon. July 26- Fri. July 30 (9am-12pm)
Price: $160 per player.
Location: Opachinski Field Complex at Pottle St.
Ages 5-12 years old
Bring Glove, Bat (optional), Water Bottle and Hat.
The South Shore's leader in baseball instruction returns to
Duxbury & Kingston again this summer for 2 action-packed
and fun-filled weeks on the ball field. Whether you're an
all-star or just starting out, our Frozen Ropes coaches can
help you be your best in 2010!
340 Oak St.
781-826-2234
Jim.Pomeroy@frozenropes.com
Summer Baseball Camp
Early Bird
Specials
Online!
the decision to name him
Coach of the Year.
“The worst thing is to go
to a track meet and sit there
for hours while it drags on
and on,” he said. “These
days, ADs are always look-
ing at their budgets and when
they see a bus sitting there
for 12 or 14 hours, they want
to know why. I have a great
core of people surrounding
me, and we are going to have
the best possible output. You
know when you put on a
frst-class meet, it means a
lot to people.”
Kates has little time to
savor his new award as he
just fnished organizing and
hosting the annual Bay State
Games qualifying meet at
Notre Dame, which was the
largest qualifying meet ever
at Notre Dame. He is also
moonlighting in Carver as a
per diem EMT on 911 dis-
patch. Kates worked as an
EMT before going to Notre
Dame, where he teaches
physics in addition to coach-
ing, and said he is fortunate
he never let his EMT license
lapse as he had to treat an
offcial who collapsed dur-
ing an indoor track meet this
year until an ambulance ar-
rived.
“Luckily I had the medi-
cal knowledge to help take
care of him,” Kates said.
“It’s something I am always
going to keep up.”
continued from page 24
Kates named USTAF
Coach of the Year
No fireworks for
Pembroke Legion
Post 143 loses to Bridgewater and Brockton
by Dave Palana, sPorts eDitor
Dave@PembrokexPress.com
It was a rough Fourth of
July weekend for the Pem-
broke American Legion Base-
ball team. Twice Post 143 took
leads deep into games against
bigger, more experienced
teams and twice the leads
slipped away.
Pembroke started the holi-
day weekend with a 9-4 loss
to Bridgewater on July 3 and
then watched a 6-2 lead disap-
pear in an 11-7 loss to Brock-
ton on Monday.
Lefty Adam Simpson
turned in his best performance
of the summer in Bridgewater
on Saturday, but the Pembroke
defense broke down in the
fourth inning and Bridgewater
took advantage by scoring fve
runs to take a 6-4 lead.
“Adam deserved a way
better fate,” manager Tom
Drummond said. “He’s gotten
better every single game. You
can see what happens when
he throws strikes; his stuff is
great.”
Bridgewater’s frst run of
the inning came after Simpson
struck out a batter with a ball in
the dirt, allowing the runner to
run to frst and the runner from
third to score on the throw.
Bridgewater added a run on
a bloop single and then two
more on a single to center that
turned into a triple as Post 143
threw the ball around. Another
Post 143 error and Bridgewa-
ter single later, and they were
on top to stay.
“These are the problems
we’ve been having,” Drum-
mond said. “We threw the ball
around a bit and it hurt us. A
couple of guys had a tough
game today, and that is unusu-
al for them. That one inning
dictated the rest of the game.”
Bridgewater added another
two more unearned runs in the
ffth on a Pembroke throwing
error and an RBI double and
tacked on an insurance run in
the sixth.
Despite the loss, Drum-
mond was pleased not only
with Simpson’s performance
but also shortstop Mike Mar-
tin’s day at the plate. Martin,
who started the season slow
but has been on a tear of late,
smacked two doubles, walked
and drove in two runs.
“Mike has been on abso-
lute fre,” he said. “I couldn’t
be happier with the guy. With-
out question, he is our hottest
hitter and best defensive play-
er. He is growing every day in
confdence and ability, and he
just smoked the ball today.”
Pembroke turned to ace
Matt McCartney to right the
ship again Monday against
Brockton and staked him to
a 6-2 lead with four runs in
the top of the ffth inning, but
Brockton tied the game in the
bottom of the inning and, af-
ter Post 143 took a 7-6 lead in
the sixth, scored fve more in
the bottom of the inning to win
11-7.
Post 143 will try to get
back in the win column with
some home cooking on Friday
when they host Duxbury at
Mattakeesett Street.
LEgIoN BASEBALL
Pembroke 7
Brockton 11
LEgIoN BASEBALL
Pembroke 4
Bridgewater 9
Mike Martin launches one of two doubles in Pembroke’s game against Bridgewater on Saturday, but
it wasn’t enough to overcome a five-run Bridgewater fourth inning. Photo by Dave Palana
Friday, July 9, 2010 24
Pembroke Express – Your Hometown Newspaper!
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the deadline
is tuesday at noon. TiTan SporTS
by Dave Palana, sPorts eDitor
Dave@PembrokexPress.com
When you send a pitch-
er to the mound with a 0.25
ERA, you don’t usually ex-
pect to lose by 11 runs.
