The University of Michigan Interdisciplinary Committee on Organizational Studies (ICOS) Website Redesign Project

SITE DOCUMENTATION

Written for: Michael D Cohen, School of Information Gerald F Davis, Ross School of Business Paula Kopka, Ross School of Business Written by: Jonathan G Cohen Anindita De Nik Rozaidi Rashid Benjamin Worrel

School of Information University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Winter 2008

ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation

Table of Contents
Table of Contents .................................................................................................................... i Executive Summary................................................................................................................1 Acknowledgments ..................................................................................................................1 PART A: INTRODUCTION...................................................................................................2 What is ICOS? .................................................................................................................... 2 The ICOS Website and the SI631 CMS Project .............................................................. 2 Arrangement of Sections .................................................................................................. 2 The ICOS Website Design ................................................................................................ 3 PART B: CONTENT MANAGER .........................................................................................5 List of Tasks by Frequency............................................................................................... 5 STATIC PAGES.................................................................................................................. 6 B1. How to add a static page..................................................................................7 B2. How to Edit a Static Page.................................................................................8 B3. How to Delete a Static Page.............................................................................8 LECTURES.......................................................................................................................... 9 B4. How To Create A Lecture ................................................................................9 B5. How To Add/Edit The Default Values In The Lecture Content Type .....11 B6. How To Attach A Web Recording to a Lecture ..........................................11 BLOGS............................................................................................................................... 12 B7. How To Write A Blog Post.............................................................................12 B8. How To Find A Member’s Blog Post............................................................12 B9. How To Edit or Moderate A Blog Post ........................................................13 B10. How To Delete A Blog Post ...........................................................................14 COMMENTS .................................................................................................................... 14 B11. How To Enable/Disable Comments For A Specific Blog Post ..................14 B12. How To Write A Comment............................................................................15 B13. How To Edit or Moderate A Comment in a Blog.......................................15 B14. How To Delete A Comment in a Blog..........................................................16 USER PROFILES .............................................................................................................. 16 B15. How To Edit a Member’s Profile Content (Any Role) ...............................17 B16. How to Delete a Profile ..................................................................................18 GROUPS............................................................................................................................ 20 B17. How to Create a Group ..................................................................................20 B18. How to update group information ...............................................................21 B19. How to delete a group....................................................................................22 B20. How to find a group .......................................................................................23 B21. How to Join a Group.......................................................................................23 B22. How to Leave a Group ...................................................................................23 B23. How to Invite Someone to Join a Group......................................................24 B24. How to create a group blog post...................................................................25

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B25. How to Edit or Moderate a Group Blog Post ..............................................25 B26. How to Delete a Group Blog Post.................................................................25 B27. How to Send Messages to a Group...............................................................25 B28. How to Send Replies to a Group Message Received as an email.............25 B29. How to Add Members to a Group................................................................26 B30. How to remove members from a group ......................................................27 PART C: SITE DESIGNER ...................................................................................................28 HOSTING INFORMATION........................................................................................... 28 MODULES INSTALLED ................................................................................................ 28 THEMES............................................................................................................................ 30 VIEWS, BLOCKS, MENUS & PANELS........................................................................ 30 ROLES ............................................................................................................................... 30 SELECTED CUSTOMIZATION TASKS ...................................................................... 31 C1. Configuring the List of Lectures page (using Views) ................................31 C2. Configuring Upcoming Lecture block (Part 1 of 4: Views) .......................32 C3. Configuring Upcoming Lecture block (Part 2 of 4: Panels).......................33 C4. Configuring Upcoming Lecture block (Part 3 of 4: Contemplate) ...........34 C5. Configuring the Upcoming Lecture block (Part 4 of 4: CSS) ....................35 C6. How To Create a New User Profile Field ....................................................35 C7. To add a Panel .................................................................................................37 C8. How to change a member’s role....................................................................38 C9. How to set actions that receive userpoints ..................................................38 C10. How to add or remove User Points from a member:.................................39 C11. How to learn what CSS ID or CLASS corresponds to a field:...................40 C12. How to change the stylesheet:.......................................................................40 PART D: APPENDICES .......................................................................................................42 Appendix I: Customized Theme, CSS Stylesheet & PHP Template......................... 42 Appendix II: Screenshots of Customization for Menus, Blocks, Views, and Panels ...................................................................................................... 49 Appendix III: Access Control Setting ........................................................................... 54 Appendix IV: Lecture Contemplate Code.................................................................... 59 Appendix V: Lecture Contemplate Code..................................................................... 61 C13. How To Create Lecture Recording ...............................................................61 C14. How To Upload Lecture Recording .............................................................63 Appendix VI: ICOS Wish List........................................................................................ 64 Appendix VII: Deliverables............................................................................................ 65

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation

Executive Summary
The original ICOS website was launched in 1998 and over the past ten years has served as a hub for their background information. Members and the public could learn about this 600+ member organization, their research competitions, lecture schedules, and listen to lecture recordings. In 2008, ICOS Co-Directors Professor Michael Cohen and Professor Gerald Davis approached graduate students in a Content Management Systems course with a request to redevelop their online presence. They envisioned a community platform where ICOS members could interact with each other, discover content, and contribute to each other’s research. The new ICOS presence was developed on the Drupal platform, an open-source content management system. Its modular architecture provides site administrators and content managers with an elegant interface for deploying and moderating content, as well as adding and customizing features. This document therefore contains operational instructions for the Content Managers and Site Designer: (i) The Content Manager is responsible for managing the content of the website, and the day-to-day running of the site, but not for the technical configuration of the site. Towards this end, he/she will update information, moderate user behavior, and perform minor administrative tasks. The Site Designer is responsible for designing and configuring the site into a workable and presentable one. Towards this end, he/she will handle the features and design changes, and manage server-related issues, including the monitoring of Drupal’s security listserv.

(ii)

Acknowledgments
The ICOS Redesign Team would like to thank: SI631 Professors Paul Resnick and Mark Ackerman, as well as SI631 Classmates For their support and advice. ICOS Co-Directors Professors Michael Cohen and Gerald Davis, and ICOS Coordinator Paula Kopka For their feedback and guidance. SI634/635 Instructor Michael Hess For sharing his technical knowledge. The ICOS Community For their time, interest, and outreach.

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation

PART A: INTRODUCTION
What is ICOS?
The Interdisciplinary Committee on Organizational Studies (ICOS) at the University of Michigan is a network of graduate students and faculty who are interested in research on organizations. It was established in 1990 to connect researchers across twelve departments. ICOS is most widely known by its weekly lecture series, which attracts speakers from around the world to speak about their research. The talks are recorded and archived on the ICOS site, which can be freely accessed by anyone. The ICOS mailing list currently has over 600 subscribers. ICOS also offers financial support for conferences, awards prizes for outstanding dissertations related to organizational studies, and provides research grants to faculty and doctoral students.

The ICOS Website and the SI631 CMS Project
The previous ICOS web presence – located at http://si.umich.edu/ICOS was set up in 1998. The site provides general information about ICOS, including a list of related faculty and courses, upcoming seminar events and related papers, past lecture recordings, and a form which allows members to subscribe to their mailing list. The CMS project aims not just to refresh the design of the ICOS website and improve its information architecture and navigation structure, but also to create an online meeting place for ICOS members. The Drupal framework provides social computing tools such as collaborative blogs, social tagging, and content syndication. Its interface provides an efficient means to manage content for administrators without requiring technical expertise. The new ICOS website can be accessed at http://icos.umich.edu.

Arrangement of Sections
This document is arranged in four parts. Part A (this part) contains introductory information about the site. Part B contains instructions for the Content Manager (who is currently also the ICOS Coordinator) to manage the contents on the site. Part C contains instructions for the Site Designer to ensure the site is properly operational. Part D contains supplementary information regarding the background work on the ICOS site.

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation

The ICOS Website Design
The home page is divided into 5 main parts: the header and footer, the left, center and right columns. The menu items in the left column are intended to be fixed to provide consistent navigation experience to users, regardless of role. The right column is intended to contain role-specific menu items, as well as recommended content. The center column contains the main content that ICOS needs to promote and inform, such as the upcoming lecture, news and announcements, and recent blog posts.
Figure 1: The ICOS Home Page

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation The main content types of the ICOS website are: About ICOS The ICOS Course Lectures Research Support A static page that provides the general background information about what ICOS is. A static page containing information for the students enrolled in the SI702 and BA840 course. All the detailed information regarding each ICOS lecture is contained in this content type. This set of static pages contain information about the Dissertation Poster Session, ICOS Conference Funding, ICOS Small Grant Competition and the Likert Prize. A list of all groups within the ICOS Community A list of all members of the ICOS Community The list shows the words that have been most frequently tagged in the website, with the more frequent ones in bigger font size. The activity leader board of the members, intended to encourage participation in the community. Points (not shown) are collected by creating content, commenting and tagging. List of announcement and news items related to ICOS. List of external events that may be relevant to ICOS members, but excludes the ICOS Lecture Series. May be suggested by members, but subject to approval.

Groups People Directory Popular Tags Most Active Member Announcements Related Events

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Content Manager

PART B: CONTENT MANAGER
The Content Manager is responsible for managing the content of the website, and ensuring the day-to-day running of the site, but not for the technical configuration of the site. This role is traditionally undertaken by the ICOS Coordinator, but with the new site, some contents will be added by community members, so the Content Manager will be expected to moderate them, when necessary.

List of Tasks by Frequency
Daily: • Checking if the site is operational. This is done simply by visiting the site at http://icos.umich.edu. If the site is not responding, try http://icos.cms.si.umich.edu. If there is still no response, please contact SI Computing at 734-936-7255 to check if the Drupal CMS server is down. • Reading through the ICOS home page (especially the blog entries) to check for outdated or inappropriate content, as well as abnormalities in terms of presentation (Refer to Figure 1), and then taking appropriate action. Weekly: • Update an upcoming lecture with the latest information (such as speaker photo, reading materials, abstract, etc) • Attach a lecture recording to a recently concluded lecture Per Semester: • Create list of lectures for the upcoming semester • Review (and edit) the static pages regarding ICOS and the Course • Invite newly enrolled ICOS students to register on the site As and when necessary: • Add announcement or news item • Add related events or approve submitted events • Add/Allow/Block a user • Edit/Delete blog entry • Edit/Delete user comment • Edit/Delete tags • Add/Edit/Delete static pages • Send out email to a group

To add task references

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Content Manager

STATIC PAGES
A static page displays the same content every time it is viewed, as the whole HTML code is embedded in the page. Adding or editing a static page requires some knowledge of HTML for proper presentation of content. In the ICOS site, each static page has a corresponding menu item in the left column. The following are static pages on the ICOS Site, accessible from the left menu, and may be changed in the future: • Activities >> The ICOS Course • Activities >> Research Support • Activities >> Research Support >> Dissertation Poster Session • Activities >> Research Support >> ICOS Conference Funding • Activities >> Research Support >> ICOS Small Grant Competition • Activities >> Research Support >> The Likert Prize • About >> ICOS • About >> ICOS >> ICOS Affiliated Faculty • About >> ICOS >> ICOS Executive Committee • About >> ICOS >> Information for Speakers • About >> ICOS >> Our Sponsors • About >> Our Website • Community >> Other Communities
A sample static page

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B1.

How to add a static page
1. 2. 3. 4. Login (if not already so) In the Right Sidebar, click "Create Content" In the Center content area, click "Page" Enter the following information: i. Title: This will appear in the browser's title bar, as well as the title of the static page. ii. Body: Enter text here. iii. Input format (Click to view options): If the Body Text contains complex HTML codes (such as <table>), choose “Full HTML” option. The default is “Filtered HTML”.

5. 6.

