Bank of photocopiable exercises Round 3 consistent with programs 2002 and 2007 Tips and corrected edited by Sophie

Le Callennec Professor of History and Geography Jacques Bartoli certified teacher of history and geography, professor of IUFM Ol ivier Cottet Inspector of National Education Claude Ranaivonasy certified teache r of history and geography Illustrations: Isa Python Credit: (c) Apollo 17 Crew, NASA Thank you to Laura for her coloring © HATIER PARIS 2007 Any representation, translation, adaptation or reproduction, even partial, by an y means, in every country, made without prior permission is illegal and would ex pose the violator to legal prosecution. Ref. : Act of March 11, 1957, paragraphs 2 and 3 of Article 41 • A representation or reproduction without permission of th e publisher of the French Centre d'Exploitation du Droit Copy (20 rue des Grands -Augustins, 75006 Paris) would a counterfeit sanctioned by articles 425 and foll owing of the Penal Code. Foreword The Magellan Collection, which consists of a teacher's guide (Teaching geography in cycle 3) and a manual (Geography cycle 3) is now supplemented by a bank of p hotocopiable exercises. Here is the corrected exercises covering the entire prog ram cycle 3: the exercises are divided into four main themes, themes that corres pond to programs in 2002 and 2007 but also the cutting of the manual. In correct ed, you will find: - red the corrected or adjusted suggestions - green, guidelin es for selecting exercises based on objectives (year of implementation, student assessment, formation of the paper trail ...) , boards of operation to guide stu dents, suggestions for evaluating various possible answers ... Teachers will fin d tips and more detailed information concerning the periods studied in the guide teaching geography in cycle 3 in the Magellan. Sophie Le Callennec Instructions 1. Choose an exercise based program, your division, your objectives (establishme nt of the written record, application, evaluation ...) and depending on the leve l of students. 2. Photocopy the page to keep your exercise bank intact and cut the chosen exerc ise with its title. 3. Put it on a blank page. Allow room for a caption or correction of the year. 4. Complete the page: - customize it: enter the title sequence, number the year, expect the place for students to write their name, date ... - possibly, arrange the documents: draw lines to indicate the driving where students write on the c ards ... - possibly, provide guidance to assist students to work independently: advise students to help their manual, their book cycle, a dictionary, an atlas o f search to the BCD ... 5. Photocopy the assembly and distribute it to students.

6. Some exercises can be the written record: each student cut the result of his work (map, diagram ... arrow) after correction and stick it in his notebook cycl e. Other exercises can stay in a workbook, a goblin or a shirt. 5 Instructions Summary World Watch: spaces organized by human societies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Prerequisite 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 The Earth and its performances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Oceans and continents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 The distribution of men on Earth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Ways of life suited to settlement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Living in big cities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Relief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Modes of life adapted to the terrain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Climate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Modes of life adapted to high temperatures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Modes of life adapted to water resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Vegetation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Lifestyles a dapted to the vegetation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 The inequalities of wealth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 European areas: a diversity of landscapes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 6 What is Europe? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Urban spaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Rural areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 The mountain areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Spaces plain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Maritime spaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 The coastal areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 A continent unequally populated. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 A continent unequally rich. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 A road and rail uneven. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A .70 waterwa ys, sea and air uneven. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 2 Northern Europe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Southern Europe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Western Eu rope. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Central Europe and Eastern Europe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 The European Union. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 The E uropean Union: an economic project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 The European Union: a political project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Centers and peripheries of Europe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94

Summary Showcasing French. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Prerequisite 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 5 4 55 56 The historical landscape is constantly evolving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Urban landscapes .97 housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 The cityscapes of work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102 Landscapes trade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Landscapes of culture and recreation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The .109 downtown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 The periphery of cities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 Peri-urban areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 New towns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122 Agricultural landscapes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125 Forest landscapes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128 Villages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 Landscapes of rural tourism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131 Mountains in winter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The mountain was .133. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136 The Fren ch coasts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137 The coastal tourism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140 Cutting in common. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141 The cutting de partments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144 Cutting into regions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147 Small cities and countries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151 Big cities and their area of influence. .€. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153 T he main lines of communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156 The French rivers, roads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The opening lines of .159 on the world. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161 Communication networks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162 France in the era of globalization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 7 The movement of people. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163 The movement of g oods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165 T he flow of information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167 Companies across the world. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169 The center of the global village. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170 Inequalities in the world. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174 Poverty in the world. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176 Resistance to globalization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177 France, a territory across the world. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179 The economic weight of France in the world. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182 Th e political weight of France in the world. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184 The cultural influence of France in the world. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 Summary 1 World Watch

