Initiation The DPRG fee survey is conducted regularly since 1997 by the German Public Relat ions Association

. The aim of the study is to determine a current fee and salary levels for the PR industry. In 2005, the survey was completed by current issues, in addition to identify developments and trends in the PR industry and cover. I n this context, the survey was renamed DPRG fee and trend barometer. Interviewed members of PR agencies (DPRG members Division 4 "PR Consulting"), as well as co mpany employees who work in PR departments (DPRG members of a category "business enterprises" and 2 "service" were). To place the study on a broader basis and t o obtain more reliable results, were also included public relations agencies in the brand manual with the survey who are not members of the DPRG. Through a data base search, and personalized surveys ensured that each agency could participate only once in the poll. Distortion of results by duplications were avoided in th is way. A total of 1125 members of PR agencies as well as 456 members from busin ess to this online survey in December 2007 were invited by e-mail. It was after 12-day field time 179 complete interviews from the agency division as well as 30 interviews of the two business segments are generated. Due to the low response rate in the two lines of business in the following only the responses of the mem bers of PR agencies are represented quantified. As in past years, the DPRG has b een carried out fees and Trend Barometer 2007 by the independent market research SKOPOS. 1st PR tools 1.1 Distribution of fee revenues over PR-instruments The agencies surveyed in 20 07 ordered their fee income generated nine different PR tools (see Figure 1). Am ong the PR-instruments dominated even more than in recent years, the traditional media work, with a share of 43% on fee income. Relatively important areas still have the "Strategic Consulting, Kon1 concepts, analysis "by 19% and" Publications ", with a share of 13% on fee incom e. Together, these three instruments combine three quarters of the fee revenue 2 007th followed by smaller shares in the fee income etc. the PR tools "Online / I nteractive" (8%), "Events, Events" (7%), "Seminars, training (4%). Chart 1: Distribution of fee revenues over PR tools Strategic media relations consulting, concepts, analysis, publications Online / Interactive Events, events seminars, training activities Advertising Sponsorship Other © 43% 37% 39% 19% 19% 19% 13% 18% 17% 8% 5% 6% 7% 8% 9% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 4% 1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 2% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 2007 2004 2003 (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179/182/164) 2.1 PR instruments compared 2007/2006 falls at the changes compared to last year especially the growing importance (+69%) of "Online / Interactive" in the eye ( see Figure 2). Compared to the other instruments, the level of 8% is still relat ively low, but can the largest increase in significance in comparison to last ye ar are observed. The changes in the proportions of other PR tools are also in th is year's numerically so small that they may have had already concluded by a few statistical outliers and are therefore difficult to interpret and only with due caution. 2 Figure 2: PR instruments in comparison 2007/2006 16% 0% 26% 69% -14% 7% 36% -28% -29% -40% -20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80%

