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Talk about the news at Town Square: www.PaloAltoOnline.com
■ Upfront High Speed Rail line could stop in Palo Alto Page 3
■ Title Pages Redeeming baseball's scapegoats Page 10
■ Sports Season previews for high school basketball Page 18
w w w. P a l o A l t o O n l i n e . c o m
Vol. XXIX, Number 25 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 ■ 50¢
w w w. P a l o A l t o O n l i n e . c o m
Palo
Alto
Page 8
Innovations
HOW YOUR NEIGHBORS ARE WORKING
TO MAKE LIFE BETTER IN 2008
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T
he California High Speed Rail
Authority is eyeing Palo Alto
as a potential stop for super-fast
trains that could whiz passengers
from San Francisco to Los Angeles
in less than three hours.
After selecting the Pacheco Pass,
by default, at a mid-December meet-
ing, the authority’s governing board
said the train route, if constructed,
would use the Peninsula to reach
San Francisco.
That means trains zipping at
speeds reaching 125 miles per hour
along the current Caltrain tracks, an
authority staff report states.
The authority envisions four paral-
lel tracks along the current Caltrain
route — the center two shared by the
high-speed trains and the exterior
tracks used solely by Caltrain.
But the electric trains, propelled
by energy from overhead wires,
need a minimum path 50 feet wide,
one authority document states.
Caltrain spokesman Jonah Wein-
berg said he thinks that most of the
high-speed train’s needs can be ac-
commodated within existing Cal-
train right-of-way.
He said Caltrain is building new
tracks and planning for electrifica-
tion — changes that would facilitate
high-speed rail but will also improve
local service by reducing air pollu-
tion, noise and saving money.
But if extra land is needed, the
authority, not Caltrain, would be re-
sponsible for acquiring it, Weinberg
said.
He said he did not think the high-
speed rail would significantly affect
existing Caltrain service. And some
upgrades needed for high-speed
rail, such as crossing improvements,
would also benefit Caltrain, Wein-
berg said.
Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 3
Upfront
Local news, information and analysis
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(continued on page 5)
Existing Caltrain land would be used, officials say
by Becky Trout
A
30-year-old Sunnyvale
woman is in isolation at
Stanford Hospital with an
active case of multi-drug-resistant
tuberculosis.
She was infectious when she
flew into San Francisco Interna-
tional Airport around Dec. 13,
returning from her travels abroad
and also when she sat in the wait-
ing room of the Emergency De-
partment at Stanford Hospital
several days later, Santa Clara
County Health Officer Marty
Fenstersheib said.
The woman flew from New
Delhi to Chicago, and 44 people
sitting near her have been con-
tacted by the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, Fen-
stersheib said Thursday. The 44
people were found in 16 states and
will be followed by local health
authorities, he said.
He said he does not know where
she acquired tuberculosis (TB),
but she had been receiving treat-
ment abroad, Fenstersheib said.
Officials have also contacted the
“very small” number of people in
the emergency room and they are
being offered tests and treatment
if necessary, hospital spokeswom-
an Shelley Hebert said.
But, she emphasized that only a
few people were exposed.
“If people were treated at the
emergency room recently and
have not been contacted, they
have not been exposed,” Hebert
said. “It’s important to know that
this patient’s condition is not dan-
gerous to the public.”
Fenstersheib said the woman
was not feeling well enough to go
anywhere else after she returned
home.
TB is a bacterial infection that
attacks the respiratory system.
Victims cough violently, some-
times coughing up blood, and
have chest pain, fever, chills and
weight loss. TB is spread through
fluid by sneezing, coughing or
talking.
According to World Health Or-
ganization guidelines, travelers
only need to be notified if they
are on a flight longer than eight
hours with someone who has ac-
tive TB.
TB is only contagious if the
individual has active symptoms.
Many people worldwide carry the
bacteria in their bodies but are not
contagious, a condition known as
“latent” TB. Fenstersheib said the
disease has a 10-week incubation
period, so those infected won’t
know for sure until February or
March if they have the disease.
Multi-drug-resistant TB is a
form of the bacteria that is no
longer incapacitated by some an-
tibiotics.
It can still be treated, however,
Fenstersheib said.
“Treatment may take a lot lon-
ger, and the drugs may have some
additional side effects,” he said.
Someone who is otherwise
healthy is likely to survive, he
said.
The woman is being kept in a
single-bed room and all health-
care workers are using protective
equipment, county Public Health
Woman with drug-resistant
TB at Stanford Hospital
Sunnyvale woman flew into SFO
while infectious, officials say
by Becky Trout
(continued on page 5)
Café to move
into train
depot
Caffé del Doge to receive
free rent in exchange for
cleaning
by Becky Trout
B
y as early as February, Palo
Alto train riders may be able
to grab a cup of coffee from
Caffé del Doge in the University Av-
enue Station.
The café, which also has a loca-
tion six blocks away on University
Avenue, was one of two firms that
bid for several hundred square feet of
space in the depot. In exchange for
free rent for six months, the company
must keep the depot bathrooms clean,
City of Palo Alto Real Property Man-
ager Bill Fellman said recently.
The Caffé del Doge’s proposal
needs to be approved by the City
Council in January before the busi-
ness can begin applying for permits
to install sinks and other equipment,
Fellman said.
The nonprofit Bike Coalition also
plans to rent about 500 square feet of
the depot, Fellman said.
Both organizations hope to be set
up before the Feb. 17 Tour of Califor-
nia bike race, he said.
Fellman said he expected more ap-
plications.
“I think they realized the janitorial
(work) is more than not paying rent,”
he said.
After six months, the café will be-
gin paying rent based on its sales.
Two coffee carts previously sta-
tioned at the depot have failed, but
the number of passengers passing
through has increased since then,
Fellman said.
Santa Clara County Valley Trans-
portation Authority (VTA) pays for
janitorial service now, but the bath-
rooms are only available for transit
workers. VTA rents the depot from
the City of Palo Alto, which then
pays property owner Stanford Uni-
versity. ■
Staff Writer Becky Trout can be
e-mailed at btrout@paweekly.com.
Baby, it’s cold outside
Skaters take to the ice at Palo Alto’s Winter Lodge during open skating, held between 3 and 5 p.m. daily.
BUSINESS
PUBIC HEALTH
High-speed rail could stop in Palo Alto
Page 4 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
Our
Town
by Don Kazak
Letters to us
W
hat principles should guide
journalists? What values
should be imbued in the
work we perform?
Those are questions for students
in a classroom, but they also are rel-
evant for those of us who are work-
ing reporters and editors, often too
busy with getting the next story to
think about what we are doing and
why.
Bill Woo taught journalism at
Stanford University for a decade un-
til he died in 2006. Before that, he
had a distinguished career, includ-
ing being the editor of the St. Louis
Post-Dispatch for many years.
In addition to talking to his stu-
dents, Woo would write e-mails
to them, ruminating on what he
thought and why.
A collection of those letters was
published last fall (“Letters from
the Editor,” University of Missouri
Press). Now we can all become his
students, too. His thoughts come
alive with immediacy as he draws
upon his insights born of long ex-
perience.
Even as newspapers evolve in the
face of the Internet revolution, there
is a reason, Woo reminds us, why
we work as journalists.
Woo writes that his newspaper,
the Post-Dispatch, never conducted
a focus group of readers on whether
they wanted to hear about the plight
of poor people.
“Quite the contrary. In fact, no-
body told us they wanted to read
about those things. And yet I knew
that the public trust, at least as we
defined it, required us to print such
stories so our readers would have a
better understanding of society and,
hence, be better equipped to change
it for the better.”
Woo writes about not being too
worried about trying to please read-
ers.
“As poll after poll shows, our
business falls ever more sharply
from the public’s grace, and the
press has struggled to repair the
damage. You hear editors talk about
‘reconnecting with our communi-
ties.’ That’s a worthy objective, but
it also contains a danger of associ-
ating ourselves with orthodoxy and
the status quo.”
The work of reporters and editors
should be to question and challenge,
along with reporting the breaking
news. The “why?” is often as im-
portant as the “what?”
Much of what we do includes cov-
ering government, and Woo warns
about journalists getting too close to
their government news sources.
“The relationship between news-
papers and government is a cru-
cially important — and extremely
complicated — topic,” he notes.
“The independence of the press
is absolutely essential to its cred-
ibility; and without credibility we
are doomed.”
One way of thinking about that is
to understand that journalists hold
accountable elected officials and
those whose salaries are paid by us,
the taxpayers.
During the Palo Alto Unified
School District’s management crisis
in the fall of 2006, I thought it was
important to remind readers that it
wasn’t the superintendent’s school
district nor the board’s district. It
was our school district.
Woo also writes about mundane,
everyday tragedies that newspapers
report. He quotes the English poet
John Donne, famous for his words,
“No man is an island.” But the words
that followed the famous quote were
just as important, Woo thought:
“Any man’s death diminishes me
because I am involved in mankind,
and therefore never send to know
for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for
thee.”
“Every journalist should commit
this to heart,” Woo writes, “for it
not only says that we are part of vast
whole of humankind, but that the
loss of any of that whole affects us
as well as anyone else.”
When I am out in the community
with my pen and notebook, I see and
hear things our readers aren’t pres-
ent to experience. I write for them,
so they can see and understand at
least some of what I witness.
“But, as Kipling said in another
context,” Woo concludes, “after
the tumult and shouting dies, there
stands that ancient sacrifice, a hum-
ble and contrite heart. We write for
that heart and that person, too, and
I don’t want a single one of you to
forget it. Ever.” ■
Senior Staff Writer Don Ka-
zak can be e-mailed at dkazak@
paweekly.com.
INDEX
Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
PUBLISHER
William S. Johnson
EDITORIAL
Jay Thorwaldson, Editor
Jocelyn Dong, Managing Editor
Allen Clapp, Carol Blitzer, Associate Editors
Keith Peters, Sports Editor
Tyler Hanley, Online Editor
Rebecca Wallace, Arts & Entertainment Editor
Rick Eymer, Assistant Sports Editor
Don Kazak, Senior Staff Writer
Arden Pennell, Becky Trout, Staff Writers
Sue Dremann, Staff Writer, Special Sections Editor
Karla Kane, Editorial Assistant
Norbert von der Groeben, Chief Photographer
Marjan Sadoughi, Veronica Weber, Staff
Photographers
Jeanne Aufmuth, Dale Bentson,
Lynn Comeskey, Kit Davey, Jack McKinnon,
Susan Tavernetti, Robert Taylor, Craig Wentz,
Contributors
Alex Papoulias, Joyce Tang, Editorial Interns
Hardy Wilson, Photography Intern
DESIGN
Carol Hubenthal, Design Director
Diane Haas, Sue Peck, Senior Designers
Dana James, Paul Llewellyn, Charmaine
Mirsky, Scott Peterson, Designers
PRODUCTION
Jennifer Lindberg, Production Manager
Dorothy Hassett, Blanca Yoc,
Sales & Production Coordinators
ADVERTISING
Vern Ingraham, Advertising Director
Cathy Norfleet, Display Advertising Sales Asst.
Judie Block, Tony Gay, Janice Hoogner, Display
Advertising Sales
Kathryn Brottem, Real Estate Advertising Sales
Joan Merritt, Real Estate Advertising Asst.
Mark Arnold, Irene Schwartz,
Classified Advertising Sales
Alicia Santillan, Classified Administrative Asst.
ONLINE SERVICES
Lisa Van Dusen, Director of Palo Alto Online
Shannon White, Assistant to Webmaster
BUSINESS
Theresa Freidin, Controller
Haleh Yee, Manager of Payroll & Benefits
Paula Mulugeta, Senior Accountant
Elena Dineva, Tina Karabats, Cathy Stringari,
Doris Taylor, Business Associates
ADMINISTRATION
Amy Renalds, Assistant to the Publisher &
Promotions Director;
Rachel Palmer, Promotions & Online Assistant
Janice Covolo, Receptionist; Ruben Espinoza,
Jorge Vera, Couriers
EMBARCADERO PUBLISHING CO.
William S. Johnson, President
Michael I. Naar, Vice President & CFO; Walter
Kupiec, Vice President, Sales & Marketing;
Frank A. Bravo, Director, Computer Operations
& Webmaster
Connie Jo Cotton, Major Accounts Sales
Manager; Bob Lampkin, Director, Circulation &
Mailing Services; Alicia Santillan, Susie Ochoa,
Circulation Assistants; Chris Planessi, Chip
Poedjosoedarmo, Oscar Rodriguez Computer
System Associates
The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159)
is published every Wednesday and Friday by
Embarcadero Publishing Co., 703 High St., Palo
Alto, CA 94302, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals post-
age paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing
offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circu-
lation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly
is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park,
Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty
and staff households on the Stanford campus and
to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not cur-
rently receiving the paper, you may request free
delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send
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Reproduction without permission is strictly prohib-
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Our e-mail addresses are: editor@paweekly.com,
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“The independence of
the press is absolutely
essential to its credibility.”
– Bill Woo
Looking for an opportunity to learn more about
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Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 5
Upfront
Department spokeswoman Joy
Alexiou said. She cannot have any
visitors.
Hebert said she is receiving treat-
ment and will be kept in the hospital
until it is safe to release her, which
could take until mid-January.
Santa Clara County had two cases
of multi-drug-resistant TB within
the last year, although neither per-
son traveled abroad, Fenstersheib
said.
If necessary, CDC spokeswoman
Shelly Biaz said, officials can place
an infected person on a “do not-fly”
list to prevent them from leaving
the country.
She said cases of multi-drug-re-
sistant TB rates are holding steady
at 1 percent of the approximately
14,000 annual cases in the U.S.
An even deadlier form of the dis-
ease, extremely drug-resistant TB,
has emerged also, she said.
The woman had been diagnosed
with the disease before returning to
the United States and was taking
drugs for it, Fenstersheib has said.
If someone develops active TB
abroad, they should seek local
medical attention, although no laws
prevent them from flying home, he
said.
“We really don’t want people
traveling with infectious TB,” Fen-
stersheib said. ■
Staff Writer Becky Trout can
be e-mailed at btrout@paweekly.
com.
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Tuberculosis
(continued from page 3)
He said it hasn’t been determined
if the authority would pay Caltrain
for the use of its tracks yet.
Coming into San Jose from the
Central Valley, the high-speed train
would stop at either Palo Alto or
Redwood City, Millbrae and then
San Francisco.
Palo Alto would probably have
more passengers interested in board-
ing, but Redwood City and the Red-
wood City Chamber of Commerce
have expressed interest in hosting a
stop, the staff report states.
Menlo Park and Atherton have
both lobbied to keep the high-speed
rail off the Peninsula.
Voters will be asked in November
2008 to approve a $10 billion bond
measure. The money would pay for
preliminary studies for the $33 bil-
lion-plus endeavor. ■
Staff Writer Becky Trout can
be e-mailed at btrout@paweekly.
com.
Rail
(continued from page 3)
New driving-related laws go
into effect
Regulations authored by Sen. Joe Simitian
will address cell-phone use while driving
by Bay City News
T
he rules of the road are chang-
ing again in California.
Starting this week, several
new laws aimed at improving safety,
protecting children and defending
the interests of consumers are tak-
ing effect.
Unless otherwise noted, the bills
go into effect on Jan. 1.
Assembly Bill (AB) 808, authored
by Assemblywoman Nicole Parra,
D-Hanford, requires applicants for a
driver’s license or license renewal to
sign a declaration that states if they
drive under the influence of alcohol
or drugs and someone is killed as
a result, they can be charged with
murder. It gives a prosecutor the op-
tion to charge a first-time offender
with second degree murder in a fatal
DUI case.
Senate Bill (SB) 67, authored by
State Senate President Pro Tem
Don Perata, D-Oakland, broad-
ens vehicle-impound laws to allow
law enforcement to seize a vehicle
when arresting a driver for reckless
driving, reckless driving in an off-
street parking area or exhibition of
speed.
The bill is aimed at cracking
down on illegal “sideshows,” in
which large groups of young people
gather on city streets late at night on
weekends to watch drivers engage
in stunts such as speeding and spin-
ning contests.
It re-enacts provisions of a 2002
bill that expired at the beginning
of 2007 because Oakland officials
failed to document the law’s success
before its five-year sunset provision
took effect.
SB 33, authored by Sen. Joe Simi-
tian, D-Palo Alto, prohibits anyone
under the age of 18 from using a cell
phone, hand-held or hands-free, or
any other mobile service device,
such as a BlackBerry, while driv-
ing. The bill doesn’t go into effect
until July 1.
Beginning at the same time, under
SB 1613, which was also authored
by Sen. Simitian, drivers 18 or older
must use a hands-free device if they
are using a cell phone while driv-
ing.
AB 645, authored by Assembly-
man Mike Feuer, D-Los Angeles,
prohibits courts from allowing per-
sons charged with driving under
the influence or with a hit-and-run
from attending traffic school. AAA
of Northern California, which sup-
ported the legislation, said that at-
tendance at traffic school for those
offenses results in masking a ticket
that would otherwise add two re-
cordable points to the person’s driv-
ing record.
AB 801, authored by Assembly-
woman Mimi Walters, R-Laguna
Niguel, prohibits the use of a device
that would impair the recognition
of a license plate by an electronic-
enforcement device such as a red-
light camera or those at toll-bridge
(continued on page 7)
STATE
Page 6 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
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Rick & Lisa Barr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Brigid Barton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Richard A. Baungartner & Elizabeth M. Salzer. .350
Vic Befera. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Elton & Rachel Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
The Bell Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Ken Bencala & Sall O’Neil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Bonnie M. Berg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Gerry & Harriet Berner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Bill & Barbara Binder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Terry & Jenny Blaschke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Roy & Carol Blitzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Eric Keller & Janice Bohman . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
John & Olive Borgsteadt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Steven & Linda Boxer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
The Braff Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Lawrence M. Breed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Dick & Carolyn Brennan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Rick & Eileen Brooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Gloria Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Allan & Marilyn Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Richard Cabrera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Carolyn Caddes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bruce F. Campbell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Robert & Micki Cardelli. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Barbara Carlisle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bob & Mary Carlstead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Earl & Ellie Caustin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Craig & Barbara Champion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Mark Chandler & Chris Kenrick. . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mel & Dee Cherno . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
George & Ruth Chippendale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ted & Ginny Chu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
David Labaree & Diane Churchill. . . . . . . . . . 200
Mr & Mrs Robert Clark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Laura Cline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Marc & Margaret Cohen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Paul & Marcia Cook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Chip & Donna Crossman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Julie Crozier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Robyn Crumly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
John & Ruth DeVries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
M.M. Dieckmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Ted & Cathy Dolton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Attorney Susan Dondershine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Eugene & Mabel Dong. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Albert & Susan Dorsky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
James & Shirley Eaton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Joseph & Meri Ehrlich . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Tom & Ellen Ehrlich . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Jerry & Linda Elkind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Hoda S. Epstein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
David & Sarah Epstein. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Leif & Sharon Erickson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Stanley & Betty Evans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Russ & Alice Evarts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Steven & Helen Feinberg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Carl H. Feldman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
David & Diane Feldman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
S. & D. Finkelstein. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Allan & Joan Fisch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Adrian & Sue Flakoll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Michael Fleice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Debbie Ford-Scriba. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mike & Cathie Foster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Bob & Betty French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Jan & Freddy Gabus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
John & Florine Galen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Gregory & Penny Gallo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Betty W. Gerard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Mark & Kate Gibbons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Wallace Gibson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
David & Carol Gilbert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Paul Goldstein & Dena Mossar. . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Margot Goodman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Wick & Mary Goodspeed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Richard & Lynda Greene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Richard Heydt & Roberta Reidel . . . . . . . . . . . **
Anne Gregor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Eric & Elaine Hahn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Jack Hamilton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ben & Ruth Hammett. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Phil Hanawalt & Graciela Spivak . . . . . . . . . . . **
Carroll Harrington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Harry & Susan Hartzell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Michael & Gwen Havern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2500
Walt & Kay Hays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bob Heinen & Cyndi Morrow. . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Alan Henderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Victor & Norma Hesterman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Hank & Nancy Heubach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Richard & Imogene Hilbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Sam & Ida Holmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mary Houlihan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Skip & Sue Hoyt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mahlon & Carol Hubenthal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Leannah Hunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Marc Igler & Jennifer Cray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Robert & Joan Jack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ray & Eleanora Jadwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Rajiv & Sandy Jain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Jim & Laurie Jarrett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
John & Diane Jennings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Jon & Julie Jerome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bill Johnson & Terri Lobdell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Richard K. Johnsson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Tony & Jan Julio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Zelda Jury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
David & Nancy Kalkbrenner . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Ed & Masako Kanazawa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Michael & Marcia Katz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Charles Katz & Gina Signorello . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ron & Tobye Kaye. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Sue Kemp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Ed & Eileen Kennedy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Leo & Marlys Keoshian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Markus Asckwanden & Carol Kersten . . . . . . 150
Peter & Lynn Kidder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Kieschnick Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Richard Kilner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
August & Janet King . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Bob & Edie Kirkwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Tony & Sheryl Klein. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Stan Schrier & Barbara Klein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Jim & Judy Kleinberg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Hal & Iris Korol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Art & Helen Kraemer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mark & Virginia Kreutzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Karen Krogh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Lillian L. Kwang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Donald & Adele Langendorf . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Wil & Inger Larsen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mary Lemmon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Patricia Levin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Stephen Levy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Harry & Marion Lewenstein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bjorn & Michele Liencres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000
Robert & Constance Loarie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Robert & Nancy Lobdell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Steve & Linda Longstreth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Gwen Luce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Lorraine Macchello. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
John & Claude Madden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Dick & Ellie Mansfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Last Year's
Grant Recipients
Adolescent Counseling
Services ...................................... $7,500
All Saints' Episcopal Church,
Palo Alto ....................................... 5,000
American Red Cross - Palo Alto
Area ............................................... 3,000
Art in Action ............................... 10,000
California Family Foundation ..... 2,500
CAR (Community Association
for Rehabilitation)........................ 5,000
Challenge Learning Center ........ 5,000
Cleo Eulau Center........................ 5,000
Collective Roots........................... 5,000
Community Breast Health
Project........................................... 5,000
Downtown Streets, Inc. ........... 10,000
East Palo Alto Family YMCA ...... 7,500
East Palo Alto Kids Foundation . 7,500
Environmental Volunteers ......... 3,000
EPA Children's Day Committee . 5,000
Family Service Agency
of San Mateo County .................. 5,000
Foundation for a College
Education...................................... 5,000
Friends of the Palo Alto
Junior Museum & Zoo................ 5,000
Hidden Villa .................................. 5,000
Jeremiah's Promise, Inc. ........... 5,000
JLS Middle School PTA ............. 3,500
Jordan Middle School PTA. ....... 3,500
Kara, Inc. .................................... 25,000
Mayview Community Health
Center............................................ 5,000
Music in the Schools Foundation 2,500
My New Red Shoes .................... 2,500
New Creation Home Ministries 5,000
Nuestra Casa ............................. 10,000
Palo Alto Art Center Foundation 7,500
Parents' Nursery School ........... 4,300
Peninsula Stroke Association ... 1,500
Peninsula Volunteers, Inc. ......... 5,000
St. Elizabeth Seton School......... 5,000
St. Vincent de Paul Society ...... 5,000
Teach for America ...................... 5,000
TheatreWorks .............................. 5,000
YES Reading ............................... 25,000
Youth Community Service .......... 7,500
E
ach year the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund raises money
to support programs serving families and children in the Palo
Alto area. Since the Weekly and the Silicon Valley Community
Foundation cover all the administrative costs, every dollar raised
goes directly to support community programs through grants to non-
profit organizations ranging from $1,000 to $25,000.