Spaces organized by human societies PRIOR The Earth and its performances EX C E R IC E THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE EARTH - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 8-9. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Write the name of each of these representations of the Earth: satellite images, globe or world map 1. satellite image 2. planisphere 3. planisphere 4. earth 8 World Watch EX C E R IC E The diagram AND BENCHMARKS CE2 - Exercise of application: see the manual CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 8-9 and atlas map 1. - Constitution of the written record: cut the card fina lized and paste in the contract cycle. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed wi thout documentation). Complete the planisphere. 1. 2. 3. 4. Red returns to the equator. Specifies the North Pole by a blue arrow and write: the North Pole. Specifies the North Pole by a green arrow and write: South Pole. Be in the right place: Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere. North Pole Northern Hemisphere Southern Hemisphere

South Pole EX C E R IC E The diagram AND BENCHMARKS: VOCABULARY - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 8-9. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation).

Match each word in the appropriate definition. poles to the equator a hemisphere • • • • • • axis around which the Earth rotates one of th two halves of the Earth imaginary line equidistant from both poles, which divid es the earth into two equal parts 9 World Watch EX C E R IC E VOCABULARY: THE EARTH AND ITS REPRESENTATIONS - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 8-9 or help of a dictionary. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without d ocumentation). Write the meanings of words. 1. globe: a model of the Earth or a small representation of our planet. 2. a world map: a flat representation of the Earth (students can specify: he can see all parts of the Earth at a time). 3. a satellite image, an image produced by computer, using information collected by satellite and on Earth. EX C E R IC E VOCABULARY: THE EARTH AND ITS MARKS CE2 - Exercise of application: see the manual CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 8-9 or help of a dictionary. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Write the meanings of words.

1. the equator, the imaginary line that divides the Earth into two equal parts and that located at the same distance from each pole 2. the North Pole: the northern end of the earth, through which passes the axis aro und which the Earth. 3. The definition of the tropics is reserved for students in CM2. South Pole: the southern end of the earth, through which passes the axis around which the Earth. 4. 5. hemispheres: the northern half and southern half of the Earth from the equator. the tropics: the two imaginary lines located on both sides of the equator, which along the hot zone of the globe. 10 World Watch SEQUENCE 1 The oceans and continents EX C E R IC E Planisphere OCEANS - Constitution of the written record CE2: cut the CM1 carteCM2 finalized and pas te it in the contract cycle. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without docu mentation). CE2: put the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. CM1 and CM2: place as the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. Complete the planisphere. 1. 2. Red returns to the equator. Colour blue oceans and write their name. In what ocean can you write the name twice because you can see in both parties? Pacific Ocean 3. Give a title card. OCEANS EX

C E R IC E VOCABULARY: THE OCEANS AND SEAS - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 11. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Write the meanings of words. 1. coast: a huge expanse of salt water (Students can add between continents). 2. sea: a salt water medium, which borders a continent. 11 World Watch EX C E R IC E Planisphere CONTINENTAL Constitution of the trace Completes planisphere. CE2 written: cut the CM1 and CM 2 card finalized 1. Red returns to the equator. Paste in the contract cycle. 2. Colour each of the six continents in a different color and write their name. Remember Antarctica! Students write once the name of each continent. 3. Give a t itle card. For America, they can locate the name in North America, South America or in between (Central America). CONTINENTS EX C E R IC E VOCABULARY: THE OCEANS AND CONTINENTS - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 11 or help of a dictionary. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without do cumentation). Write the meanings of words. 1. 2. a continent: a vast expanse of land. an island a tract of land surrounded by the sea or ocean. 12 World Watch

EX C E R IC E AROUND THE WORLD - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 10-11. This exercise helps to understand concretely the roundness of the Eart h: The journey does not stop at the left edge of the world map but continues wit hout interruption, on the right side of the planisphere. Applies the instructions and answer the questions (with a sentence each time) on the first round of the world by Magellan and his crew. 1. Viewing the world map: in what direction Magellan and his crew are gone? Magellan and his crew are headed for the west. 2. 3. Red returns to their journey from Europe to the West. What ocean did they first crossed? They first crossed the Atlantic Ocean. 4. To the south of which continent they get there? They went to South America. 5. 6. Green returns after their return journey to Europe. Appoints, in order, they the n crossed oceans. They crossed the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean and are pressed by the Atlan tic Ocean. THE FIRST ROUND OF THE WORLD BY MAGELLAN AND HIS CREW (1519-1521) 13 World Watch EX C E R IC E THE MAP AND ITS SCALE - Exercise CM1 application: CM2 see manual Magellan Geography 3 per cycle 12-13. Attention level is a fraction: the map represents a more extensive space, more small scale is used. The world map is always map to the smallest scale. Look at these maps and answer the questions but one sentence each time. 1. Surrounded by the red card to the largest scale and the blue to the smallest sca

