HANDBOOK OF BUSINESS ETHICS October 2007 I. INTRODUCTION ................................................. .............. .................................... ......... 3 II. FOUNDATIONS FOR A GUIDE TO ETHICAL BUSINESS .....................................

...... .. 4 III. CONTENT O F BUSINESS ETHICS GUIDELINES ........................................... 10 a. T RANSVERSE VALUES ................................................ .............. ................... 11 1. Respect for human dignity ............................ ................. .......................... 11 2. Concept of ourselves ........ ...................................... ....................................... 1 1 3. Pro-activity ............................................... .............. .................................... ..... 11 4. Hard to achieve goals ......... ..................................... ................................... 12 5. Responsibility ................................................. ............... ................................. June 12 . Consistent life .................... ........................... ................................................. 12 7. Loyalty ................................................. .................. ................................ ............ 13 8. Veracity ................... .............................. ................................................. . ......... 13 B. STRUCTURE OF THE GUIDE TO ETHICAL BUSINESS ................... ..................... 13 1. Relationship with employees ........................ ...................... .................................. 13 2. Relationship wit h Customers and Suppliers ............................................. ........ ............ 14 3. Competition ................................................. .................................................. ..... 15 4. Relationship wit h the Community .............................................. ................. ................. 15 5. Communication and public information (advertising )..... .................................... 16 6. Conflicts of Interest ............... ................................ ........................................... 16 7. Environmental Issues ................................................ August 17 ................................................ . Financial practices ...... .......................................... ..................................... ......... 17 9. State ................................................. ........ .......................................... ............... 17 10. Confidentialit y and Loyalty ............................................... .................. ......... 18 11. Direction of Company .......................................... ..... ......................................... 18 IV. ETHICAL DILEMMAS ........ ........................................ ....................................... ........... .19 2 I. INTRODUCTION In the context of globalization, it becomes increasingly important to the promot ion and development of an ethical culture in business, corporate and institution al level. The level of advancement of business ethics depends in large As the effective market access and international partnerships and investment cap ital, as well as greater assurance of quality of traded goods in the domestic ma rket, from consumer goods to financial sector Nothing stated in this manual of B usiness Ethics, could be a reality without good men and resources mobilized to i ncrease ethical behavior in business. This manual is intended to assist in parti cipatory construction of an ethical culture, as well it contributes to developme nt by ensuring the provision of goods and buyers in particular freedom of choice , economic and social justice, better quality services and ensuring they can exercise their rights by meeting t he requirements of good repute.

A Handbook of Business Ethics directs us to appropriating the moral and ethical paradigms more in line with international standards of fairness and transparency . Moreover, international organizations, as influential in the view, increasingl y require harder in the codes of business ethics. It is important to note that e thical issues are more a matter of persuasion than coercion. 3 II. A GUIDE FOR FOUNDATIONS OF BUSINESS ETHICS International organizations and the public are increasingly calling Corporate Codes of Ethics. In this sense we may say that the adoption of a Guide for Business Ethics is a step to put the company ahead in its image among targe t audiences. Definitions: • ETHICS involves a discipline that looks at good and bad practices in the context of moral duty. • Conduct is a moral behavior that i s right. • Business ethics involves practices and behaviors that are good.€Two t ypes of ethics: • The descriptive ethics involves describing and characterizing and studying the morality of what it is. • Normative ethics involves the justifi cation of moral systems about what should be. 4 • 5 The company is under pressure, such as: movements and union demands; Globali sation, economic Guidelines; Agendas (International Declaration of Human Rig hts, the MilénioWorld Bank 2000); Government policies, guidelines Philosophica l Society (fair) and religious (social agenda). These include social responsibil ity, regulation / deregulation government spending on social programs and ethica l issues. These social pressures and changing market values and horizons of busi ness. In the area of Social Responsibility, the interfaces between business and society to environmental issues, health and safety, and education. 6 Several questions of responsibility social derive of standards government concerning the health, safety, environmental control and equal opport unities policies. 7 8