And with the generous support matching grants from local
foundations, including the Packard and Hewlett foundations and the
Peery & Arrillaga family foundations, your tax-deductible gift will be
doubled in size. A donation of $100 turns into $200 with the foundation
matching gifts.
Whether as an individual, a business or in honor of someone else, help
us beat last year's total of $280,000 by making a generous contribution
to the Holiday Fund. Send in a contribution today (or give online) and
then check out our progress by watching the growing list of donors
each issue in the Palo Alto Weekly. All donations of $25 or more will
be acknowledged in every issue of the Palo Alto Weekly between late
November and mid-January.
With your generosity, we can give a major boost to the programs in
our community helping kids and families.
Give to the Palo Alto
Weekly’s Holiday Fund
and your donation is doubled.
You give to non-profit groups
that work right here in our com-
munity. It’s a great way to ensure
that your charitable donations
are working at home.

Last Year's
Grant Recipients
Adolescent Counseling
Services...................................... $7,500
All Saints' Episcopal Church,
Palo Alto ....................................... 5,000
American Red Cross - Palo Alto
Area ............................................... 3,000
ach year the Palo
to support program
Alto area. Since t
Foundation cover
goes directly to support co
profit organizations rangin fi i i i
And with the generous s
foundations, including the
Peery & Arrillaga family f
doubled in size. A donatio
matching gifts.
Whether as an individua
us beat last year's total of
t th H lid F d S d
Give to the Palo Alto
Weekly’s Holiday Fund
and your donation is doubled.
You give to non-profit groups Y i t fit
that work right here in our com-
munity. It’s a great way to ensure
that your charitable donations
are working at home.

Click
and
Give
449 donors through 12/26/07 totalling $127,585
with match $219,585 has been raised for the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund
Support our Kids
with a gift to the Holiday Fund
Donate online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com
Enclosed is a donation of $_______________
Name ___________________________________________
Business Name ___________________________________
Address _________________________________________
City/State/Zip ____________________________________
Phone ___________________________________________
❑ Credit Card (MC or VISA) ____________________________________Expires __________________
Signature ________________________________________ E-mail _______________________________
I wish to designate my contribution as follows: ❑ In my name as shown above – OR –
❑ In name of business above
❑ In honor of: ❑ In memory of: ❑ As a gift for: __________________________________
(Name of person)
❑ I wish to contribute anonymously. ❑ Please withhold the amount of my contribution.
The Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund is a fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation. All donations
will be acknowledged by mail and are tax deductible as permitted by law. All donors will be published in
the Palo Alto Weekly unless the coupon is marked “Anonymous.” For information on making contributions
of appreciated stock, contact Amy Renalds at (650) 326-8210.
Make checks payable to
Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund
and send to:
PAW Holiday Fund
P.O. Box 1610
Palo Alto, CA 94302
E
Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 7
Upfront
Atherton chooses city manager
Jerome “Jerry” Gruber, a former department head for the ski-resort
city of Big Bear Lake, is poised to become the next city manager of
Atherton.
The Atherton City Council announced late Thursday that it tenta-
tively tapped Gruber to lead its town staff, pending the negotiation
of his compensation package. Until recently, Gruber was the general
manager of the Big Bear Lake Department of Water and Power.
The council chose him unanimously, said Councilman Charles
Marsala.
Interim City Manager Wende Protzman, who has led the town since
the retirement of Jim Robinson in July, will resume her previous posi-
tion as assistant to the city manager. Protzman was also a candidate
for the city manager position.
“The council was impressed with Jerry’s many years in a manage-
ment position, which, with Wende’s knowledge of local and regional
issues, should provide a positive direction for the town,” the City
Council’s press release stated.
The council is expected to take formal action to hire Gruber after
the holidays. ■
—Almanac News staff
Taxi cab overturns on Page Mill Road off-ramp
A taxi cab crashed and overturned on the northbound Page Mill
Road off-ramp at Interstate Highway 280 Friday morning at approxi-
mately 8 a.m.
The cab was traveling northbound on 280 when it exited at Page Mill
Road, went up the embankment and landed on its roof, according to
CHP Officer Graciela Castillo.
There were no passengers in the cab at the time, and the driver was
treated at the scene after complaining of back pain, Castillo said. ■
—Tyler Hanley
Merger prompts name change for Camino Medical
Mountain View’s Camino Medical Group changed its name to the
Palo Alto Medical Foundation, or PAMF, on Jan. 1.
The change comes in the wake of physicians’ approval of a plan to
merge Camino Medical Group, Palo Alto Medical Clinic and Santa
Cruz Medical Clinic into a single entity.
All three medical groups were previously affiliated with the not-
for-profit medical foundation as three separate legal entities that con-
tracted with PAMF to provide physician services. The reorganized
group will work toward making it easier for patients to receive care
at any PAMF location, a plan that will go into effect later in 2008,
according to officials.
Under the new structure, all three medical groups will be linked
through a single electronic health-record system.
PAMF operates facilities in Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara and
Santa Cruz counties, and the consolidated organization will have ap-
proximately 850 physicians. PAMF is part of the Sutter Health group. ■
—Alexa Tondreau, Mountain View Voice
Cancer risks shown for some minority women
A new study released last week by researchers from Stanford Medi-
cal School and the Northern California Cancer Center found that His-
panic and young black women may benefit from genetic screening
in connection with a specific mutated gene associated with breast
cancer.
The study of more than 3,100 Northern California breast-cancer
patients was published Dec. 26 in the Journal of the American Medi-
cal Association. It found that 16.7 percent of black women under 35
with breast cancer have a mutated BRCA1 gene. The rate for Hispanic
women with breast cancer was 3.5 percent.
All human beings have the BRCA1 gene, which makes a protein that
helps the cell repair its DNA. Women who inherit the mutation are less
able to fix DNA damage and tend to accumulate mutations that lead
to cancer. They have a roughly 65 percent risk of developing breast
cancer and 39 percent risk of ovarian cancer.
Scientists have known for some time that Ashkenazi Jewish women
are more likely to carry the mutation, and thus they are more likely to
be referred for genetic counseling. This new study should encourage
physicians to refer women of other ethnicities as well, according to
study senior author and Stanford University health research and policy
professor Alice Whitemore.
“The message is that these minority breast-cancer patients may need
screening in ways that we hadn’t appreciated before,” Whitemore said
in a statement.
The study was funded by the National Cancer Institute. ■
—Bay City News Service
News Digest
LET'S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the
issues at Town Square at www.PaloAltoOnline.com
Joe & Lynnie Melena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
John & Eve Melton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Mona R. Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Ruth B. Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
David & Lynn Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Stephen Monismith & Lani Freeman . . . . . . . . **
Diane Moore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Mark & Elizabeth Moragne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Les Morris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Robb & Timi Most . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Thomas & Isabel Mulcahy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Aron Murai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
“No Limit” Drag Racing Team. . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Elsbeth Newfield. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Merrill & Lee Newman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Nishumura Familiy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Craig & Sally Nordlund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Joan B. Norton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Peter & Kay Nosler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Boyce & Peggy Nute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
John & Barbara Pavkovich. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Scott & Sandra Pearson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Enid Pearson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Barbara Peterson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Conney Pfeiffer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Jim & Alma Phillips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Helene Pier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Virginia Pirrotta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Jeremy Platt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
David & Virginia Pollard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Joe & Marlene Prendergast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Don & Dee Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Nan Prince . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
The Read Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bill & Carolyn Reller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Amy Renalds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Jerry H. Rice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Thomas Rindfleisch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Teresa L. Roberts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Nancy Rogers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Joe & Diane Rolfe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Dick & Ruth Rosenbaum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Peter & Beth Rosenthal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Paul & Maureen Roskoph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Don & Lou Ross. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Steve & Karen Ross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Norman & Nancy Rossen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Don & Ann Rothblatt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ruth & Kris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Don & Jacquie Rush. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Al & JoAnne Russell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Ferrell & Page Sanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
George & Dorothy Saxe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
John & Mary Schaefer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
John & Kathleen Schniedwind. . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ken Schroeder & Fran Codispoti . . . . . . . . . . . **
Irving & Naomi Schulman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Joseph Sciascia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Carlisle Scott. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bill & Eleanor Settle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Hersh & Arna Shefrin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mark & Nancy Shepherd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Martha Shirk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Lee & Judy Shulman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Bob & Diane Simoni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Robert & Barbara Simpson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Sandy Sloan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Roger Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Andrea B. Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Charles A. Smith & Ann D. Burrell . . . . . . . . 650
Alice Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Lew & Joan Southern. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Bob & Becky Spitzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Art & Peggy Stauffer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Charles & Barbara Stevens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Doug & Kathy Stevens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Shirley F. Stewart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Blaire & Jacqueline Stewart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Carl Stoffel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Bryan & Bonnie Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Stan & Sue Sucher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Debra Szecsei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Jacqueline S. Thielen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Warren R. Thoits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Tom & Pat Thomas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
John N. Thomas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Carl & Susan Thomsen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Roy Levin & Jan Thomson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
David & Nehama Treves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Tony & Carolyn Tucher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Daniel & Janis Tuerk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mike & Ellen Turbow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Janis Ulevich. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Jim & Susan Voll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Jerry & Bobbie Wagger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Leonard & Jeanne Ware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Roger & Joan Warnke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Don & Sylvie Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 900
Anna Wu Weakland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Mark & Karen Weitzel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2000
George & Lois Wentworth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ralph & Jackie Wheeler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Wildflower Fund @ SVCF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Scott Wong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Douglas & Susan Woodman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
John E. Woodside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Tom & Ellen Wyman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Jia-Ning & Lijun Xiang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Mark Krusnow & Patti Yanklowitz. . . . . . . . . . **
George & Betsy Young. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Steve & Grace Zales. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Steve Zamek & Jane Borchers . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
As A Gift For
Dr. Richard R. Babb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
The Burk Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ro & Jim Dinkey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Carolyn Fox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Jason & Lauren Garcia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Charlotte K. Joyner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Robert Lobdell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Andrew & Caitlyn Louchard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ned Lund Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Attorney Alison Cherry Marer & Family . . . . . **
Marjorie Smith. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
In Honor Of
Ray & Carol Bacchetti. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
The Warren Cook, Jr. Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Richard Heydt & Roberta Riedel . . . . . . . . . . 200
Al Jacobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Mae Kenrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
The King/Brinkman Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ted & Peggy Larsen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Terri Lobdell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Larry & Trina Lovercheck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Paul & Barbara Madsen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Katie Maser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
David & Lynn Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
My wonderful clients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
The Nordlunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Our neighbors on Dana Avenue . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Sandra Pearson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bill & Carolyn Reller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Shelby Anne Rider. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mike & Anne Rosenthal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Sandy Sloan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Amalia, Ari & Sam Stein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Marilyn Sutorius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Sallie Tasto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Bob Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Dr. Louis Zamvil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Paul & Becky Zuanich. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
In Memory Of
William (Wild Bill) Beames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Carol Berkowitz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
John D. Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Max & Anna Blanker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Louis Bogart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Willie Branch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Willie Branch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Leo Breidenbach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
A.L & L.K. Brown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Eugenia Buss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Edward & Elizabeth Buurma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bill Carlstead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Lydia Champagne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Frank & Jean Crist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Sallye Dawidoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Harriet Moore De Nault. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Patty Demetrios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bob Dolan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Bob Donald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bob Donald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Arlee R. Ellis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Fred Eyerly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Steve Fasani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mary Floyd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Beverly Fuchs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
DJ Gauthier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Arthur Gleim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Pam Grady . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Vincent Grande . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Grandpa Bud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Sydney Griswold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Gail Ann Hawkins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Alan Herrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bob Iwamoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Dr. Robert Jamplis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bertha Kalson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Florence Kan Ho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Alfred Kenrick. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
David Kessler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Sally Kiester. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Katharine King. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Helene F. Klein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
James B. Klint, MD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Marlene Krohn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bill Land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Dr. Pao Yu Lee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Charles Bennett Leib. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Emmett Lorey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
loved ones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Bob Markevitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Dr. Larry Mathers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Roger May . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Theresa McCarthy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Peter Milward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Patsy Moore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Ernest J. Moore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Kathy Morris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Bessie Moskowitz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Melva Murphy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Al & Kay Nelson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Our son Nick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Our dad Al Pellizzari . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Boyd C. Paulson, Jr.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Paul Arthur Pearson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
John & Mary Perkins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Thomas W. Phinney. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Wade & Louise Rambo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Irving F. Reichert, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Nancy Ritchey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
C. Peter Rosenbaum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Irving & Ivy Rubin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Helen Rubin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Sally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Arnold Scher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Meyer Scher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Mary Fran & Joe Scroggs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Stephen Scroggs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Maria J. Serpa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
John Smitham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Jean & Arthur Spence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Charles Henry & Emma Westphal Stelling. . . . **
Jack Sutorius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
YC Yen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Dr. David Zlotnick. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Businesses &
Organizations
Alta Mesa Improvement Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 625
Bleibler Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Essabhoy Realty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
First Lutheran Chruch Women . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Harrell Remodeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . **
MindTribe Product Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . **
Palo Alto Weekly Moonlight Run. . . . . . . . 17130
Roxy Rapp & Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
The Milk Pail, Friends & Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . 750
Holiday Fund
(continued)
booths.
SB 7, authored by Sen. Jenny Oro-
peza, D-Long Beach, makes it ille-
gal to smoke cigarettes, a cigar or a
pipe in a motor vehicle where a mi-
nor is present. Violators can receive
a fine of up to $100 per person.
AB 118, authored by Assembly
Speaker Fabian Nunez, D-Los An-
geles, increases the annual vehicle-
registration fee and the smog-impact
fee in order to provide revenue for
research and development of alter-
native fuels. Consumers can expect
to pay from $3 to $11 more when
registering their vehicles. This law
is in effect from July 2008 through
2016.
Additional laws address the physi-
cal inspection of hazardous-material
commercial vehicle terminals, cre-
ation of a San Francisco Bay Area
Water Emergency Transportation
Authority, research and develop-
ment of alternative fuels, placement
of traffic signals that detect motor-
cycles and bicycles at intersections,
and a study of the effects of fuel
temperature on consumers. ■
Laws
(continued from page 5) $2$!6)$"*/.%3
Dr. David B. Jones, 86, died Sunday, December 16,
2007, in Palo Alto, California. He is survived by his
daughters Linda Suzuki of Walnut Creek, Laura Johnson of
Palo Alto, granddaughters Elizabeth and Margaret Johnson,
and brother Tracey K. Jones Jr., of Sarasota, Florida.
David was born in Canton, China, the youngest child
of Marion and Tracey K. Jones, YMCA missionaries. His
beloved wife, Jean, and daughter, Susan, preceded him
in death.
A seven-decade resident of Syracuse, New York, Dr.
Jones enjoyed a long and productive career at the State of
New York College of Medicine in Syracuse, graduating first
in his medical school class in 1945, and continuing on as a teacher and then professor of
pathology until his retirement in 1992. His work there was interrupted only by his service as
a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy and a fellowship in neuropathology at the Mayo Clinic.
The sixth generation of his family to enter medicine, David was a pioneer in electron
microscopy, an international expert in kidney pathology, and author of over 90 articles on
kidney disease for professional journals. He founded the Cytotechnology program in the
College of Health Related Professions and served as a consultant in nephropathology for the
Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. In 1988 he was named New York State Distinguished
Pathologist of the Year. The College of Medicine honored him and his colleague Robert
Rohner by establishing the Jones-Rohner Endowed Professorship in Pathology in 1991.
David was known for his prodigious memory, integrity, and humility. He loved teaching.
His family and friends remember him as a loving and generous father, husband,
grandfather, uncle, brother, cousin, and son. He put the interests of others first, and was
stoic in life’s difficulties. He was a true gentleman. Even in his final illness some of his
last words were, “What can I do for you?” He was an avid salmon fisherman, gardener,
photographer, model ship builder, and loyal member of the First United Methodist Church
in Syracuse.
Memorial services will be held Saturday, January 5, 3:00 PM at All Saints’ Episcopal
Church, 555 Waverly, Palo Alto, and in Syracuse in July. The family asks that in lieu of
flowers donations be made to the Upstate Medical Alumni Foundation, Setnor Academic
Bldg., suite 1510, 750 E. Adams St., Syracuse, NY 13210, or a charity of your choice.
P A I D O B I T U A R Y
Page 8 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
POLICE CALLS
Palo Alto
Dec. 15-25
Violence related
Assault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Assault with a deadly weapon . . . . . . . .1
Attempted suicide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Child abuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Theft related
Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Credit card forgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Theft undefined. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Vehicle related
Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Driving w/ suspended license. . . . . . . . .9
Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .8
Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . 19
Vehicle impound/store . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Alcohol or drug related
Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Miscellaneous
Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .3
Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Noise ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .4
Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Vandalism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Warrant/other agency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Pulse
A weekly compendi-
um of vital statistics
$
30off
Holiday Special
DRIVERS ED/TRAINING PACKAGE
www.StanfordDrivingSchool.net
Holiday Special Holiday Special
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Stanford
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(650) 493-1978 • 3960 El Camino Real, Palo Alto
For more information on getting your permit, visit our website at:
www.StanfordDrivingSchool.net
WITH THIS AD
Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4
Wed 12/26 Thur 12/27 Fri 12/28 Sat 12/29
Wed 1/2 Thur 1/3 Fri 1/4 Sat 1/5
Weekends Jan 19-20, 26-27
Winter in-Class Schedule
Water Heater
Special
10% Discount through
1/31/08
Energy
Efficient
Water
Heaters
650/952-6578
O’Dowd Plumbing, Inc.
Lic 522217
Kite Runner (R)
Fri-Thurs.1:30, 4:30, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m.
The Savages (R)
Fri-Thurs. 1:40, 4:20, 7:15 & 10:10 p.m.
psychotherapy in nature
...walking and talking in nature’s healing environment...
Nancy Klimp, LMFT 650.493.1935 ext. 2
The Dish • Palo Alto Baylands • Client’s nature choice
For local movie times for
Wednesday and Thursday, go
to www.paloaltoonline.com
and click on “Movies.”
The Peninsula Orchid Society
Saturday January 5, 2008 and
Sunday January 6, 2008
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Peninsula Orchid Society Show and Sale
Community Activities Building
1400 Roosevelt Ave, Redwood City, CA
Website: http://penorchidsoc.org
Tickets: $5 – Adults
$3 – Seniors, Disabled &
Children 12-16 years
S H O W A N D S A L E
Featuring incredible orchids, sales by orchid vendors and members,
seminars on orchid culture and repotting, orchid raf es and orchid art.
Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 9
Transitions
Births, marriages and deaths
Sally Valente Kiester, 70, a writer,
educator and leader of nonprofit or-
ganizations, died Dec. 19 of compli-
cations from
leukemia.
She was
born at a New
Year’s Eve
party in Cebu
City, the Phil-
ippines.
She was a
graduate of
the University
of the Philippines and received her
doctorate from the Stanford Univer-
sity School of Education.
She served on the Stanford Uni-
versity faculty and as marketing di-
rector for the International Program
in Engineering Studies. She was a
founding member of the Interna-
tional Association for Continuing
Engineering Education and served
on the California Commission for
Curriculum Standards in Foreign
Language Instruction.
She continued her Stanford af-
filiation as a visiting scholar at the
Center for Teaching and Learning.
She served as president of the
United Nations Association in Palo
Alto and received the UNA’s highest
distinction. She also served as presi-
dent of the Sister Cities Internation-
al Palo Alto branch. She co-founded
the International Visitors Commit-
tee of Palo Alto, which gave weekly
welcoming parties to international
visitors. In 1994, she chaired the
opening evening of Palo Alto’s cen-
tennial celebration. She also served
on the advisory board of the Com-
munity Media Center.