le. 2. Europe 1. World 3. La France 4. Paris 2. Name two oceans that we see on a map, not on others. Students may nominate any ocean: they are all visible. 3. Name one item visible on the map 4 that is on any other maps? On the map 4, we see Paris and the Seine we see that we can not see on other car ds. 4. Why can not we see on other cards? Paris (or the Seine) is too small on the scale of these maps before it can be (t he) view. 5. Explains the difference between a map and plan: A map represents a larger space, a plan represents a smaller space. 14 World Watch SEQUENCE 2 The distribution of men on Earth EX C E R IC E An uneven CE2 - Exercise of application: see the manual CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 14-15 and map 2 of the atlas. - Constitution of the written record: cut the card finalized and paste in the contract cycle. Complete the planisphere. 1. Colour in red the regions in which populations are most numerous (Do not crayon oceans). 2. Be in red the names of these regions by choosing from the following list:

South Asia, East Asia, Western Europe, North America, South America. 3. Be blue name a few areas where populations are small many, by choosing from the following list: Sahara, Australia, Siberia, Amazonia, Great Northern, Gobi desert, Greenland. 4. 5. Complete legend. Give a title card. THE DISTRIBUTION OF PEOPLE ON EARTH LEGEND Regions where populations are high 15 World Watch EX C E R IC E THE REASONS FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION ExerciceCE2 application: see the manual CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 14 -15. Answer the questions by a sentence each time. 1. Which continent contains half the world population? Asia contains half the world population. 2. What crop helped feed this large population? Rice has fed this large population. 3. What explains that because natural populations are few in polar regions? The extreme cold is not conducive to human life (or to agricultur e, livestock, etc..). 4. History explains why the populations are less numerous in Africa than on other continents? The slave trade to America has cost Africa much of its population. EX C E R IC E

VOCABULARY: THE DISTRIBUTION OF PEOPLE ON EARTH - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 16 or help of a dictionary. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without do cumentation). Write the meanings of words. 1. 2. the population of a country: the citizenry of this country. population density: the number of inhabitants per square kilometer. 16 World Watch EX C E R IC E THE DENSITY OF POPULATION - Exercise of application: Apply the instructions and answer questions. CM1 CM2 see manual Magellan Geography 1. Complete the table with data about your town an d calculates the density of 3 per cycle 16-17. population by dividing the number of inhabitants per area. This exercise is open to students beating the division . Area Population 83,000 inhabitants 210 inhabitants km2 Population density 35 inh abitants per km2 7545 inhab/km2 inhab/km2 - Constitution of the written record: cutting table and the plan finalized and p aste in the contract cycle. Suggest that students place the items in groups of 5 or 10 for counting easier. For students who are familiar with their common plan , propose to allocate the points by neighborhood: more points in populated areas , fewer points in the green, etc.. Leaguers (Dordogne) Créteil (Val-de-Marne) 6 km2 11 km2 2. Is the population of your town by dots on the map: 1 point for every 10 people if your village has fewer than 500 inhabitants 1 poi nt per 100 people if your village or your town has 500-5 000. 1 point for 1 000 inhabitants if your city has 5 000-50 000. 1 point for 10,000 people if your cit y has more than 50,000 inhabitants. 3. Compare population density of your common with that of common Ligueux Creteil and by one or two sentences. NAME OF TOWN: 17

World Watch SEQUENCE 3 Lifestyles adapted to settlement EX C E R IC E LIVING IN AREAS Different people - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 18-19. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Underline in red the words that correspond to daily life in a densely populated area in green and those corresponding to daily life in a sparsely populated area . 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Each person could have a huge garden. We construct buildings higher and higher. Few people who have a personal garden. Farming is practiced, leaving the animals move over large areas. You can walk for hours without seeing houses. There is r oom for all the families have gardens.€We practice the rice, which is labor-intens ive. It must provide parking for cars. Most residents live in detached houses. I t seeks to save space by all means. There is always room to park his car. Most r esidents live in apartment buildings. 10. 11. 12. EX C E R IC E RICE - Exercise of application: see the manual CM2 Magellan Geography 3 per cycle 1819 and complete a personal research. Complete the sentences. 1. Rice cultivation is labor-intensive: in fact, it takes many people for one to one transplant rice seedlings in paddy fields. 2. The rice can feed the teeming population: in fact, rice is very nourRissa and a small plot of rice can feed a large family. 3. The rice is suitable for areas where population density is high. 18 World Watch