9 III. CONTENTS OF THE GUIDE FOR BUSINESS ETHICS In the world of globalization may notice is the increased role of private enterp rise and the growing interdependence of the world, such as between the company a nd its employees, the company and the municipality and between the company and t he environment. This increasingly dominant role of private enterprise led govern ments, international agencies, multilateral institutions to consider the ethics of involving the private sector, which led to an increase in ethical criteria in private companies. The need for businesses to pleasing your customer base also played a role here. It is recommended that for the elaboration of a code of ethi cs to consider values that are operating at the document that fits all. Sectoral and adapt to the type of business, since there are variations among the compani es that make it impossible to have a What is Your Level of Development Ethics? Level 3 Level 2 Level 1 Principles - "What is the right thing to do?" Conventional - "What is legally re quired to do?" Pre-conventional - "What can I do?" 10 a. VALUES TRANSVERSE We designed these recommendations, which when operated, allow to work in a trans parent and ethical perspective. Human values are essential for creating an ethic al environment and they must prevail in our attitudes, such as the stress honest y, the whole word and example of entrepreneurs to benefit the population. . 1. Respect for human dignity Respect for the dignity of the person is a primary value and universal with many consequences. Putting it in first is not only a logical necessity as a statemen t of purpose concerning the design of the company. However, how to reach this po int in the company? We will have to implement standards in each of our areas of operation. 2. Concept of ourselves You strive to be better people and free people, responsible, with unity and cohe rence of life and aspirations. Know and use the most of our operational capacity to meet any need itself from other customers. members of the organization and 3. Pro-activity It is the ability to act and not just react. It is the firm's decision to take i nitiative, take risks reasonable plan and strive to achieve our goals and ideals . 11 The service attitude encourages us to improve the procedures, attitudes and char acteristics of the service we offer. It should be remembered that we should deve lop our initiative with suggestions to management, as a demonstration of that co mmitment temops to improve professionally. 4. Hard to achieve goals Our pro-activity is particularly important to achieve goals we set ourselves and to support others in efforts to achieve goals. Give an adequate effort at perso nal goals leads to the benefit of everyone, because everyone gets better results .

5. Responsibility We consider this value as a willingness to accept the consequences of our action s and accountable for results, not only for their efforts. Our business must be reliable and prudent risk assessment. Trust is generated when our actions are pr edictable because they are always ethical. So we must observe all regulations an d strictly maintain the attitude to carry always with justice. 6. Consistent life To generate and tranrsmitir this trust we rely on the personal life. Our world i s private and personal and family is a valuable incentive for our daily work. We note that to act immediately and spontaneously in the right direction, we behav e as we are in all aspects of our lives.€So try to be consistent with our way of life, already in itself challenging and exemplary. 12 7. Loyalty We must find alternatives to everything that is not ethical in our dealings dail y. 8. Veracity The truth is the reflection of reality without changes. It is important to have good sources when we transmit data and give our opinion on the facts, people or situations. The truth has benefits economically because people prefer to do busi ness with whom it is true or not only tells half truths. B. STRUCTURE OF THE GUIDE FOR BUSINESS ETHICS When we make decisions in our daily work, we take into account that the primary duty is to protect the Company and our customers because we are administrators o f property of others. Transactions within and outside a company are identified e leven elements, which must consider and include in the Guide to Business Ethics, which we list below: 1. Relationship with employees • • • • Promoting decent work based on the rights promoted by the ILO (Internati onal Labour Organization) Respect for human dignity and fundamental rights of wo rkers and employees, according to national legislation. Promoting a vocabulary o f respect, friendship and fellowship within the same company. Promoting the empl oyees and contractors with respect to the company, customers, suppliers and othe r agents with which it relates. 13 • • • • Promote policies pay based on merit employment, productivity and performance. Pr omote the integral development, training and welfare. Create policies to encoura ge staff development. Develop plans for social benefits. Create decent job secur ity. Promoting actions and conditions in which employees feel part of the compan y's development. • • Disseminate the values of an ethical culture within the company. These principle s are not limited to mere compliance with the laws of the country. 2. Relationship with Customers and Suppliers Clients • • Declare the client as our core business and raison d'être of the com pany. Treat customers with transparency and ethics, promoting the quality contro l of what the company offers customers, ensuring the desired expectations, devel oping environment of credibility and trust. • Companies should develop a culture