Strategic media relations consulting, concepts, analysis, publications Online / Interactive Events, events seminars, training activities Advertising Sponsorship Other © (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179/182) 2nd Fee income on PR-Markets / Industries 2.1 Distribution of the fee on PR-Markets / Industries The second assignment des cribes the distribution of fee revenues over PRMärkte and industries. "Computer industry, telecommunications is" with a share of 17% of total fee income in rece nt years as the most important market (see Chart 3). Followed by "pharmaceutical , chemical" with 10%, "Financial Services" with 9% and the Transport, Tourism, A rts "with 8%. 3 Chart 3: Distribution of fee revenues over PR-Markets / Industries Computer industry, telecommunications, pharmaceuticals, financial services chemi stry transport, tourism, leisure, consumer goods supply and food and beverage pl ant and machine government, states, municipalities, energy policy, oil, environm ent construction and furnishing industry media conglomerates Automobil-/Zuliefer erindustrie retail or mail order Electrical Industry Others © 15% 10% 9% 9% 10% 8% 8 3%% 5% 5% 4% 5% 4% 4% 6% 4% 3% 4% 5% 3% 4% 3% 5% 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 2% 17% 2007 2004 16% 16% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179/182) 2.2 Change of PR-markets / industries in comparison 2007/2006 falls at the chang es to last year especially the heavily growing importance of supply and consumer goods industry in the eye, in which the relative share of sales could be double d (see chart 4). However, even here - as well as with the PR-instruments for asc ertaining numerical - that the changes in the other PR-markets this year are num erically so small again, that they might have already come through a few statist ical outliers about and are therefore difficult or to be interpreted with due ca ution. 4 Chart 4: Changes in the PR-markets / industries in comparison 2007/2006 Computer industry, telecommunications, pharmaceuticals, financial services chemi stry transport, tourism, leisure, consumer goods supply and food and beverage pl ant and machinery federal, state, local, politics -34% energy, petroleum, enviro nmental construction and furnishing industry media Automobil-/Zuliefererindustri e -32 % retail and mail order conglomerates 41% -18% -26% -12% 49% 26% 13% 2% 5% 3% 109% 14% Electrical Industry -33% Others © (base: all respondents agencies, n = 179/182) -40% 1% 0% 40% 80% 120% 3rd Fee revenues over PR tasks For the first time this year, a distribution of revenues was queried on PRAufgab enbereiche (see Chart 5). Foremost among these is product-PR (35%), followed by

the traditional media relations. These two areas account for 60% of the total fe es of the surveyed agencies. By far follow Corporate Identity (9%), Human Relati ons (7%) and other tasks that join each less than 5% up. 5 Chart 5: Distribution of fee revenues over public relations tasks Product Publicity / Product PR Media Relations Corporate Identity Human Relation s Issues Management Public Affairs Community Relations Crisis Management Financi al / Investor Relations Other eco Relations © 35% 25% 9% 7% 5% 4% 4% 4% 3% 2007 1% 3% 10% 20% 30% 40% 0% (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179) 4th Changes in the fee situation To view the fee situation in Chapter 4 distinguishes between PR Consultants / lo cal agencies (1-4 permanent employees) and middle / large agencies (5 or more re gular employees). In Chapter 5, a finer differentiation takes place in four agen cy categories. 4.1 Fee rates for PR consultancies and service / services, the fee rates on an h ourly basis for the different services have developed over the previous year dep ending on the agency size differently. For the small agencies / PR consultants i s: The fee rates are in almost all PR consultancies and service / services compa red to 2004 decreased on average by about 4% (see Chart 6). This is most apparen t for the chief advisory (-13%) and the texts (-11%). The average hourly rate fo r a PR consultancy boss in small agencies and PR consultants is now at 111 . Th is decline in fee rates could be observed already in 2004, 2003, the hourly rate stood at 129. An increase was seen only in the areas of Secretariat (+10%) an d documentaries (+4%). 6 In the Middle / large agencies an opposite development is observed (see chart 7) : Here, the fee rates on an hourly basis since 2004 by an average of 20% have in creased, most notably in the fields of "text" (+25%) and organization (+27 %). T he relatively low growth recorded in the areas of documentation (+14%) and PR ad vice (15%). In the area of fee rates on an hourly basis shows, therefore, a wide ning gap between large and small agencies. The big agencies can increase their h ourly rates, while the hourly rates of decline rather small agencies. Chart 6: Payment rates for PR consulting and service / services Hourly rates of PR Consultants / Small PR Agency chief consulting PR consultancy Text Graphics Evaluation / success * Online / Multimedia Organisation PR-Junior Advisory Secretariat documentation © (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179/182/164) * first collection in 2004 0 87 93 99 87 97 84 76 80 77 75 77 73 76 77 71 72 73 67 72 81 56 54 57 56 50 56 50 100 111 128 129

