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Using a large amount or the “heart” of a copyrighted material is generally considered in violation

Using a large amount or

the “heart” of a

copyrighted material is generally considered in violation of fair use

noun : a legal doctrine that portions of copyrighted materials may be used without permission of
noun
: a legal doctrine that portions of
copyrighted materials may be used
without permission of the copyright
owner provided the use is fair and
reasonable, does not substantially
impair the value of the materials, and
does not curtail the profits reasonably
expected by the owner
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Fair use depends greatly on the purpose and character of the work compared to the original

Adding to, or transforming, the original work to be used for a different purpose or with different intentions can be fair use

If the copyrighted material is being used to negatively affect the original work, instead of as a form of creative expression, it will most likely be considered in violation of fair use

Use that harms the potential or existing market for the original copyrighted work is not considered fair use

Using a large amount or the “heart” of a copyrighted material is generally considered in violation

Only use the bare minimum of the original work to explain concepts

Ask the library about available multimedia for in-class use

Using a large amount or the “heart” of a copyrighted material is generally considered in violation

Keep true to the original purpose and character of the copyrighted work

To learn more about using library resources in class

Go to: library.mst.edu

or

Email: library@mst.edu

For more information on Fair Use go to:

www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html