EX C E R IC E LIVING IN a densely populated ExerciceCE2 application. CM1 CM2 Read the text and answer the questions but one sentence each time 1. What region of the world speaks the text he? The text speaks of tropical Asia. 2. Changing the index shows that this region is very lowplée? The average density is 170 inhabitants per km2. The area of rice cultivation practice that requires a workforce in plentiful and can sustain a large populat ion. 3. Tropical Asia has an average density of about 170 inhabitants per km2, whereas i n the rest of the world's humid tropical, average densities do not reach 15 inha bitants per km2. This difference is explained by the different modes of use of s pace: the practice of rice in tropical Asia. According to R. Brunet, Universal Geography, Hachette-Reclus, 1990 Emphasizes the two reasons why the regions rice are densely populated. Rice is the traditional farming system that provides the greatest amount of food per hectare, which requires the greatest amount of human labor for the same sur faces. According to R. Brunet, Universal Geography, Belin-Reclus, 1996 EX C E R IC E LIVING IN A sparsely populated area ExerciceCE2 application. CM1 CM2 Read the text and answer the questions but one sentence each time. 1. Which country speaks the text there? This text speaks of Australia. 2.

Changing an index that shows that this country is sparsely populated. In Australia, there are huge farms. or In Australia, remote villages are sometim es hundreds of kilometers. or In Australia, people need to "break their isolatio n." 3. Stresses in blue problems posed by this low stand. 4. Underline in red the solutions found to address these problems. The Australian desert are mainly farmers, leading to vast holdings of several th ousand hectares each operation is separated from neighbors by tens of kilometers , the village or town that provides basic services can be removed several hundre ds of kilometers; private plane plays a critical role in ensuring linkages with the rest of the world, like the radio cuts isolation: Classes for children are p rovided by radio, such as emergency health advice in case of illness or accident . According to R. Brunet, Universal Geography, Hachette-Reclus, 1990 19 World Watch SEQUENCE 4 Living in big cities EX C E R IC E MAJOR WORLD CITIES - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 20-21 and map 2 of the atlas. This exercise is an opportunity to learn how to handle an atlas. CE2: does place a few cities. - Constitution of the written re cord: cut the card finalized and paste in the contract cycle. Complete the planisphere. 1. 2. Colour in red the world's major cities. Write the name of the world's major citi es: New York, Beijing, London, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Buenos Aires, Sao Paulo, Paris, Cal cutta, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Moscow, Jakarta, Cairo, Shanghai. 3. Full caption and gives a title to the card. MAJOR WORLD CITIES LEGEND Great World City

- Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 Magellan Cycle 3 Geography and Map 2 of the atlas. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documenta tion). Answer the questions. 1. Name a major metropolis of America: Los Angeles or Mexico City or New York or São Paulo and Buenos Aires. 2. 3. 4. Name a major city in Europe: London or Paris or Moscow. Name a major city in Afr ica: Cairo.€Name three major cities in Asia: Beijing or Calcutta or Jakarta or Tok yo World Watch Shanghai or Hong Kong. 20 EX C E R IC E VOCABULARY: THE CITIES, THE CITIES - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 21. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Write the meanings of words. 1. 2. metropolis: a city of several million inhabitants. Urban: who report to the city . EX C E R IC E DIFFICULTIES IN DAILY - Pursuit of application: see the manual CM1 CM2 Magellan Geography 3 per cycle 20-21. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). For each of the following statements explains why it is a difficulty for the inh abitants of large cities. 1. The inhabitants of large cities have little room: they must live mostly in buildings or in small apartments. 2. 3. They live in a noisy environment: it's tiring. Factories and offices are located far from residential areas, they must perform travel long distances each day to get to work and go home.