2007 2004 2003 150 7 Chart 7: Payment rates for consultants and services / Services Hourly rates of Medium / Large Agencies PR chief consulting PR consultancy Text Online Graphics / Multimedia-Junior PR consultancy evaluation / performance meas urement organization Secretariat documentation © (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179/182/164) * first collection in 2004 206 178 172 146 127 122 135 108 106 118 99 98 117 93 98 95 114 110 2007 91 2004 92 2003 108 85 89 78 64 62 7 8 69 61 50 100 150 200 250 0 2.4 Fees for services pauschalisierungsfähige The determination of the fee situa tion for pauschalisierungsfähige benefits are based on specific definitions of c ertain benefits. These are listed here to better understand the results again. T he creation of a mini concept includes therefore (at least) the benefits briefin g, analysis (short), sketch, plan of action (short), concept development plan an d budget. A "medium-sized design is similar to the services of a small design, t he analysis and action plan will be offered more detailed and comprehensive. In addition to these services and create these agencies with a mean conception is u sually a presentation of the concept (other services, however, possible or proba ble). A "grand design" is different in comparison to a middle approach, essentia lly only to the extent of the individual services. In addition, a major concept in general research activities and the creation of a timetable. An exact differe ntiation between a small, medium and large design is extremely difficult because the scope of services is offered by the respective customer / project and the o ther by the agency depending on the size of one and sometimes highly differentia ted. 8 The organization of a press conference (regional and national) through a PRAgent ur includes by definition usually following services: creating and sending invit ations (regional / national), create a distribution list, content and thematic d esign of the press conference, organizing and hosting the conference, advice and Customer support, writing lyrics and creating a press kit. At a press conferenc e the national agencies usually offer an additional follow-up (comprising at lea st from the compilation of media coverage) to. The "continuous advice and suppor t" was defined on the advisory services (on site, by telephone) to recommend mea sures, copywriting and public relations. This is the spectrum of services provid ed varies greatly and depends on the client or the agency. This may also include the following (among others): contacts for customers, design Creation, market m onitoring, media analysis, analysis and target-state, creating a results report, distribution structure and maintenance, detailed documentation. When interpreti ng the results is to note, therefore, that the continuous support covers a wide range of services as a very different agency for a small agency. This is reflect ed, of course also reflected in the average fee rates. Unlike the fee rates on an hourly basis is found in the fee rates for services a t the pauschalisierungsfähige PR Consultants / local agencies an average growth of 9%. The average fee rate for a great design now stands at around 6,500 euros - to the 2004 level could be reached again (see chart 9). In particular, the all owances are increased significantly for medium design (+18%) and for a local pre ss conference (+15%). there is stagnation or a decline in fee rates are only ava ilable at the national press conferences, and the minimum monthly salary for con tinuous support.

9 Chart 8: Payment rates for services pauschalisierungsfähige PR Consultants / Small Agencies Great concept 6547 5904 6447 5622 5876 6414 4308 3970 4192 3801 245 3557 3096 3543 1935 1726 1642 1426 1407 1573 0 2000 4000 2007 2004 2003 Nationwide Press Conference Continuous care maximum Mean conception Local / regional press Small Concept Continuous support minimal © (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179/182/164) 6,000 8,000 As might be expected, the average fee rates are with the medium / large agencies much higher than in the PR Consultants / local agencies (Chart 9). Within the p ower spectrum of the medium / large agencies can be seen in 2007, different tren ds.€Particularly in the performance, "Continuous care than" a large increase is observed (+28%). This large increase in the maximum amount may be even by a few statistical outliers concluded, and therefore should not be over-interpreted. In contrast, stagnating fee rates for press conferences or the "minimal ongoing su pport." Prices for large and medium-sized concepts have even gone back since 200 5 (both 14%). 10 Chart 9: Fee rates for services pauschalisierungsfähige Medium / Large Agencies 13,952 Continuous care maximum 8,007 10 885 9429 9647 9820 8454 9772 9278 5103 5217 4903 2307 2207 1823 2233 2609 2665 5,000 10,000 15,000 2007 2004 2003 Nationwide Press Conference Great concept Local / regional press Mean conception 4976 5141 4480