Comment Settings: By default, comments are disabled for static pages. Menu Settings: This sets where the item will appear in the site map. For example, if you added a page titled "Jerry's Favorite Snacks" and assigned it the "Activities" parent item, a link to the new page would be visible alongside other items in the Activities menu.

To create a menu link for this static page, enter the following: i. Title - The name to display for this menu link.

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7.

ii. Parent item - The new page's location within the site's navigation hierarchy. iii. Weight – determines where in the parent menu the item will appear; a positive weight “sinks” the menu item down the list. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click Submit to save changes, or preview to view how the page will appear to members before saving changes.

B2.

How to Edit a Static Page
1. 2. 3. Login (if not already so) Browse to the static page you would like to edit. In the center content area, please click on the tab that reads "Edit"

4. 5. 6.

Make changes. (please see above for an explanation of static page options) Scroll to the bottom of the page and click Submit to save changes, or preview to view how the page will appear to members before saving changes. Note: There is no confirmation step after Submit. Please ensure you have not removed text that you might like to keep, because it cannot be recovered.

B3.

How to Delete a Static Page
1. 2. 3. Login (if not already so) Browse to the static page you would like to edit. In the center content area, please click on the tab that reads "Edit"

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4.

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click "Delete"

5. Proceed to confirm the delete request. Note: This action cannot be undone.

LECTURES
All information related to lectures are contained in this content type. This includes the lecture event description (date, time, venue), speaker information (speaker name, affiliation and homepage), reading materials (abstract / article), and lecture recording.

B4.

How To Create A Lecture
1. 2. Login (if not already so) In the Right Sidebar, under your own User ID heading (e.g. pkopka), click "Create Content", and choose "Lecture." A Submit Lecture page will be displayed. Enter the following information: i. Title of Event: This field identifies each lecture. Please enter the speaker’s name and affiliation (see below), or if there are more than two speakers, such as a forum, enter the Event name, e.g. Likert Prize Presentation. ii. Speaker: • If there is only one speaker, copy & paste from above. It must contain the speaker(s) name(s), including affiliation, e.g. Professor Michael Cohen, School of Information, University of Michigan. • If there are multiple speakers, list them using the HTML tags: <ul> <li>Mr A <li>Mr B ... </ul> iii. Under “When and Where”, first select the Semester. To add semester or change the default, see next Task on Editing Lecture Content Type. iv. Enter the Date in the month/day/year number format. The current date is always displayed initially. v. Change the Time, if it is not the default "1:30 - 3:00 PM". vi. Change the Venue, if it is not the default "Room 4212, School of Education". To change the default value, see next Task on Editing Lecture Content Type.

3.

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vii. Lecture Title: Enter without the quotation marks. This can also be the discussion topic of a panel session. viii. Topics & Interests: (optional) Enter the keywords (i.e. tags) related to the lecture. This is often taken from the article abstract. ix. Enter the Speaker(s) home pages as URL - starting with "http://". Click on "More links" if you need to enter more URLs. x. Lecture Graphic: This is usually the photograph of the speaker taken from his/her homepage. Multiple photos need to merged in a graphic editing software first. To upload, first click "Browse" to find the file, then click "Upload". (you may have to scroll down for the next step)

xi. Additional notes: This includes "Introduced by" and "Co-sponsored with" xii. Enter the Abstract provided by the speaker, if any, replacing the default “No abstract provided” text. xiii. Reading List: Prepare the files and its citation beforehand. Filetypes that can be uploaded are PDF, DOC, DOCX and TXT. To upload, click "Browse" to find the file, then click "Upload". The filename will be displayed; this should be changed with the citation. To add another article, click "Browse", "Upload" again and rename.

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4.

xiv.Recording: This field will be left blank until the lecture recording has been completed and uploaded to the server (See also: Uploading lecture recordings). Finally, click "Submit" (ignore the rest of the page)

B5.

How To Add/Edit The Default Values In The Lecture Content Type
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Login (if not already so) In the Right Sidebar, under the Admin heading, find Administer, and click "Content Management" Click on "Content Types". List of content types will be displayed. Find "Lecture", and click on "edit" Click "Manage Fields" tab. List of fields will be displayed. Semester: To add semester, click "configure". Scroll to near the bottom to find "Allowed values list". Insert the new semester as the topmost line. To change the default value, click "configure". Find and click on "Default Value", and choose the required semester. To change the default value for time and venue, follow the Semester way.

B6.

How To Attach A Web Recording to a Lecture
1. The URL of the lecture recording (It starts with "http://" ) must be available first from the ICOS Co-Director. Please refer to the Appendix on how to create lecture recording and upload it to the SI Server. Login (if not already so) In the Left Sidebar, under the Activities heading, select "Lectures". The list of the current semester's lectures will be displayed.

2. 3.
The List Lectures page

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4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Find the relevant lecture to be updated, and click on its Title. The lecture page will be displayed. Click on the "Edit" tab just below the Title Scroll down near the bottom of the page to locate "Recording" Enter the URL of the lecture recording Click "Submit"

BLOGS
A blog is like an online diary. The ICOS site features blog posting by its members, either in their own individual blog, or in a group blog, which they must be a member of. While the members are responsible for the content they post, the Content Manager has to monitor their posting for inappropriate entries and take the necessary action.

B7.

How To Write A Blog Post
1. 2. 3. 4. Login (if not already so) In the Right Sidebar, under the Username Heading, click "My Blog" In the Center content area, click "Post new blog entry." Write your post in the "Body" field and add a title in the "Title" field. (required) Adding interests (optional) will tag a blog post so other members can find your blog post if they browse by tag. Click "Submit" to publish your post. (visible to the public) Click "Preview" to view what your post will look like (not visible to the public). To edit your post, change the text in the "Title" and "Body" fields, and click "Preview" to see what your post will look like or "Submit" to publish.

5.

B8.

How To Find A Member’s Blog Post
1. 2. 3. Login (if not already so) In the Left Sidebar, under the Community Heading, click "People Directory" Members are listed in alphabetical order. Browse to and click a desired username.

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4.

You will arrive at the member's profile page. Scroll down past their profile content to “My Posts” to view their blog posts.

Where to find a member’s blog posts

5.

Click on the title of the post, or “Read more” to view the full blog entry.

B9.

How To Edit or Moderate A Blog Post
This Task continues from the previous task B8 on finding a member’s blog post 1. In the center content area, click the tab "Edit" 2. Make desired changes to your post content. 3. Scroll to the bottom of the page. Click "Submit" to publish your post. (visible to the public) Click "Preview" to view what your post will look like (not visible to the public). To edit your post, change the text in the "Title" and "Body" fields, and click "Preview" to see what your post will look like or "Submit" to publish.

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B10.

How To Delete A Blog Post
This Task continues from the previous task B8 on finding a member’s blog post 1. In the center content area, click the tab "Edit" 2. Scroll to the bottom of the page. Click "Delete" and you will arrive at a deletion confirmation page. Click "Delete" again to remove the post. Once deleted, a post can never be recovered.

COMMENTS
The new ICOS site features commenting by members on any content in which commenting is allowed/enabled. Note however that comments are attached to a particular content, and not exactly a content of its own. What this means is that to locate a comment, in order to edit or delete, the Content Manager has to know the location of the encapsulating entry in the site.

B11.

How To Enable/Disable Comments For A Specific Blog Post
Note that all content types have commenting built-in, so this task is applicable to other content types as well. This Task continues from the previous task B8 on finding a member’s blog post. 1. In the center content area, click the tab "Edit" 2. Scroll down to and click on the menu for "Comment Settings" 3. In the expanded field, choose "Disabled" to hide all and prevent the addition of new comments, "Read only" to retain existing comments and prevent the addition of new comments, or "Read/Write" to retain existing comments and allow the addition of new comments. Only one option can be selected at a time, which will be indicated by a filled radio button to the left of your selection.

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4.

Scroll down to the bottom of the page and click "Submit" to save your changes.

B12.

How To Write A Comment
1. 2. Login (if not already so) Scroll to the bottom of a blog post. Click "Add new comment" or "(#) comment(s)".

3. 4. 5.

Add a title in Subject (optional) and type text into the Comment field (required). Click "Preview comment" Review comment text and click "Post comment" to save.

B13.

How To Edit or Moderate A Comment in a Blog
This Task continues from the previous task B8 on finding a member’s blog post 1. Scroll down until you locate your comment. 2. Click "edit"

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3. 4. 5.

Make the desired changes to the comment. In the center content area, click "Preview comment" Review comment text and click "Post comment" to save your changes.

B14.

How To Delete A Comment in a Blog
This Task continues from the previous task B8 on finding a member’s blog post 1. Scroll down until you locate the comment. 2. Click "delete"

3.

Click "Delete" again to remove the comment. Once deleted, a comment can never be recovered.

USER PROFILES
User Profiles: ICOS members with a site account have the option to enrich their community experience by making information about themselves available to other community members. Profiles can't be accessed by anyone who isn't logged in to the ICOS site. Profile Types: When members register, they identify their role: a U of M Faculty Member, Student, or Friend of ICOS. Members will have different profile fields depending on their role. For example, a U of M Faculty Member will have the option to include "Courses I Teach", while a Student will have the option to include "Courses I've Taken". Required information for all profiles: Members can fill in their entire profile when they register, but it's not mandatory. Required fields for all member roles are: Name,

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City, and Affiliation. Site members have the option to add or remove profile information anytime.

A sample profile of a prominent personality Also shows where Content Managers should click to edit a user profile

B15.

How To Edit a Member’s Profile Content (Any Role)
1. 2. 3. 4. Login (if not already so) In the Left Sidebar, under the Community Heading, click "People Directory" Members are listed in alphabetical order. Browse to and click the desired username of the profile you would like to moderate. You will arrive at the member's profile page. In the center content area, find the heading “Edit My Account” (see above image)

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Content Manager

i.

To edit the basic user profile, such as "Name", "City", or "Interests", which all members have, click “Basic Profile”

5. 6.

ii. To edit the student-specific profile information, which only members who have been assigned with the Student role have, click “Student Profile”. iii. To edit faculty-specific profile information, which only faculty will have, click “Faculty Profile” Make desired changes to their profile. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click "Submit"

B16.

How to Delete a Profile
1. 2. 3. 4. Login In the Left Sidebar, under the Community Heading, click "People Directory" Members are listed in alphabetical order. Browse to and click the desired username of the profile you would like to delete. You will arrive at the member's profile page. In the center content area, under the heading “Edit Account”, please click Basic Profile.

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5.

You will arrive at the member's profile edit page. Scroll to the bottom of the page and click "Delete"

6.

Once you confirm the delete action, all of the member's contributed content as well as their profile information will be removed forever. This action cannot be undone.

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GROUPS
The ICOS site supports a Group feature, that allows members to establish a subcommunity of their own according to their interest or whatever. While the functionality is user-driven, the Content Manager have to monitor the group activity from time-to-time and take appropriate action. At the same time, Content Managers may be requested to create or manage groups.

B17.

How to Create a Group
Note: 1. 2. 3. Anyone with a site account can create a group. Login (if not already so) In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click Groups. In the center content area, below the sub-navigation tabs, click "Add a new group"

4.

Enter the Group's title, short description (which will be visible in the group directory), and long description (background information which will be visible at the group's page).

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5. 6.

You may also upload an image file (optional) Indicate how to manage subscription requests • open - subscription requests are accepted immediately. • moderated - subscription requests must be approved. • invite only - subscriptions must be created by an administrator. • closed - subscriptions are fully administered by an administrator. 7. Groups will be listed in the group directory by default. You may also opt to list the group during the registration process so new members may subscribe immediately. You may also opt to make the group private - so unsubscribed members can't view activity. (perhaps useful for administrative communication) 8. Scroll to the bottom of the page. Click "Submit" to create your group. Note: There is no confirmation step before group creation.

B18.