In 2003 she moved from Califor-
nia to Pittsburgh, Penn., to be nearer
to family members.
She and her husband coauthored
18 books, including the “Better
Homes and Gardens New Baby
Book.”
Loved ones recall her as a noted
party giver, gracious hostess and
activist for the down trodden.
She is survived by her husband
of 43 years, Edwin Kiester Jr. of
Penn.; their son, William Kiester
of Beverly, Mass.; three sons by a
previous marriage, Michael, Robert
and Richard Kennewick of Seattle,
Wash.; four grandchildren; and a
sister, Thelma Rapatan of Washing-
ton, D.C.
A memorial service will be an-
nounced at a later date. For inqui-
ries please call William Kiester at
718-219-0859.
Donations may be made to the
Virginia Gildersleeve International
Fund (thegildersleeve.org/).
Sally Kiester, Stanford scholar and
community leader, dies at 70
%5'%.)!(!,3%9"533
Eugenia Halsey
Buss passed away
gently in Weston,
CT on November
15th at the home of
her daughter Jennifer
Barron, surrounded by
loving family members.
She was 89. She was
kind and generous,
with a joyful smile,
easy l aught er,
boundless enthusiasm,
and enormously proud
of her large family.
Eugenia, a 4th generation Californian, was born in San Francisco
on March 24th 1918. Eugenia’s family moved to Los Altos in
1924, where her mother planted a fabulous garden and redwood
saplings along Adobe Creek. Her childhood home still stands
today as the Redwood Grove Nature Preserve.
Eugenia was a 1935 graduate and valedictorian of Castilleja
School of Palo Alto. She graduated from Stanford University
in 1939 and married Robert Buss shortly after. Eugenia had
dreamed of being a pediatrician but decided against it and was
thrilled when years later her son Richard became a doctor. Since
childhood, Eugenia loved to vacation in the Sierras. Robert and
Eugenia spent their honeymoon in the high Sierra where their
family later camped nearly every summer. As recently as last
summer Eugenia happily returned to hike and camp with many
family members.
During World War II Eugenia and Robert moved their growing
family to the east coast, returning to California in 1951 to build
their dream home and raise six children in Los Altos Hills. The
family was active in the First Congregational Church of Palo Alto
where Eugenia volunteered in many activities and charity events.
Since 1964, Eugenia was an enthusiastic and continual member
of Dr. Jeanne Shutes’ literature class. Eugenia and Robert attended
innumerable concerts together and transmitted their shared love
of music to their children. During car and camping trips she and
Robert taught their children to sing, inspiring two daughters
into musical careers. Eugenia loved traveling with her husband
Robert. Together they visited many locations including Japan,
Alaska and Europe. Eugenia’s gifts to the world include music,
food, and unconditional love to family, friends, and strangers.
Eugenia is survived by her brother Ted Halsey of Brentwood;
children Katherine Buss of Berkeley, Jennifer Barron of Weston,
CT, Dr. Richard Buss of Jackson, Stephen Buss of Los Altos
Hills, Laura Van Hook of Kings Beach, and 13 grandchildren,
7 great-grandchildren, and 1 great-great grandchild. She was
preceded in death by her daughter Margaret Finney in 2003 and
husband Robert in 2004. Memorial services will be held at First
Congregational Church of Palo Alto on Sunday January 6th at
3:00 pm. Donations in lieu of flowers may be given to the Organ
Fund of First Congregational Church of Palo Alto.
P A I D O B I T U A R Y
6)2').)!,%)'(+%,,%93)%'-!.
“Kelley”, as she preferred to
be called, died November 26,
2007, in San Jose. Born August
10, 1929, to Richard Leigh
Kelley and Anna Leighton Kelley
in San Francisco, she grew
up in Modesto and graduated
from Modesto High School.
After attending Modesto Junior
College, she graduated from
San Francisco State University
with an elementary school credential. She taught in Keyes
and Oxnard before marrying in 1957 at Stanford. She spent
most of her life in Palo Alto. “Honey”, as she was known in
the family, was keenly interested in swimming, art, reading,
and people—especially children.
She is survived by her three children: Anne, aka Jessica,
Phillips and son-in-law Steve Phillips of Sacramento; Winn
Kelley Siegman and son, Jackson, and daughter, Rachel, of
Menlo Park; and Patrick Edward Siegman of San Francisco;
sister Rosemary K. Maulbetsch and brother-in-law John S.
Maulbetsch of Atherton and their children, Erik, of Boulder,
Colorado and Kelley of Sausalito and many cousins in the
Bay Area.
A memorial luncheon for the family will be held in
January to honor her life. Memorial contributions in her
name may be made to an organization for the purpose of
funding research in mental health: NARSAD, 60 Cutter Mill
Road, Suite 404, Great Neck, NY 11021, or to a charity of
one’s choice.
P A I D O B I T U A R Y
For your home’s new look
Hardwood • Tile • Carpet
Laminate • Sand & Finish
980 O’Brien Dr., Menlo Park • 800-949-8818
INTERIOR FLOOR COVERING & DESIGN
Page 10 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
Title Pages
A monthly section on local books and authors, edited by Don Kazak
Book
Talk
SAROYAN PRIZE ... The third
annual William Saroyan Interna-
tional Prize for Writing will be
given by the Stanford University
Libraries and the William Saroyan
Foundation in 2008. Prizes will be
awarded in fiction and nonfiction
categories recognizing “originality,
vitality and stylistic innovation.”
ALL ABOUT FORGIVING ... Palo
Alto psychologist Fred Luskin,
author of “Forgive for Good,” has
written a follow-up book, “Forgive
for Love: The Missing Ingredient
for a Healthy and Lasting Rela-
tionship.” The message of his
book is that love between two
people will not work unless they
also learn to forgive each other
when things get bumpy between
them. Luskin will appear in an
author event at Kepler’s in Menlo
Park at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 15.
ALL ABOUT YELLOWSTONE ...
Local writer Janet Chapple has
written a second edition of “Yel-
lowstone Treasures: The Trav-
eler’s Companion to the National
Park.” The book includes guides
to different areas of the park with
detailed maps and chapters on
the park’s animals and history,
including period photographs.
CHILD OF THE BALKANS ... A
small press in Palo Alto, The Soci-
ety for the Promotion of Science
and Scholarship, has published
“Memoirs of My Childhood in Yu-
goslavia” by Wayne S. Vucinich,
edited by Larry Wolff. The late
author was a noted historian of
Eastern Europe and taught at
Stanford University for more than
four decades. The book is about
Vucinich’s time in Yugoslavia in
the 1920s.
AUTHOR, AUTHOR ... Author
events at Kepler’s Books in Menlo
Park this month include Beth
Lisick (“Helping Me Help Myself:
One Skeptic, Ten Self-Help Gu-
rus, and a Year on the Brink of
the Comfort Zone”) at 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 3. Editor Victoria Zackheim
and writers Ellen Sussman, Eliza-
beth Rosner, Susan Ito, Deborah
Grabien, Margot Duxler and Re-
gina Anavy (“For Keeps: Women
Tell the Truth About Their Bodies,
Growing Older, and Acceptance”)
appear at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 16.
MORE AUTHOR, AUTHOR ...
Author events at Books Inc. in
Mountain View this month include
Louise Dunlap (“Undoing the
Silence: Six Tools for Writing to
Make a Difference”) at 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 24. And Michael Shermer
(“The Mind of the Market”) ap-
pears at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 25.
Items for Book Talk may be sent by
the last Wednesday of the month to
Don Kazak, Title Pages editor, Palo
Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo
Alto, CA 94302 or e-mailed to
dkazak@paweekly.com.
“Baseball and the Blame
Game: Scapegoating in the
Major Leagues” by John Bill-
heimer; McFarland & Co.; 216
pp.; $35
by Don Kazak
J
ohn Billheimer, a Portola Val-
ley mystery writer, had a pain-
ful experience when he was a
boy playing baseball in West Vir-
ginia. He was denied a chance to
make a youth team on the basis of
one play during a tryout.
He went on to some boyhood
baseball success anyway, help-
ing lead a later team to a league
championship.
But the scars of youth never
fully heal.
“Baseball is the first thing most
men fail at,” Billheimer writes in
the opening sentence in “Baseball
and the Blame Game,” an exami-
nation of some of the most infa-
mous, boneheaded plays in the
history of Major League Baseball.
Some of the guilty players were
forever changed under the glare
of harsh criticism.
But some of the best-known bad
plays in baseball lore weren’t as
they seemed, Billheimer found
in almost a year and a half of re-
search. Some players have been
unjustly accused for what wasn’t
really their fault.
Billheimer, who has a master’s
degree from MIT and a Ph.D.
from Stanford, both in engineer-
ing, spent a career as a transpor-
tation consultant. But baseball
always remained a love of his.
He also liked to write while in
RIGHTING
THE
WRONGS
OF BASEBALL MYTHS
Local author researches baseball’s most infamous plays
high school. “Most of my high
school essays were about base-
ball,” he remembers. “I had a la-
tent interest but never did much
with it.”
About 25 years ago, Billheim-
er began taking creative writing
classes. He took a his first class
as part of Stanford’s Continuing
Education series, taught by novel-
ist and professor John L’Heureux,
whom Billheimer said was the
best teacher he ever had.
His interest in writing led to
trying his hand at short stories
and getting the rejection slips
common to beginning writers.
But Billheimer liked read-
ing mysteries, so he thought he
would try that genre.
Since then, he has written
five novels, all mysteries set in
West Virginia, including “The
Contrary Blues,” “Highway
Robbery,” “Dismal Mountain,”
“Drybone Hollow” and “Stone-
wall Jackson’s Elbow.” All are
literate and lively.
So how does a career trans-
portation engineer who became
a mystery writer become a base-
ball historian?
Several years ago, Billheimer
read a story in a local newspaper
about Ernie Lombardi, a Cincin-
nati Reds catcher from a bygone
era. Lombardi was known for
being big and slow-footed, but
he was a career .306 hitter, a Na-
tional League MVP (most valu-
able player) and all-star.
Lombardi is most remembered,
though, for his on-field “snooze”
that lost the Reds the 1939 the
World Series.
Billheimer remembered Lom-
bardi because the Cincinnati
Reds were the closest Major
League team to his boyhood
home in West Virginia.
So he decided to do a little re-
search.
The end result is “Baseball and
N
o
r
b
e
r
t

v
o
n

d
e
r

G
r
o
e
b
e
n
Mystery writer John Billheimer of Portola Valley has written “Baseball and the Blame Game” examining famous controversial plays in the
Major Leagues.
Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 11
Community Health
Education Programs
January 2008
Events & Lectures
Web site • www.pamf.org E-mail • publicaffairs@pamf.org
Hearst Center for Health Education, Level 3, Jamplis Building, Palo Alto Medical Foundation,
795 El Camino Real, Palo Alto. RSVP to (650) 853-4873.
Classes
For information on class fees and to register, call the Education Division at (650) 853-2960.
“Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction,” begins on January 14 & 15, 6:30 – 9 p.m.
Free orientation on Wednesday, January 2, 6:30 – 9 p.m. This program is designed to help people learn how to deal effectively with
physical and emotional stress by providing training in breathing, meditation and gentle yoga.
“Supermarket Wise,” Tuesday, January 15, 2 – 4 p.m.
Learn techniques for making healthier food choices in a local supermarket with dietitian Karen Ross, M.S., R.D.
“Taking Charge of Your Body,” Mondays, January 21 – March 3, 6 – 8 p.m.
A six-week course focusing on healthy living and managing your lifestyle through exercise and healthful eating.
“Managing Your High Blood Pressure,” Wednesday, January 23, 3 – 5 p.m.
This class provides information on causes, risks and treatment of high blood pressure, and approaches to successful reduction, such
as exercise and medication.
“Advance Health Care Directives,” Call for available dates and times.
PAMF’s specially trained volunteers will provide advice and answer questions about the advance health care directive form. No cost.
Support Groups
Cancer (1st & 3rd Tuesdays) • Diabetes (1st Wednesday) • Multiple Sclerosis (2nd & 4th Mondays) • Sleep Apnea (1st
Thursday) • Alcohol and Drug Education (Every Tuesday) • Healing Imagery for Cancer Patients (January 9 & 23)
“All About Kidney Stones: From Diagnosis to Treatment”
Tuesday, January 8, 7 – 8:30 p.m.
Keith Lee, M.D., PAMF Urology
Kidney stones are unpredictable and painful. Join us to learn about the different types of kidney
stones, risk factors for developing kidney stones and the latest available treatment options.
• State-of-the-art, brand new
orthodontic office
• Directly across the street from
Stanford University
• Dr. Wu provides the latest
innovations in orthodontic care
to help bring comfort and speed
to his patients, including the high
tech Damon system bracket.
• Complimentary consultation
Eric Wu, DMD
DIPLOMATE, AMERICAN BOARD OF ORTHODONTICS
For Free Consultation Please Call: 650-322-0288 www.WUORTHO.com
1865 El Camino Real bet. Leland and Park Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 office@wuortho.com
Creating Your
WUnderful Smile!
the Blame Game.”
Billheimer found that Lombardi
wasn’t guilty as charged by report-
ers covering that 1939 game. His
supposed transgression was that he
failed to pay attention after a base
runner collided with him trying to
score. As the story goes, Lombardi
lay flat on his back while yet an-
other runner, the game- and series-
winning run, scored.
But Billheimer found that Lom-
bardi didn’t commit a mental
mistake. And he was never in a
collision with the first runner, as
reporters of the time wrote.
Instead, the throw from the out-
field short-hopped him, catching
him in a particularly vulnerable
place, dazing him.
“Anybody but Lombardi, they
would have had to carry him from
the field,” a teammate said.
But the damage to his reputation
was done. Lombardi was never the
same. After an otherwise distin-
guished career, his pay was cut, he
moved to the Braves and the Giants
(although also named an all-star
while with both teams), and left
baseball in 1947.
He became bitter and dejected
for being remembered — wrongly
— for committing a mental lapse
during a key play.
Lombardi even tried to commit
suicide after leaving baseball and
was never publicly exonerated in
his lifetime.
He is perhaps the most extreme
example of a player being mistak-
enly accused for doing something
particularly stupid during a key
play in an important game. But
Billheimer surprisingly found sev-
eral other famous bonehead plays
where the supposed transgressor
wasn’t really to blame.
“In some of these cases, people
were condemned for life but they
didn’t deserve the blame they got,”
Billheimer said.
“Baseball and the Blame Game”
sets the record straight for some of
baseball’s most maligned players.
Still, Billheimer has warm mem-
ories of baseball and a continuing
passion for the game.
After being unfairly judged dur-
ing one youth team tryout, his later
success was being part of a cham-
pionship team, which included
three black youths.
Billheimer didn’t realize at the
time, but the director of the league
was quietly trying to integrate it, at
a time when black people had sepa-
rate drinking fountains and had to
sit in the back of buses in West Vir-
ginia and throughout the south.
No one much cared because
it was just the kids riding to the
games on their bikes, he said. It’s
far different today, with the close
parental involvement in Little
League.
One of those teammates recently
retired from being the first black
justice of the West Virginia Su-
preme Court, Billheimer said.
Small, good things happen,
too.■
Senior Staff Writer Don Ka-
zak can be e-mailed at dkazak@
paweekly.com.
This month’s picks by Frank
Sanchez, head book buyer at Ke-
pler’s Books in Menlo Park, are
all historical. Included are two
books about Joseph Stalin and
his Soviet regime, the journals
of American historian Arthur
Schlesinger, a book about a na-
val disaster during World War II,
and more.
“Young Stalin” by Simon Se-
bag Montefiore chronicles the life
of Stalin before he rose to power.
The future dictator came from
an impoverished background but
was cunning and ruthless, traits
that he embodied as the Soviet
ruler. Montefiore had access to
previously unavailable archived
material in Russia on which to
base his book.
“The Whisperers: Private
Life in Stalin’s Russia” by Or-
lando Figes looks at the impact
the totalitarian regime had on the
private lives of ordinary citizens.
One in eight people in the USSR
was a victim of Stalin’s purges:
family members sometimes con-
demned their relatives in order to
survive.
“Journals: 1952-2000” by
Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. are the
private writings of the two-time
Pulitzer Prize winning historian
who also was part of the Ken-
nedy White House. Schlesinger,
who died earlier this year, writes
about the Bay of Pigs, the Cold
War, Vietnam, and more recent
events, including the 2000 presi-
dential election.
“Down to the Sea” by Bruce
Henderson tells the story of
an epic naval disaster of World
War II. Admiral William “Bull”
Halsey was one of America’s
most storied naval commanders
but he ignored a law of the sea
by sailing his huge fleet into the
path of a typhoon in 1944. Three
ships were lost, along with almost
800 men, and 28 other ships were
damaged by the storm’s 90-feet
seas and 160-mph winds.
“Arsenals of Folly: The Mak-
ing of the Nuclear Arms Race”
by Richard Rhodes is the author’s
third volume of the history of
nuclear weapons. This volume
looks at the latter stages of the
arms race under Reagan and
Gobachev.
“Days of Empire: How Hy-
perpowers Rose to Global
Dominance — and Why They
Fall” by Amy Chu is a long look
back at Persian, Roman, Mongol
and British empires, as compared
to the contemporary United
States. Chu concludes that each
empire was pluralistic and toler-
ant of other cultures.
“The Story of India” by Mi-
chael Wood is an illustrated com-
panion to the author’s BBC series
on a country that is the world’s
largest democracy, a nuclear
power and also the world’s most
ancient surviving civilization.
“The Discovery of France: A
Historical Geography, from the
Revolution to the First World
War” by Graham Robb tells the
story of how France was a largely
rural country of regional divi-
sions as late as 1890. The author
took a 14,000-mile bicycle tour of
France as part of his research.■
— Don Kazak
NEW & RECOMMENDED
A different take
Page 12 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 13
E
ric Shrader, Jennifer Morrill and Yi Cui may not be household names. But what
makes them tick is a familiar thread in the fabric of Silicon Valley. Shrader of Palo
Alto Research Center, Inc., Morrill of Adiri, Cui of Stanford University and others
featured in this cover story are innovators: people who aren’t content to let things be.
Like William Hewlett, David Packard, Steve Jobs and a host of others in the Valley over
the years, they are following an impulse to do something better or to solve a problem.
The Weekly sent its staff out to find people who — in their own ways, large and small
—are trying to create something new. Here are their stories.
P
rinted matter is literally disappearing at
Palo Alto Research Center, Inc. (PARC).
In partnership with Xerox Research Cen-
tre of Canada since early 2004, PARC scientists
have been developing “erasable paper,” tempo-
rary documents that self-erase within a matter
of hours.
Although the computer interface has become
more ubiquitous in daily activities, research-
ers at PARC discovered that “for some reason
people still like paper,” Eric Shrader, PARC
area manager and project lead, said. Shrader is
a mechanical engineer who has developed other
products such as electronic paper —a low-cost
display medium — and cost-saving printing
technologies for circuit boards and solar cells.
Stemming from PARC’s focus on corporate
ethnography, Shrader discovered, from self-
reports and from sifting through recycle bins,
the types of documents that office workers print
and then throw away or recycle on the same
day. Such documents included daily calendars,
e-mails and reference materials relevant for a
limited period of time.
“I think the biggest ‘aha’ moment was at the
very beginning, when we realized that so much
of what people print is only temporary.”
On average, people in offices print approxi-
mately 1,200 pages per month, of which 25 per-
cent is discarded on the same day.
“I wouldn’t want to be in the business of sell-
ing file cabinets any more. People are thinking
about the archive as something that the com-
puter people keep and not that the filing people
keep,” Shrader said.
Erasable paper, also known as a transient doc-
ument, is exactly like regular printer paper but
coated with a molecule that changes color when
exposed to light. Shrader compared it to pho-
tochromic glasses, which darken in tint when
people go outside.
The printer, nowbeing developed solely as an
attachment to standard printers, prints by expos-
ing the paper to a UVB light source. Research-
ers are also conceptually developing a pen that
writes on the erasable paper by using an internal
light source.
Images remain on the erasable paper for a
solid eight hours before gradually disappearing,
but Shrader notes that they are still refining that
part of the project. Initial feedback indicates that
people would prefer the image to last longer, or
to last until an undetermined point at which they
no longer need the document. But Shrader wants
to avoid options or variation in how long the
image lasts because it would require people to
make more conscious choices about printing.
Running the paper through the printer will
also erase the current image, as heat is applied
in the printer, which stimulates the erasing pro-
cess.
To distinguish the erasable paper fromregular
printer paper, and also to identify it for reuse,
researchers have given it a yellowtint. The reus-
able life of the paper depends on its treatment,
but is potentially limitless. The paper is robust
and does not need to be treated or stored differ-
ently than regular paper.
“You can reuse it as long as you can keep from
stapling or crumpling it,” Shrader said. In their
own experiments, PARC researchers have re-
used a single sheet of paper between 50 and 100
times. “Most people think they’ll wreck it after
20 times.”
The simple concept behind the printer elimi-
nates the need for ink and toner in printers,
which contribute significantly to the cost of
printing. Shrader anticipates the printer attach-
ment will add only approximately 10 to 20 per-
cent to the cost of regular printers.
And although the projected cost of the eras-
able paper is greater than regular paper, in the
long termShrader expects people to save money
because of its reusability.