3233

3

Continuous support minimal Small Concept © (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179/182/164) 0 5th Comparison of the fee situation, the number of permanent staff To describe the trends of individual agency segments better, the different agenc ies were subjected to an even finer subgroup analysis: 1st "Independent PR consultants" without permanent employees 2 "Small agencies' third with 2-5 permanent staff "Middle Managers' fourth with 60-20 permanent emp loyees "Larger agencies" and "large agencies with more than 20 permanent employe es Basically, as in previous years, the larger the agency, the higher their es for all services. It is however acknowledged that the number of cases the large agencies with more than 20 employees this year is very low (n nd the results therefore are subject to the risk of random fluctuations. eless, the results indicate the co11 connection with the other agencies a good overview of the fee structure of PR ag encies. 1.5 Fee rates for PR consultancies, the fee rates on an hourly basis point and i n particular in the consultation area large differences between large and small agencies. Thus, the hourly rates vary for a PR chief advisory from 101 with th e PR consultants and 263 in the agencies with over 20 employees (Chart 10). Th us the difference between small and large agencies in the PR chief consulting wi th 162 is even greater than in 2005 (108 ). These differences between agencie s of different staffing levels are low, however, the lower guidance is located. There is in the public relations consultancy, a difference of 63 and in the PR -Junior Consulting, a difference of 52 per hour. The crucial step in the hourl y rate for each agency size difference is found between the agencies with 2-5 em ployees and the agencies with 60-20 employees. Each large or small agencies are closer together. 2.5 Fee rates for other public relations services, the described differences bet ween large and small agencies are continued in other public relations services. Large differences are observed particularly in the areas of text (58 ), Online / Multimedia (50 ) and graphics (50 ). Slightly smaller the differences of the fee rates are on an hourly basis between the agencies in the areas of "organiza tion" (44 ), evaluation / performance measurement (41 off). The smallest diff erences, "the Secretariat" and "documentation" on (both 26 ), said here to find out the high hourly rates in the agencies with 60-20 employees are. 12 Figure 10: Payment rates for PR consulting and service / services Hourly rates by number of employees PR chief consulting PR consultancy Text Onli ne Graphics / Multimedia Evaluation / Organisation PR success-Junior Advisory Se cretariat documentation © (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179) 0 40 76 101 125 201 263 98 fee rat is down = 12) a Neverth

152 82 114 56 200 240 280

139 93 111 57 82 71

140 81 110 72

133 68 108 57

121 76

119 74

118 73 66

119 76 67 74

120 101 57 83

1 al. 2-5 In. 60-20 In. With more than 20. 69 80 120 160

5.3 Fees for services pauschalisierungsfähige For services pauschalisierungsfähigen show - as in previous years - the largest fee differences between the agency groups. The biggest difference in the perform ance of "Continuous care than with a difference of 13,056. I.e.€large companie s with over 20 employees, the charge for this service 3.2 times the rate of the agencies with only one employee ( 4,068 compared to 17 125, see chart 11). Ag ain, the biggest difference in the fees again between agencies with 2-5 employee s on the one hand and agencies with more than 6 people on the other side. In add ition to continuous care, the fee rates vary widely for a national press confere nce: Here, take the big agencies is 1.5 times the PRConsultants. In assessing th ese differences should also be taken that large agencies often serve large compa nies, thus the support effort is considerably greater than for example for a sma ll agency that manages a medium-sized enterprises. Say, hide behind the differen ces in pairs of different services. 13 Figure 11: Payment rates for services pauschalisierungsfähige By number of employees up Continuous care 4,069 4,634 14,548 17,125 4,689 5,956 9,112 11,934 6612 6456 8321 9886 3627 3680 4692 6736 4267 3453 4397 5368 1420 1464 1993 3995 1972 1870 2133 2818 5000 10,000 Nationwide Press Conference Great concept Local / regional press Mean conception 1 al. 2-5 In. 60-20 In. With more than 20. Continuous support minimal Small Concept © (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179) 0 15,000 20,000