4. The cars are very likely to move: it makes noise, it pollutes, would ariseno traffic jams ... 21 World Watch EX C E R IC E THE LIVING CITY - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 20-21. Surrounded crayon or situations that can be found in major cities. 1. congestion 2. vast fields 3. Transit 4. problems of air pollution 5. neighborhood of tall buildings 6. of livestock in the meadows 7. one store 8. hospitals 22 World Watch SEQUENCE 5

Relief EX C E R IC E VOCABULARY: THE RELIEF CE2 - Exercise of application: see the manual CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 22-23. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Write the meanings of words. 1. 2. Terrain: all the bumps and hollows that form the surface of the Earth. a mountai n: a landform located more than 600 m and characterized by a steep incline. 3. a valley: an area elongated, hollow, often between two mountains, beneath which flowing river. 4. 5. plain: a flat surface; low altitude. a tray: a flat or slightly wavy, altitude v ariable, where rivers flow by digging valleys. EX C E R IC E FORMS OF RELIEF - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 22-23. Explain in a few sentences the difference between a plate and a plain. The main difference is that the streams cut valleys in the uplands, so they flow without digging valleys in the plains. Students can add: The valleys are low al titude, whereas the trays can be a higher altitude. 23 World Watch EX C E R IC E FORMS OF RELIEF - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 22-23. - Constitution of the written record: cut and paste the drawings in th e contract cycle.

Be the legend corresponding to each form of relief: mountain, valley, hill, plain, plateau, mountain range 1. plain 2. mountain 3. hill 4. plateau 5. valley World Watch 6. mountain range 24 EX C E R IC E THE RELIEF OF THE PLANET - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 22-23 and Map 3 of the atlas. - Constitution of the written record: cut the c ard finalized and paste in the contract cycle. Complete the planisphere. 1. 2. Colour brown areas of high mountains. Write the name of the high mountain areas: Alps, Himalayas, Ethiopia, the Andes, Rocky Mountains, Atlas 3. Write the name of the main peaks: Everest, Aconcagua, Kilimanjaro. 4. Colour in yellow the low mountain areas, plains and plateaus (Excluding Greenland and Antarctica, covered by ice year-round). 5. 6. List the areas left blank. Full caption and gives a title to the card.

THE RELIEF OF THE PLANET LEGEND High Mountain Summit Medium mountains, plateaus and plains 25 World Watch EX C E R IC E ALTITUDE Exercise can be the trace CE2 CM1 written: CM2élèves complement the coloring and dra wing and paste it into their notebooks cycle. See manual Magellan Geography 3 pe r cycle 23. Applies the instructions and answer questions in sentences each time. 1. Give the definition of the altitude: the height of a point measured from the lev el sea 2. Complete the picture with: sea, mountain, plateau, plains, uplands. mountain uplands 3000 2500 2000 1500 1,000,500 0 plateau plain sea 3. In the calculation of the altitude, which element is 0 and the altitude is a sig npost? The sea is at altitude 0, and serves as a benchmark. 4. The plain is she at an altitude above or below 500 m? The plain lies at an altitude below 500 m. 5. All mountains are they good at altitudes above 1600 m?

Some mountains are at elevations below 1600 m. All the mountains or are at an al titude above 600 m and 1600 m not The highlands or are at an altitude below 1600 m. 6. At what altitude is the highest peak on this drawing? It is about 2800 m. (Mont Blanc, France, is 2807 meters) 26 World Watch SEQUENCE 6 Lifestyles adapted to the terrain EX C E R IC E LIVING IN THE PLAINS, LIVING IN THE MOUNTAINS - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 26-27. Green emphasizes the sentences that correspond to life in the plains. Underline in red the words that correspond to life in the mountains. If some phrases are v alid for both modes of life, the stresses of the two colors. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Companies there are large flat areas and available, and a land rich. In rich cou ntries, we are equipped for winter sports resorts. It has built bridges and dug tunnels to facilitate transport. The soils are poor and hilly. Farmers adjust te rraces for farming there. Farmers settled here to be safe from flooding. At high altitudes, oxygen is scarce and very low temperatures. Populations were located along rivers that serve as communication routes. They raise animals in pastures . The flat terrain favors the construction of many roads. 10. SEQUENCE 7 Climate EX C E R IC E THE STUDY OF CLIMATE - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 28-29. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Outlines the components of the climate 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. temperatures in the day the distribution of plants abundant rainfall force winds the length of the full moon the hours of sunshine temperatures overnight rainfa ll distribution over the year the wind direction 27