Beyond financial savings, Shrader predicts
that the biggest impact will be the benefit to the
environment. Aside from the reusability of the
paper, the inkless and tonerless printers elimi-
nate the waste generated from regular printers.
In addition, fewer materials are needed, which
thus reduces the amount of carbon emissions
generated from transportation.
“From a life-cycle, carbon-credit analysis,
we’re saving on a bunch of different fronts,”
Shrader said.
However, erasable paper —currently in pro-
totype phase —won’t be out on the market for
a while, he added. ■
Editorial Intern Joyce Tang can be e-mailed
at jtang@paweekly.com.
‘Erasable paper’ can be reused, reduces waste
by Joyce Tang
Printed documents may
self-erase in future
Above, Eric Shrader of Palo Alto Research Center, Inc., holds self-erasing paper. Below, Shrader
in his office at PARC, where he leads a team of scientists who have been developing the special
paper and printer.
N
early three years ago, Jennifer Morrill
had a dilemma on her hands: She had in-
herited a company from her father whose
product was loved by some but, quite frankly,
mocked by others.
The company, Adiri, produced a baby bottle
called the “Breast Bottle Nurser.” Squat in shape
and bearing a striking resemblance to its ana-
tomical namesake, the bottle drew rave reviews
from the medical community. Babies who had
difficulties feeding froma bottle, including pree-
mies, easily took to the Adiri brand, whose softer
plastic infants could latch onto.
But the product provoked another, more com-
mon reaction, Morrill said.
“You could not take it out without someone
starting to laugh and —usually guys —joking
about it,” she said, holding onto the plastic bottle
with the rounded top and extruding nipple.
Morrill, a lawyer for Yahoo at the time, toyed
with the idea of selling her father’s company. She
had it appraised, but the value wasn’t high. She
could have dissolved it but didn’t have the heart
to, given Adiri’s small-yet-loyal following.
So she decided to trade in her corporate job
for the life of an entrepreneur. Using all of her
skills, she would try to pump new life into the
little business.
She was still stuck, however, with a product
that wasn’t exactly flying off shelves. Besides its
unconventional look, the bottle had problems,
Morrill said. It was complicated to use, had a
tendency to leak and was difficult to clean.
Morrill decided the best plan of action was to
literally go back to the drawing board and re-
design the Palo Alto company’s one-and-only
product.
Her father, John Prentiss, had patented the bot-
tle’s “natural” shape and bottom lid (the bottle
is filled when upside down). But Morrill knew
those elements could be tweaked to lessen the
embarrassment of people using the bottle —and
it could be made easier to use.
She also wanted it to be made of polycarbon-
ate-free materials, owing to recent concerns that
certain plastics, when microwaved or put in the
dishwasher, can release chemicals that harm in-
fants.
A final requirement: It had to be attractive.
“People in the mothering set these days are
looking for something that looks good as well
as is functional,” said Morrill, who grew up in
Palo Alto and has two children. “Everyone’s so
trendy about their kids these days. And this is
since I had my kids, which was several years ago.
Things have gotten hyper-trendy. So you have to
get out there with cute graphics.”
She cast about for a design firm to create a
newand improved version of the Adiri bottle and
found Whipsaw, Inc., headed by Palo Altan Dan
Harden.
“When I talked with Jennifer it was an instant,
‘Yes, we’ve got to do this,’” Harden said. “When
you have an age-old problem that requires solid
design thinking —especially when there could
be opportunities for innovation —that’s when we
get excited for doing something.”
It didn’t hurt that Harden’s wife has been a
leader in the La Leche League, a breastfeeding-
support nonprofit.
Harden liked Prentiss’ original line of think-
ing —that of trying to create a bottle that would
simulate the natural experience.
“Why reinvent the wheel?” Harden said. “The
perfect breast-feeding instrument is already
there. We wanted to create the next best thing.”
Harden knew it would be a challenge.
“When you have ... a bonding experience that
by nature is very warm, a product can break that
bond or warmth,” he said.
Harden said his moment of inspiration came
early on in the design process. While drawing
versions of the bottle, he realized the soft plastic
of the dome and nipple could be continued down
over the harder plastic cylinder of the bottle —
simultaneously giving babies a soft rubbery tex-
ture to grab onto and parents a rigid structure to
hold while filling the bottle.
“I was sketching it and said, ‘That’s it!’” re-
called Harden, whose industrial designs have in-
cluded Leapfrog Leappads, Rio MP3 players and
Logitech mice. He is also the former president of
frog design, which is known in part for its work
with Apple Computer.
In the end, Harden and his team created a
streamlined 6-inch-tall bottle with a nearly
3-inch-wide, easier-to-close bottom lid.
It came in three different colors —white, blue-
purple and orange —for the different stages of
breastfeeding.
The group also solved another vexing problem:
the need for a vent that would equalize the pres-
sure inside the bottle and prevent babies from
ingesting air and getting colic. That design solu-
tion —a cut-out flower vent at the bottomof the
bottle — took four to five months to develop,
Morrill said.
In the end, the new design — simpler to use,
attractive, safer, mass-producible, cost effective
and less likely to provoke giggles —was ready
after a year’s work.
“It’s a long process, doing any design,” Morrill
said. “It’s like birthing a baby, really.”
Since its August debut, it’s succeeded in ways
the old version didn’t, Morrill said. Buyers for
Babies “R” Us spotted newAdiri Natural Nurser
and placed an order, as have Whole Foods and
Right Start, a national retailer of children’s prod-
ucts, among others.
Boutiques have also been distributing the bot-
tle, which received press attention recently when
celebrity and expectant mother Jennifer Lopez
ordered 10 froma Los Angeles boutique, accord-
ing to the New York Daily News.
A better baby bottle?
‘Natural’ design of Adiri nurser helps colicky infants to feed
by Jocelyn Dong
Above, the employees of Adiri stand by their Park Boulevard office: (from
left) Beth Shvodian, president; Sarah Eisner, vice-president of sales and
marketing; and Jennifer Morrill, CEO. Below, the Adiri Natural Nurser
features soft plastic and a rounded top.
Local innovators tackle problems of paper waste, yellow jackets, short-lived batteries and more
by the Weekly staff
(continued on page 15)
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"The biggest 'aha' moment was at the very beginning,
when we realized that so much of what people print is
only temporary."
— Eric Shrader
area manager and product lead, PARC
Cover Story
Page 14 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
I
n the old model of HIV-prevention educa-
tion, slogans and lessons strive to teach but
aren’t designed to fit how people learn. In
the new model, students worldwide participate
in an interactive curriculum engineered for
learning — on their cell phones.
Or so hopes Piya Sorcar, a doctoral student at
Stanford’s School of Education developing an
HIV-prevention curriculum based on cutting-
edge research about how students absorb and
process information.
Sorcar developed the short tutorial, now
available online, when her research led her to
conclude even well-intentioned educational
campaigns can fail when poorly designed, she
said.
So Sorcar teamed up with her Stanford advi-
sors and doctors abroad to develop Interactive
Teaching AIDS, a roughly hour-long animated
tutorial of a student’s visit to a doctor to learn
about HIV.
Every detail in the tutorial, whose creation
began in summer 2006 and continues through
pilot testing and adjustments, represents pains-
taking study, she said.
The seemingly simple blob-like cartoon char-
acters were created after students said anatomi-
cally real bodies were embarrassing and stick
figures hard to learn from, she said.
Mindful of how certain cultures shun sexual
education, the tutorial avoids discussion of sex
and sticks to biology, focusing on high-risk flu-
ids, she said.
“This is a way you can teach about AIDS edu-
cation without being so sexually explicit, so it
fits abstinence-only curriculum,” she said.
The pilot confirmed the carefully constructed
curriculum may be working: More than 90 per-
cent of 423 Indian students said it taught them
more than television or school, according to
Sorcar, whose family is from West Bengal.
And while 65 percent were unsure whether
HIV can be spread by coughing before watch-
ing the tutorial and completing its embedded
quiz, 94 percent knew it cannot be afterwards,
she said.
“I’m extremely excited about the program’s
success so far,” she said, noting that the program
was overcoming cultural taboos and students
said they talked to family and friends about it.
While the tutorial is on the Web now, she is
hoping to use technology popular among stu-
dents to spread the message.
“We want to expand using Web 2.0, using Fa-
cebook or Orkut [an Indian networking site],”
she said.
“About 90 percent of the students shared what
they learned from this animation with other
people. We know that these kids are really ac-
tive on these social networking sites,” she said.
Even though a survey given to Indian users
was anonymous, many students provided an e-
mail address because they wanted to forward
the curriculum to friends, she said.
She also hopes to make the curriculum avail-
able for cell phones so people can listen or
watch from the comfort of a living room sofa,
she said.
Cell-phone access is critical for spreading the
message to the developing world, where people
often lack computer access, said Clifford Nass,
a professor of communication at the School of
Education and one of Sorcar’s doctoral advi-
sors.
Yet curriculum use isn’t limited to poor coun-
tries — the learning tool is also appropriate for
the United States, where sexual education re-
mains a sensitive topic for some, he said.
“Even in countries where [sexual education]
is legal there is still tremendous discomfort on
certain parts of the population,” he said.
And the curriculum won’t just help with HIV
protection — it should inspire other teachers to
think more deeply about their work, she said.
“I hope the research behind this project, as
well as the learning tool itself, will motivate
educators to innovate in how they teach difficult
subjects,” she said.
The idea for the curriculum came about when
Sorcar, then a master’s student, began hearing
that even Indian regions investing money in
HIV-prevention campaigns showed high trans-
mission rates, she said.
Incredulous, she traveled to India in spring
2006 to survey students exposed to billboard
and television advertising as well as classroom
lessons, she said.
She was surprised to learn they were con-
fused about crucial details, she said.
Having learned fluids could transmit the HIV
virus, “students were scared of all kinds of flu-
ids. So they were scared of water, and they were
scared of saliva,” she said.
So Sorcar began to pore over the latest data
about how brains integrate information and
what makes people change their behavior, she
said.
And a chance introduction to a South Korean
businessman who encouraged her to contact
the government led to a wellspring of funding
from the South Korean Ministry of Science and
Technology, she said.
The ministry also helped her get in touch with
doctors who were also animators and could help
create the series, she said.
The curriculum began as part of Sorcar’s
master’s project and has become her doctoral
thesis, but it is far from finished, she said.
She is continually refining the tutorial as she
pilots it with student groups, she said.
The group is also trying to introduce it to
other countries, such as China, Professor Nass
said.
Although created largely with help from
South Korea, the project still awaits translation
into Korean, Sorcar said.
And she hopes to bring it to Africa and Latin
America, she said.
The English-language versions are available
online at www.InteractiveTeachingAIDS.org. ■
Staff Writer Arden Pennell can be e-mailed
at apennell@paweekly.com.
I
magine rarely having to recharge the bat-
tery of your new, all-electric car. Saving
gas is just one potential benefit of a new
battery that lasts 10 times longer than stan-
dard models, creator and Stanford University
researcher Yi Cui said.
“It can be used in laptops. You can do in-
ternational flights without charging up” or it
can be used in iPods or cell phones, said Cui,
an assistant professor in the Materials Science
and Engineering Department.
Cui and colleagues announced the break-
through battery last month, capping two years
of research, he said.
The notion of a battery based on nanotech-
nology came about when Cui got to Stanford
in 2005.
“I was very excited when this idea was
demonstrated to work for the first time,” Cui
said.
The new battery generates 10 times as
much energy as traditional batteries by get-
ting around the tendency of silicon to break
down through normal use, he said.
In standard lithium-ion batteries, the silicon
expands during charging as it absorbs lithium
ions, then shrinks during use as the tiny par-
ticles flow back out.
The expand-and-contract cycle causes sili-
con, which is in the shape of particles or lay-
ers, to degrade. But Cui’s new battery uses a
forest of tiny silicon wires to store ions, he
said.
The nanowires, each with a diameter of one-
thousandth the thickness of a sheet of paper,
grow to four times their normal size but don’t
fracture as other silicon shapes do, he said.
With silicon intact, the battery keeps going
— including in electric-car engines, a use Cui
is particularly excited about.
“You don’t need to burn gasoline. You can
use the battery. It has high enough energy to
drive really long distances,” he said.
He plans to run more lab tests to determine
the battery’s exact duration, but it could hit
commercial markets in as little as five years,
he said.
He plans to either start his own company or
license the technology to others, he said.
And with abundant supply and pre-existing
technology, it shouldn’t cost too much, he
said.
“Silicon is really abundant, the second most
abundant element. The semiconductor indus-
try is mature. [So] the cost is low,” he said.
As the region’s nickname implies, silicon
played a crucial local role in high-tech innova-
tions as an ideal material for semiconductors
and later computer chips.
But nanotechnology, or the ability to make
such small objects, is only about a decade old,
Cui said.
“In previous research, they couldn’t solve
this problem” of preventing silicon breakage,
because the pieces were too large, he said.
And while silicon has the highest known
charge capacity, or ability to store lithium ions,
that potential could not be unlocked earlier
due to its tendency to wear out, Cui and others
said in a letter describing their findings.
Cui has received phone calls from all over
the world since the letter’s publication online in
the journal Nature Nanotechnology, he said. ■
Staff Writer Arden Pennell can be
e-mailed at apennell@paweekly.com.
Above, Yi Cui, assistant professor in the Stanford University Materials Science Department,
fabricates a bag for his long-lasting battery in his laboratory in late December. Below, Cui
holds a prototype of the battery.
"It has high enough
energy to drive really long
distances."
— Yi Cui, researcher, Stanford University
New battery lasts 10 times as long
Silicon Valley legacy of innovation continues — with silicon
by Arden Pennell
Preventing AIDS through animation
Interactive tutorial offers education without being sexually explicit
by Arden Pennell
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Cover Story
Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 15
P
aul Donahue’s been inventing contrap-
tions since his boyhood in Berkeley,
when he and his buddies zoomed down
hills in a plywood “tank” — unfortunately
before they had figured out how to install
brakes.
While working at National Can Corpora-
tion in Chicago, the now-77-year-old Palo Al-
tan designed a machine that wrapped bundles
of cans and a fiber-optic sorting system. In
his free time, he came up with a blow poke
to stoke fires.
Now, however, Donahue has moved on to
bigger challenges. Or some would say smaller
ones.
His latest gizmo — the G’Bye Yellow Jacket
trap — was inspired by a single yellow jacket
that pestered Donahue at his Mountain View
office for several hours in 1982.
“I finally got him,” Donahue said, still
proud.
But he had been bit by the drive to entrap
the aggressive, social wasp with a searing
sting.
Although he was running a data-export
business, Donahue spent hours talking to
entomologists worldwide and concocting a
yellow-jacket attractant, a formula he finally
perfected after five years.
Donahue isn’t giving away his secret recipe,
but he did share a single ingredient: Omega-3
fatty acids. Unlike some traps that use fruit
juice or soda to snare yellow jackets, Donahue
said he relies on their attraction to protein to
feed young wasps back in the nest.
With the perfect, yet non-toxic, potion, Do-
nahue then began crafting the trap itself.
He scrapped several designs before coming
up with an 8-inch clear plastic cylinder that’s
as wide as a roll of wrapping paper with holes
in the bottom. Inside sits a small plastic slot-
ted funnel with its tip pointing upward.
Smelling the nectar, the wasps whiz into the
holes and find themselves inside the funnel.
Trying to get out, they then fly up through the
funnel’s tip, only to find themselves trapped
in the cylinder. They soon expire from ex-
haustion, Donahue said.
His trap capitalizes on wasps’ aversion to
flying down, Donahue said. Although they
could return through the holes they entered,
they won’t, he said.
Donahue is looking for about $50,000 of
venture capital to kick off his company, Do-
nahue Environmental Products. He’s done his
research: The molds could be crafted in Chi-
na, shipped to St. Louis, Mo., for manufactur-
ing and then assembled here by Veterans of
Foreign Wars in California, he said.
But if the money doesn’t come through, Do-
nahue plans to dip into his own pocket to pay
for the start-up costs. He said G’bye Yellow
Jacket traps should be in Palo Alto Hardware
by summer 2008.
Donahue said he plans to donate a large
portion of the proceeds to charity.
“This has been just a tremendous amount
of fun,” Donahue said.
And he’s already working on his next in-
vention — a mosquito trap.
When faced with a problem, Donahue said
he often just “sees” the answer.
Describing his vision for the can wrapper,
for example, Donahue said, “I can see it, hear
it running. I can see how I made it, but I can’t
tell you what size gear or what horsepower of
motor it needed.
“That’s how you get started.”
When he’s not tinkering with inventions,
Donahue enjoys spending time with his wife,
Rosemary, his three children and their spous-
es and his eight grandchildren. ■
Staff Writer Becky Trout can be e-mailed
at btrout@paweekly.com.
Paul Donahue stands with his yellow-jacket trap, which he hopes to have on the market by
summer 2008.
Stanford University doctoral student Piya Sorcar has created an AIDS-awareness program she hopes to
disseminate to youth through cell phones.
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Day One, a Palo Alto- and San Francis-
co-based retailer, carried the original Adiri
bottle and is stocking the new one.
Co-founder Nancy Held said the key to
Adiri’s success lies partly in its soft plastic,
which comes into contact with the baby’s
face and feels “more natural.”
Held, a lactation consultant, recommends
the product to anxious mothers. She noted
that her confidence in Adiri rubs off on the
parents and, consequently, the babies.
Morrill believes she and her employees
may soon be seeing the fruit of their labor.
“It’s been crazy. We just got 10,000 bot-
tles yesterday, and they’re gone,” she said
in mid-December in the company’s packed
Park Boulevard office. “We’re going to get
15,000 in two weeks, but that’s already ac-
counted for as well. We have 5,000 back-
orders on our site.”
Morrill has ramped up production in Tai-
wan and said she is expecting at least a 12-
fold increase in sales within the next year.
“The sky’s the limit,” Morrill said. “If
we can just make the bottles, we can sell
them.” ■
Managing Editor Jocelyn Dong can be
e-mailed at jdong@paweekly.com.
Bottle
(continued from page 13)
When faced with a problem, Donahue said
he often just "sees" the answer.
"I can see it, hear it running," he said.
"That's how you get started."
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Inventor says ‘g'bye’ to yellow jackets
Palo Alto man capitalizes on wasps' aversion to flying down
by Becky Trout
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Page 16 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
Spectrum
Editorials, letters and opinions
Editorial
Palo Alto’s big
decisions in 2008
Both city and school district face significant
turning points and will need public involvement
and support along the way
A
s eventful as 2007 was for Palo Alto residents and institutions,
2008 promises to be even more so. It is shaping up to be the
year of big decisions for both city and school officials.
We can think of no year in recent history where so many issues
seem to be reaching decision-points so close together, or when the
need for broad-based public attention is more important.
Some decisions will be policy directions, some will be financial
and many will be both. And the city’s resident group of regular
civic critics will be kept busy picking holes — some of them valid
and helpful — in whatever decisions the officials make.
Big decisions on the horizon of 2008 include:
1) This spring will see an initial city environmental-impact
review of the immense expansion plans for the Stanford Medical
Center and hospitals, and the parallel expansion of the Stanford
Shopping Center. The draft environmental-impact report
encompassing both projects is due out in by late spring. These
are multi-year projects, but the big direction-setting policy issues
will confront the city in 2008.
Key decisions relate to how to mitigate big increases in traffic
and an increase in demand for housing, especially for new lower-
pay employees. The shopping center expansion has implications
for the city’s sales-tax-revenue base, on which many city services
depend.
2) There needs to be a major update/revision of the Palo Alto
Unified School District’s Strategic Plan, from which future
policies and priorities are supposed to flow. New Superintendent
Kevin Skelly and a reconstituted Board of Education seem well
positioned to create an open, inclusive process. The resulting
plan should include realistic implementation strategies —
something the old Strategic Plan lacked, to its detriment.
Overriding concerns are continued enrollment growth and
the need to expand and renovate schools to accommodate the
growth, as well as replacing the many “portables” scattered
throughout the district with permanent additions. The cost could
be hundreds of millions of dollars, and district voters will have
the ultimate responsibility for deciding how best to meet the
academic needs for coming generations of students.
3) The city must find a new city manager in the first half of
2008, based on the announced retirement plans of City Manager
Frank Benest, effective June 30. The decision on a new manager
comes at an absolutely critical time for the city as it struggles
to recover from problems in its huge Utilities Department, the
manager’s office itself and in numerous areas identified in reports
from the city auditor. It will be the first test of the reconstituted
nine-member City Council, with four new members.
4) City officials must address replacing the inadequate police
headquarters and emergency operations center, presently below
and behind City Hall. The police department violates state
standards for privacy of witness interview areas and in its ability
to assure that evidence is protected adequately.
Worse, all the core emergency services are vulnerable to a
major earthquake, and some believe it was only through timely
earlier work that they survived the 1989 Loma Prieta quake.
But the cost of a new “public safety building” rises each year,
while surveys show public support falls short of the two-thirds
required for a bond measure, despite a healthy majority approval
in the high 50 percent range.
The importance of this project cannot be overstated, as lives will
depend (sooner or later) on the city having an adequate command
center that is safe and fully operational when truly needed.
5) City leaders also must decide about the city’s shopworn
libraries, and get past the equally shopworn debate about how
many branches there should be. What we have in Palo Alto is
two large libraries, a downtown branch, a College Terrace branch
and a treasured Children’s Library — recently restored and
expanded in a magnificent effort. The Main and Mitchell Park
libraries (despite the Internet) seem to be doing more business
than ever, serving seniors, young families and teenagers alike.
The challenge for officials underlying virtually all the above
decision-points is to restore citizen confidence in our public
institutions and create a feeling that the City Council and school
board are capable of overseeing the complex, interrelated
decisions facing our community.