6th Staff numbers and structures Figure 12 shows the average of total employees in 2007, broken down by agency si ze. This too shows that the year 2007 was especially successful in the large and medium-sized agencies. The two agency groups have increased their number of emp loyees in 2007 significantly. Thus the number of salaried employees in medium ag encies rose by 18% and in the large agencies by 13%. For small agencies, the ave rage number of permanent employees decreased slightly by 4%. Similar development s took place also in the Number of Employees: The number of freelancers in 2007 rose slightly in the large and medium-sized agencies, while it decreased slightl y in the small agencies. 14 Graph 12: Staff structure and staff development in 2007 2.9 Freelancers Freelancers for 31/12/2007 to 12/31/2007 at 1:01:07 Permanent employ ees Permanent employees to 01:01:07 Small Agency (2-5 employees) 3.0 3.3 3.4 6.0 Medium Agency (6-20 employees) 5.1 12.1 10.3 5.3 Large Agency (More than 20 employees) 3.6 61.1 54.2 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 © (Base: All respondents agencies, n = 179) 7th Turnover and employee development Even more clearly than in previous years, noted this year the majority of agenci es surveyed a positive sales trend. Shall rectify two thirds (2005: 51%) of the agencies of a sales increase of 25% on average (see chart 13). Only 10% of firms report a decline in sales for the previous calendar year. This value is compare d to the peak values measured in previous years (2005: 19%, 2003: 27%). Look bac k in a positive as well as the forecast for the coming year: 71% of businesses e xpect an increase in sales, 51% with increasing staff numbers in the respective companies. These values are compared to the previous waves of extremely positive . In comparison, only 4% of agencies expect declining sales figures and declinin g staff numbers and 1%. Broken down by the four agency groups (defined in Chapte r 5) are the following differences in the sales expectations to recognize: the l owest expectations of self-PR consultants, who also expect a majority (57%) with increasing sales, but still below the value of 2005 (62%). Positive are the exp ectations of small and medium-sized agencies Agencies: Here expect 74% (2005: 76 %) or 73% (2005: 68%) increased 15 Transactions. The most optimistic in the future, the large agencies look with mo re than 20 employees, more expected 91% (2005: 75%) increase in turnover. Simila r to the revenue expectations is assessed and the future of employees from large agencies more positive than from the small agencies. Sun 75% of large agencies predict an increase in staff numbers, while this is only at 52% of small agencie s in the case.

Chart 13: Sales and Staff Development Sales in 2007 compared to 2006 rose fallen unchanged 10% 23% 67% ... about 25% in ∅ ... about 24% in ∅ Sales development in 2008 will be more likely to rise will not change back more 4% 25% 71% Development in 2008 number of fixed staff will be more likely to rise is not going to change rather go back © Base: n = 17 9 1% 51% 49% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 8th Trends in the PR industry 1.8 Performance-based compensation is still incentive fee in most t common. However, the share of variable component since 2001 has 16% to 33% (Chart 14). The rule here is that, under the medium / paid more frequently than under the performance-PR Consultants / (24% vs. 42% of agencies with performance-fee income). 16 Graph 14: Percentage of total performance-related fee income 100% 3% 13% 80% 19% 20% 8% 12% 60% 40% 84% 73% 67% 20% 0% 2001 0% success2004 10-20% success2007 21-100% success© Base: n = not 178, in 2002 and 2003 raised 8.2 tools and methods for control and measurability of communication services In agencies is no increased from large agencies small agencies