World Watch EX C E R IC E VOCABULARY: THE CLIMATE - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 28-30. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Write the meanings of words. 1. climate: the type of weather at a given location. It is characterized by tempera temperatures, precipitation, wind, sunshine duration ... 2. 3. Precipitation: water that falls from the sky (rain, snow, hail ...). Weather: se rvice which announces the time it will do (by extension, the time or is he going to do). 4. tempered neither very cold nor very hot. EX C E R IC E THE STUDY OF CLIMATE CE2 - Exercise of application: see the manual CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p.28-29. Explains what A desert is a rare or that s are covered EX C E R IC E THE STUDY OF CLIMATE - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 28-29 and Map 4 of the atlas. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Match each region to the appropriate sentence. near the equator near the poles • • • in the deserts in the temperate zones • • it hardly ever rains • winters and summers are relatively mild • temperatures are high through out the year • it is cold all the year a sentence being a desert. place where it rains very little. Students can add: The plants are there is sand or pebbles. For good students, so clear: Some desert with ice, as in Antarctica.

28 World Watch EX C E R IC E CLIMATE ZONES - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 28-29 and Map 4 of the atlas. - Constitution of the written record: cut the c ard finalized and paste in the contract cycle. Complete the planisphere. 1. 2. Red returns to the equator.€Crayon blue regions located in cold areas (do crayon not continents) and write a few names: Antarctica, Greenland. 3. Colour orange regions are in the hot zone and wrote some Name: Amazonia, Central Africa, India. 4. Colour green areas located in the temperate zones and wrote some Names: North America, Europe, China. 5. 6. 7. Be in red the name of deserts: Sahara, Arabian, Gobi, Australia. Complete legend . Give a title card. CLIMATE ZONES OF THE WORLD LEGEND Cold areas Hot Zone Temperate 29 World Watch EX C E R IC E THE WEATHER: THE MEASURING INSTRUMENTS - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 30-31. - Constitution of the written record: cut and paste the drawings in th

e contract cycle. This exercise can lead to a search in encyclopedias or on the Internet, as part of the preparation of B2i. Write the name of each of these meteorological instruments: rain gauge, thermometer, anemometer, barometer. Then explains in a sentence or two what is each of them. 1. gauge: it is used to measure precipitation (the amount of rain in one day in a week ...). thermometer is used to measure temperature (at a time of day at different times) . 2. 3. anemometer: it is used to measure wind speed. 4. barometer is used to measure atmospheric pressure (the weight of the air "), thus predicting the evolution of time. 30 World Watch EX C E R IC E THE WEATHER: THE TIME IT DOES The renewal of CE2 this exercise several days allows pluCM1 CM2 identify pattern s related to a season. The renewal of this exercise over the year helps to ident ify the characteristics of the seasons. Look at the weather today and answer the questions but one sentence each time. 1. What was the temperature this morning? 2. What is the temperature this afternoon? 3. The weather is dry it is there rainfall? 4. In what form this precipitation are they (rain, snow, hail ...)? 5. This precipitation, if any, are they plentiful? 6.

Y does it wind? 7. If any, he whispered sharply? 8. If there is, what direction he whispers 9. How is heaven? 10. Note today's date: 11. What season are we? 31 World Watch SEQUENCE 8 Lifestyles adapted to temperatures EX C E R IC E LIVING WITH THE HEAT, LIVING WITH THE COLD - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 32-33. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Underline in red the words that correspond to life in hot zone. Emphasizes the s entences in blue correspond to life in cold area. If some phrases are valid for both modes of life, the stresses of the two colors. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. The temperatures are favorable for plant growth. People move with snowmobiles an d sleds. The people grow rice, cassava, cocoa, tropical fruits ... Traditionally , people hunting for seals and bears. Traditionally, people make homes in skins. The temperatures are not conducive to plant growth. People are making thatched roofs. People working from early morning stop at midday. People wear clothes of wool. People eat meat and oily fish. Noted: the sentence 9 can also be underlined in red because some populations of the desert wear wool clothing for the insulating nature. 9. 10. EX

C E R IC E LIFE IN COLD HIGH This exercise gives rise to a search CE2 CM1 CM2 encyclopedias or the Internet, as part of the preparation of B2i. Do some research and explains what an igloo and how it is constructed. An igloo is a temporary shelter constructed from blocks of snow or ice. To build it, they tend to collect snow to harden it by block-shaped brick or cinder bloc k, then stacks them to form the walls forming a dome, and leaving an entrance on one side. 32 World Watch EX C E R IC E LIVING WITH THE HEAT, LIVING WITH THE COLD - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 32-33. - Constitution of the written record: cut and paste the drawings in th e contract cycle. Full captions indicating what people are doing to adapt to the climate. 1. When traveling€Inuit protect themselves from 2. To move, Lapps use cold building igloos. Specify that it is not housing but temporary shelters. sledges pulled by reindeer or snowmobile. 3. To move to the cities in winter 4. Since cultures are not Canadian, we cleared the snow with snow plow. possible, the Nenets living from farming. 5. To protect themselves from heat, 6.