of customer service throughout the organizational structure of the company, to ensure excellence. • • Comply with laws and regulations on weights, measurements and metrology. Promote quality standards. Suppliers • • Set clear rules and policies within the relations of the company, creditors and suppliers. Maintain loyalty and ethics' suppliers developing admin istrative controls within the empreasa to prevent unethical acts. 14 • • Making suppliers and creditors to participate in the company's growth. Develop r eporting mechanisms and controls to prevent illegal acts among employees of the intermediate lines affecting both the suppliers and creditors. • • • Fostering trade relations with companies that operate within ethical standards. Comply fully with legal and contractual obligations. Create mechanisms able to m ediate and arbitrate between suppliers and companies to resolve disputes and avo id the cost of legal mechanisms. 3. Competition • • • • • • • Applying competition laws governing the country. Comply with the r ules governing intellectual property and ensuring its compliance. Comply with th e provisions on promotion of competition and restrictive trade practices on dome stic markets. Develop alternative solutions to conflict between client and suppl ier. Coordinate surveillance and monitoring mechanisms to ensure transparency of government procurement processes and facilities. Supporting the formation of a business community with ethical, conscious of their responsibility to pursue soc ial justice. Cronyism and nepotism are two factors that affect competitiveness. 4. Relationship with the Community • • Recognize that the companies have their relationship with the community with honesty and truth, promoting that there are cartels that affect the community. 15 • • • • • Reduce bureaucracy and have in account the risks, controlling behaviors that lead to adverse reactions. Resist the crime of corruption. Streng then the organizational procedures of each company for allowing the implementati on of a code of ethics. Refrain from illegal acts that harm others.

5. Communication and public information (advertising) • The information applied to the general public should be clear, precise and hon est€and advertising must be consistent with the services and products they offer . • • • • Do not use advertising to unfair competition and to disqualify the oth er bases true. Respect the consumer's right to be informed about products or con tent. Advertising must be verifiable on the products or services. A food product should include basic information about the basic ingredients, the nutritional q uality, expiration date, benefits and harm it can cause to health. 6. Conflicts of Interest • • • • • Do not combine economic interests of employees with suppliers. One sho uld not allow an employee of the shopping section benefiting companies related t o him or family. Do not use a position in business for profit or other persons, or influence peddling. Benefits, commissions and fees provided by the company us ed for their benefit. Nepotism may affect shareholders of a company. 16 7. Environmental Issues • Use within the technical possibilities and market clean technologies that ensu re the conservation of the ecosystem, and refrain from using unfair procedures a nd technologies that proved so damaging to the environment. • • • Consider the d evelopment of the code of the company's defense environment. Promote an atmosphe re of responsibility within the same code. Publish good practice and show its be nefits. 8. Financial practices • • • • Promote transparency in transactions, particularly in treasury. Set stan dards applicable in the business, especially for control. Make external audits o n a regular basis and always keep up to date financial documents of the company. Tell the truth with economic and financial situation of the company. 9. State • Collaborate with the fulfillment of the purposes of the state through strict c ompliance • • • obligations in matters of employment, tax, administrative, comme rcial and contractual matters. Insert all activities under formal. Require timel y compliance with the state of public ethics Where contracts with state entities , the principles of transparency, accountability and economy and fully meet the requirements. • • Observe an ethical attitude towards the civil servants. Refrai n from perks that may influence or compromise the public servant. 17 • Refrain from situations involving real or potential conflicts of interest when t here is the possibility of representing the state and the private sector sometim es elsewhere. • • Do not use confidential information that belongs to the state and its institutio ns for personal benefit and the company. Do not agree to give or receive bribes or extortion. 10. Confidentiality and Loyalty • • Determine the levels of confidentiality for various subjects. Avoid activiti es such as industrial and commercial espionage, bribery, illicit access to place s, theft and intervention in phone lines and hiring employees from competition i