addition, the agencies were asked as part of the DPRG fee and trend barometer " to use whatever tools and methods as the client company to control and measurabi lity of communication services (see chart 15). Most often this has been traditio nal press clippings (93%) and media coverage analysis (65%) mentioned. are less frequently used, according to the PR agencies customer satisfaction surveys and employee surveys. 3.8 Importance of PR in the marketing mix as in the previous year are more than two thirds of the surveyed agencies believe that the importance of PR in the mar keting mix will increase in future (Figure 16). A quarter sees stagnation, while 2% believe that PR is less important. The PR Consultants / small agencies in th eir assessments here tend to be somewhat more cautious than the medium and large agencies (69% vs. 76% rise in importance). 17 Graph 15: tools and methods for control and measurability of communication servi ces 93% 89% Evaluation Pressclippings Media resonance analysis 65% 66% 55% Customer satisfaction surveys 56% 39% Employee surveys 37% 2007 20% 2005 other © Base: n = 179/182 17% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Chart 16: Importance of PR in the marketing mix PR in the marketing mix is compared to other marketing efforts ... ... strong in crease 17% ... rise 56% ... rather stay the same 25%

... somewhat less important 2% 2007 ... lose much of its importance 0% © Base: n = 173 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 18 8.4 General trends in the PR industry, almost 60% of respondents in the near fut ure, "Corporate Social Responsibility" and the "integrated communication" as the most important trends (Chart 17). For half of the surveyed agencies have also t he area of social networking in the future importance for the PR. Here the produ ct PR (42%) and eco Relations (40%). Further back on the list end up Web2.0 appl ications such as podcasting, Consumer Generated Content, paid conversationalist and particularly Second Life. Chart 17: General trends in the PR Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Integrated Communications Social Networkin g (plate shapes such as MySpace, StudiVZ and OpenBC) Product PR eco Relations po dcasting and video podcasting Consumer generated content (like videos on YouTube ) International Paid conversationalist (eg, professional PR bloggers) Second Lif e © Base: n = 179 58% 58% 50% 42% 40% 38% 31% 29% 22% 6% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 2007 0% 9th Remuneration 1.9 Remuneration of salaried employees in the following are the basic salaries o f selected eleven o'clock positions in the form of a salary level (see Table 3). In a breakdown by agency size was omitted because of the small data base (up to n = 74). The low response rate for individual items probably resulted from the fact that not many of the surveyed agencies have a correspondingly differentiate d staffing. According to the surveyed public relations agencies to get public re lations assistant with the lowest average salary 19,075 / annum, followed by P R-Junior19 consultants with 25,753 / per annum. In a similar level as the junior consulta nts are graphic artists / designers with 25,618, slightly above copywriter wit h an average year salary of 30,608 and 32,500 with media planners. Higher ea

rning potential is there for PR Senior Consultant, Director and CEO. Deserves an "PR senior consultant" annual average of 38,787, a "department" 44,500 and a "manager" 73,181 on average. In the training period trainees are paid on ave rage 13,693 / pa, volunteers first 309 / per month and interns 431 / per mo nth. 9.2 Remuneration of freelancers around the level of compensation to cover the fr ee movement of employees in agencies, the agencies surveyed were asked to provid e information on the average hourly rates (Table 3). The highest hourly wages re ceived while PR consultant with 84 , followed by the PR consultants Junior 69 . Subsequent follow Texter (63 ) and graphic / layout artist (62 ). 20 Notes to the fee table (see tables p. 21 - p. 24) In Table 1 "be Consultants / Small Agencies" (1-4 permanent employees) and Mediu m / Large agencies (5 or more regular employees) are compared. In the table betw een two "independent PR consultants" (without permanent employees), "Small Agenc ies" (2-5 full-time employees), "Middle Managers" (60-20 full-time employees) an d larger agencies / large agencies (more than 20 full-time employees) differed. Mean: Statistical average over all agencies median: 50% of all agencies are more expensive than this value, 50% are less expensive quartile 1: Only 25% of all a gencies are cheaper than this / these agency quartile 3: Only 25% of all agencie s are more expensive than this value / the agency (in other words, between quart ile 1 and quartile are 3 50%, so the bulk of the agencies) Note: All figures exc lude the legal VAT Table 3 presents the annual salaries and hourly rates in 2007 (see also Chapter 9 "Compensation"). 21 Fee Tables 2007 Table 1 PR Consultant / Small Agency Average hourly rates ( / h) PR chief consulting PR consultancy PR Junior Consultative Organization Secretari at documentation graphic text online / multimedia evaluation / performance measu rement ( / h) Pauschalisierungsfähige services ( ) fee small fee middle concept ion conception conception fee fee large local / regional press conference fee na tionwide Kontinuierl press conference. Monthly support. Grundh. Kontinuierl mini mal. Monthly support. Grundh. Max. Mean 2007 111 87 67 71 56 56 87 76 73 75 Median 2007 100 88 70 70 55 50 80 75 70 70 Quartile 1 2007 80 60 40 50 40 40 70 64 50 54 Quartile 3 2007 141 100 85 90 64 70 100 95 94 92 n 66 48 38 48 44 43 61 38 36 34 1935 3801 6547 3557 5622 1426 4308 1500 3000 5000 3000 5000 1000 4000 1000 2000 3000 1938 3625 725 2500