You also don’t expect to
give up nine unearned runs
regardless of who is pitch-
ing. But both happened to the
South Shore Warriors of the
wooden bat Cranberry Base-
ball League on Tuesday in a
17-6 loss to the Easton Hus-
kies at Frothingham Park.
With the Huskies trail-
ing the Warriors by a game
and a half, manager Greg
“Chili” Davis sent his ace
Eric Haughn to the mound.
But Haughn, who had only al-
lowed a single earned run in
fve starts while amassing 34
strikeouts, left the mound in
the third inning down six runs
while striking out none.
“There isn’t really much
to say,” Davis said. “We didn’t
make the plays when we need-
ed to. We made mistakes and
they capitalized. You can’t
make mistakes against a team
like that. And the pitching
wasn’t there today.”
Nothing went right for
the Warriors, who loaded the
bases with no outs in the top
of the frst and came away
with only one run. They then
lost their starting right felder,
Beau Barnes, in the bottom
of the frst when he separated
his shoulder diving for a line
drive.
Things didn’t get much
better as errors led to Easton
runs in the third and fourth
innings, and Nate Weber was
robbed of a sure RBI single in
the ffth when he hit a rocket
that Easton’s second baseman
snagged diving to his right
and turned into an inning-
ending double play that killed
the last Warrior rally.
Though the Warriors
stayed with the Huskies for
most of the game, things got
out of control in the bottom of
the ffth when Easton chased
Doyle from the game after an
error and a hit-and-run RBI
single and then scored seven
more times off Jeff Sarahs.
The Warriors added a late
run in the top of the sixth
when Chris Amate singled and
scored later in the inning on
a wild pitch before the game
was called for darkness.
Amate also singled and
scored in the frst inning on
a grounder by Tim Norton,
who drove in two runs on the
day. Catcher and frst base-
man Greg Baggett also had
a big day at the plate with
two mammoth triples that
would have been home runs
if Frothingham Park had out-
feld fences. His second triple
drove in the other three South
Shore runs.
With the loss, South Shore
is now clinging to second
place in the Cranberry League
by a half game over both the
Huskies and the Rockland
Cardinals and one game over
the Foxboro Knights and
Middleboro Bolts with fve
games left on their schedule.
Only the frst-place Braintree
White Sox are guaranteed a
spot in the playoffs when they
start in two weeks, so Davis
said the Warriors now need to
treat every game as a must-
win with the race so tight.
“We’ve got to win out,”
he said. “These are games that
we should win, and if we win
at least four out of fve, we
should be sitting OK.”
Problems for the Pinstripes
Huskies hammer Warriors
Easton’s Jack Taylor slides home ahead of the tag from Warrior catcher and Pembroke native Rich
McHugh during Easton’s rout of South Shore on Tuesday. Photos by Dave Palana
Former Pembroke High School star Eric Haughn has been
dominant for the Warriors this summer but suffered his first loss
against Easton on Tuesday.
Kates named Coach of the Year
Pembroke resident voted top HS coach in nation by USTAF
by Dave Palana, sPorts eDitor
Dave@PembrokexPress.com
Rick Kates is not one to
toot his own horn, but there
are plenty of people lining up
to sing his praises — most re-
cently U.S. Track and Field,
who named the Pembroke
resident and Notre Dame
Academy track coach its High
School Coach of the Year.
The award not only takes
into consideration a coach’s
success on the track, but also
their community involve-
ment and contributions to the
sport. Kates won the award
over 196 applicants from
across the country after being
nominated by a group of par-
ents and students from Notre
Dame.
“I was very taken aback
that they did that,” he said.
“It was very humbling.”
Kates’ teams helped run
the Hingham 5K charity road
race as well as the Feed the
Need road race, a race where
runners turn in canned goods
instead of entry fees, and col-
lected more than 500 cans of
food.
“The kids got a lot of pos-
itives from it,” Kates said. “It
was a great thing to do.”
The Notre Dame Cou-
gars also had another positive
year on the track, where they
cruised to their 22nd Catho-
lic Conference state champi-
onship and competed at the
Penn. Relays, Glenn Loucks
Games in upstate New York
and Hornet Relays on Ran-
dall’s Island in New York
City.
Notre Dame also sent 44
girls to the Division II State
Championship, including
Pembroke resident Shauna
Owen, who broke the school
record in the 400-meter hur-
dles as a freshman.
“I’m sure [Pembroke
High School coach Greg]
Zopatti is crying that she is
running for me,” Kates said
jokingly. “She’s a fantastic
kid.”
While Kates was pleased
with his team’s success, he
said he was equally proud
that all 146 track athletes
were able to maintain at least
a 3.0 grade point average.
“Every year, they are the
gold standard for the MIAA,”
he said. “It was a fantastic
season, and I couldn’t ask for
anything more.”
Kates also serves as the
meet director for the MIAA
state championships and
does the time keeping from
numerous races and fun
runs across the South Shore,
something that he takes pride
in and which factored into
Rick Kates moves the hurdles
during the Bay State games
qualifying meet. File photo
continued on page 23