How to update group information
Group managers may also update group information. 1. Login (if not already so) 2. In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click Groups. 3. In the center content area, locate the group you would like to update by clicking the Group title in the Group column. 4. In the center content area, click "Edit" in the tab sub-navigation menu.

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5. 6. 7.

Make changes. Scroll to the bottom of the page. Click "Submit" to save changes. (visible to the public) Click "Preview" to view what your group will look like (not visible to the public). To edit your previewed group, make changes and click "Preview" to see what your group will look like or "Submit" to publish.

B19.

How to delete a group
Note: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Group managers may also delete groups. Login (if not already so) In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click Groups. In the center content area, locate the group you would like to update by clicking the Group title in the Group column. In the center content area, click "Edit" in the tab sub-navigation menu. Scroll to the bottom of the page. Click "Delete".

6.

Proceed to the confirmation page. You may opt to redirect group posts to another group, delete only posts that are not cross-listed, or delete all posts in the group (even if they are cross-listed). Click "Delete Group" to confirm your action. (This can not be undone and deleted posts can not be recovered)

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B20.

How to find a group
7. 8. In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click Groups. In the center content area, groups are listed in descending alphabetical order. Click the title of a group to view their posts and background information.

B21.

How to Join a Group
1. 2. 3. Login In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click on Groups. In the center content area, locate the group you would like to subscribe to by reading the Group titles in the Group column. Once found, click "subscribe" in the same row as the group title. Proceed to confirm the subscription request.

4.

B22.

How to Leave a Group
1. 2. 3. Login In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click on Groups. In the center content area, locate the group you would like to unsubscribe to by clicking the Group title in the Group column.

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4.

In the center content area, under the "Group Actions" heading, please click "My subscription"

5. 6.

In the center content area, please click "Unsubscribe from this group" Proceed to confirm the unsubscribe request. Note: Unless blocked by a group administrator, you can re-subscribe anytime.

B23.

How to Invite Someone to Join a Group
1. 2. 3. 4. Login In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click on Groups. In the center content area, locate the group you would like to unsubscribe to by clicking the Group title in the Group column. In the center content area, under the "Group Actions" heading, please click "Invite friend"

5.

Type the email address(es) of the person you would like to invite. If the person has an ICOS site account, you may opt to enter their username. If desired, enter a personal message.

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6.

Click "Send invitation"

B24.

How to create a group blog post
1. 2. 3. Login In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click Groups. In the center content area, locate the group you would like to post to by clicking the Group title in the Group column. Note: You must be a member of a group to create a post for that group. For information on how to join a group, please see "How to Join a Group" In the center content area, under the "Group Actions" heading, please click "Create group post" Enter the title in the "Title" field and body text in the "Body" field. To add tags, please enter them in the "Topics" field. Note: The post will be visible on the icos.umich.edu front page by default. To restrict your group post so that it only appears in your group's section, please expand the "Publishing options" field and uncheck the box "Promoted to Front Page" Scroll to the bottom of the page. Click "Submit" to publish your post. (visible to the public) Note: Click "Preview" to view what your post will look like (not visible to the public). To edit your previewed post, change the text in the "Title" and "Body" fields, and click "Preview" to see what your post will look like or "Submit" to publish.

4. 5.

6.

B25.

How to Edit or Moderate a Group Blog Post
This is the same as editing an individual blog post (Task B9)

B26.

How to Delete a Group Blog Post
This is the same as deleting an individual blog post (Task B10)

B27.

How to Send Messages to a Group
1. When you create a group blog post, all members subscribed to that group will receive an email with the post. The email will be sent to the address used during account registration. If members subscribe to the group using RSS, blog posts will also appear in their RSS reader.

B28.

How to Send Replies to a Group Message Received as an email
Note: When a member receives a group post as an email in their inbox, they won't be able to click reply (as they usually do) to send a message – in this case, to other group members. When a group member wants to reply to a post they receive as an

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email, he or she will need to scroll down past the post. If a group member replies to the email, rather than clicks on the “Post reply” link, she will receive a delivery status failure notification. The message will not reach anyone. Please see our Wish List (in the appendix) for another note on this problem. 1. In the email, scroll down past the post text. Click "Post reply" link.

2. 3. 4.

Enter your response. When finished click "Preview comment" Make edits and press "Submit". The response will be sent as an email to all group members. It will also be archived at the ICOS site.

B29.

How to Add Members to a Group
Note: Group managers may also add members to a group. The other two roles who may add members to a group are: Site Coordinator, Site Administrator. The Content Manager is assigned the role: Site Coordinator. 1. Login 2. In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click Groups. 3. In the center content area, locate the group you would like to add subscribers to by clicking the Group title in the Group column. 4. Under the "Group Actions" heading, click on "# subscriber(s)". Note: # will reflect the number of people currently subscribed to the group.

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Content Manager

5.

In the center content area, click the "Add subscribers" tab in the subnavigation menu.

6. 7.

Enter the usernames of the individuals you would like to subscribe to the group. They must have an ICOS site account to be subscribed to a group. Click "submit" and the usernames will be saved as group members.

B30.

How to remove members from a group
Note: 1. 2. 3. 4. Group managers may also remove members from a group. Login In the left sidebar, under the "Community" heading, please click Groups. In the center content area, locate the group you would like to remove subscribers from by clicking the Group title in the Group column. Under the "Group Actions" heading, click on "# subscriber(s)". Note: # will reflect the number of people currently subscribed to the group. In the center content area, browse the list of subscribed members to locate the individual you would like to unsubscribe. Once located, click "unsubscribe" next to the individual's username. Proceed to confirm the unsubscribe request. Note: If the group is set to public, the unsubscribed member may choose to re-subscribe at any time.

5.

6.

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Site Designer

PART C: SITE DESIGNER
The Site Designer is responsible for designing and configuring the site into a workable and presentable one. Towards this end, he/she will handle the features and design changes, and manage server-related issues, including the monitoring of Drupal’s security listserv.

HOSTING INFORMATION
Server location: Host name: SecureFTP Port: Type: IP address: Site directory: School of Information cms.si.umich.edu 22 (Access using KERBEROS username and password) Drupal 5 CMS Server 141.211.185.182 /data/sites/icos.cms.si.umich.edu/

MODULES INSTALLED
Module name advanced_profile auto_nodetitle calendar Version 5.x-1.0alpha3 5.x-1.1 5.x-1.7 Purpose Glue module with bits needed to put together an advanced user profile Allows hiding of the node title field and automatic title creation. Adds date calendar themes to views that can display any type of date field, and creates default calendar views. Allows administrators to define new content types. Allows users to 'tag' other users' content. Weighted tag lists or 'tag clouds' are generated for each piece of content to show the popularity of tags. Create templates to customize output of teaser and body content. Defines a field type for taxonomy terms Defines a date/time field type. Creates a block to be placed on a user's profile providing links to editing custom content typesuprofile,student details, andfaculty details Defines an email field type for cck

cck community_tags

5.x-1.xdev 5.x-1.0beta1

contemplate content_taxonomy date edit_my_account

5.x-1.9 5.x-1.xdev 5.x-1.8 n/a

email

5.x-1.xdev

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Module name event filefield group list

Version 5.x-1.0 5.x-2.3rc3 n/a

Purpose A story-like node that implements the event API automatically Defines a file field type. Provides a block listing a user's organic group memberships, based on user's profile page Defines an image field type. Attempts to thwart spam-bots by encoding email addresses. Improves Drupal's login system Provides common mime detection for drupal sites. Allows the admin to setup different membership types. Each uses a unique pageroute Builds node families based on content types and author information. Marks content types as profiles Enable users to create and manage their own 'groups' Allows restriction of content type use based on group. Make one group mandatory for new users and/or require new users to pick a group. Allows a site admin to make one or more groups mandatory to new site subscribers, to group owners, or by role. Allows the creation of pageroutes. Core Panels display functions Provides a mechanism for modules to automatically generate aliases for the content they manage. Provides a new form element that makes reusing other forms easy Tagadelic makes weighted tag clouds from your taxonomy terms.

imagefield invisimail link logintoboggan mimedetect nf_registration_mod

5.x-1.2rc1 5.x-1.xdev 5.x-1.2 5.x-1.0beta 5.x-1.5

nodefamily nodeprofile og og_content_type_admin og_mandatory_group

5.x-1.3 5.x-1.3 5.x-5.4 5.x-1.5 5.x-1.0

og_multiple_mandatory_ groups_by_role pageroute panels pathauto

5.x-1.2

5.x-1.0 5.x-2.0beta2 5.x-2.1

subform_element tagadelic

5.x-1.3 5.x-1.0

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Module name taxonomy_redirect textfield_autocomplete token userpoints userpoints_role_exempt

Version 5.x-1.1 5.x-1.xdev 5.x-1.10 5.x-3.4 5.x-2.0

views views_bookmark

5.x-1.6 5.x-1.4

Purpose Allows the admin to override where taxonomy term links go. Defines a text field with an autocomplete widget. Provides a shared API for replacement of textual placeholders with actual data. Users earn points as they post nodes, comments, and vote on nodes. Exempts certain roles from earning userpoints. Useful for admin and moderators. The views module creates customized views of node lists. Create customized bookmarks that individual users can set on nodes.

THEMES
The ICOS site uses the Bluemarine as the underlying theme, but the CSS file was heavily customized, as well as a template.php file. These can be found in the Appendix I.

VIEWS, BLOCKS, MENUS & PANELS
The ICOS site makes use of views, blocks, menus and panels, combined with CSS customization for its presentation. The screenshots of the configuration can be found in the Appendix II.

ROLES
The initial deployment for ICOS includes five identity-based roles: 1. The Site Director has global permissions to create, read, update, and delete all site content, code, architecture, and modules. He can also reassign the Site Coordinator role. This is usually for the ICOS Co-Directors. 2. The Site Coordinator has permissions similar to the Site Administrator, but can not reassign his own role. This is intended for the ICOS Coordinator. 3. Faculty are for University of Michigan professors and professionals. 4. Students are for current ICOS masters and PhD students, as well as alumni. 5. Friends are for ICOS stakeholders around the world that would like to participate on the ICOS site, but are not U of M student or faculty.

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Faculty, students , and friends have similar access permissions, but “Group managers” (which role is not defined by the Designer, but automatically assigned when they create their own Groups) can also administer groups (create, update, delete) as well as invite new members. There are two default roles provided by Drupal: • Anonymous User: any member or non-member who is not logged in. • Authenticated User: any member who is logged in – setting a permission for an authenticated user applies to all five identity-based roles, when they log in. For a detailed chart of role-based access controls, please see the Appendix III.

SELECTED CUSTOMIZATION TASKS
C1. Configuring the List of Lectures page (using Views)
1. 2. 3. 4. Under the Admin heading, find "Administer", click on "Site Building" Click "Views" (not Views Bookmarks). A list of Views will be displayed. Find "Lecture" and click "edit". (or go to http://icos.umich.edu/admin/build/views/Lecture/edit) Basic Information: i. Field name is "Lecture". ii. Access is open to all (no boxes are checked). iii. Description is "A view containing all lectures" Page: iv. Provide Page View is checked. v. URL for this view is "lectures". vi. View Type is Table View. vii. Title is given as "ICOS Lectures". viii. "Use Pager" is checked to limit display to x items (nodes) per page. ix. Breadcrumb trail is unchecked. x. Nodes per page is set to 15 - so that all the lectures in the current term is displayed without going to the next page. xi. Header & Footer is not configured. xii. Empty Text is set to the following code block - when users search for a semester without content (as the lecture data is still being migrated):
<h2 style="color:#536A93"><img src="/sites/icos.cms.si.umich.edu/files/beach.jpg" style="float:right"> The ICOS Lecture Series will return after the holidays.</h2> <p>Our Fall term begins in September, while the Winter term commences in January. For a list of past lectures, please visit our <a href="/lectures">Lectures</a> page.