‘Our Town’ oversight
Editor,
I was happy to read the Weekly’s
“Our Town” column (Dec. 26 ) about
First Congregational Church’s deci-
sion to open its doors to all people
— 35 years after its denomination or-
dained the first openly gay minister.
I was also happy to read that you
are aware that First Presbyterian and
First Methodist also “welcome gay
and lesbian members.”
I was sorry to see you include so
many of the Palo Alto churches that
are open and inclusive of all people
and not list All Saints’, which has
been a member of “Integrity” (our
denomination’s organization for the
support of LGBT Episcopalians) for
many years now and for more than
two decades has welcomed people
of all sexes and sexual orientations
in our pews, in our pulpit and at our
altar.
We had been open and welcom-
ing for at least 20 years before our
denomination took the step of con-
secrating the first openly gay man to
the episcopate in 2003.
That may not be news, but it would
at the very least be accurate to list us
along with First Methodist and First
Presbyterian in your otherwise very
good and accurate article.
Reverend Ian B. Montgomery
All Saints’ Episcopal Church
Waverley Street
Palo Alto
Another open church
Editor,
Congratulations to First Congre-
gational Church in Palo Alto for be-
ing an “open and affirming church,”
welcoming gays, lesbians and trans-
gender people; and congratulations
to Don Kazak for writing about this
enlightened policy in a local church
(Dec. 26).
Don stated that First Presbyterian
and First Methodist churches have
the same policy. He should also have
included the Unitarian Universal-
ist Church of Palo Alto in his list of
churches with this policy.
Hershey Julien
James Road
Palo Alto
Unfair EIR
Editor,
Anyone in Palo Alto who owns a
house built before 1957 should be
concerned about a dangerous prec-
edent that is about to be set by the
city.
For the first time in the city’s his-
tory, a family that wants to add an
addition to a single family residence
is being required to conduct an ex-
pensive and time consuming Envi-
ronmental Impact Report (EIR) in
order to get approval.
The home in question is at 345
Lincoln Ave. and is an acknowledged
historical residence. The addition is
of a modern, contemporary design
and therefore the city historical pres-
ervation staff and the neighbors be-
lieve that it will damage the histori-
cal nature of the house.
Except for a brief period in 1998-
2000, Palo Alto has never required
preservation of historical features
of single family residences. Instead,
Palo Alto encourages voluntary his-
torical preservation, accompanied by
substantial incentives such as zoning
concessions and flood control ex-
emptions.
The city previously tried to make
historic preservation mandatory in
1998, first imposing an emergency
temporary ordinance and then pass-
ing a permanent ordinance. However,
in March of 2000, as a result of citi-
zen petition, a referendum repealed
the ordinance.
For the 345 Lincoln project, how-
ever, the city apparently has adopted
an overly broad interpretation of
an obscure provision of the Cali-
fornia Environmental Quality Act
(CEQA).
It is to be noted that requiring an
EIR under these circumstances is in
effect a ban on the project altogether,
given the disproportionate cost and
trouble involved.
What is a “cultural historic re-
source” under CEQA? It turns out
that any residence older than 50
years is eligible to be so classified.
There is no requirement that a house
actually be designated as a national
or state landmark.
Anyone who owns such a house
should be concerned that if they ever
want to do a substantial renovation,
the city staff or an offended neighbor
can wield the EIR process over the
project like the Sword of Damocles.
The March 2000 Measure G vote
of the citizens of Palo Alto will in
effect have been eviscerated.
Norman H. Beamer
University Avenue
Palo Alto
Sport highlight
Editor,
The Weekly wrote its article about
the sports highlights for 2007 too
soon!
The Stanford highlight for me was
the women’s basketball team’s vic-
tory over Tennessee on Dec.22.
Harriet Benson
Ramona Street
Palo Alto
The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on
issues of local interest.
What do you think? What should be the Palo Alto City
Council’s first order of business in 2008?
Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com
or shorter comments to readerwire@paweekly.com. Include your name,
address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right
to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors
known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted.
You can also participate in our popular interactive online forum, Town
Square, at our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Read
blogs, discuss issues, ask questions or express opinions with you neighbors any
time, day or night.
Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of per-
mission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Publishing Co. to also publish
it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square.
For more information contact Editor Jay Thorwaldson or Editorial Assistant
Karla Kane at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.
YOUR TURN
Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 17
Board of Contributors
Check out Town Square!
Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on
Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our commu-
nity website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask
questions, read Diana Diamond’s blog or just stay up on what people are
talking about around town!
Streetwise
If you had one hope or wish for 2008, what would it be?
Asked in front of Whole Foods Market on Emerson Street in Palo Alto. Interviews by Joyce Tang. Photographs by Norbert von der Groeben.
Pam LePage
Professor of Education
Everett Street, Palo Alto
“Good health for the whole family.”
David Lees
Computer Scientist
Everett Street, Palo Alto
“I hope our country will be run better
next year.”
Carrie Widener
Teacher
11th Avenue, San Francisco
“A more peaceful way of resolving
things in the world.”
Brian Sullivan
Director of Business Development
Webster Street, Palo Alto
“I think our country should adopt more
renewable energy.”
Josephine Jones
Dog Walker
Waverley Street, Palo Alto
“For people to be able to really and
sincerely give without restrictive think-
ing. Just because you're in a specific
income bracket doesn't mean you
can't give.”
by Steve Levy
E
ach year I prepare
a report that looks
ahead 10 years for
the economy of Califor-
nia and major regions of
the state, including the
Bay Area. This year’s
report will be published
in late spring, and we’ve
already started work on
it.
The report focuses on
the outlook for job, population and housing
growth and is used by large private companies
and pubic agencies to do strategic planning
for the future.
The conceptual approach to developing
these projections is the same as is used by
the Association of Bay Area Governments
(ABAG) in its long-term projections, current-
ly the source of controversy in Palo Alto and
other communities.
The approach may be of interest to Palo
Alto residents puzzled by how ABAG devel-
oped its regional totals for 2035. I have done
similar projections for ABAG’s counterparts
in Southern California and the Sacramento
region.
The first concept is that population and
household growth follow job growth, although
the location of jobs and housing within the
region also depends on other factors (such as
schools). People come to California or a re-
gion in response to major movements in job
opportunities and migration falls when indus-
tries such as aerospace or high-tech decline. A
million people left Southern California after
(not before) the 1990s recession. So we project
job growth first.
Projecting the number of jobs in a region is
easy in theory, harder to nail down precisely
in practice because the future, of course, is
uncertain. We look at key “export“ industries
in each region and at statewide factors such
as high tech, foreign trade, Internet services
and tourism.
And we ask two questions: 1) “How fast
are these industries expected to grow in the
nation?” and 2) “What is a reasonable share
of job growth to expect for California or the
Bay Area?” The Bay Area has a strong base
in industries with good growth prospects —
industries such as Internet services, inter-
national trade and finance, “greentech” (or
“cleantech”), biotech and a wide variety of
professional services that compete in markets
worldwide.
Our strength is symbolized by companies
with a Palo Alto presence such as Facebook,
VMWare, Google and Hewlett Packard, and
their counterparts throughout the region.
So, in economist talk, we have a good eco-
nomic base.
As a result, Bay Area job-growth rates will
likely outpace the nation for awhile longer —
unless we become a less-favored location for
some of these fast-growing industries.
ABAG projected a year ago that Bay Area
jobs would increase by 15 percent between
2005 and 2015 compared to a nationwide
job gain of 12 percent. But my last Bay Area
projections anticipated a 19 percent job gain
— which would have meant an even larger
housing allocation for Palo Alto had ABAG
used it.
Does the lower job-growth projection mean
it’s time to worry a bit that California may
be losing its “favored state” status? Will the
region and state continue to be favored loca-
tions for fast-growing high-wage industries as
in the past?
Or is California becoming an “average”
state in terms of job growth, as recent data
suggest? I know that a number of residents,
my Palo Alto neighbors, wouldn’t mind if job
growth slowed — as long as it’s not their job.
So what is the big deal if we grow a bit more
slowly?
My real concern is that slower job growth
would come only if we drop the ball in terms
of keeping California and the Bay Area a
great place to work and live. Unless we shoot
ourselves in the foot by making the region a
bad place to live, companies do and will want
to locate here to tap into our highly educated
talent and venture capital — and most cities
will welcome their jobs and related revenue.
So I worry about unaffordable housing, poor
funding for schools and a general paralysis on
state policy issues, such as the upcoming $10
billion to $14 billion state-budget shortfall.
When I have to assess what share of In-
ternet jobs the Bay Area will capture I have
to wrestle with whether firms will shy away
from the state because we can’t balance the
budget, can’t seem to decide on education or
housing or prisons or water or health care or
much of anything.
Sometimes I wish Mountain View or San
Jose would agree to take our Palo Alto ABAG
housing allocation, not because I think this is
a good solution but because then Palo Alto
residents could participate in the major policy
debates in California without thinking only
about whether maintaining California as a
great place to live will increase the popula-
tion in Palo Alto.
I worry that we are losing our ability to rec-
ognize how we are connected, rich and poor,
old and young across this region and state.
I offer two examples:
1) An affluent area like Silicon Valley can
and does have many low- and middle-wage
jobs because most of us residents can afford
to eat out, have nannies and gardeners, hire
people to repair our computers and toilets and
use lots of health care and public services.
Those “service” folks must live some-
where.
2) As the baby boomers retire during the
next 20 years, they will be replaced by a gen-
eration filled with immigrants and their chil-
dren, some affluent, many not. These will be
the taxpayers and homebuyers of the future.
Even if all of our children in Palo Alto do
fine, our future is still connected to the mil-
lions of students who do not go to Palo Alto
schools.
As I project the likely growth in the Bay
Area and state, part of my task is to assess
how we will do in meeting these difficult, in-
terlocked challenges.
And each year I become a bit more con-
cerned that we are slipping more toward aver-
age in areas that used to be our edge.
I fear we are slipping because we have be-
come a people who would rather fight with
each other than plan for and invest in the fu-
ture. This is not the path to give California
the economy or quality of life I wish for my
children. ■
Stephen Levy is director of the Palo Alto-
based Center for Continuing Study of the
California Economy. He can e-mailed at
slevy@ccsce.com.
Projecting the state economy and housing needs
I worry that we are losing
our ability to recognize how
we are connected, rich and
poor, old and young across
this region and state.
Page 18 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
Sports
Shorts
Thursday
Men’s basketball: UCLA at Stanford,
7:30 p.m., Fox Sports Net; KNBR (1050
AM); KZSU (90.1 FM)
Friday
Women’s basketball: Stanford at
UCLA, 7 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)
Saturday
Men’s basketball: USC at Stanford,
5 p.m.; Fox Sports Net Bay Area; KNBR
(1050 AM); KZSU (90.1 FM)
Sunday
Women’s basketball: Stanford at
USC, 2 p.m., KZSU (90.1 FM)
ON THE AIR
Sports
Gunn’s perfect
record will be
put to the test
League openers this week begin a
new season for the local teams by
Keith Peters
W
ith many of the preliminaries over and league
seasons ready to begin, two prominent sto-
rylines have headline what should be an inter-
esting season for local girls’ basketball teams.
The first one involves Gunn and its remarkable 14-0
run through the preseason. The Titans have been in-
active since Dec. 15 and the obvious question is: can
the winning streak continue into the SCVAL De Anza
Division season?
That season begins Saturday — the Titans first host
Castilleja on Thursday in a f i n a l
nonleague test at 5:30 p.m. —
when Gunn travels to
Fremont.
The other ques-
tion involves Divi-
sion V of the Central
Coast Section. In the
past four years, the
CCS championship
game has matched
Pinewood against Sa-
cred Heart Prep, with the
Panthers winning all four. In f a c t ,
Pinewood has won 10 straight CCS titles in various
divisions and made 13 straight appearances in the sec-
tion finals.
The two teams that have been left out of the title
game each year have been Castilleja and Eastside
Prep. The Panthers have lost three straight to SHP in
the semifinals.
This season, however, could be one of change.
Speaking of change, the Gunn girls have shaken
things up this season with their three tournament titles
and with junior Jasmine Evans winning MVP honors
in each of those events. The Titans have beaten some
perennially tough teams in Pinewood, Presentation and
Notre Dame-Belmont, so that 14-0 mark is the real
deal.
But, how long can it last? Gunn will shake off its rust
against Castilleja on Thursday, then begin league play.
The first big circle on the calendar will be on Jan. 11,
then the Titans visit Wilcox — regarded as no worse
than a co-favorite for the De Anza Division title with
Gunn.
These two will battle for division honors and perhaps
again in the postseason.
Gunn, thus far, has matched up well with everyone
with a lineup that features the quick and talented Evans,
5-11 senior post Neva Hauser, 6-foot junior forwards
Sophie Shevick and Taylor McAdam, plus the Cartun
sisters — senior Ilana and juniors Tamar and Rimona.
That’s the foundation for Gunn’s best start in school
history under second-year coach Sarah Stapp. The Ti-
tans went 17-11 a year ago, losing to Mitty in the CCS
Division II quarterfinals.
Castilleja’s 6-foot freshman Natasha von Kaeppler (with ball) has been a big addition to the
Gators. She had nine points, 11 rebounds, five blocks and nine steals in a loss to St. Francis.
(continued on page 20)
K
e
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P
e
t
e
r
s
by Keith Peters
P
alo Alto has had a hard time
shooting. Woodside Priory
has found difficulty trying to
defend. Gunn and Eastside Prep are
dealing with youth. Sacred Heart
Prep is having problems with its
relative inexperience.
Despite the seemingly endless
number of problems facing local
basketball teams, all is not lost. On
the contrary. Only one team, East-
side Prep, has a losing record as
2007 ends.
This week not only marks a new
year, but a new beginning with
league play opening. It’s time for a
fresh start for some and continued
success for others.
The big stories of last season
look to be same again — Palo Alto,
Woodside Priory, Menlo and Men-
lo-Atherton.
Priory, M-A and Menlo all lost
their respective section finales a
year ago. Palo Alto lost to eventual
champion Mitty in the semifinals.
The good news is that all four should
contend once again in ‘08. The bad
news, Mitty is nationally ranked and
still is in Division II along with the
Vikings and Bears.
Depending on the postseason
seedings, perhaps only Woodside
Priory and Menlo will be playing
in the NorCal playoffs this season.
Both certainly have the talent and
experience to get there.
The Priory Panthers are even big-
ger than a season ago when they
went 26-5 and lost in the NorCal
Division V semifinals to Modesto
Christian. Coach Al Klein returns
7-2 senior center Greg Somogyi and
6-7 Tyler Starling, who has grown
seven inches in two years. Klein has
(continued on page 19)
PREP BASKETBALL
For expanded daily coverage of college
and prep sports, please see our new site
at www.PASportsOnline.com
SPORTS ONLINE
ALL-AMERICANS . . . Stanford’s
Christen Press and Allison Mc-
Cann have earned more postsea-
son accolades after being named
to the Soccer Buzz Freshman All-
America’s teams as announced
by the magazine. Both Cardi-
nal first-year players also were
named Top
Drawer Fresh-
man All-Amer-
ican’s earlier
in the month.
Press was one
of four forwards
named to the
first team, and
McCann was
named to the
fourth team. Press, already has
been named the Freshman of the
Year in the Pacific-10 Conference
and was second team All-Pacific-
10. She was the third Cardinal in
the programs
history to earn
Freshman of the
Year honors.
Press, from
Palos Verdes
Estates, scored
eight goals in
her rookie cam-
paign and also
assisted on six
other goals throughout the sea-
son despite missing the first two
games of the season. McCann, a
native of Carlsbad, completed a
strong rookie season by starting
every game but one. She provid-
ed strong play in the midfield and
added one assist for the season.
She was also one of five players
to appear in every game for the
Cardinal on the season.
COACHING CORNER . . . Sacred
Heart Prep is seeking a boys’
varsity lacrosse assistant coach,
a boys’ junior varsity head ten-
nis coach and a boys’ and girls’
track assistant coach.† Interested
applicants should contact Frank
Rodriguez at 473-4031 or frodri-
guez@shschools.org. . . . Palo
Alto High is looking for a varsity
girls’ softball coach for the spring.
Those interested should contact
Paly Athletic Director Earl Han-
sen at 329-3886 or at ehansen@
pausd.org.
Familiar foursome has title aspirations again
Woodside Priory, Menlo, Palo Alto and M-A should contend for the postseason in 2008
Christen Press
Ally McCann
Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 19
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CITY OF PALO ALTO
NOTICE TO DESTROY WEEDS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on December 10, 2007, pursu-
ant to the provisions of Section 8.08.020 of the Palo Alto Municipal
Code, the City Council passed a resolution declaring that all weeds
growing upon any private property or in any public street or alley,
as defined in Section 8.08.010 of the Palo Alto Municipal Code,
constitute a public nuisance, which nuisance must be abated by
the destruction or removal thereof.
NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that property owners shall without
delay remove all such weeds from their property, and the abutting
half of the street in front and alleys, if any, behind such property,
and between the lot lines thereof as extended, or such weeds will
be destroyed or removed and such nuisance abated by the city
authorities, in which case the cost of such destruction or removal
will be assessed upon the lots and lands from which, or from the
front or rear of which, such weeds shall have been destroyed or
removed; and such cost will constitute a lien upon such lots or
lands until paid, and will be collected upon the next tax roll upon
which general municipal taxes are collected. All property owners
having any objections to the proposed destruction or removal of
such weeds are hereby notified to attend a meeting of the Council
of said city, to be held in the City Chamber of the City Hall in said
city on January 14, 2008, at seven o’clock pm., when and where
their objections will be heard and given due consideration.
FIRE CHIEF
CITY OF PALO ALTO
added 6-9 Dinko Marshavelski from Bulgaria, 6-3 An-
dras Helmeczi from Hungary and 6-3 Ignis Pavilonis
from Lithuania. All but Somogyi are juniors.
Klein also has plenty of depth with 6-2 junior Kyle
Berka, 5-10 junior Servando Barriga, 5-9 junior Nate
Feldman, 6-2 Rian Draeger, 6-1 freshman Keaton Car-
ano and 6-2 brothers Joe and Mark Willhite.
Klein, however, really misses the other Willhite —
6-3 Reggie, who graduated. Reggie was the motor that
took the Panthers places last season, the best in school
history. Willhite’s leadership and scoring have been
missed and it has taken all of the preseason to get ev-
eryone on the same page. Priory took a 7-3 record into
the holiday break, including a 2-0 mark in the Private
Schools Athletic League — where they went 16-0 last
season.
No one should touch the Panthers again in league.
The big question is whether the Panthers can avoid an-
other embarrassing loss in the CCS finals and somehow
manage to wind up in the state championship game.
That’s a nice problem to have, of course, one not
shared by all the other local teams.
Menlo has the personnel, determination and coaching
(Kris Weems) to get it done after a 26-7 season that saw
the Knights reach the NorCal Division IV semifinals.
Menlo can be that good again, but a lot depends on the
availability of 6-4 junior Alex Smith, who suffered a
torn meniscus (in his knee) in the preseason and missed
back-to-back tournaments.
While the valuable scorer/rebounder rehabs, the
Knights have fared well on the tournament trail with
6-2 senior forward Max Frye, 6-6 junior center Will
Tashman, 5-11 junior guard Jerry Rice Jr., 6-3 junior
guard/forward Max Glenn, 6-0 senior guard Garrett
Cohen, 5-10 senior guard Marc Nguyen, plus 6-3 senior
Alex Curtis and 6-1 senior Matt Bouret.
The Knights hustle, play great defense and will bat-
tle to the end under Weems. That’s something Menlo-
Atherton will have to deal with in the PAL Southern
Division this season after the Bears shared the division
crown with the Knights last season.
The Bears lost six players off last season’s 23-11
squad that lost to Mitty in both the
CCS Division II finals and NorCal
semifinals. M-A has a new coach in
Phillip White, who has the Bears off
and running again with a winning
record.
M-A is led by 6-1 senior guard
Richard Branning, 6-1 junior guard
Peter Defilipps and 6-3 junior for-
ward Sam Knapp. They’ve carried
much of the offensive load this sea-
son. Other key contributers are 6-4
senior Matt Aguilar, 6-1 senior for-
ward Brendan McGrath and 6-0 se-
nior guard Nicky Fogel.
While Menlo and Menlo-Atherton
battle it out again in the PAL South,
the annual Palo Alto-Gunn show-
downs in the SCVAL De Anza Divi-
sion will take on a different look.
Gone for the Titans is their one-
two punch of Peter Jordan and David
Riley. Back for the Vikings is their
one-two punch of Mike Scott and
Dom Powell.
Paly was hoping to play for the title
in the St. Francis Holiday Tourna-
ment last weekend, a week following
Gunn’s championship effort in the
Fremont-Sunnyvale Holiday Tournament.
The difference between those teams is experience.
Paly has it and Gunn just needs some more of it.
Along with the 6-1 Scott and the 6-6 Powell, both
seniors, Paly coach Peter Diepenbrock returns senior
guard Nick Robinson, senior 6-3 forward Jordan Jef-
ferson and 6-5 sophomore forward Kevin Brown off
last season’s team that went 19-8 and lost to Mitty by
five in the CCS Division II semifinals. The Vikings lost
only four players who scored in that game and only one,
Christian Bakken, started.
Replacing Bakken is 5-10 sophomore guard Joseph
Lin, who has been nursing a sprained ankle for two
weeks. Once Lin is healthy, Paly will have an additional
ballhandler and able scorer to make the Vikings even
tougher.