In tropical Asia, are cultivated plants Africans build mud houses with thatched roofs. adapted to the heat. 33 World Watch SEQUENCE 9 Lifestyles adapted to water resources EX C E R IC E LIVING WITH WATER IN ABUNDANCE OR LOW WATER - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 34-35. Mirroring each sentence in the right place in the table below. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. People build their houses on stilts. People gather around the few wells. It has built plants can desalinate sea water were constructed huge dams to retain water and prevent flooding. The houses have sloping roofs. People put in place system s to irrigate fields. It collects rainwater for watering gardens. It grows mainl y rice. The houses have flat roofs. Regions where water is plentiful Regions where water is scarce 1. People build their houses on stilts. 2. People cluster near the few wells. 3. It has built factories capable desalinate seawater 4. They built huge dams to retain water and prevent flooding. 5. The houses have sloping roofs.

6. People put in place irrigation fields. 7. It collects rainwater for watering gardens. 8. It grows mainly rice. 9. The houses have flat roofs. 34 World Watch EX C E R IC E RESPOND TO WATER RESOURCES CE2 - Exercise of application: see the manual CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 34-35. - Constitution of the written record: cut and paste the drawings in t he contract cycle. Under each of these developments, explains what it is. 1. a house on stilts: 2. desalination of seawater prevent flooding (and wildlife). produce fresh water in the deserts bordering the sea 3. Well: 4. a tank recovery of rain: find drinking water in the basement. recover rainwater for use when needed. 5.

dams on the river: 6. an irrigation system: prevent flooding or conserve water for crops. 35 World Watch irrigate crops in areas that lack water. EX C E R IC E RESPOND TO WATER RESOURCES - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 34-35. Read the text and answer in sentences. This summer, the Huai River has reached 1. In which country did these events take place? 26 m, exceeding a foot the previous record in 1991. 750,000 soldiers and civilia ns were mobilized to stack sandbags to limit These events took place in China. The text gives a clue when he mentions: "The C hinese authorities. 2. When were they held? The events took place in July 2003. And not in 1991 as a superficial reading may believe. The indices are: "This summer" and the date of the article in the sour ce. 3. the flooding of the river to its mouth. The Chinese authorities have played a ho le How responsible is called the River 1500 m in a large dam to relieve the main river. This has forced nearly 400,000 people in vilthese floods? The river is called the Huai. 4. What are the consequences of these floods? The floods have forced people to leave their homes, others are blocked because t hey are surrounded by water. The floods have damaged homes and caused their coll apse. 5.

lages and intentionally flooded from their homes. All along the river, nearly 1. 2 million persons in the uplands are surrounded by What steps are taken to limit these conconsequences? People have stacked sandbags to limit the river overflows. Others have made a hole in a dam to relieve the river course. Finally, it was temporari ly moved many people to the shelter.€The army blocked supply people with water waters. The army provides them daily food and essential commodities by sea. More than 32,000 houses collapsed while 120,000 were damaged. According to Nguyen Hong, Libération, July 9, 2003 36 World Watch SEQUENCE 10 Vegetation EX C E R IC E VOCABULARY: THE VEGETATION - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 36-37. - Constitution of the written record: cut and paste the drawings in th e contract cycle. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Be under each picture type of natural vegetation that is: boreal forest, savanna, steppe, rain forest, desert, temperate forest. 1. rainforest 2. desert 3. steppe 4. temperate forest 5. boreal 6. savannah 37

World Watch EX C E R IC E AREAS OF VEGETATION - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 36-37 and Map 5 of the atlas. - Constitution of the written record: cut the c ard finalized and paste in the contract cycle. Complete the planisphere. 1. Colour: - Dark green vegetation of the tropics: tropical forest, savannah and rainforest - the light green vegetation in temperate grassland and temperate forest - in o range, the steppe - in yellow, hot deserts - purple forest Cold - pink areas wit h low vegetation cold tundra and frozen desert - brown, vegetation poor highland 2. Be a few names: Antarctica, the Sahara, Greenland, Congo, Amazon, Australia, Siberia, the Gobi, Indonesia, India, China. 3. Full caption and gives a title to the card. AREAS OF VEGETATION LEGEND Plants of the tropics: tropical forest, savanna and rainforest vegetation of tem perate regions and temperate forest steppe grassland Desert Hot Cold Forest Vege tation poor areas cold tundra and frozen desert vegetation poor highland 38 World Watch SEQUENCE 11 Lifestyles adapted to vegetation EX C E R IC E LIVING IN THE PRAIRIE, THE SAVANNAH, THE STEPPE, THE FOREST ... - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 38-39. - Research Work in an encyclopedia or the Internet as part of the prep aration B2i. Be one end each sentence. 1. Everywhere in the world, companies use plants available for build their homes: for example, some companies (in Africa, but also in Normandy)