5.

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6. 7. 8.

Menu: "Provide Menu" is checked. Menu Title is set as "Lectures". Under which heading it appears is controlled in blocks. Block: Not configured Fields: Add the following fields and configure them

9. 10.

11.

12.

: Arguments: Not configured Filters: xiii. Node: Type -- Is One Of -- Lecture xiv. Text: Semester -- Is One Of -- Winter 2008 (or the current term) -Expose. This may be a potential problem in listing if semesters are added without making it default. Exposed Filter: xv. Text: Semester (field_semester) -- Label: "Semester". xvi.Check these boxes: Optional, Filter Settings Default, Force Single (allow only one value to be selected), Lock Operator xvii. Sort: Datestamp: Date (field_date) -- Order: Ascending. Click "Save"

C2.

Configuring Upcoming Lecture block (Part 1 of 4: Views)
1. 2. 3. 4. Under the Admin heading, find "Administer", click on "Site Building" Click "Views" (not Views Bookmarks). A list of Views will be displayed. Find "Next_Lecture" and click "edit". (or go to http://icos.umich.edu/admin/build/views/Next_Lecture/edit) Basic Information: i. Field name is "Next_Lecture". ii. Access is open to all (no boxes are checked). iii. Description is "Upcoming ICOS lectures" Page: Not configured Block: i. Provide Block View is checked. ii. View Type is Teaser List. 32

5. 6.

ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Site Designer

7.

Title is given as "Upcoming ICOS Lectures". Nodes per Block is set to 1 - only shows the next one. Header & Footer is not configured. Empty Text is set to "No new lecture has been scheduled for the semester" - useful during the holidays. (Note: The website should display Spotlight Lectures during holidays) Fields: Add the following fields -- further configuration not needed here

iii. iv. v. vi.

8. 9.

10. 11. 12.

Arguments: Not configured Filters: i. Node: Type -- Is One Of -- Lecture ii. Datestamp: Date (field_date) -- Greater Than Or Equal To -- now Exposed Filter: Not configured Sort: Datestamp: Date (field_date) -- Order: Ascending. Click "Save"

C3.

Configuring Upcoming Lecture block (Part 2 of 4: Panels)
1. 2. 3. Under the Admin heading, find "Administer", click on "Panels" and then "Panel Pages" Find "Frontpage" and click "edit" (or go to http://icos.umich.edu/admin/panels/panel-page/Frontpage/edit/general). Under "Settings" tab: • Panel name: Frontpage. • Title is left blank (we will use another title for display). • CSS ID is "frontpage" (important for CSS!). • Path is "frontpanel" (should not change this). Under "Layout Settings" tab: • Width unit type is "% percentage" • Total width: 100; Rows: 2 • Row 1: Column: 1; Width: 100; Title: Top • Row 2: Column: 1; Width: 100; Title: Bottom

4.

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Site Designer

5. 6.

• Sidebars: Not configured • Panel settings: "Per panel settings: checked. Nothing else. Under "Content" tab (not Context) In the Top Panel: • (skip this) To add, click [+] -- and choose "Upcoming ICOS Lecture" under Views (that we did earlier) • To modify, find the "Upcoming ICOS Lecture" panel, and click the settings icon (gear wheel - not the Close button) • The "Override Title" is checked, and content is "Upcoming Lecture" • View Type: Block

6. 7.

• CSS ID: nexticoslecture (important for CSS!) Click Save (or "Add Panel" if the first time) When done, click anything else. Panels will not return you to a default page. The Bottom Panel is not relevant for Lectures.

C4.

Configuring Upcoming Lecture block (Part 3 of 4: Contemplate)
1. 2. 3. 4. Contemplate is used to control how the "Upcoming Lectures" block, and the "Lecture" nodes are displayed. Under the Admin heading, find "Administer", click on "Content Management and then "Content Templates" Find "Lecture" and click "edit template" (or go to http://icos.umich.edu/admin/content/templates/lecture). Under "Teaser": xviii. Check the "Affect Teaser Output" -- this is for the front page xix. Teaser template:
<img src="<?php print $node-> field_lecture_graphic[0]['filepath'] ?>" height=150 style="float:right; margin:0 0 0 10px; top:20px; border:5px solid #aaa;"> <?php print "<b>".$node->field_speakers[0]['view'] ."</b>". $node->field_date[0]['view'] ."<br>".

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$node->field_time[0]['view'] ."<br>". $node->field_venue[0]['view']."<br><br>". $node->field_additional_notes[0]['view'] ?>

5.

6.

Line 1 calls the path of the image as the image source Line 2 sets the image height to be 150px, and floats it to the right, giving margin space on the left (10px); nudging it up 20px; setting border Line 3 prints the speaker's name and bold it Line 4-7 prints the date, time, venue and additional notes. Under "Body": xx. Check the "Affect Body Output" -- this is for the node xxi. Teaser template: The code can be found in the Appendix IV. RSS: Not configured.

C5.

Configuring the Upcoming Lecture block (Part 4 of 4: CSS)
1. 2. 3. 4. Use a Secure FTP client to connect to "icos.cms.si.umich.edu" port 22 using your Kerberos username and password Navigate to folder /data/sites/icos.cms.si.umich.edu/themes/bluemarine/ Find style.css The relevant CSS for Upcoming Lecture is:
div#frontpage {right:10px} div#frontpage div div.panel-row.panel-row-1 {width:95%; background-color:#eacf5f; padding:0 10px 12px 10px;} #nexticoslecture h2.title {font-size: 12px; color:#252525; padding:0; top:10px;} #nexticoslecture > div.content h2.title {font-size: 18px; padding:0;} #nexticoslecture span.taxonomy, #nexticoslecture div.links {display: none;}

The first line limits the block by 10px on the right (so as to not to interfere with Right Sidebar) The second line controls the color of the block, width and padding. The third line controls the "Upcoming Lecture" title on the frontpage. The fourth line controls the "Title of the Lecture" The fifth line hides the taxonomy and commenting feature on the homepage only

C6.

How To Create a New User Profile Field
1. 2. 3. Login In the Right Sidebar, under the Admin Heading, please click Administer. You will arrive at the Administer by Task page. In the center content area, under the "Content Management" heading, please click "Content Types"

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4.

You will arrive at the Content Types page. In the center content area, in the list of content types, please click "User Profile".

5.

6.

You will arrive at the User Profile content type administration page. In the center content area, under the sub-navigation tab menu, please click "Add Field" In the Add Field options page, create a new field as follows: i. Name: The title. For example: "Favorite Music" ii. Field Type: The type of information to be stored. One attribute may be selected iii. Text field - The member enters content. iv. Text field with autocomplete - As the member types, they will receive suggestions for what to store based on pre-existing objects in the database. For example, if you enter "SI 68" in a field for "Courses I've Taken" and someone has already saved the course "SI 688 - Human Behavior", this suggestion will appear to you. v. Select list - The Site Coordinator populates a list with items. Members select one or many items from a list of pre-defined attributes. vi. Check boxes / radio buttons - The Site Coordinator populates a list with items. Members may only select one item from a list of pre-defined options. vii. Single on/off checkbox - The Site Coordinator populates a checkbox with an attribute. By checking the box or leaving it empty, members indicate whether the attribute is true or false. 36

ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Site Designer

7.

viii. Image - The member may upload an image file with this field. ix. File - The Site Coordinator determines acceptable file types, which members can choose from. To save the new field, please scroll to the bottom of the page and click "Create Field"

C7.

To add a Panel
1. 2. 3. 4. Administer >> Panels >> Panel Pages >> Add (tab on the top) Choose layout for panels, flexible or predefined Flexible allows for customizing number of rows/columns and column widths Set Panel details:

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Panel name – for panel pages listing Page Title – Name displayed on the top of the panel page (optional) CSS ID – ID to be used by the css theme Path – the address at which the panel will be accessed, don’t start with a /. Arguments, such as user ids or node ids can be utilized by inserting a % into the path. Click next If flexible layout was chosen, set number of rows/columns and column widths. Click next If arguments were entered in the path, click the context tab Under the arguments drop down menu, select node id, user id, etc. Click add argument • • • •

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Site Designer

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

On the opened window, “keyword” can be used later to customize block/view titles with the relevant argument data. Click save If no arguments were added or after all arguments are added, click the content tab On this screen, block and view content can be added to the panel. To add content to a column/row, click the + symbol in the individual section. Select the desired content from the new window. Set the configuration for the new content, arguments, titles, etc. If desired, new content can be dragged to a different section Don’t forget to save the changes made to the panel by clicking the save button.

C8.

How to change a member’s role
1. 2. 3. 4. Login In the right sidebar, under the Admin heading, please click User Management” In the center content area, click “Users” Members are listed in descending order from most recently joined to least recent. You may sort by username (alphabetically) or Last Access (recent). Browse to the member’s username. In the “Operations” column, please click “edit” for the corresponding username. Scroll down to roles. Make desired changes. Click “Submit”. There will be no confirmation step, but this action can be reversed.

5. 6.

C9.

How to set actions that receive userpoints
1. 2. 3. Under the Admin heading on the right side bar, click Administer Under “Site Configuration” menu, select “Activity Settings” Configure the points as follows: • Moderation: Approved • Activity Expiration: Four weeks – a global expiration date for all userpoints earned. • Messages: No – to Display Message • Report Settings: Shows how many users will be listed; Transactions per page: 10; No – Display zero active users; Users per page: 30

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Site Designer

Activity or Basic Events: Activity for posting a Personal Blog Entry: Activity for posting a Event: Activity for posting a Announcement: Activity for posting a Faculty Details (profile): Activity for posting a Group: Activity for posting a Group Post: Activity for posting a Lecture: Activity for posting a Page: Activity for posting a Student Details (profile): Activity for posting a User Profile: Activity for posting a comment: Activity for moderating a comment:

2 points 0 points 0 points 4 points 5 points 3 points 0 points 0 points 4 points 5 points 1 point 0 points

6.

Exempt roles – sets which self-set member identities *cannot* receive points: Authenticated User Off Faculty Off Friend Off Site Admin On Site Coordinator On Student Off Scroll down and click “Save configuration” •

C10. How to add or remove User Points from a member:
1. 2. 3. Under the Admin heading on the right side bar, click Administer Under “User Management”, click Activity. Click the “Add” tab.

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Site Designer

4. 5. 6. 7.

Type the desired username in the autocomplete field. In the points field, add or subtract points. To make the change permanent, under the “Expiration Date” please clear the GMT datetime. Click save to commit changes.

C11. How to learn what CSS ID or CLASS corresponds to a field:
These instructions require the use of Firefox and an add-on “Firebug”. This method was last tested on 4/19/08 and works with Firefox version 2.0.0.14 and Firebug version 1.0.5. Firebug may be downloaded from http://www.getfirebug.com/ 1. Browse to the page where you would like to make a visual design change. 2. Press F12. This will cause the Firebug console to appear in the bottom part of your browser window. 3. Click Inspect. 4. Mouse over the region you would like to change. Please make a note of the id and/or class.

C12. How to change the stylesheet:
1. 2. 3. 4. Use an FTP client (such as WinSCP) to login to the remote server at cms.si.umich.edu, port 22. . Use your KERBEROS username and password to access Browse to the folder “/sites/icos.cms.si.umich.edu/themes/bluemarine” Open style.css

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5. Browse to the element you would like to change, or create a new one. 6. Make desired changes and Save The customized CSS stylesheet that was included in the version of this site that was delivered in April 2008 can be found in the Appendix I.