Thus, Palo Alto has the experience and talent to go
places this season. The best hope is to reach the CCS
finals (against Mitty) and earn an automatic pass into
the NorCal playoffs.
Gunn finished 2007 with a 7-5 mark in
preseason and should carry momentum
from the Fremont tourney title into the
new season. The Titans are built around
6-3 junior Kyle Perricone and fellow re-
turnees Richard Wiley and Ryan Miller,
both 6-1 guards. There’s also 6-8 junior
Gus Brennan, 6-4 senior Brian Flaxman,
6-4 junior Stephen Castro, 6-5 junior Av-
ery Reiss and 5-10 junior Mike Shubat.
It would appear coach Chris Redfield
has a squad that may be a year away from
maturing, but the Titans will give it good
shot this season while battling Palo Alto,
Milpitas, Los Gatos and Saratoga in the
De Anza Division, which tips off Sat-
urday.
Gunn hits the road to test Fremont
while Paly opens at home against Sara-
toga, both at 7:45 p.m.
Pinewood (1-0, 5-2) is off to a good
start in the PSAL but will face Woodside
Priory on Jan. 9 to find out just where it
fits in the league this season.
Coach Andrew Slayton has a solid
group this season with junior Connor
Whitlock, junior Darius McClelland,
junior Akash Jindal and senior Parker Fields leading
the way. Three-point shooting is again the team’s trade-
mark in a league that thrives on it.
Sacred Heart Prep also will be firing away from
three-point land this season under first-year coach Tony
Martinelli. The Gators have some decent height with
6-5 senior Bryan Harris and 6-4 junior Alex Baloff and
has an experienced backcourt with juniors Ben Tay-
lor and Kevin Lamb and seniors Mike Nakamura and
Keith Taylor.
There’s also 6-0 senior Christian Buono and 6-0
junior Doyle Pitchford, but going up against tall and
talented Woodside Priory in PSAL play will be a tough
assignment.
After 10 years under veteran coach Chris Bischof,
Eastside Prep has a new coach in Tunde Sobomehin,
who played briefly at Stanford in 2002-03.
Sobomehin inherits a young team this season, one
that features junior Ivan Prema, sophomore Titus Van
Hook, and junior Dwayne Williams, among others.■
Boys basketball
(continued from page 18)
Senior guard/forward Max Frye (33) will be a key to
Menlo’s success this season.
Paly senior Mike Scott.
K
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P
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Sports
Page 20 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
995 Fictitious Name
Statement
SumOpti
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No. 503073
The following individual(s) is (are) doing business
as, SumOpti, 742 Moreno Ave., Palo Alto, CA
94303:
JEAN T. P. GOYAL
742 Moreno Ave.
Palo Alto, CA 94303
JAI GOYAL
742 Moreno Ave.
Palo Alto, CA 94303
This business is being conducted by a general
partnership.
Registrant began transacting business under
the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on
Nov. 1st., 2007.
This statement was filed with the County Clerk-
Recorder of Santa Clara County on December
12, 2007.
(PAW Dec. 19, 26, 2007, Jan. 2, 9, 2008)
GALERIE D’ART SYLVIE PLATINI
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No. 503287
The following individual(s) is (are) doing business
as, Galerie D’Art Sylvie Platini, 1625 Hamilton
Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303:
JEAN-LUC LAMINETTE
1625 Hamilton Avenue
Palo Alto, CA 94303
This business is being conducted by an indi-
vidual.
Registrant has not yet begun to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name(s) listed
herein.
This statement was filed with the County Clerk-
Recorder of Santa Clara County on December
18, 2007.
(PAW Dec. 26, 2007, Jan. 2, 9, 16, 2008)
MONSTER SUSHI
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No. 503232
The following individual(s) is (are) doing business
as, Monster Sushi, 2595 California St. # C & D,
Mtn. View, CA 94040:
SANG KIM
3533 Golden State Dr.
Santa Clara, CA 95051
This business is being conducted by an indi-
vidual.
Registrant began transacting business under
the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on
12/17/07.
This statement was filed with the County Clerk-
Recorder of Santa Clara County on December
17, 2007.
(PAW Jan. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2008)
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
The following person(s) has/have abandoned
the use of the fictitious business name(s). The
information given below is as it appeared on the
fictitious business statement that was filed at
the County Clerk-Recorder’s Office.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S): DUNHILL
PROFESSIONAL SEARCH OF SAN JOSE
1790 Hamilton Avenue
San Jose, CA 95125
FILED IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY ON: 05/24/07
UNDER FILE NO. 494675
REGISTRANT’S NAME(S):
HAMILTON PROFESSIONAL, LLC
1790 Hamilton Avenue
San Jose, CA 95125
THIS BUSINESS WAS CONDUCTED BY a limited
liability company. This statement was filed
with the County Clerk Recorder of Santa Clara
County on December 24, 2007.
File No. 503549
(PAW Jan. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2008)
PEPPER LANE DESIGNS
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT
File No. 503001
The following individual(s) is (are) doing business
as, Pepper Lane Designs, 15370 Pepper Lane,
Saratoga, CA 95070:
SUSAN M DUNN
15370 Pepper Lane
Saratoga, CA 95070
This business is being conducted by an indi-
vidual.
Registrant has not yet begun to transact busi-
ness under the fictitious business name(s) listed
herein.
This statement was filed with the County Clerk-
Recorder of Santa Clara County on December
12, 2007.
(PAW Jan. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2008)
997 All Other Legals
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE
OF:
JOE A. DANIELSON aka JOEY ALLEN
DANIELSON
No. 1-07-PR-162586
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent
creditors and persons who may otherwise be
interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOE
A. DANIELSON, aka JOEY ALLEN DANIELSON.
A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by:
ROY A. DANIELSON in the Superior Court of
California, County of SANTA CLARA.
THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that
ROY A. DANIELSON be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of the
decedent.
THE PETITION requests authority to administer
PublicNotices
(continued on next page 23)
HIGH SCHOOL SCOREBOARD
BOYS BASKETBALL
St. Francis Holiday Tournament
First round
Palma 12 8 14 9 — 43
Palo Alto 12 14 9 17 — 52
Palma — Bonano 6 1-1 13, Ramirez 1 2-2
4, Morris 0 2-2 2, Fox 6 4-6 16, Fales 3 0-0
8, Martinez 0 0-4 0, Anderson 0 0-4 0, Smith
0 0-1 0. Totals: 16 9-20 43.
PA — Scott 8 8-9 26, Powell 3 0-3 6, Jef-
ferson 1 0-0 3, Hall 1 0-0 2, Robinson 2 5-6
11, Brown 1 2-4 4. Totals: 16 15-22 52.
Three-point goals: Fales 2 (P); Scott 2,
Robinson 2 (PA).
Records: Palo Alto 8-2
Surf N Slam Tournament
At San Diego
First round
SH Prep 11 18 7 10 — 46
Bonney Lake 15 12 18 17 — 62
SHP — B. Taylor 3 0-0 6, K. Taylor 1 0-0
2, Lamb 2 0-0 4, Nakamura 1 0-0 3, Harris
2 4-4 8, Pitchford 5 0-0 10, Buono 2 3-3 7,
Baloff 2 2-4 6. Totals: 18 9-11 46.
BL — Winans 5 3-4 15, Jackson 1 2-5 4,
Avey 2 3-9 7, Z. McMullen 5 1-2 11, Henning-
son 3 0-0 6, P. McMullen 6 0-2 14, Skinner 2
1-2 5. Totals: 24 10-22 62.
Three-point goals: Nakamura (SHP); Hen-
ningson 3, P. McMullen 2, Winans 2 (BL).
Records: Sacred Heart Prep 1-4
Sand Dune Classic
At St. Ignatius
First round
Menlo-Atherton 9 7 13 9 — 38
Branson 12 10 9 15 —
48
MA — Branning 1 2-2 4, Knapp 4 2-3 10,
Defilipps 2 0-0 5, Fogel 5 0-0 12, McGrath 2
1-1 5, Aguilar 1 0-0 2. Totals: 15 5-6 38.
B — Akhile 3 0-0 7, McNally 4 5-6 13,
McGuigan 2 2-2 8, John 3 0-0 6, Elijah 5 0-0
10, Kilups 1 0-0 2. Totals: 18 7-7 46.
Three-point goals: Fogel 2, Defilipps (MA);
McGuigan 2, Akhile (B).
Records: Menlo-Atherton 8-5
Chaminada Christmas Classic
First round
El Camino Real 8 9 5 20 — 42
Menlo 10 14 15 14 — 53
ECR — Sher 4 3-5 11, Edrisavi 1 1-2 3,
Ina 0 2-2 2, Fowler 2 3-6 7, Brooks 3 0-1
6, Harvey 3 0-1 7, Kolodny 2 2-3 6. Totals:
15 11-20 42.
M — Nguyen 0 2-4 2, Glenn 3 4-6 10,
Tashman 3 2-2 8, Cohen 1 0-0 3, Frye 5 2-2
12, Rice Jr. 2 3-4 8, Bouret 2 3-4 7, Hawkins
0 1-2 1. Curtis 0 2-4 2. Totals: 16 19-28 53.
Three-point goals: Harvey (ECR); Cohen,
Rice Jr. (M).
Records: Menlo 9-2
Second round
Valencia 71, Menlo 54
Records: Menlo 9-3
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Palo Alto Classic
First round
Eastside Prep 19 11 15 22 — 67
San Mateo 9 11 10 13 — 43
EP — Anderson 5 0-0 11, Harvey 3 0-0 7,
Martin 1 1-2 4, Sh. Bunch 1 0-0 2, Holland
4 3-3 11, Sa. Bunch 11 10-12 32. Totals: 25
14-17 67.
SM — Kaizojl 1 0-0 2, Shenson 2 0-0 4,
Yamauchi 3 0-0 7, Kawakatsu 2 1-2 5, Pick-
ett 2 0-0 4, Okimura 0 1-2 1, Niupalau 9 2-3
20. Totals: 19 4-7 43.
Three-point goals: Anderson, Harvey,
Martin (EP); Yamauchi (SM).
Records: Eastside Prep 10-1
Castilleja 8 12 4 12 — 36
St. Francis 10 12 11 16 — 49
C — Amos 1 0-2 2, Taylor 3 7-14 14, E.
von Kaeppler 1 1-2 3, N. von Kaeppler 3 3-6
9, Thornburg 3 2-2 8. Totals: 11 13-26 36.
SF — McGraw 0 2-2 2, Taylor 2 1-2 5,
Gate 1 0-0 2, Reischl 4 0-0 11, Bianchi 2
0-0 5, Geppert 4 5-8 14, Montanari 5 0-0
10. Totals: 18 8-12 49.
Three-point goals: Taylor (Cast); Reischl
3, Bianchi, Geppert (SF).
Records: Castilleja 4-3, St. Francis 5-2
Pinewood 13 16 19 10 — 58
Washington 11 6 14 5 — 36
P — Morehead 1-0-3, Beck 2-3-8, Fraioli
3-0-8, Marty 1-1-3, Liang 0-1-1, Eackles
6-0-13, Taniguchi 1-0-3, Massingil 1-0-2,
Nickel 7-2-17. Totals: 22-7-58.
GW — Hwee 3-0-6, Wakefield 2-3-7,
Jones 6-1-13, Ishii 1-0-3, Won 2-0-4, Seiki
1-1-3. Totals: 15-5-36.
Three-point goals: Fraoili 2, Morehead,
Beck, Eackles, Taniguchi, Nickel (P); Ishii
(GW).
Records: Pinewood 4-5
Menlo 1 11 3 11 — 26
Palo Alto 12 9 14 10 — 45
M — Rosales 1 3-8 5, Ranadive 2 0-0 4,
Marini 2 2-4 6, Wemple 0 1-2 1, Hooper 1
0-0 3, Shepard 0 5-12 5, Coultas 0 0-2 0,
Sontag 0 2-2 2. Totals: 6 13-30 26.
PA — Mah 3 0-0 6, Slater 6 0-1 16,
Hoffacker 1 2-2 4, LeMarque 1 0-0 2, Ga-
rica 5 0-0 11, Phillips 1 0-0 3, Lovely 1 0-0
3. Totals: 18 2-3 45.
Three-point goals: Hooper (M); Slater 4,
Garcia, Phillips, Lovely (PA).
Records: Menlo 6-5, Palo Alto 2-6
Newark Memorial Cougar Classic
First round
Menlo-Atherton 16 15 22 17 — 70
Livermore 9 19 12 16 — 56
MA — Greene 1 0-0 2, McKee 8 0-2 16,
Hayes 7 8-13 23, Jenkins 1 0-0 2, Mongird
4 1-2 9, Tuliua 1 1-2 3, Fakalata 3 0-1 4,
Peck 2 0-0 4, Thomas 3 0-0 7. Totals: 27
10-20 70.
L — Webber 0 1-2 1, Borba 3 0-3 7, Ed-
wards 0 1-4 1, A. Raber 5 1-2 15, Hoehne
2 2-2 7, R. Raber 5 0-0 13, Betts 2 2-2 7,
McConvey 1 0-2 2, Garza 1 0-0 3. Totals:
19 7-19 56.
Three-point goals: Hayes, Thomas (MA);
A. Raber 4, R. Raber 3, Betts, Garza, Hoe-
hne, Borba (L).
Records: Menlo-Atherton 8-3
Due to holiday deadlines, results
from last Friday and Saturday will ap-
pear in this Friday’s edition. Results
from last weekend can be found at
www.PASportsOnline.com
On the subject of CCS, the Divi-
sion V postseason will have a famil-
iar look with Pinewood, Castilleja,
Eastside Prep and Sacred Heart
Prep (plus perhaps St. Francis-
Central Coast Catholic) battling for
section honors and the two available
NorCal berths.
“Pinewood is still the favorite, un-
til someone beats them,” said Cas-
tilleja coach Jez McIntosh. “They’re
still the team to beat.”
McIntosh has his best team ever
and would like a shot at playing
Pinewood or Eastside Prep in the
championship game. The Gators,
however, first have to overcome a
bunch of obstacles.
Junior and leading scorer Ericka
von Kaeppler suffered what may be
a fractured left wrist during a 49-
36 loss to St. Francis in the opening
round of the Palo Alto Classic last
Thursday. She’ll also leave for India
on Jan. 2 for a 10-day school trip.
In addition to the 6-foot von Kaep-
pler, there’s 5-11 freshman Natasha
von Kaeppler, 6-0 freshman Abby
Thornburg, 6-0 sophomore Eve
Zelinger, 6-0 freshman Laura Rose,
5-9 senior guard Lindsay Taylor and
5-6 senior Marion Cohn.
Pinewood had five losses as of last
week and has lost a lot to graduation
from a team that went 30-3 and fell
in the NorCal semifinals to Rincon
Valley Christian, 54-51. The Gators
were young and inexperienced until
senior guard Grace Beck rejoined
the squad last Thursday after miss-
ing the previous eight games with
an injury.
Coach Doc Scheppler’s lineup
now includes Beck, junior Lindsay
Nickel, freshman Hailie Eackles,
sophomore Lauren Taniguchi, se-
nior Maddy Fraioli and a host of
other young players.
Pinewood does lack height and
experience, but still relies on its out-
side shooting. The Panthers should
breeze through the Private Schools
Athletic League once again, use its
always-tough nonleague schedule
to improve and will be ready to de-
fend its CCS Division V title come
March.
Eastside Prep, which was 10-1
entering last weekend, will be there
waiting for Pinewood again this sea-
son. The Panthers have a new coach
in Donovan Blythe, who takes over
for 10-year veteran Gretchen See-
ley. Blythe has only seven players
on his roster and one senior, Sa-
mantha Bunch. The 6-foot Bunch,
along with sophomore guard Feli-
cia Anderson and freshman Ahjalee
Harvey, give Eastside Prep plenty
of offense. There’s also freshmen
Ausjerae Holland, Leanne Martin
and Alicia Ponce plus junior Shayla
Bunch to round out the rotation.
Sacred Heart Prep will take a 10-1
record into its West Catholic Ath-
letic League opener on Thursday at
home (7:30 p.m.) following a highly
successful preseason for first-year
coach Derek Kameda, who’s al-
ready on his way to surpassing last
season’s 12-19 record. Still, Sacred
Heart reached the NorCal Division
V semifinals before losing.
The Gators return junior guard
Gabby Micek plus junior sisters
Bryn and Morgan Aitken-Young.
Helping round out the rotation has
been senior Maria Gibbs, freshman
Miranda Seto, sophomores Kate
Lonergan, Tory Wilkinson and ju-
nior Katalina Tameilau.
Another team with the ability to
pile up the points is Menlo-Ather-
ton, which tallied 70 in a win over
Livermore last week as senior guard
Erica Hayes tallied 23. Hayes helped
veteran coach Pam Wimberly win
her 600th career game a week ear-
lier by winning MVP honors in the
Half Moon Bay Cougar Classic.
Hayes runs this M-A team and
has plenty of support from 6-footer
Arielle McKee, 5-10 sophomores
Victoria Fakalata and Lizzy Peck,
junior guard Chelsea Mongird, East-
side Prep transfers Kendra Thomas
and Alexis Jenkins plus sophomore
forward Jessica Tuliau.
The Bears should be favored to
defend their title in the PAL South-
ern Division after going 10-0 in
league (24-7 overall) last season.
Menlo has struggled this season
with injuries and inconsistency and
lost five key players to graduation,
including leading scorer Alex Shep-
ard. Her sister, Jackie (a junior), is
back along with sophomores Sarah
Rosales, Anjali Ranadive and Nikki
Wemple, juniors Lauren Berry, Cla-
rissa Coultas, Dana Tom and Alyssa
Sontag, plus freshmen Serena Mari-
ni and Whitney Hooper.
Palo Alto also has been strug-
gling. The Menlo game was only
their second win of the season.
Coach Scott Peters lost a key player
in Nicole Behr (to an ACL injury),
saw leading scorer Rachael Pecota
transfer along with Kiley McDer-
mott.
Thus, Paly is young with only two
seniors in Liz Slater and Yoali La-
marque. Sophomore Lauren Mah,
junior returnees Madison Hoffack-
er, Taylor Lovely and Olivia Garcia
all are contributing. There’s also
freshmen Katerina Peterson and
Mariah Phillips plus junior Kirsten
Atkinson. ■
Girls hoops
(continued from page 18)
Bulletin
Board
115 Announcements
It’s a New Year!
Is it time to make some changes? We
can help you make decisions that can
change your life! Call California Tarot
1-888-367-2725.
Writers Wanted
The Academy for Alternative Journalism,
established by papers like this one
to promote diversity in the alternative
press, seeks talented journalists
and students (college seniors and up)
for a paid summer writing program at
Northwestern University’s Medill School
of Journalism. The eight-week
program (June 22 - August 17, 2008)
aims to recruit talented candidates from
diverse backgrounds and train them
in alt-weekly style feature writing. Ten
participants will be chosen and paid
$3,000 plus housing and travel allow-
ances. For information and an applica-
tion visit http://aaj.aan.org. You
may also email us at altacademy@
northwestern.edu. Applications must
be postmarked by February 8, 2008.
Northwestern University is an equal
opportunity educator and employer.
(AAN CAN)
12/14 Gallery Reception
Artist’s Way “Creative Cluster”
Barbies and toys for sale
Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA)
Emerson School Open Houses
Free Single Travel Party
GREEN painting contractor
HOLIDAY HORSE CAMP......
Hybrid Yellow Retriever Puppies
JKD Self Defense School
One Stop Dance & Theater Store
Public Speaking Jitters? Then..
You Can Go Carbon Neutral! $50
130 Classes &
Instruction
Prepare for future Railroad
employment. NARS, in Overland Park,
Kansas, will teach you the skills in
4-8 weeks. Average salaries $63k.
Tuition assistance available. Conductor-
Mechanical- Welder- Signal. 1-913-
319-2603. www.RailroadTraining.com
(Cal-SCAN)
Instruction for Hebrew
Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and
Unaffiliated
George Rubin, M.A. in
Hebrew/Jewish Education
650/424-1940
133 Music Lessons
A Piano Teacher
Children & Adults
Ema Currier (650)493-4797
Barton-Holding Music Studio
Roger Emanuels, cello and Laura
Barton, vocals. 6 week “singing for
the non-singer” class. Starts 1/15.
650/965-0139
Hope Street Studios
In Downtown Mountain View
Most Instruments, Voice
All Ages, All Levels
(650) 961-2192
Jazz & Pop Piano Lessons
Learn how to build chords & improvise.
Bill Susman, M.A., Stanford.
(650)906-7529
McCOOL PIANO 566-9391(MP)
mccoolpiano.com 5 min walk fr.
Burgess gym
Piano Lessons
Taught in your home.
Member MTAC & NGPT.
Specializing in beginners.
Karen, (650)233-9689
Piano Lessons in Palo Alto
Call Alita (650)838-9772
Violin - all styles, all ages.
MV & Cupertino. MM, Eastman; tchg
credential; former SJ Symphony.
408/446-5744
135 Group Activities
BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP - $1
HOLIDAY HORSE CAMP......
Moms, Get Fit!
PARENT OF A TEEN???
Scrabble-Bstn Mkt-Mon Evg-Free
140 Lost & Found
Runaway Cat!