2500 4497 8000 5000 7485 2000 5000 48 49 43 42 36 64 60 Medium Agency / large agency Average hourly ( / h) PR chief consulting PR consultancy PR Junior Consultative Organization Secretari at documentation graphic text online / multimedia evaluation / performance measu rement ( / h) Pauschalisierungsfähige services ( ) fee small fee middle concept ion conception conception fee fee large local / regional press conference fee na tionwide Kontinuierl press conference. Monthly support. Grundh. Kontinuierl mini mal. Monthly support. Grundh. Max. 2233 4480 8454 5103 9429 2307 13952 2000 4000 6500 4000 7500 2000 9000 1500 3000 5000 2950 5000 1500 5750 3000 6000 10000 625 0 12000 3000 12 750 51 53 50 53 50 62 58 Mean 2007 206 146 114 108 78 78 135 118 117 110 Median 2007 170 125 100 90 60 60 110 100 100 90 Quartile 1 2007 130 110 80 80 55 50 90 81 85 75 Quartile 3 2007 240 150 120 115 80 80 143 120 120 114 n 63 60 61 57 56 54 57 44 45 48 22 Table 2 PR Consultants Average hourly ( / h) PR chief consulting PR consultancy PR Junior Consultative Organization Secretari at documentation graphic text online / multimedia evaluation / performance measu rement ( / h) Pauschalisierungsfähige services ( ) fee small fee middle concept ion conception conception fee fee large local / regional press conference fee na tionwide Kontinuierl press conference. Monthly support. Grundh. Kontinuierl mini mal. Monthly support. Grundh. Max. Mean 2007 101 76 67 66 56 57 82 71 68 74 Median 2007 92 65 55 60 50 50 80 68 65 70 Quartile 1 2007 79 50 40 44 40 36 60 44 40 50 Quartile 3 2007 113 100 100 90 68 78 95 100 90 98 n 30 17 11 18 17 16 27 14 15 12 1972 4267 6612 3627 4689 1420 4069 1368 2500 3500 3000 5000 1000 3500