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PART D: APPENDICES
Appendix I: Customized Theme, CSS Stylesheet & PHP Template
The Bluemarine theme is configured as follows:

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ICOS Website Redesign: Site Documentation: Appendix

The CSS provided here is shown in two columns to save space.
/* NIK $Id: style.css,v 1.19 2006/12/27 13:17:15 drumm Exp $ */ /* ** HTML elements */ body { horizontal-align: center; margin: 0 auto; color: #111; background-color: #fff; font: 76% Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; width: 1004px; position: relative; } tr.odd td, tr.even td { padding: 0.3em; } h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 { margin-bottom: 0.5em } h1 { font-size: 1.3em; } h2 { font-size: 1.2em; } h3, h4, h5, h6 { font-size: 1.1em; } p { margin-top: 0.5em; margin-bottom: 0.9em; } a { text-decoration: none; font-weight: bold; } a:link { color: #536A93; } a:visited { color: #369; } a:hover { color: #39c; text-decoration: underline; } fieldset { border: 1px solid #ccc; } pre { background-color: #eee; padding: 0.75em 1.5em; font-size: 12px; border: 1px solid #ddd; } table { /* make <td> sizes relative to body size! */ font-size: 1em; } .form-item label { font-size: 1em; color: #222; } .item-list .title { font-size: 1em; color: #222; } .links { margin-bottom: 0; } .comment .links { margin-bottom: 0; } /* ** Page layout blocks / IDs */ /*Footer*/ #block-block-1 { background-color: #DEDDD8; padding-top: 2px; width: 1004px; } #content { width: 1004px; } #header { background-color: #DEDDD8; width:1004px; position: center; } #logo { vertical-align: middle; border: 0; height:110px; float:left; background-color:#deddd8; } #logo img {

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float: left; left: -10px; padding: 10px; border: 0; } #menu { display:none;padding: 0.5em 0.5em 0 0.5em; text-align: right; vertical-align: middle; } #navlist { font-size: 1.0em; padding: 0 0.8em 1.2em 0; color: #9cf; } #navlist a { font-weight: bold; color: #fff; } #subnavlist { padding: 0.5em 1.2em 0.4em 0; font-size: 0.8em; color: #9cf; } #subnavlist a { font-weight: bold; color: #9cf; } ul.links li { border-left: 1px solid #9cf; } ul.links li.first { border: none; } #search .form-text, #search .form-submit { border: 1px solid #369; font-size: 1.1em; height: 1.5em; vertical-align: middle; } #search .form-text { width: 8em; padding: 0 0.5em; } #mission { background-color: #369; padding: 1.5em 2em; color: #fff; } #mission a, #mission a:visited { color: #9cf; font-weight: bold;

} .site-name { margin: 0.6em 0 0 0; padding: 0; font-size: 2em; color:green; } .site-name a:link, .site-name a:visited { color: #fff; } .site-name a:hover { color: #369; text-decoration: none; } .site-slogan { font-size: 1em; color: #eee; display: block; margin: 0; font-style: italic; font-weight: bold; } #main { /* padding in px not ex because IE messes up 100% width tables otherwise */ padding: 10px; width: 624px; } #mission, .node .content, .comment .content { line-height: 1.4em; } #help { font-size: 0.9em; margin-bottom: 1em; } .breadcrumb { margin-bottom: .5em; } .messages { background-color: #eee; border: 1px solid #ccc; padding: 0.3em; margin-bottom: 1em; } .error { border-color: red; } #sidebar-left { /* padding in px not ex because IE messes up 100% width tables

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otherwise */ padding: 10px; vertical-align: top; width: 160px; background-color: #536A93; } #sidebar-right { /* padding in px not ex because IE messes up 100% width tables otherwise */ padding: 10px; vertical-align: top; width: 160px; background-color: #536A93; } #main div.tabs ul {whitespace:normal} /*Community*/ #block-menu-108 .title{ color: #E8CD5D; } #block-menu-108 a:link, #blockmenu-108 a:visited {color: #C0D7FF} #block-menu-108 ul li {liststyle-image: none; color:#C0D7FF;} /*About*/ #block-menu-107 .title{ color: #E8CD5D; } #block-menu-107 ul li {liststyle-image: none; color:#C0D7FF;} #block-menu-107 a:link, #blockmenu-107 a:visited {color: #C0D7FF} /*Activities*/ #block-menu-106 .title{ color: #E8CD5D; } #block-menu-106 ul li {liststyle-image: none; color:#C0D7FF;} #block-menu-106 a:link, #blockmenu-106 a:visited {color: #C0D7FF} /*Web Admin*/ #block-menu-105 .title{

color: #E8CD5D; } #block-menu-105 a:link, #blockmenu-105 a:visited {color: #C0D7FF} #block-menu-105 ul li {liststyle-image: none; color:#C0D7FF;} .block { border-bottom: 1px solid #bbb; padding-bottom: 0.75em; margin-bottom: 1.5em; } /*Tags*/ #block-tagadelic-2 .title{ color: #E8CD5D; } #block-tagadelic-2 .content { position: relative; left: 2px; } #block-tagadelic-2 a:link, #block-tagadelic-2 a:visited {color: #C0D7FF}

/*Search*/ #block-search-0 { position: relative; float:right; left: -10px; top: 20px; border-bottom: 0px solid #bbb; }

/*User Points*/ #block-views-Active_Users .title{ color: #E8CD5D; } #block-views-Active_Users a:link, #block-viewsActive_Users a:visited {color: #C0D7FF} #block-views-Active_Users .odd{ background-color: #536A93; color: white; border: 0px; } #block-views-Active_Users .even{

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background-color: #536A93; color: white; border: 0px; } /*User Field*/ #block-user-1 .title{ color: #E8CD5D; } #block-user-1 a:link, #blockuser-1 a:visited {color: #C0D7FF} #block-user-1 ul li {liststyle-image: none; color:#C0D7FF;} /* Most Active Members */ #block-views-Active_Users h2.title {color: #E8CD5D} #block-views-Active_Users .content tr {backgroundcolor:#536a93; rder:0px; color:#c0d7ff} #block-views-Active_Users .content tr a {color:#c0d7ff} #block-views-Active_Users .content thead tr th {border:0px; color:#c0d7ff; } #block-views-Active_Users .content tbody {border:0px}

list-style-type: none; } #block-menu-102 { float:right; position: absolute; width:100px; height: 30px; right: 0px; top: 30px; border-bottom: 0px solid #bbb; } #block-menu-102 ul li { list-style-image: none; list-style-type: none; } /*ICOS Mission Statement*/ #block-block-5 { float:left; position:absolute; width:400px; height:90px; left: 350px; top: -10px; border: 0px solid #bbb; } /*ICOS Spelled Out*/ #block-block-4 { float:left; position:absolute; width:110px; height:90px; left: 180px; top: -10px; border-bottom: 0px solid #bbb; }

/*Login - Register - Logout*/ #block-menu-104 { float:right; position: absolute; width:100px; height: 30px; right: 0px; top: 30px; border-bottom: 0px solid #bbb; } #block-menu-104 ul li { list-style-image: none; list-style-type: none; } #block-menu-103 { float:right; position: absolute; width: 90px; height:30px; right: 100px; top: 30px; border-bottom: 0px solid #bbb; } #block-menu-103 ul li { list-style-image: none;

/*User Profiles*/ #user-profile .panel-pane h2.title{ background-color: #3F4370; } #user-profile .panel-pane h2.title a:link, #user-profile .panel-pane h2.title a:visited {color: #C0D7FF}

/*Upcoming Lecture*/ div#frontpage {right:10px} div#frontpage div div.panelrow.panel-row-1 { width:95%; backgroundcolor:#eacf5f; padding:0 10px 12px 10px; } #nexticoslecture h2.title{

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font-size: 12px; color:#252525; padding: 0; top:10px; } #nexticoslecture > div.content h2.title { font-size: 18px; padding:0; } #nexticoslecture span.taxonomy, #nexticoslecture div.links { display: none; } /*Latest Recording*/ #block-viewsMost_Recent_Lecture .title{ color: #E8CD5D; } #block-viewsMost_Recent_Lecture a:link, #block-viewsMost_Recent_Lecture a:visited {color: #C0D7FF} #block-viewsMost_Recent_Lecture ul li

{list-style-image: none; color:#C0D7FF;} #block-viewsMost_Recent_Lecture .content{ position: relative; left: -10px; }

/*Spotlight Recording*/ #block-views-Random_Lecture .title{ color: #E8CD5D; } #block-views-Random_Lecture a:link, #block-viewsRandom_Lecture a:visited {color: #C0D7FF} #block-views-Random_Lecture {list-style-image: none; color:#C0D7FF;} #block-views-Random_Lecture .content { position: relative; left: -10px; }

The customized template file was page.tpl.php (changes in “red underlined”):
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" lang="<?php print $language ?>" xml:lang="<?php print $language ?>"> <head> <title><?php print $head_title ?></title> <?php print $head ?> <?php print $styles ?> <?php print $scripts ?> <script type="text/javascript"><?php /* Needed to avoid Flash of Unstyle Content in IE */ ?> </script> </head> <body> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" id="header"> <tr> <td id="logo"> <?php if ($logo) { ?><a href="<?php print $base_path ?>" title="<?php print t('Home') ?>"><img src="<?php print $logo ?>" alt="<?php print t('Home') ?>" /></a><?php } ?> <?php if ($site_name) { ?><h1 class='site-name'><a href="<?php print $base_path ?>" title="<?php print t('Home') ?>"><?php print $site_name ?></a></h1><?php } ?> <?php if ($site_slogan) { ?><div class='site-slogan'><?php print $site_slogan ?></div><?php } ?>

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<div><?php print $header ?></div> </td> <td id="menu"> <?php if (isset($secondary_links)) { ?><?php print theme('links', $secondary_links, array('class' =>'links', 'id' => 'subnavlist')) ?><?php } ?> <?php if (isset($primary_links)) { ?><?php print theme('links', $primary_links, array('class' =>'links', 'id' => 'navlist')) ?><?php } ?> <?php print $search_box ?> </td> <tr><td><div><?php print $header?></div></td></tr> </table> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" id="content"> <tr> <?php if ($sidebar_left) { ?><td id="sidebar-left"> <?php print $sidebar_left ?> </td><?php } ?> <td valign="top"> <?php if ($mission) { ?><div id="mission"><?php print $mission ?></div><?php } ?> <div id="main"> <?php print $breadcrumb ?> <h1 class="title"><?php print $title ?></h1> <div class="tabs"><?php print $tabs ?></div> <?php print $help ?> <?php print $messages ?> <?php print $content; ?> <?php print $feed_icons; ?> </div> </td> <?php if ($sidebar_right) { ?><td id="sidebar-right"> <?php print $sidebar_right ?> </td><?php } ?> </tr> </table> <div id="footer"> <?php print $footer_message ?> </div> <?php print $closure ?> </body> </html>

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Appendix II: Screenshots of Customization for Menus, Blocks, Views, and Panels

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<p style="line-height:14px;padding:0;" align=center> Interdisciplinary Committee on Organizational Studies (ICOS)<br> Copyright &copy; 2008 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109<br> ICOS Coordinator: pkopka @ umich.edu | (734) 936-1525<br> </p> <script type="text/javascript"> var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); </script> <script type="text/javascript"> var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-4052697-1"); pageTracker._initData(); pageTracker._trackPageview(); </script>

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Appendix III: Access Control Setting