n order to obtain confidential information between employees and customers from the competition. • • • Protect the personal information of our employees. Promot e incentive plans of employee loyalty to the company. Promoting fairness in dail y business. 11. Direction of Company • • • must be avoided conflicts of interest among members of the Board who have links with other groups or companies. The Board must be concerned to promote eth ical behavior in business. Top management must comply with laws and promote the enactment of anti-corruption standards that apply without exception and include appropriate sanctions. • The mission and vision of the company should take into account ethical considerations. 18 IV. ETHICAL DILEMMAS FALSE IDENTITY In Angola a lot of people die annually in traffic. Most of these deaths occur in accidents caused by errors of drivers who do not have cars. A serious accident moved to the city: a young driver lost control of the vehicle forward at the int ersection, struck and killed two children. On investigation it turns out that he had taken the letter a month ago. The newspapers do a lot of stories about the deficiency of training in driving schools and the examination and up statistics that boys with a letter recently that are most involved in accidents. Your newsp aper has information that a driving school to obtain a driver's license for some customers, even if they are properly qualified to drive cars, pay an extra fee. The information is that part of that fee will be given to examining the distrib ution of transit. A reporter who is assigned to investigate the case. He matricu lated at the driving school with the real name, but gives another activity.€In t he first class, get to say you can not do 19 maneuvers and will not pass the exam without assistance. Then probe the instruct or about the possibility of bribing someone to get the license. The next day, be fore class, an employee calls the student (reporter) in particular and says he i s not doing well in class and may need reinforcement or a hand. - You know, the exam is very difficult, but always finds a way. - But do not give to a trick? Suggests the reporter. - I do not know - the official answer - Formerly it was e asy, but now is difficult. The exams are supervised. But I'll give what to do. U ntil the last day of school officials does not touch the subject, but the demand for alunorepórter know if you have news. - Well, we can water the examiner's ha nd for 20,000 Kwanza. The reporter agrees. By doing the exam, behaves with negli gence, purposeful mistakes and still is okay. The examination is photographed fr om a distance by the newspaper. The reporter received your letter and write an a rticle telling his experience as a denunciation of corruption in school. The sch ool is closed and opened an investigation into the case. The ethical aspect and issues for discussion Everybody knows that it received the complaint of corrupti on, if the reporter for the school as a journalist only hear negative. It will b e difficult to find anyone who admits to having bought the license, because they betray an accomplice or co-author of a crime. Resort to false identities is the refore an efficient method to prove a serious irregularity, denounce it and prev ent unauthorized persons could endanger the lives of pedestrians and other drive rs. The doctrine of false identity in journalism justifies the "misdemeanor" in the name of the denunciation of the "great crime". Reporters and media outlets t hat 20

do that have no intention of committing crimes, but to show the errors of the sy stem and contribute to their correction. Questions for discussion 1. What weight should be given to the truth as a fundam ental ethical value? 2. Should be exhausted the possibilities of making the stor y about the bad drivers take before resorting to bribery? For example: a) the re porter taking the exam, purposeful mistakes and wait to see if it would be appro ved. Or this attempt should be discarded at the possibility of flunking the repo rter and burn the matter? b) insist the reporter to convince a person who "bough t the letter" to identify themselves in a testimony, and failing, to make the st ory using only her initials. Or this should be dismissed for being time consumin g and not produce any results after aging the news about traffic accidents? 3. W hat weight should be given in an ethical discussion, the detail of the proposed bribe came from a reporter, not the school, and he was the inspirer and co-autho r of the crime that only gives to others? 4. A reporter who lies, deceives the s ources and bribe officials to report bribery has credibility? 5. It should take into account the remote possibility that, contrary to initial information, the s chool does not have this practice, and have it adopted on the basis of a proposa l from a reporter? 6. It should take into account the argument that, although no t a common criminal motive, the reporter and the media 21 benefited from the offense, earning him an entry that sell to readers and gives them prestige? 22