constructed thatched roofs because they protect effectively the heat (in Africa ) and rain (in Normandy). 2. Worldwide, the massive clearing of forests poses problems: it destroys the forest that is the "lung" of the world, because plants convert carbon dioxide in to oxygen. SEQUENCE 12 Inequalities of wealth EX C E R IC E COUNTRY RICH, POOR COUNTRIES - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 40-41. - Assessment Exercise (to be completed without documentation). Among the following sentences, underline in red correspond to those living in ri ch countries. Stresses in blue correspond to those living in poor countries. War ning: some sentences are valid for rich countries and poor countries: the stress es of the two colors. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. The fertile fields produce quantities of cereals, fruits and vegetables. The pla nts are rare and occur shortly. The residents spend part of their leisure time. There is much in schools, hospitals and transport. Many children do not attend s chool but work for a wage report. Everybody does not eat his fill. Most resident s lead a hard life and are poor. The inequalities are significant between the ri chest and poorest. 39 World Watch EX C E R IC E INEQUALITY OF WEALTH IN THE WORLD - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 40-41 and map 6 of the atlas. - Constitution of the written record: cut the c ard finalized and paste in the contract cycle. Complete the planisphere. 1. Colour in red the richest regions: United States & Canada, Western Europe, Japan, Australia and New Zealand, and write their name. 2. Colour orange growing regions: Mexico, Brazil and Argentina, Africa

South, North Africa, Russia, Saudi and some regions of the Far East, and write t heir name. 3. Colour in yellow the poorest regions: the rest of Latin America, most part of Africa and Asia. Attention leave blank the two regions which are not or very sparsely populated: Greenland and Antarctica. 4. Full caption and gives a title to the card. INEQUALITY OF WEALTH IN THE WORLD LEGEND Region rich region growing region poor 40 World Watch EX C E R IC E LIVING IN A POOR COUNTRY - Pursuit of application: see the manual CE2 CM1 CM2 geography Magellan Cycle 3 p. 40-41. Read the text and answer the questions but one sentence each time. 1. Alex In what country does he live? Alex lives in Brazil. 2. At what age does it start working? He began working at age 7 years. 3. What small business has he used? He washed cars and sold candy 4. Why does he returned home in the evening more? He did not return home more at night because he works away from home and means o f transport are inadequate. 5. Alex was born in a slum in Brazil. At age 7, he left school to clean the cars in the street. In the evening he came home and handed to his mother as well earned . At age 9, he went to sell candy in the center of the city. The distance and tr ansport difficulties have often prevented from returning home and began living o

n the street. According to the Letter of the International Federation of the League of Human R ights, May 1995. Where does he sleep? He sleeps in the street. 6. Imagine what he will become. It could become a homeless person, a bum. It will not make good business because it has not been to school. It may fall sick, get hit by large, crushed by a car , etc.. 41 World Watch EX C E R IC E SOME GREAT WORLD OF STATES The ficheCE2 can be filled CM1guise of CM2 synthesis chapter or subject to a sea rch during each sequence on the theme. Constitution of the written record: cut t he sheet and paste it into the contract cycle. Students may give a figure of pop ulation density but also describe the distribution of the population. Do research and complete the form on a state of the world. State Name: Capital: Current Head of State or Government: Flag Continent on which it stands: Oceans and seas that border: Population Distribution: Terrain: Climate: Natural vegetation: Level of wealth: Major cities: Other information: 42 World Watch EX C E R IC E

SOME MAJOR CITIES OF THE WORLD The ficheCE2 can be filled CM1guise of CM2 synthesis chapter or subject to a sea rch during each sequence on the theme. Constitution of the written record: cut t he sheet and paste it into the contract cycle. Do research and complete the form on a large city in the world. Name this city: state in which it is located: Current Mayor: Continent on which it is located: Oceans and seas that surround it: Coat Population: Level of wealth: Main advantages: Main difficulties: Terrain: Climate: Natural vegetation of the region: Other information: 43 World Watch