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Appendix IV: Lecture Contemplate Code
<p><span style="float:right; padding:10px"> <?php print $node->field_lecture_graphic[0]['view'] ?> </span></p> <p><b><div class="field field-type-text field-field-speakers"> <span class="field-items"> <span class="field-item"><?php print $node>field_speakers[0]['view'] ?></span> </span> </div></b></p> <p><div class="field field-type-link field-field-speakers-webpages"> <span class="field-label">Speaker(s) Web Pages :</span><br> <span class="field-items"> <?php foreach ((array)$node->field_speakers_web_pages as $item) { ?> <span class="field-item"><?php print $item['view'] ?></span> <?php } ?> </span> </div></p> <p><div class="field field-type-text field-field-semester"> <span class="field-label">Semester : </span> <span class="field-items"> <span class="field-item"><?php print $node>field_semester[0]['view'] ?></span> </span> </div> <div class="field field-type-datestamp field-field-date"> <span class="field-label">Date : </span> <span class="field-items"> <span class="field-item"><?php print $node->field_date[0]['view'] ?></span> </span> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-time"> <span class="field-label">Time : </span> <span class="field-items"> <span class="field-item"><?php print $node->field_time[0]['view'] ?></span> </span> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-venue"> <span class="field-label">Venue : </span> <span class="field-items"> <span class="field-item"><?php print $node->field_venue[0]['view'] ?></span> </span> </div></p>

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<p><div class="field field-type-text field-field-additional-notes"> <span class="field-label">Additional Notes :</span><br> <span class="field-items"> <span class="field-item"><?php print $node>field_additional_notes[0]['view'] ?></span> </span> </div></p> <hr style="height:1px"> <p><div class="field field-type-file field-field-abstract"> <span class="field-label">Abstract : </span><br> <span class="field-items"> <span class="field-item"><?php print $node>field_abstract[0]['view'] ?></span> </span> </div></p> <p><div class="field field-type-file field-field-reading-list"> <span class="field-label">Reading List : </span> (must be logged in to see the list)<br> <span class="field-items"><ul> <?php foreach ((array)$node->field_reading_list as $item) { ?> <span class="field-item"><li><?php print $item['view'] ?></span> <?php } ?> </ul></span> </div></p> <p><div class="field field-type-link field-field-recording"> <span class="field-label">Lecture Recording : </span> <span class="field-items"> <span class="field-item"><?php print $node>field_recording[0]['view'] ?></span> </span> </div></p> <hr style="height:1px">

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Appendix V: Lecture Contemplate Code
C13. How To Create Lecture Recording
1. 2. 3. Using TechSmith Camtasia Studio version 5 (minimum), load the project into the Clip Bin and onto the tracks Select the File menu, choose "Produce Video As..." Choose "Custom Production Setting". Click "Yes" to continue if there is a warning about the video maybe looking different than in preview. Click "Next"

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4.

Choose "Flash (SWF/ALV) Adobe Flash output", and click "Next"

5.

Make sure Appearance is "ExpressShow with TOC" and size is 800x600 for video (maximum - may be less for old videos) and total dimension of 960x618 (less for older movies). Click "Next"

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6. 7.

In the Video Options, uncheck everything, Click "Next" Finally in the Produce Video page, give a filename in the form of "yyyymmdd.Lastname.SWF" and store it in the folder of your choice

8.

Click "Finish" and wait about 40 minutes for a 1.5 hour recording to be rendered into SWF

C14. How To Upload Lecture Recording
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. The lecture file (in SWF/Flash format) has to be uploaded via a Secure FTP client. Launch the client. Connect to "cms.si.umich.edu" port 22 Enter your KERBEROS username and password Navigate to "/data/sites/icos.cms.si.umich.edu/files/lecture" (not lectures) Upload the SWF file in that folder Logout

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Appendix VI: ICOS Wish List
1. WYSIWYG editor, or at least rich text, for the following content types: lectures, blog posts (individual and group), comments. “Flag as inappropriate” – Even though ICOS administrators trust their members to be respectful of each other, a “Flag as inappropriate” link appended to blog posts (individual and group) and comments would make it easier for people to report potentially objectionable content and increase reaction time. However, this may come at a cost: people might overuse this feature and report objectionable content that isn’t objectionable by your standards. (all subjective, of course) User Points for Tags – Members currently receive user points, which contribute to the “most active member” list, for contributing blog posts, user profile content, comments, and comments. However, they do not receive user points for contributing tags. Perhaps a custom module could connect Tagadelic and Userpoints to reward members for their tag contributions. When members subscribe to a group, they receive blog posts and comments in their email inbox (by default). If they reply to the email, they will receive a delivery status failure notification. Members must click on a “post reply” link in the email that contains the original blog post. A customized delivery status notification message for this event would help guide members in the event of an error.

2.

3.

4.

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Appendix VII: Deliverables
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Client Requirement Analysis Personas and Scenarios Information Architecture Workflow Analysis Modules Requirement Analysis

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1 Jonathan Cohen Anindita De Nik Rozaidi Rashid Benjamin Worrel

Part I: Client Requirement Analysis
Introducing ICOS
The Interdisciplinary Committee on Organizational Studies at the University of Michigan (ICOS) is a network of graduate students and faculty who are interested in research on organizations. It was established in 1990 to bring together the researchers at the University who are distributed across more than a dozen departments, schools, colleges and to connect them to leading developments in their field worldwide. ICOS is better known by the weekly lecture series it organizes, which brings speakers from all over the country and overseas to speak on topics on organizational studies. The talks are recorded for the Web, and viewed by audiences in Ann Arbor and around the world. The ICOS mailing list currently has over 600 subscribers, a large number of whom are not on campus.

Mission and Objective
The single goal of ICOS is enhancing the University of Michigan's strength as a world center for interdisciplinary research and scholarship on organizations. The mission of ICOS is therefore to enrich the intellectual environment of graduate students and faculty interested in organization studies, by increasing the quality, breadth, depth, and usefulness of organizational research.

ICOS Activities
In supporting the mission, ICOS organizes the following activities: Seminar / Lecture Series: ICOS offers a weekly Friday seminar that brings together top organizational researchers to present their work. An ICOS video library for seminars between 1994 and 1998 is available through the University’s Film and Video Library, and is listed on Mirlyn, the University’s Library Catalog System. RealAudio recordings of lectures began in late Fall 1997, which offers Internet browser playback with accompanying slides and photographs. Coursework: The Ross School of Business, School of Social Work and School of Information offer a 1 to 4 credit course in ICOS. Students who read all papers presented at the seminar and attend each session receive one credit. All masters students enroll at this level. Doctoral students who write a paper for review by an affiliated faculty member of the Business School or School of Information faculty sponsor receive additional credits. ICOS is offered every Fall and Winter terms.

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Workshops: ICOS also provides opportunities for graduate students to deepen their understanding of scholarly work and careers through periodic workshops on issues such as thesis topic selection, scholarly writing, journal reviewing, and careers outside the professorate. Poster Sessions: Poster sessions for dissertations in progress are held every two years. Awards and Funding: ICOS awards the biannual Likert Prize for organizational research stemming from dissertations in the University. Faculty interested in organizing conferences of benefit to the organizational community may receive up to $5,000 in support. Up to two conferences, events or workshops a year are typically organized. Research grants for up to $3,000 and up to two years are available for faculty and doctoral students to support joint faculty-student work related to their dissertation.

The ICOS Community
ICOS is run by two faculty members from the School of Information and the Business School (Michael Cohen and Jerry Davis, respectively) on a part-time basis, and assisted by a staff administrator (Paula Kopka). They meet every Monday at 9 a.m. The oversight for ICOS is provided by the Executive Committee, the members of which represent the schools and departments that provide sponsorship to the program. The 12 current members (as of February 1, 2008) are: • • • • • • • • • • Gautam Ahuja, Ross School of Business Jane Banaszak-Holl, School of Public Health Michael Cohen, School of Information Jerry Davis, Ross School of Business Jane Dutton, Ross School of Business Mark Mizruchi, Department of Sociology Jason Owen-Smith, Organizational Studies, Sociology Lloyd Sandelands, Organizational Psychology, Management & Organizations Diane Kaplan Vinokur, School of Social Work Robert Kahn, Professor Emeritus of Psychology; Health Services Management & Policy, and Research Scientist Emeritus, Survey Research Center (Emeritus member) Karl Weick, Ross School of Business (Emeritus member) Mayer Zald, Department of Sociology (Emeritus member)

• •

There are also the 15 students enrolled in the course for the Winter 2008 term. Based on the mailing list, the ICOS community is also made up of students and researchers from the University and around the world who are interested in organizational studies.

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Communicating ICOS
Besides the seminar series and alumni/research network, ICOS is communicated to its community through a website (http://si.umich.edu/ICOS/) that was set up in 1998. The site provides general information about ICOS, including about the faculty and related courses; the upcoming seminar event, including the speaker’s papers; links to past recordings of the seminars; and a subscription form to the ICOS mailing list.

The SI631 Project
The CMS project aims not just to redesign the ICOS website, but also to improve finding and navigation, provide multiple notification channels, improved distribution of lecture recordings in multiple formats; and opportunities to experiments with new services, such as group blogging or tools for discovering other community members who share common interests. The added functionality will support ICOS goal of stimulating and supporting community interaction, as well as enriching the community itself. Of course, the site will need to be easily maintained by a non-technical person.

Stakeholders: 1. Executive Committee
The Executive Committee is comprised of distinguished University of Michigan professors from several departments whose research and interests correlate with ICOS. Six different schools are represented in this interdisciplinary nine member group: the Ross School of Business, School of Public Health, School of Information, Department of Sociology, Department of Psychology, Organizational Studies Department, and School of Social Work. There are also three emeritus members. The Co-Directors are also members of the Executive Committee. Responsibilities to ICOS are threefold: budget oversight, hiring decisions, and internal consultation on major directives. They're not significantly involved with operational actions on a day-to-day or even a month-to-month basis, which is typically handled by the Co-Directors and the ICOS Coordinator. When Co-Directors leave their posts, the committee convenes to hire their replacements. Another significant contribution to ICOS is their incubation and discussion of organizational initiatives. For example, the committee reviews applications for conferences, events, or workshops twice a year and supports top proposals with as much as $5,000. The committee also convenes once a year to review research grant proposals that encourage faculty-student work and awards top entries with as much as $3000.

2. Co-Directors
ICOS employs Co-Directors to carry out day-to-day tasks and long-term initiatives, Michael Cohen and Jerry Davis. As professors mainly affiliated with the School of Information and Ross School of Business (respectively), the co-directors lead efforts to

SI 631 W/08 ICOS Web Project improve research, understanding, and interdisciplinary opportunities for PhD students and faculty interested in organizational studies.

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Michael and Jerry perform three core responsibilities. First, they organize a weekly seminar which takes the form of panel discussions or presentations. The co-directors engage and invite relevant thought leaders to share their research with the organizational studies community. Second, they organize developmental activities such as career workshops for graduate students, dissertation poster sessions for PhD students to present their research, and award a $500 Likert prize with travel stipend for one of those PhD students who have presented at these sessions in the past. Third, Michael and Jerry are instructors for the cross-departmental (SI / Ross) course “Interdisciplinary Committee on Organizational Studies Seminar Series”. Accreditation options range from 1-4 credits and give students a choice in their level of expected involvement. The course is centered on the weekly seminars and papers presented by speakers.

Vision
The co-directors envision an environment where students and faculty have many roads to finding content and each other. To achieve this end, the dual-approach of a hierarchical organization scheme with a controlled vocabulary set and member-tagging could benefit search and discovery. The site currently offers access to its archive of seminar recordings by chronological order. Faculty members are listed in alphabetical order, and recommended courses for students interested in organization studies are listed by departments (also in alphabetical order). The organization of all site content is static and pre-determined by administrators. The co-directors would also like to provide members with more notification options for new content and announcements. The site currently offers a snail-mail service and has an e-mail listserv with over 600 members. Some members complain that contact is too frequent; others too rare. Michael envisions the introduction of member-customized email listservs and RSS feeds with one caveat, “Truth of the matter is most faculty don’t read RSS.” The ICOS site currently doesn’t offer a blog platform. The co-directors envision a site blog with several authors contributing research and benefiting from feedback generated by peripheral discussions. We suspect the value proposition of this content may be strong enough to serve as an incentive for some faculty members to sample RSS, perhaps for the first time. The co-directors would like to give members an option for the annotation of seminar recordings. This feature isn’t currently available, but could be implemented through a forum, discussion thread, or within user profiles.