750 1000 1750 1500 2100 775 2500 2250 4000 5900 5000 6250 2000 5000 20 19 17 15 9 30 27 Managers with 2-5 permanent employees Average hourly mean ( / h) 2007 PR chief consulting PR consultancy PR Junior Consultative Organization Secretari at documentation graphic text online / multimedia evaluation / performance measu rement ( / h) Pauschalisierungsfähige services ( ) fee small fee middle concept ion conception conception fee fee large local / regional press conference fee na tionwide Kontinuierl press conference. Monthly support. Grundh. Kontinuierl mini mal. Monthly support. Grundh. Max.€125 98 74 76 57 57 93 81 76 73 Median 2007 120 99 78 80 55 50 90 80 75 65 Quartile 1 2007 90 80 60 61 45 45 75 70 50 53 Quartile 3 2007 150 110 85 90 70 73 100 97 95 90 n 43 38 34 36 33 33 41 28 23 25 1870 3453 6456 3680 5956 1464 4634 1500 3000 5000 3000 5000 1500 4800 1000 2000 4000 2125 4000 750 3000 2500 4500 8000 4875 7500 2000 6000 33 35 31 32 32 41 39 23 Agencies with 60-20 permanent employees Average hourly mean ( / h) 2007 PR chief consulting PR consultancy PR Junior Consultative Organization Secretari at documentation graphic text online / multimedia evaluation / performance measu rement ( / h) Pauschalisierungsfähige services ( ) fee small fee middle concept ion conception conception fee fee large local / regional press conference fee na tionwide Kontinuierl press conference. Monthly support. Grundh. Kontinuierl mini mal. Monthly support. Grundh. Max. 201 152 120 110 82 83 140 121 118 114 Median 2007 160 125 100 60 110 90 60 95 95 90 Quartile 1 2007 128 108 80 71 55 55 90 80 80 75 Quartile 3 2007 235 155 120 110 75 80 150 120 115 110 n 45 42 43 40 39 38 39 31 33 34 2133 4397 8321 4692 9112 1993 14 548

2000 4000 6500 4000 7250 1900 9250 1500 3000 5000 2950 5000 1275 5250 3000 6000 10000 5000 10500 2875 12 000 35 37 34 37 34 44 44 Agencies with more than 20 salaried employees average median hourly Average ( / h) 2007 2007 PR chief consulting PR consultancy PR Junior Consultative Organization Secretari at documentation graphic text online / multimedia evaluation / performance measu rement ( / h) Pauschalisierungsfähige services ( ) fee small fee middle concept ion conception conception fee fee large local / regional press conference fee na tionwide Kontinuierl press conference. Monthly support. Grundh. Kontinuierl mini mal. Monthly support. Grundh. Max. 2818 5368 9886 6736 11934 3995 17125 2000 350 0 7500 5000 10000 3850 13500 263 139 101 108 72 69 133 119 119 111 200 125 100 1 00 75 68 125 100 100 100 Quartile 1 2007 175 120 85 80 60 49 110 88 95 90 Quartile 3 2007 320 150 115 125 80 81 130 138 153 130 n 11 11 11 11 11 10 11 9 10 11 1500 3000 5000 2400 5000 3000 8375 5000 8000 15000 12000 16000 5000 19 500 11 11 11 11 11 11 8 24 Table 3: Annual salary and hourly rate in 2007 Mean 2007 19075 25753 38787 44500 73181 32500 30608 25618 13693 1309 431 Basic salary of all surveyed agencies PR-Assistent/-in ( / pa) PR-Juniorberater/-in (/ pa) PR-Seniorberater/-in ( / pa) of Division-in ( / pa) Manager /-in ( / pa ) Media Planner /-in ( / pa) Writer /-in ( / pa) graphics is now / layout /-in ( / pa) Trainee /-in ( / p a) Volunteer /-in ( / month) Intern -in ( / month) Median 2007 22800 30000 42000 52000 77000 32500 34000 30000 15800 1400 400 Quartile 1 2007 15000 24000 36000 22125 43000 30000 26000 3200 6000 1000 315 Quartile 3 2007 25000 31625 50000 60750 100000 35000 40000 40000 19050 1500 500 n 59 74 67 26 59 2 12 11 44 65 65 Remuneration in / h (for contract employees) PR-Juniorberater/-in PR-Berater/-in copywriter / graphic artist-in / layout / f

69 84 63 62 65 75 55 60 40 50 40 45 96 108 80 80 34 64 69 59 25