145 Non-Profits
Needs
Free Cubicles
150 Volunteers
Help the Needy, Cool the Earth!
feeders needed for cat colonies
volunteers needed to visit
155 Pets
Desert Lynx kittens for sale - $200
50 Plus German Shepards
Available - Adopt or Foster
G.S. Rescue of No. CA invites you to its
Redwood City Adoption Day first Sat.
of each month, 11am-2pm, Pet Food
Epress, 372 Woodside Plaza. www.
savegsd.org or call 1-866-SAVEGSD
For Sale
201 Autos/Trucks/
Parts
$500 Police Impounds
Cars from $500! Tax Repos, US
Marshall and IRS Sales! Cars, Trucks,
SUV's, Toyota's, Honda's, Chevy's and
more! Listing Call 1-800-298-4150 ext.
C107 (AAN CAN)
Autos Wanted
$1,000 Gift. Donate Car! IRS Deduction,
Any Condition, Lost Title OK, help Kids.
Espanol 1-888-548-4543. (Cal-SCAN)
Donate Vehicle,
running or not accepted! Free Towing.
Tax Deductible. Noahs Arc - Support No
Kill Shelters, Animal Rights, Research to
Advance Veterinary Treatments/Cures.
1-866-912-GIVE. (Cal-SCAN)
Donate Your Car:
Children’s Cancer Fund! Help Save
A Child’s Life Through Research &
Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast,
Easy & Tax Deductible. Call
1-800-252-0615. (Cal-SCAN)
BMW 1999 528i - pristine - $15,950
Cable Tire Chains - $15
Cadillac 2003 Seville STS Sedan
44,700 miles. 1 owner. Extremely
clean with a transferable GM extended
Major Guard warranty to 80,100
miles. Champaign Color inside and
out. Loaded with all features, including
Navigation, 6 CD changer, sunroof, etc.
Always garaged. Lives in Woodside.
650-851-1042
Chevrolet 1969 Camaro SS
Price 5000 USD, 350 Engine and
Transmission, Ext Blue/Int Black,
Automatic, Clear Title, pictures/
details contact:kevinanderson@live.
com/(651) 222 9603
Lexus 2002 SC430 - $32,750
TOYOTA 1997 CAMRY
4dr,5sp 80k,exc.con.650-853-0200
220 Computers/
Electronics
Bose 501 Speakers - $50 /pair
FREE Satellite TV
Pioneer CS-66 3-way Speakers - BO
Sony CMRX100 Analog cellphone - BO
230 Freebies
Fruit trees. - FREE
235 Wanted to Buy
Antique dolls
240 Furnishings/
Household items
Danish Modern Sideboard
Old enough for a very solid piece of
furniture but young enough for good
condition. Excellent buy!
display case - $80
double sided easel - $30
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER-BOOKSHELF
Futon frame - like new!! - $100
245 Miscellaneous
$8 Prescription Eyeglasses.
Custom made to your prescription, styl-
ish plastic or metal frame,
Highindex, UV protection, antiscratch
lens, case, lenscloth for only $8.
Also available: Rimless, Titanium,
Childrenâ ™s, Bifocals, Progressives,
Suntints, ARcoating, etc. http://
ZENNIOPTICAL.COM (AAN CAN)
Are you underpaid ?? - $0
Dee Dee Ranch Daffodils
Great Gift Idea!
A Season of Grandma’s Daffodils.
Weekly delivery Jan-Mar
Area Redwood City south to Mountain
View
Call Deb 650-851-0623 or Email
DeeDeeRanch@aol.com
Firewood
Cord, 24” $280, 16” $320, mix, 1/2
cord, less avail. 650-328-1058
Firewood - Seasoned
1/2 cord mix $150; full cord mix
$300; 1/2 cord oak $200. full cord
oak $400. Free delivery in local area.
650-630-1077
LOVE HORSES......?
Metal Bender - $85.00
quit smoking - $25
260 Sports &
Exercise Equipment
New Women’s K2 Cadence LS Roller
- $99
Ski Equipment Wanted
Marketplace
fogster.com
THE PENINSULA’S
FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE
Combining the reach of the Web with print
ads reaching over 150,000 readers!
fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and
an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.
go to fogster.com to respond to ads without phone numbers
PLACE
AN AD
ONLINE
fogster.com
E-MAIL
ads@fogster.com

PHONE
650/326-8216
Now you can log on to
fogster.com, day or night
and get your ad started
immediately online. Most
listings are free and
include a one-line free
print ad in our Peninsula
newspapers with the
option of photos and
additional lines. Exempt
are employment ads,
which include a web
listing charge. Home
Services and Mind &
Body Services require
contact with a Customer
Sales Representative.
So, the next time you
have an item to sell, bar-
ter, give away or buy, get
the perfect combination:
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more than 150,000 read-
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INDEX
■ BULLETIN
BOARD
100-155
■ FOR SALE
200-270
■ KIDS STUFF
330-390
■ MIND & BODY
400-499
■ JOBS
500-560
■ BUSINESS
SERVICES
600-699
■ HOME
SERVICES
700-799
■ FOR RENT/
FOR SALE
REAL ESTATE
801-899
■ PUBLIC/LEGAL
NOTICES
995-997

The publisher waives any and all claims
or consequential damages due to errors
Embarcadero Publishing Co. cannot assume
responsibility for the claims or performance of
its advertisers. Embarcadero Publishing Co.
right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely
at its discretion without prior notice.
Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 21
330 Child Care
Offered
Elem/SpEd Teacher
Experienced Morning Nanny avail.
Have something to do?
HOLIDAY HORSE CAMP......
Mary Poppins For Hire!
All ages. CPR cert., TrustLine, top refs.
650/926-9717
nanny looking for family.
New school; 555 Waverley PA
Night Nanny / Postpartum Doula
Preschool reviews - Neighbor.com
Professional Babysitting-PT/FT
340 Child Care
Wanted
F/T Nanny Wanted in Palo Alto
Nanny wanted in Palo Alto for 2 & 4 yr
olds. F/T, live out. Must speak English
and drive. 650-430-3804
Need Live in Housekeeper / Nanny
www.spnannies.com
Twins in San Carlos. Boy & Girl,
4 weeks old. 9:00-5:00. M-F, $18/hr.
RWC family is seeking a loving
nanny. 6 mos & 2 yrs. 7:30-3:30,
M/Tu/W, $18 /hr
650-462-4580
345 Tutoring/
Lessons
Adult French Lessons
Adult French, Spanish
Adult Spanish Lessons
All Math, Spanish, French, Scien
ART WITH EMILY
Art:Classes, birthday parties! -
6507990235
Back 2 School Spanish & French!
College Coach/Tutor
English Tutor/Writing Coach
French & Spanish for Adults
French & Spanish for High School
French Lessons for Home Schooled
French Native Teacher
All levels and ages. SAT, AP, conversa-
tion for travelers and business profes-
sionals.
Hessen Camille Ghazal, Ph.D.
650/965-9696
French, Spanish for HS students
Language Experts
Experienced European French-Spanish
Teacher with degree. Kids, high school-
ers, special programs for adults.
(650)691-9863 (650)804-5055
www.languagesexpert.com
One-to-One Tutoring Service - 363-8799
Spanish 4 hme schooled
Spanish for High School Students
350 Preschools/
Schools/Camps
Early Learning Preschool
Ages 3-6. Environment designed for
learning and exploration. 650/857-
0655. www.growingtreepreschool.com
Waldorf preschool
355 Items for Sale
Baby Bjorn Carrier $30 Only!
Burton snowboard boots
Graco Snugride inf carseat/base
kids’ adidas soccer shoes, 4 1/2 - $12
LOVE HORSES......?
Snugli baby carrier $20
Peninsula Parents
Are you looking for a
nanny? Advertise in the
Weekly’s Kids’ Stuff
section and reach over
47,000 people!
326-8216
No phone
number in the ad?
GO TO
fogster.com
for contact
information
Ski, Rossignol 9X Pro - $125
Skis, Dynastar Speed SX - $150
Skis, Rossignol 7X - $100
425 Health Services
Winter Blues?
Proven nutritional therapy.
1-888-34HAPPY
www.MyHappyBrain.com
440 Massage Therapy
Caring Attention to Excellent
Therapeutic Massage
Be Well! Call Lois in San Carlos
(650)906-7000
445 Music Classes
Music lessons, voice, piano
Performance. Confidence.
Experienced. University
Instructor. 650-965-2288
Piano Lessons in Palo Alto
Call Alita (650)838-9772
450 Personal Growth
Free Personality & IQ Testing
Your IQ, personality and aptitude
determine your future. Know them. No
obligations. 408-390-8431
Jobs
500 Help Wanted
Ambitious? Tired of Trading Time 4
$$$ ?
Earn Executive Level Income w/o the
stress. Call 800-470-4876.
Appointment Setter Needed
Exp’d only. No cold calling. 10-12 hrs. a
week. Must be willing to call eves/Sat.
am. Call Mattee 408-358-3880
Caregivers / CNAs / HHAs
Visiting Angels (Sunnvyale) has imme-
diate openings! Exp w/elderly requ-
ried. Full-time, part-time, overnights
& live-in. Flexible schedule, top pay,
medical benefits & BONUSES! (408)
735-0983
Nurse: LVN/RN
5 days/30 hrs w/benefits; adult day
health center. Job description at www.
avenidas.org. Resume to: lpark@aveni-
das.org or fax 650-691-1119
P/T Temporary Bookstore Help
Needed on site interviews
Cashiers, all shifts.
Apply in person: Stanford Bookstore
519 Lasuen Mall, Stanford, CA
94305
**Interviews: M-F 9 am - 4 pm**
Packages processing manager
needed
MAIL PACKAGES from home without
leaving your current
job. Easy! Ship parcels from our clients.
Get paid $24
per parcel Info: http://cargo-logistic.
biz/line/vacancies/
Payroll Administrator
Immediate need for F/T or P/T Payroll
Admin w/Pro Business experience.
Fax resume to 650.384.0161
Email to Opportunities@c-a-r.org.
Or mail to
Community Association for Rehab
525 E. Charleston Road
Palo Alto, CA 94306
Attn: Human Resources
EOE
Preschool Teacher’s Assistant
Opening Jan 2nd for a P/T Preschool
teacher’s assistant for a class of 2
year olds. Located in Palo Alto. Hours
8:45am to 1:00pm. Please send us a
copy of your resume and references via
fax 650 493 3425 or email chabadof-
fice@pacbell.net
550 Business
Opportunities
$700,-$800,000 Free Cash Grant
PROGRAMS-2007!, Personal bills,
School, Business/Housing. Approx.
$49 billion unclaimed 2006! Almost
Everyone Qualifies! Live Operators 1-
800-592-0362 Ext. 235. (AAN CAN)
Advertise!
Newspaper advertising works! Reach
6 million Californians! 240 newspapers
statewide. $550 for a 25-word clas-
sified ad. Call (916) 288-6019 eliza-
beth@cnpa.com www.Cal-SCAN.com
(Cal-SCAN)
Advertising Sales Manager
The Association of Alternative
Newsweeklies (members include papers
like the one you’re holding in your hand)
is looking for an experienced account
executive or sales manager to sell
advertising, as well as oversee market-
ing and operations for its successful
national classified advertising network.
You must be able to work independently
in our small, non-corporate DC office
and know your way around spread-
sheets, databases and the web.
Significant income potential and excel-
lent health, dental, vacation benefits
and IRA.
Relocation expenses paid. Resume,
cover letter and salary expectations
no later than Friday, Jan. 11 to rkarpel
at aan.org or AAN, 1250 Eye Street
NW, Ste. 804, Washington, DC 20005.
(AAN CAN)
All Cash Candy Route.
“Be Your Own Boss”. 30 Machines and
Candy for $9,995. MultiVend LLC, 880
Grand Blvd., Deer Park, NY.
1-888-625-2405. (Cal-SCAN)
Attn: Drivers.
Paid Orientation and Bonus. 36-43cpm
($1000+ wkly) Excellent Benefits. Class
A and 3 months OTR required.
1-800-635-8669. (Cal-SCAN)
Awesome First Job!
Now hiring motivated sharp individuals
to work and travel entire USA. Paid
training. Transportation, lodging fur-
nished. Call today, Start today.
1-877-646-5050. (Cal-SCAN)
Bartenders Needed!
Looking for part/full time bartenders.
Several positions available. No experi-
ence required. With hourly wages and
tips make up to $300 per shift.
Call (800) 806-0082 ext. 200.
(AAN CAN)
Display Advertising!
Reach over 3 million Californians in 140
community newspapers. Cost $1,800
for a 3.75”x2” display ad (Super value
that works out to about $12.86 per
newspaper). Call (916) 288-6019 eliza-
beth@cnpa.com www.Cal-SCAN.com
(Cal-SCAN)
Driver - CDL Training
$0 down, financing by Central
Refrigerated. Drive for Central, earn up
to $40k+ 1st year! 1-800-587-0029
x4779. www.CentralDrivingJobs.net
(Cal-SCAN)
Driver:
Don’t Just Start Your Career, Start It
Right! Company Sponsored CDL training
in 3 weeks. Must be 21. Have CDL?
Tuition Reimbursement! www.JoinCRST.
com 1-800-781-2778. (Cal-SCAN)
Driver:
The respect you deserve...Get it at
Swift!! As a truck driver with Swift
Transportation, you can have it all
- freedom, stability and outstanding
financial rewards. Call us at: 866-476-
6828. www.SwiftTruckingJobs.com.
EOE (Cal-SCAN)
Government Jobs
Earn $12 to $48 Per Hour. Benefits,
Paid Training, Homeland Security, Law
Enforcement, Administrative, Clerical,
Office, Accounting, Finance, Wildlife,
More! 1-800-320-9353 x 2001.
(AAN CAN)
Help Wanted
Earn Extra income assembling CD
cases from Home. Start Immediately.
No Experience Necessary. 1-800-405-
7619 ext. 150 http://www.easywork-
greatpay.com (AAN CAN)
Make $150/Hour
Get Paid Cash for Your Opinion! Earn $5
to $75 to fill our simple surveys online.
Start NOW! http://www.paidchoice.com
(AAN CAN)
Movie Extras, Actors, Models!
Make $100-$300/day. No Experience
Required, Meet celebrities, Full
Time/Part Time, All looks needed! Call
Now! 1-800-556-6103. extension 528
(AAN CAN)
Mystery Shoppers
Get paid to shop! Retail/Dining estab-
lishments need undercover clients to
judge quality/customer service. Earn
up to $70 a day. Call 800-901-9370
(AAN CAN)
News or Press Release Service?
The California Press Release Service is
the only service with 500 current daily,
weekly and college newspaper contacts
in California. Questions call (916) 288-
6010. www.CaliforniaPressReleaseServi
ce.com (Cal-SCAN)
Outdoor Youth Counselor.
Make more than a living. Make a differ-
ence. Immediate job
opportunities at Eckerd outdoor thera-
peutic programs in NC, TN, GA, FL, VT,
NH and RI. Year-round residential posi-
tion, free room & board, competitive
salary/ benefits. Info and apply online:
http://www.eckerdyouth.org. Or
fax resume to Career Advisor/AN,
727-442-5911. EOE/DFWP (AAN CAN)
Post Office Jobs Available.
Avg. Pay $20/Hour or $57K annually
including Federal Benefits and OT. Paid
Training, Vacations. PT/FT.
1-866-616-7019 USWA (AAN CAN)
Investor-Partner
Website Concepts. If you missed get-
ting in on start of MySpace, YouTube,
Facebook, this billion dollar market will
be the next big one. Serious investors
call 970/278-2228
Business
Services
604 Adult Care
Offered
Geriatric Care Management —-
Clark Consulting 650-879-9030
620 Domestic Help
Offered
Cocktail party pianist
Cocktail party pianist and sing-along
leader. Piano bar experienced.
650-329-9831.
Experienced Housekeeper
Need extra hands for holidays? Detailed
cleaning, ironing, laundry, organizing,
errands. English speaking, current CDL,
great refs. 25 years exp.
650/281-8637
624 Financial
$Cash$
Immediate Cash for Structured
Settlements, Annuities, Law Suits,
Inheritance, Mortgage Notes & Cash
Flows. J.G. WENTWORTH #1 1-800-
794-7310. (AAN CAN)
Credit Repair!
Erase bad credit legally. Money back
Warranty, FREEâ Consultation &
Information: 1-866-410-7676 http://
www.nationalcreditbuilders.com
(AAN CAN)
628 Graphics/
Webdesign
StraightAD
branding, web design http://www.
straightad.com
650 Pet Care/
Grooming/Training
All Animals Happy House
Pet Sitting Services by Susan
Licensed, insured, refs.
650-323-4000
Dog Training Classes
At Woodland School, PV
*Starts Mon. eves., Jan. 14:
Puppy, Beginner,
Canine Good Citizen, Rally,
Advanced. New! Tricks, fun and
games class.
*Starts Sat. AMs, Feb. 9: Puppy and
Beginner
*Outings for Dogs: Training,
exercising, socializing.
Please call 650/851-5500, box 4
to register.
Gates-Wire-Posts-Shelters
and Corrals
Stall Mats
Half Moon Bay Feed & Fuel
“Your Complete Ranch Supply”
650-726-4814
Home
Services
701 AC/Heating
Free Central Heating Unit
Get a FREE Central Heating Unit when
we install an entire heating system in
your home. It’s a huge savings and
what a great gift. Call for details while
this offer lasts. 415-720-2669
703 Architecture/
Design
CHEAP Structural Design
CHEAP Structural Engineering
License #C68517 25+Yrs Exp.
6507934140 or apdgse@gmail.com
Design/Permits
One Stop Place for Your Remodeling
Design needs. Complete Plans included.
Structural Engineering and Energy
Compliance (T-24). ADW 650/969-4980
704 Audio/Visual
AV Pros
Custom Home Theater, DirecTV
sales/instal. Speakers/voice/data. Flat
screen HDTV. Install Antennas. Security
Cameras, inwall wiring. Insured.
(650)965-8498
710 Carpentry
Cabinetry-Individual Design
Precise, 3-D Computer Modeling
Mantels, Bookcases, Workplaces
Wall Units, Window Seats
Ned Hollis 650-856-9475
715 Cleaning
Services
2 person team.
We do the same service as everyone
else-but the difference is: â œwe love
to do it!â ù Steam spot clng avail Lic.#
28276, Call (650)369-7570
www.FlorLauHousecleaning.com
Always Clean
Residential/Commercial. Trusted
since 1991. Excellent Refs. Free
Estimates. Dina or Jose Sandoval
(650)566-8136 or (650)464-0991
Francisca Deep Housecleaning
Good refs & exp. 650-771-1414 or
650-298-8212
Gloria Godinez House Cleaning
House, Office, Window Cleaning
Phone 1-650-669-3748
Green Housecleaning
Least toxic. Residential.
15 years exp. 650/329-8021
Jose’s Janitorial Service
Professional House Cleaning, Offices
* Window Washing * Commercial
Residential * Husband & Wife
References (650)322-0294
Martha’s Housecleaning
Experience and good references. Free
estimates. Call Martha 650-906-1331
Mendez Cleaning Service
Daily, weekly, monthly. Residential *
Good Refs * Reasonable Rates * 10+
yrs exp. Licensed.
650/630-1566 or 650/364-3149
This space kept
clean by
Let us keep
your space clean!
(650) 961-8288
www.merrymaids.com
Merry Maids
Professional Housecleaning. Serving
Menlo Park, Portola Valley, Atherton,
Woodside. Call for discount.
650/369-6243.
PILAS Housekeeping
Professional Housecleaning
Own transportaton, good refs.
20 years experience.
650/364-4367; 650/771-2915
Ramos Cleaning Services
Residential & commercial. Free esti-
mates, reasonable prices, 10 yrs. exp.
Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly. Please call
Doris 650-678-4792 Lic: 10929
Rosario’s Housecleaning
Experienced. Good references. 650-
703-3026
Rosie’s Housecleaning Service
Res./Comm’l. Service guaranteed,
great refs. Owner supervised work.
408/991-4300; 650/868-3530
Yanet’s House Cleaning
15 years experience
Reasonable Rates - Guaranteed Work
Move in or Move out - $15/hour
Free Estimates
Cell (650) 630-3279 (650) 906-7712
719 Remodeling/
Additions
A European Contractor
Additions, Kit/BA, remodels. All interior/
exterior jobs. Lic. #895617.
650/861-2274
NEW Construction
ROOM Additions
KITCHEN & BATH Remodeling
Cal. Lic. #627843 • Bonded • Insured
650-366-8335
DOMICILE CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
730 Electrical
Alex Electric
Lic #784136. Free Est.
All electrical
Alex, (650)366-6924
JW ELECTRIC
Quality Work / Low Prices
(888) 568-8363
Free Estimates.....Lic# 878406
37 Fences & Gates
Fences - Decks - Retaining
Wall Patio Outdoor Construction.
15 yrs Exper. Reasonable prices.
Lic#786158. Al 650-853-0824 (c)
269-7113
743 Tiling
Bath & Kitchen Tiling
And all home repairs.
Reasonable. Guar. Since 1985
Raymond, 650/815-6114
Classic Tile Company
Tile & grout repairs. Tile instalation,
repair, and grouting. Free estimates.
Bonded, license #378868
(650)969-3914. Leave msg. Over 40
yrs experience.
748 Gardening/
Landscaping
Arteaga Enterprises Inc.
Gardening, maintenance, landscap-
ing, irrigation, pressure washer, tree
service, clean up, 650-366-0888 or
415-298-9004
Beckys Landscape
Weekly, Biweekly & Periodic Maint.
Annual Rose, Fruit Tree Pruning, Yard
Clean-ups, Demolition, Excavation,
Irrigation, Sod, Planting, Raised Beds,
Ponds, Fountains, Patios, Decks.
650/493-7060
Ceja’s Home & Garden Landscape
Sprinklers, Sod, tree trimming, Stump
Removal. Cleanups. Maint. Free Est.