SI 631 W/08 ICOS Web Project Above all, Michael wants to ensure the redesigned site is “a means, not an end.” The co-directors want to ensure new processes are easy to maintain and documentation is clear. The ICOS Coordinator and student administrators should be able to easily moderate discussions, enable/disable features, and add/remove content, all with the aim of providing information flows that enhance the ICOS community.

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Interests
The co-directors first interest in the project is that ICOS members should be able to easily find, and/or automatically be notified about, details of upcoming presentations in the ICOS lecture series, including links to websites of the presenters, topics of their upcoming talks, and a downloadable paper related to each week's presentation. Besides that, members should also be able to find existing distribution of seminar audio recordings. The site currently hosts hundreds of these lectures that span the past decade. The majority of lectures must be downloaded and viewed with RealPlayer software, but seminars recorded as of Fall 2007 can be experienced directly in the browser with Camtasia and RealAudio plugins. The co-directors second interest in the project is that ICOS sponsors are given visibility. ICOS sponsors aren’t currently showcased on the Web site. Funding comes predominantly (if not exclusively) from University of Michigan departments including the Business School, Psychology, Public Health, Social Work, Education, Rackham, Art and Architecture, Public Policy, and the School of Information. The co-directors third interest in the project is to better connect faculty that have common research interests, students with course offerings, and each group with suggested readings. Michael envisions a data model that can “bring all of these different kinds of material in a kind of common map.” Perhaps member profiles could serve as a backend to this process. The co-directors believe that a comprehensive redesign will better serve the organizational studies community by improving the flow of information between interdisciplinary groups and providing a platform to distribute and discuss available research. Speakers will benefit from the blog platform, which will allow them to engage and discuss research with the ICOS community. As an added bonus, potential speakers may be more likely to commit and participate where they find evidence of an active community. Researchers at this university or elsewhere will benefit from highquality content at the blog and faster routes to discovering seminar recordings that relate to their interests. Faculty involved with ICOS will have an easier time finding opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaboration. Students could better connect with each other and faculty to find interesting coursework. Students applying to relevant graduate and PhD programs may be more inclined to enroll at the University of Michigan. The redesigned site will also serve as a platform where ICOS can make their research available to greater society.

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3. ICOS Coordinator
Paula, the ICOS coordinator at present, is responsible for updating the information on the ICOS website, as well as maintaining the mailing list, and other organizational duties. The Coordinator meets weekly with the Co-Directors, Michael Cohen and Jerry Davis, to discuss and carry out the day to day business of ICOS. The position is not currently a full time position. As the one responsible for updating the website, the coordinator has a large interest in the successful design and implementation of a new web ICOS web presence. Currently updating the information on the website is somewhat arduous, as the html must be manually edited. The new design should greatly simplify this task in addition to allowing others to assist in this task more efficiently. Additionally, tasks such as maintaining mailing lists and event calendars could transition to a user-based task, or at least a more simplified entry system. Of particular interest to the coordinator is a comprehensive set of documentation for the site, enabling both the current coordinator, future coordinators, and others involved in maintenance of the site to efficiently work within the new environment. A primary concern of the new system is to not create an environment that requires an increased technical knowledge. The goal is to improve the capabilities of the web presence while simplifying the creation/maintenance process. This not only applies to Paula, but to the ICOS community at large. The web site is meant to be a tool, not a limitation.

4. Faculty
Faculty members from various schools within the University of Michigan have a prominent stake in the organization. Some of these faculty members may teach courses related to organizational studies; others contribute to the organization by shaping ICOS directives. Some of the faculty members serve as student mentors, while others are responsible for reviewing papers as well as giving feedback. Faculty members don’t necessarily attend weekly seminars. Some of them are actively involved; others have a passive interest in organizational studies. Each semester a few seminar presentations (roughly 2-3) are made by UM faculty members. The website lists all faculty affiliations and links to their personal web pages. In this way, the website helps researchers impart information about their interests and explorations. It supports a thriving common ground for people with contingent interests to connect with each other. Thus, the website can serve as a very good means for the faculty to discover and advance interdisciplinary opportunities. This information is currently difficult to keep up-to-date, which reduces its value to the community and creates a burden for the administrator.

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5. Students
The ICOS student community includes both Masters and Doctoral students. Those registered for the seminar course are expected to read all papers presented at the seminar, attend each session, and, depending on the number of credits taken, write a paper for review by an affiliated faculty member. Doctoral students in particular gain from being involved in ICOS through the access it provides to the professional practice of organizational research, including information resources and thought leaders like visiting speakers. Students currently use the website to access organizational research materials, particularly related to the lecture of the week. It is expected that the website will evolve to include community features which allow students to discuss issues, share knowledge, and collaborate online with their peers and faculty both within and outside our university. These students are expected to be the biggest user group for the ICOS website in part because of their comfort level with new technology, perceived benefits from community features like blog discussion, and improved access to supplemental content.

6. Sponsors & The U of M Community
ICOS represents both the sponsoring departments and the University of Michigan at large. As a research university, Michigan has a vested interest in presenting the work being done to the outside world, particularly funding institutions. ICOS is a visible symbol of the collaborative, interdisciplinary work being done on the campus. A new web presence could either greatly improve or damage this image depending on the success of the new design. Additionally, the individual sponsoring departments utilize ICOS in a similar manner. Not only can they showcase the research they are involved in, but they can point potential students and faculty candidates to the organization as an example of the work being done. An engaging web site with useful information could go a long way to helping attract the next generation of researchers to the departments.

Site Trajectory
The ICOS web site hasn’t been redesigned since its inception a decade ago. Over the past ten years, Web communities have evolved to support features like group blogging, tagging, and diversified notification avenues like RSS. As we incorporate these new modes of interaction, ICOS members may feel unsettled by sudden change. To ensure a smooth transition, new features will need to be incentivized with a clear value proposition. Further, members and administrators will need to become accustomed to revised processes for established activities like retrieving schedule information and listening to seminars.

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Our client envisions a site with functionality to improve the quantity and quality of interdisciplinary communication. However, it may be hard to quantify the meaningfulness of connections made between students and potential courses of interest, faculty and researchers outside of the university, and other associations still unforeseen. ICOS could perhaps consider a measure of how many unique and discrete visits are made to user-generated pages and monitor the volume of site activity over time. In fact, the current site does have some Google Analytics tools installed. So these could provide a basis of comparison. Comparable, or enhanced tools could be enabled at the new site. We think many faculty will enjoy the blogging platform because it will give them a means to share and get feedback on their thoughts and research. Though some may feel burdened by the responsibility to contribute to the blog with content, current membership levels could sustain a steady stream of articles without reliance on any small group of researchers to write them. The ICOS Coordinator or student administrators will need to learn how to operate the Drupal content system, as well as be partially responsible for new tasks like moderation and consistently organizing content into categories. Should faculty and students find incentives to use the tagging system, blogging platform, and notifications, this site redesign has the potential to further energize an already active community. Over the past ten-years, ICOS has benefited from stable and continuous activity, producing an archive of high-quality artifacts (recorded seminars) and significant cross-disciplinary awareness. However, any roadblock to information will hinder its use and discovery. The library of recordings has grown quite large (well over 200 as of 2008) and much of its valuable content is buried without a flexible organization scheme. If new site features give easier access to and provide platforms for sharing information and communication, ICOS members will enjoy even more valuable interactions with each other and increase both the worth and amount of their research.

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Part 2: Personas and Scenarios
The next step in revamping the ICOS website after analyzing the entity’s mission, objectives and stakeholders, is developing the user personas and their likely scenarios in using the website. For this effort, the team has developed seven personas, each representing different classes of users. All characters appearing in this work are fictitious. Resemblance to real persons is somewhat deliberate but not intended to harm. If it does, it should be assumed that the undesirable characteristics are derived from someone else. The user personas that have been developed for the ICOS website are: • Joan, ICOS Administrator • Dr. Guha Ramana, Co-Director • Xavier, Doctoral Student • Liza, Masters Student • Jane, Organizational Behavior Expert (Invited Speaker) • Keith, Affiliated Faculty • David, Industry Executive (Interested Visitor)

Joan, ICOS Coordinator
Joan, 42, has been married to her husband Mark for twelve years. They have two children, both in middle school. In their spare time, Joan and her husband enjoy acting in a local acting troupe, which has started to embarrass their kids quite a bit. Joan works as an administrator in the Business School at the University of Michigan, where part of her time is spent as the ICOS Administrator. She has some experience in managing websites, but would like to be able to do more and has considered taking courses to receive additional training. Joan receives the schedule of upcoming ICOS speakers before each semester. She then adds the dates, speakers, and topics to the online ICOS calendar which is visible to anyone. Additionally, she creates logins for each of the speakers, so that they create user pages to display their interests, research topics, publications, etc. This is much less work than the old system, when she had to repeatedly contact upcoming speakers for their information. For each speaker, Joan uses the website to keep track of tasks which still need to be completed, such as transportation from the airport, accommodation, etc. This information is stored in a section of the website which is restricted to administrative personnel. As the speaker’s appearance date came closer, Joan updates the speaker’s calendar page to show their appointments and uploads a copy of the paper that is being

SI 631 W/08 ICOS Web Project presented along with suggested readings. All of this information used to be stored on the School of Information’s server as well as hard copies in Joan’s office.

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After each weekly speaker, Joan updates the website to highlight the upcoming speaker. A brief, who/what/where message is placed on the main page, with links to the speaker’s page on the site with further information. Additionally, she updates attendance information for the session, which is stored in a restricted portion of the site. When new users register with the site, some need to be granted more than the basic user access. Joan uses the administrative section of the site to upgrade the accounts of users that she can verify have a valid reason for greater access. She needs to restrict access due to concerns over spammers gaining access to the ICOS email list. The ICOS community didn’t much appreciate receiving spam advertisements for pharmaceuticals particularly aimed at male users. Throughout the semester, Joan receives emails from students asking questions about upcoming speakers or ICOS in general. In addition to using the website to find the information, she suggests the question sender check the website to answer future questions. She understands that if people haven’t seen the new website, they could be wary of looking for information on the ICOS site, as the old design often made things difficult to find.

Dr. Guha Ramana, Co-Director
Dr. Guha Ramana, 50, has been an active member of ICOS since emigrating from India to the U.S. in 1993 to pursue an MBA at the University of Michigan. He was attracted to ICOS because the community gave him an outlet to explore corollaries between new coursework and his graduate work in Psychology. In 1998, he received a Ph.D. in Management & Organizations and accepted a tenure-track associate professorship post at the Ross School of Business. Dr. Ramana was invited to join the ICOS Executive Committee in 2003. His wife Claire, a Columbia professor who met Dr. Ramana at an ICOS seminar, encouraged him to seek the Co-Director position when the previous codirector announced she was taking a sabbatical. At each seminar, Dr. Ramana records presentations in RealMedia format and later uploads them to the Web site. He would also like to offer mp3 files, and wishes users didn’t need to have RealPlayer software or codecs on their systems, but the entire catalog has been encoded into .ram files since seminar recording began in 1997. He doesn’t want to confuse people by offering content in two separate file formats. Unfortunately, Dr. Ramana doesn’t have enough time to convert the recording archive into mp3 files and plans on asking a research assistant to complete this initiative over the Fall ‘08 semester. Whereas uploading a lecture currently marks the end of the archival process, Dr. Ramana hopes that the new website will support ongoing discussions around lecture content. Further, he thinks speakers would enjoy being able

SI 631 W/08 ICOS Web Project to directly link to their presentation recordings from their personal Web pages, so he wishes each lecture had an idempotent URL instead of access via iFrames.