15 yrs.
814-1577 or 533-5994
www.cejalandscaping.com
• YARD
MAINTENANCE
• ESTATE SERVICE
• NEW LAWNS
• LANDSCAPE
RENOVATION
• SPRINKLER
SYSTEMS
LIC# 865860 (650)367-1420
H AND H GARDEN AND LANDSCAPE
Need help with your gardening or
landscaping job.monthly maintenance
and new landscaping We are here to
help. Free estimates. We are licensed
and insured.
paulino 650-537-0804, paulinovalle@
yahoo.com
J.L. Gardening Service
Garden/Landscape Maint. Weekly
or biweekly: cleanups, plant, prune,
trim. 20+ yrs exp. 650/988-8694;
650/520-9097
Japanese Gardener
Maintenance * Garden works
Clean ups * Pruning
(650)327-6283, evenings
Jesus Garcia Landscaping
Maintenance - Sprinklers - New Fences.
(650)366-4301 ask for Jesus or
Carmen
Landas Gardening/Landscaping
Service Maintenance
Clean-ups, new lawns, tree cutting/
trimming. Ramon (510) 494-1691,
650/576-6242 Excel. Ref’s!
Leo Garcia Landscape/
Maintenance
Lawn & Irrig. install, retain walls.
Res & Co. maint., tree trim/removal.
Clean-ups, grdn lighting, cust.
arbors. Install: Fences, decks,
flagstone, paver. Free Est. Lic’d.
(650)369-1477
MAINTENANCE
Clean Ups. Trimming. Pruning.
Stump removal. Rototilling. Aerating.
Tree Service. Landscaping. Drip &
Sprinkler. Roger C: (650)776-8666
Page 22 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
fogster.com
THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE
TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS
GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM
MARKETPLACE the printed version of
fogster.com
FRIDAY PAPER: noon, Wednesday
WEDNESDAY PAPER: noon, Monday
Classified Deadlines:
751 General
Contracting
Alka Construction
Remodeling, Additions, Bathrooms,
Kitchen, Tile & Marble Work, Electrical
& Plumbing, Concrete Driveways,
Patios. Lic. #638994. Tel. 704-4224
Building Ideas Inc.
754 Gutters
Gutter & Window Cleaning
Contact Jose at (650)207-7452
757 Handyman/
Repairs
A European Craftsmanship
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling.
For All Your Repair Needs. Plumbing,
Finish Carpentry and More. Licensed.
650/270-7726
Able Handyman Fred
Complete home repairs,
maintenance, remod., prof.
painting, carpentry, plumbing,
elect. & custom design
cabinets. 7 days.
650.529.1662 • 483.4227
Al Trujillo Handyman Service
Int./Ext. Painting, Kit./BA Improv.,
Dry Rot, Flooring Install, Homes/Apt.
Repairs, Auto Sprinkler, Landscapes,
Fences. 20yrs. 650-207-1306
Jeffs Handyman & Repair
Free est. 10% SENIOR Disc.
“No Job Too Small”
Call Jeff (650)714-2563
Larry’s Handyman Service
Various repairs & install, gutter clean/
repair, assemble anything, plumbing,
electrical, locks, blinds, much more.
12 yrs. quality work. 650-856-0831
Palo Alto
Need Your House Painted?
It was Fred who painted it. Call me
again! 650/568-3106
Quality Work You Can Trust
Affordable Painter Handyman. Painting,
Electric, Woodwork, Tile, Drywall. Call
650/544-4502 or 650/631-4502
759 Hauling
Frank’s Hauling
Commercial, Residential, Garage,
Basement & Yard. Clean-up. Fair prices.
(650)361-8773
J&G HAULING SERVICE
Misc. junk, office, appliances,
garage, storage, etc, clean-ups. Old
furniture, refrigerators, freezers.
FREE ESTIMATES 650/368-8810
767 Movers
768 Moving
Assistance
Aarrons Helping Hands
5 strong pros! High end experience!
Emergency OK. 650/669-6684
771 Painting/
Wallpaper
Christine’s Wallpapering
Interior Painting
Removal/Prep * Since 1982
Lic. #757074 * 650-593-1703
Lic. 52643
Great Refs & Low Rates
(650) 575-2022
D&M
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Gary Rossi PAINTING
Residential/Commercial. Wall paper
removal. Licensed (#559953) and
Bonded. Free est. 650/207-5292
Richard Myles Painting
(650)814-5523
We love to paint
www.remopaints.com
lic. #803250 • info@remopaints.com
STYLE PAINTING
Interior/exterior. Quality prep to
finish. Owner operated. Reasonable
prices. Lic 903303. 650/388-8577
Wallpapering by Trish
24 years of experience
Free Estimates
949-1820
775 Asphalt/
Concrete
Roe General Engineering
Asphalt * Paving * Sealing
New Construction and Repairs
30 years exp. No job too small
Lic #663703 * 650/814-5572
779 Organizing
Services
End the Clutter & Get Organized
Residential organizing
by Debra Robinson
(650)941-5073
783 Plumbing
Plumbing Service and Repair
Senior citizen discount. New installation
and repair. 650-323-6464 or 877-544-
3305 Lic. and insured #905661
Very Reasonable Plumbing
Drains, Repairs and Installation. 20 yrs
exp. Very fast and efficient service.
Jimmy, 968-7187
789 Plaster/Stucco
Exterior Stucco Patching
Windows & Doors. Crack Repair. 30
yrs. exp. (650)248-4205
790 Roofing
Calvin’s Repairs
Roofs and Gutters Cleaned and
Repaired. Fences, Gates, Decks.
40+ yrs. exp. 650/520-4922
795 Tree Care
David’s Tree Service
Call during storm season! Tree removal,
topping, pruning, shaping, clean up,
stump grind, certificate on power lines.
Free estimates. 650-444-3350 or
650-321-1245
Maguire Tree Care
OZZIES TREE SERVICE:
Certified arborist, 22 yrs exp. Tree
trimming, removals and stump grind-
ing. Free chips and wood. Free est.
Lic. and insured. 650/ 368-8065;
cell 650/704-5588
Palo Alto Tree Service
Business/Res. Tree Removal
Certified/Ins. 17 yrs exp.
Free estimate. Lic. #819244
650/380-2297; 650/380-5897
Real
Estate
801 Apartments/
Condos/Studios
Menlo Park, 2 BR/1 BA - $1,900/mo
MV-PA Vicinity: Studio & 1BR
Two locations. Flex rent. Prof.
residence. Unique features. Studios
$975-1250 & 1BR’s $1250-1450 Call
650/969-1190 or MMhousing@aol.com
MV: 1BR Senior Apts
Waiting list open. Central Park
Apartments, 90 Sierra Vista Ave.
Application dates: Tues. 9-12 only
or Thur. 1-4pm only. 650/964-5600
Section 8 and vouchers OK
PA: 1BR
in 4-plex. Rustic setting. Hardwood
flrs., gardener. $1045 mo., lease.
N/P. Contact Arn Cenedella, Agent,
650/566-5329
PA: 2BR/1BA, $1550/mo.
Spacious, bright, vaulted ceiling, sky-
lights, quiet midtown triplex.
650-329-8363
GREAT LOCATION!
MODERN 1BR/1BA $1,895 AND UP
BEAUTIFUL 2BR/2BA TH $2,495
WASHER AND DRYER IN THE UNIT!
HIGH CEILINGS, SUNNY, A/C, D/W
NEAR GUNN HS, STANFORD/PAGE MILL
(650) 320-8500
San Carlos, 1 BR/1 BA - $1,250.00
805 Homes for Rent
3 Acre Woodside Estate
Spacious 4BR home in central
Woodside. Lovely hill views, pool, &
tennis crts. 6 mos. lease. Avail. 1/15
Agent 650-851-4000 stuart@thewhit-
telseys.com
Los Altos Hills 3 BR/2.5 BA - $6,300
Mountain View, 3 BR/2 BA - $3500/mo
MP: 3BR/2BA
West. Lg. country kit, frplc., A/C, lanai
w/BBQ, dbl. gar. $3380.
650/854-1833
Old Palo Alto, 4 BR/3 BA - $5500/Mo
PA: 4br, 3ba
Lr, Dr, 2 car gr, remodeled, ac/heat,
lrg lot, lots of fruit trees close to YMCA,
shops, library, parks, schools. $4800
Avail. 12/25. 650-856-1610
PA: 4BR/2BA
Furnished, sep ofc, nr schools, park,
ideal for visiting prof. $3800/mo. 6
mo. min. 650-208-8624
Palo Alto, 3 BR/1 BA - $2750/mo
Palo Alto, 3 BR/1 BA
3bd/1ba; GoodSt; quiet; BigYards;
$2850; 566-8038
Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $2,500/mo
PV: 3ba/2br
Do you like to live in nature? dr, lr, fam
rm, 2 car gr, hw flr, heat sys in 1.5
acre. Get it for holiday. Very pleasant.
$4200 Avail. 12/21. 650-856-1610
809 Shared Housing/
Rooms
All Areas - Roommates.com
Browse hundreds of online listings with
photos and maps. Find your roommate
with a click of the mouse! Visit: www.
Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)
815 Rentals Wanted
Got Needs? I can help...
Housing Wanted - Exchange
In law wanted
Long-Term Rental Wanted
Partial Rent Exchange Wanted
820 Home Exchanges
ARCHITECT on call
825 Homes/Condos
for Sale
Menlo Park, 4 BR/3 BA - $1,680,000
Menlo Park, 5+ BR/4+ BA - $2300000
Palo Alto, 5+ BR/4+ BA - $5,900,000
Redwood City, 2 BR/2 BA - $599000
Redwood Shores, 2 BR/2 BA -
$582,500
Sunnyvale, 2 BR/1 BA - $675000
Sunnyvale, 2 BR/1 BA - $649800
Sunnyvale, 3 BR/1.5 BA - $695000
Sunnyvale, 3 BR/2 BA - $599000
Woodside, 4 BR/3 BA - $3,450,000
830 Commercial/
Income Property
Hypnotherapy office for share
Palo Alto.$500/ month. Available now.
(650) 996-991.
840 Vacation
Rentals/Time Shares
RedWeek.com #1 Timeshare
Marketplace. Rent, buy, sell, reviews,
New full-service exchange! Compare
prices at 5000+ resorts. B4U do any-
thing timeshare, visit www.RedWeek.
com, consider options. (Cal-SCAN)
Timeshares! Tires of Fees?
Call www.BuyATimeshare.com to sell,
rent or buy a timeshare. Get free info
today and get cash at closing. Call
Now! 1-877-868-1931. (Cal-SCAN)
N Tahoe Holiday Rntl 11/22-12/29
$2100/wk. 3 br, 2.5 ba, fantastic great
room, hot tub, dogs ok. 650-575-6889
klimans@pacbell.net
Pajaro Dunes Condo
2BR/2BA or 1BR/1BA. On beach,
ocean view. Cable TV, VCR, CD, tennis,
W/D. Pvt. deck, BBQ. Owner, 650/424-
1747. hherzenber@aol.com
Palo Alto Architect
Residential Architecture + Desig
845 Out of Area
1st Time Offered
Washington. Old Farm Liquidation. River
access & views. 6ac. - $69,900. 15ac.
old farm building - $89,900. Gorgeous
land & setting. Limited available. EZ
Terms. Call WALR 1-866-836-9152.
(Cal-SCAN)
Bulk Land Sale
40 acres - $39,900. Moses Lake,
Washington. Priced for quick sale.
Beautiful land, interesting topography,
good views & setting, abundant wildlife.
Surveyed on maintained road. Financing
available. Call WALR 1-866-585-5687.
(Cal-SCAN)
Closeout Sales
36 AC - $29,900. Price is drastically
reduced by motivated seller. Beautiful
setting with fresh mountain air.
Abundant wildlife. Secluded with good
access. Financing available. Eureka
Springs Ranch is offered by AZLR.
ADWR report avail. Call 1-877-301-
5263. (Cal-SCAN)
New Mexico Sacrifice!
140 acres was $149,900, Now Only
$69,900. Amazing 6000 ft. elevation.
Incredible mountain views. Mature tree
cover. Power & year round roads.
Excellent financing. Priced for quick
sale. Call NML&R, Inc. 1-888-204-9760.
(Cal-SCAN)
Priced for Quick Sale
Nevada 5 acres - $19,900. Beautiful
building site with electric & county main-
tained roads. 360 degree views. Great
recreational opportunities. Financing
available. Call now! 1-877-349-0822.
(Cal-SCAN)
Roanoke, Virginia
1700 acre $5M, Hawaii - 2 to 37ac
oceanfront view $750k, West Texas
- 6400ac historic ranch $5M, Chile
- 16,000ac island $750/ac. www.
CPLandCo.com call 1-850-278-1000.
(Cal-SCAN)
So. Colorado Ranch
Sale 35 Acres- $39,900. Spectacular
Rocky Mtn. Views Year round access,
elec/ tele included. Excellent Financing
available w/ low down payment. Call
Red Creek Land Co. Today! 1-866-696-
5263 x3155. (Cal-SCAN)
Texas Land Liquidation!
20-acres, Near Booming El Paso.
Good Road Access. Only $14,900.
$200/down, $145/month. Money Back
Guarantee! No Credit Checks. 1-800-
776-1954 www.SunsetRanches.com
(Cal-SCAN)
850 Acreage/Lots/
Storage
Bank Foreclosures!
Homes from $10,000! 1-3 bedroom
available! HUD, Repos, REOâ ™s, etc.
These homes must sell! For listings call
1-800-425-1620 ext 3241. (AAN CAN)
855 Real Estate
Services
“0” Stress, “0” Cost to You!
0.5% commission to Buy/Sell home
Gohalfpercent offers a smart 0.5%
commission option. No hidden cost.
Call 650.988.8813 or browse www.
gohalfpercent.com
890 Real Estate
Wanted
Paint your house “GREEN”
Palo Alto Weekly • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Page 23
fogster.com
THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE
TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS
GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM
MARKETPLACE the printed version of
to administer the estate under the
Independent Administration of Estates
Act. (This authority will allow the
personal representative to take many
actions without obtaining court approv-
al. Before taking certain very important
actions, however, the personal repre-
sentative will be required to give notice
to interested persons unless they have
waived notice or consented to the pro-
posed action.) The independent admin-
istration authority will be granted unless
an interested person files an objection
to the petition and shows good cause
why the court should not grant the
authority. A HEARING on the petition will
be held on February 28, 2008 at 9:00
a.m. in Dept. 15 of the Superior Court
of California, Santa Clara County, locat-
ed at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA,
95113. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting
of the petition, you should appear at
the hearing and state your objections
or file written objections with the court
before the hearing. Your appearance
may be in person or by your attorney.
IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contin-
gent creditor of the deceased, you
must file your claim with the court and
mail a copy to the personal representa-
tive appointed by the court within four
months from the date of first issuance
of letters as provided in section 9100
of the California Probate Code. The
time for filing claims will not expire
before four months from the hearing
date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE
the file kept by the court. If you are a
person interested in the estate, you
may file with the court a Request for
Special Notice (form DE-154) of the
filing of an inventory and appraisal
of estate assets or of any petition or
account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special
Notice form is available from the court
clerk. Attorney for Petitioner:
/s/ Peter L. Holland
342 Grant Avenue
PO Box 1625,
Palo Alto, CA 94302
(650)328-8750
(PAW Jan. 2, 4, 9, 2008)
Public Notices
(continued from page 20)
Merry Christmas!
Happy Holidays!
and
A Joyous 2008!
JAN STROHECKER
“Experience Counts”
“20+ years of Local Sales”
Direct (650) 906-6516
janstrohecker@yahoo.com
The Palo Alto
Weekly
Marketplace
is on the
INTERNET
at URL
address:
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Page 24 • Wednesday, January 2, 2008 • Palo Alto Weekly
Madeleine Albright
Memo to the President Elect: How We Can Restore
America’s Reputation and Leadership
Thursday, January 24, 12:30 p.m.
It’s our bookstore. Follow me to Kepler’s.
KEPLER’S AUTHOR SHOWCASE
Beth Lisick
HELPING ME HELP MYSELF: One Skeptic, Ten Self-Help Gurus,
and a Year on the Brink of the Comfort Zone
Thursday, January 3, 7:30 p.m.
Bruce Henderson
Down to the Sea: An Epic Story of Naval Disaster and Heroism
in WWII
Wednesday, January 9, 7:30 p.m.
Dr. Fred Luskin
Forgive for Love: The Missing Ingredient for a Healthy and
Lasting Relationship
Tuesday, January 15, 7:30 p.m.
Holding a Grudge is Hazardous to Your Relationship!
Victoria Zackheim (editor), Ellen Sussman,
Elizabeth Rosner, Susan Ito, Deborah Grabien,
Margot Duxler, and Regina Anavy
For Keeps: Women Tell the Truth about Their Bodies, Growing
Older, and Acceptance
Wednesday, January 16, 7:30 p.m.
Eric Weiner
The Geography of Bliss: One Grump’s Search for the Happiest
Places in the World
Thursday, January 17, 7:30 p.m.
Nina Hachigian & Mona Sutphen
The Next American Century: How the U.S. Can Thrive as
Other Powers Rise
Tuesday, January 22, 7:30 p.m.
Tim Harford
The Logic of Life: The Rational Economics of an Irrational World
Monday, January 28, 7:30 p.m.
Michael Shermer
The Mind of the Market: Compassionate Apes, Competitive
Humans and Other Tales from Evolutionary Economics
Tuesday, January 29, 7:30 p.m.
Neil Shubin
Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of
the Human Body
Wednesday, January 30, 7:30 p.m.
From the scientist who made the groundbreaking discovery
of the “fish with hands.
David Rieff
Swimming in a Sea of Death
A son’s memoir to his mother Susan Sontag
Thursday, January 31, 7:30 p.m.
Don’t miss these other exciting
author events!
Famil y St or y Time at Kepl er’s Ever y
Sunday at 11:30 a.m.

Januar y 6t h Cel ebrat e Who You Are St or y Time Do you l ike t o t el l jokes?
Pl ay sport s? I s your favorit e food peanut but t er? No mat t er what it is t hat
makes you you, Kepl er’s want s t o cel ebrat e who you are!
Januar y 13th St or y Time wit h David Cart er Hort on Hears a Who Pop-up
Meet mast er pop-up engineer David Cart er and see Hort on Hears a Who come al ive before your ver y
eyes Then, part icipat e in a Pop-up Workshop t hat wil l give youngst ers some basic ideas t o get t hem
st art ed on making t heir own paper fant asies. (Act ivit y recommended for ages 5 and up.)
Januar y 20th Mart in Lut her King Day Cel ebrat ion wit h special guest s ‘Hey Mom!’ My Brother Martin: A
Sister Remembers Growing Up with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. We wel come back our favorite
l ocal rocking mamma musical group, Hey Mom! I n honor of Martin Luther King, they wil l pl ay a special
themed concert with songs to honor the work of American’s greatest civil rights l eader.
January 27th Outer Space Story Time Kepl er’s Sunday St or y Ti me bl ast s of f i nt o out er space f or an
advent ure of uni versal propor t i ons.
1010 El Camino Real , Menl o Park . 650-324-4321 . www.kepl ers.com
Anthony Horowitz
Snakehead
Wednesday, January 23, 7:00 p.m.
Stop by the store to purchase
the latest action-packed,
intrigue-filled installment in the
adventures of the coolest 14-
year-old on the planet--Alex
Rider in Snakehead. Upon
purchase you will receive a
Disc Pass which, when accessed
on your computer, will contain
your mission assignment. Kepler’s will be turned into
MI6 Headquarters. Additional Disc Passes can be
purchased for $6.00. Each Disc Pass admits TWO.
Special Ticketed Event
Former Secretary of State Madeleine
Albright offers a persuasive, wide–
ranging set of recommendations to
the prospective winner of the 2008
Presidential election. She explains
how to select a first–rate foreign
policy team, how to avoid the pitfalls
that plagued earlier presidents, how to ensure that
decisions, once carefully made, are successfully
implemented, and how to employ the full range of
tools available to a president to persuade other
countries to support U.S. objectives. Member Price
$29.17 (cost of book plus tax)/Non-Member Price
$35. Each ticket admits TWO.
Special Ticketed Event
Sara Pennypacker
The Tal ent ed Cl ement i ne
Thursday, Januar y 10, 6: 00 p. m.
The creator of Clementine, America’s favorite
precocious curly-haired carrot-top, Sara Penny-
packer is stopping by Kepler’s for a special Meet
the Author Event.
Special Family Events!
Editors of THE BARK: Cameron Woo and Claudia
Kawczynska
HOWL: A Collection of the Best Contemporary
Dog Wit
Saturday, January 26, 2:00 p.m.
Bring your canine friends to a DOG PARTY with
free treats and other surprises for dogs and their
companions. Royalties from the sale of HOWL are earmarked for Gulf
Coast humane and animal rescue organizations to assist in their ongoing
post-Katrina recovery and rebuilding efforts.
Kepler’s and the Menlo Park Library Present:
Libba Bray and Shannon Hale
Tuesday, Januar y 22, 7: 00 p. m.
Meet t he mar vel ous and capt i vat i ng Li bba Bray on
t he rel ease of t he t hi rd book i n her epi c t ri l ogy
and t he exqui si t e Shannon Hal e, Newber y-
honored aut hor of The Book of a Thousand Days,
The Pri ncess Academy, and The Goose Gi rl .
Menl o Park Li brar y, 800 Al ma St .
Join or renew your membership to
Kepler's Literary Circle at Keplers.com.