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When reaching out to invite potential speakers, Dr. Ramana occasionally fields questions about typical audience sizes at seminars. Most invitees are excited at the prospect of presenting at an ICOS seminar, but want some reassurance that they won’t be flying to Michigan (many from international origins) to speak to a tiny crowd. The Registered Students’ page lists 20 students who attend regularly, which is updated each semester by the ICOS Coordinator. Potential speakers are ultimately unconvinced by a page that lists over a hundred affiliated faculty, but doesn’t make clear often they attend seminars. Dr. Ramana suspects this concern wouldn’t be an issue if the site could make the vibrant ICOS research community more visible. In the new web site design, Dr. Ramana hopes that a group blogging platform will prompt discussions that expose community activity to potential speakers and showcase engaged faculty members. Students actively involved with ICOS often ask Dr. Ramana for course suggestions, but wonders if students themselves are a better resource. He could ask students to list their related coursework on the site, but would rather support tailored recommendations. Over time, he hopes to introduce a recommender system that highlights courses of interests for a particular student by mining the enrollment data of ICOS studentmembers. Since assuming the role of Co-Director, Dr. Ramana has become overwhelmed by requests to serve on dissertation committees. He enjoys giving feedback and participating in the process, but has little time to give each dissertation his full attention. He hopes the new site will offer “an eHarmony for dissertation committees and students” – identifying potential colleagues with the same research interests, but who work in different departments. Dr. Ramana hopes that by redesigning the Web site to support and recommend meaningful connections, ICOS will help facilitate valuable collaboration between students and faculty.

Xavier, Doctoral Student
Xavier is a 27-year old Ph.D. student in the Ross School of Business. He is in the first year of his doctoral studies. Xavier is married and used to work at a government agency for a few years before deciding to further his studies. His research interest is in internal communication in public sector organizations. He found out about ICOS from his advisor while doing research planning for one of his course papers on a related topic. The advisor suggested he attend one of the Friday ICOS seminars to see if the topic being discussed is of interest to him. He also found about the ICOS website. After learning about what ICOS is from the website, and reviewing the list of lectures and topics that will occur in the term, he decided to attend the next seminar. In preparing himself for the lecture, he went to the ICOS website to download the paper

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that will be presented, as well as some suggested readings that accompany the paper. He was impressed to find all the readings he needed online in PDF format, although he noticed that not all readings for the other lectures have links—maybe that means those readings are not available online for copyright reasons, he thought. He was able to download all the readings to his computer. At the seminar, he saw some familiar faces but also many new ones. Using his social skills at the reception before the seminar, he later found out that the seminar is attended not just by U of M students and faculty, but also by smart-looking professionals (they were from The Ford Motor Company). Xavier did manage to ask how they found out about the seminar. He was told that it was through word-of-mouth and from the ICOS website. Xavier exchanged business cards with them before parting. His social network suddenly expanded, and that was even before the seminar started! During the talk, Xavier did have many questions to ask the speaker but only got to put up a couple. Afterwards, he did manage to walk up to meet the speaker, but there were many others competing for the speaker’s attention as well. Knowing that the speaker is active (relatively) on the ICOS community website, he decided to contact the speaker via the website later on (which automatically sends out a directed email to the speaker). Often, he gets a response within a short time, although he understood that it is not a guarantee. Xavier is worried that over time the community will tone down, but was surprised at the efforts made by the ICOS Administration to keep discussions alive by sending notifications that a certain thread has gone quiet after a few weeks. Meanwhile, Xavier sent out emails to his newly-found acquaintances in the industry to say hello, and to invite them to participate in the ICOS Community, to which he got many positives. In one of the exchanges, he did manage to sneak in a favor to get the executives to participate in his research. Prior to starting his dissertation, he wanted to find out who can become his cosupervisor. Previously, it was a tedious process to go through the CV of various faculties within and outside of the university. But now, the ICOS website offers a single point where he can review the CVs and research topics of renowned experts. He was able to find a supervisor whose research topic was compatible with his dissertation. Throughout the dissertation writing, Xavier used the ICOS website extensively to test ideas and obtain feedback about certain topics of interest, and he was happy with the response that he got from the diverse members.

Liza, Masters Student
Liza is from New York, 22 years, and fresh out of college. She enrolled at the University of Michigan’s School of Information Master of Science in Information (MSI) program last Fall and is currently registered for the ICOS course for 1 credit. She enrolled in the course due to her interest in how groups work, especially at the organizational level.

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Liza did not want to do an MBA as she was not a business-minded person, but she was more inclined towards information management. Liza understands that for 3 credits, she is required to attend weekly seminars, do the readings, and write a term paper. Upon attending the first seminar, Liza began to think of the topics for her paper and kept a personal note of all the deadlines in the term in her online calendar. In coming up with the topics, she had to do some preliminary research of the literatures on organizational studies in the financial sector. In the ICOS website, there were a lot of topics and subtopics listed, and under each subtopic, there was a fairly good reading list, with reviews by students and faculty. However, the topic she had in mind was not really covered, so she sought help from the librarian in the Business School. After getting a list of articles relevant to the preliminary topic she had decided upon, she uploaded them onto the ICOS website for others to share and review. Indeed, some readings were already commented, so those comments were pulled from the database to appear under her list, although not all comments were useful for her topic. Proceeding with her paper, Liza reviewed the reading list one by one to see if she can refine or redefine the topic for her paper. At this point, she thought talk discussing this with other people (students and faculty) would be useful. She logs on to ICOS website again to go to the community section, and posted a request for help in reviewing her topic question. She did get some response from other community members—some from other countries; some even suggested her more relevant articles to read. At the same time, she was also able to talk to a few fellow students whom she managed to catch after class, and with the ICOS instructors. She was very happy with the response and eventually got to refine her questions. At the same time, she also wanted to subscribe to the news feeds (RSS) on topics related to organizational studies, but it was tough to locate one. Other topics did have RSS feeds, but for hers, she had to do it almost from scratch, but she didn’t mind doing it as she thought it would be useful for others later on. After receiving feedback from the ICOS Co-Director/Instructor on the topic she has chosen, she proceeded to write her first draft of the paper. Throughout the research and writing process, she posted questions and solicited ideas about her topic, and many members were willing to offer her some input. She was always aware of the code of conduct and plagiarism, and she was also reminded by others on the online discussion forum on ICOS. At the end, she managed to complete her paper, and in the process discovered a treasure trove in terms of materials in organizational studies that exist within the community’s collective repository.

Jane, Organizational Behavior Expert, Invited Speaker
Dr. Jane H. Kilduff is the Chaired Professor of Organizational Behavior at INSEAD, France. She is 40 years old, is divorced and has no children. She is American; she

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moved to Europe around 8 years ago after her divorce, in search of a better, peaceful life. She wanted to forget about her past life and hoped to start a new one afresh in France, while enjoying an equally exciting and challenging phase in her career. The INSEAD job offer had seemed perfect and she has been enjoying her high profile professional life all the same. All the same, she is a die-hard American deep inside, and she misses everything about her country. She looks forward to official trips that take her to the USA once in a while. Jane had always been a Michigan girl. Having been born and brought up in Dexter, she went on to do her undergraduate as well as graduate studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Recently, her book titled “Working Identity: Unconventional Strategies for Reinventing Your Career” has been published, and in the first week of its release it has proved to be quite a success within related domains. Her publishers have requested her to make a trip to a few cities in the USA to promote this book. It is around this time that she has heard from Dr. Mike Sonors an old college friend of hers. Dr. Sonors is now a professor at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. In his email Dr. Sonors introduced her to ICOS, an organization within the University with the goal of enhancing the Michigan's strength as a world center for interdisciplinary research and scholarship on organizations. Jane has been cordially invited by the ICOS Co-Directors to give a talk on her newly published book. Jane is quite excited at the prospect of delivering a talk at her alma mater. She quickly opens up the link to the ICOS site provided to her in the email, eager to find out what ICOS is really about. The site opens up to a rather contemporary looking page, with a paragraph describing the intrinsic goal of the organization. The front page also has details about a featured speaker of the coming week. She checks out the speaker’s profile and is quite impressed to learn that this organization woos scholars and researchers of high standing. Next, Jane wants to find out a bit more about the people involved in this organization. She looks for an appropriate link on the header bar of the page, and clicks on the “About Us” link. Having navigated through the site for some time, Jane now has a decent idea about the organization. However, she is still not sure if she will be able to fit in this invitation in her schedule. She recalls Dr. Sonors had written about some feature on the website that can show her a schedule of speakers for the coming 6 months, so that she may be able to decide when she can make it to the lecture. Nevertheless, this entails a significant process change. Jane goes back to her inbox, and realizes that she has received another mail from the organization’s coordinator. In this mail, she found a link to an already set up account for herself on the ICOS site. She followed the link and logged in with the account login information she was provided with in the second email. Here, she found a schedule that showed her the days in the next 6 months, when slots for lectures were available. Jane checked up with her personal schedule and found that she could have two options for scheduling this lecture at ICOS during her 10 day trip to the USA. For one of the optional days, she noticed that Dr P.C. Kanha was scheduled to deliver his speech right

SI 631 W/08 ICOS Web Project before the slot she had in mind. Nevertheless, this also entails a significant process change, and due to the timing, may be unlikely..

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Dr. Kanha has been one of Jane’s favorite authors on Social Psychology. She had always dreamt of meeting him someday and be able to exchange some thoughts and ideas. Jane was now quite sure about which day she would choose for her lecture. Excited, she clicked on the slot right after Dr. Kanha’s. She followed the step by step instructions to confirm her visit, uploaded her photograph of herself to be displayed on the ICOS website, and was rather glad to hit on the “Submit” button at the end of it. She soon got a confirmation email for her visit. The thought of going back to her old school after years, while being able to meet with one of her idols brought a smile to her face.

Keith, Affiliated Faculty
Dr. Keith Simons, 55, is a Distinguished University Professor of Law and Sociology at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. He leads a happily married life with Susan and has two teenage daughters. He is a family man, who likes to lead a modest, comfortable life with his near and dear ones. Till about four years ago, the Simons family lived in Cambridge, MA, where Susan was a professor of Biology at MIT, and Keith taught at the Department of Sociology. A few years ago Susan received a lucrative offer from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at U of M, to further expand her ongoing research on “Enterococcal plasmids”. Being a supportive husband, Keith encouraged his wife to take up this wonderful job opportunity and thus the family moved to Ann Arbor. Keith was able to get associated with the Law School and the LSA (The College of Literature, Science, and the Arts) and has been a faculty at the U of M since then. He has been actively involved with ICOS as a Faculty member. He is also a professor of the OS (Organizational Studies) Program, offered to undergrad students by the LSA. It is that time of the year when the LSA receives applications from undergrad students for the OS Program. Dr. Simons is one of the key persons on the selection committee. Since last year around this time, Dr. Simons has been observed that the number of applications received for this program is not up to their expectations (never happened, but likely still). The deadline for this year is soon approaching; however the number of applications received by now clearly indicates a dearth of awareness for this program. Simons feels that the ICOS website can be effectively be used to spread the word about the OS Program across, since a significant number of undergraduates interested in Organizational studies and related subjects may visit the ICOS site and/or attend the ICOS seminars. Dr. Simons goes to the ICOS website and logs in with his username and password. He looks for the “Edit my profile” button on the left menu bar and clicks on the same. Next, he finds a lot many types of functionality which he can use to edit his details, upload files, post links etc. Dr. Simons decides to include a prominent link to the OS Program

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on his profile. On his profile page, he also decides to highlight the fact he is a teaching faculty of the OS Program at the LSA. Having saved the changes he made to his profile, Keith finds himself surfing the website with no particular goal in mind. He peruses through some of the other faculty profiles listed above and below his profile on the site. During the course of this aimless surfing, Dr. Simons comes upon the profile of one Dr. Louis Berger, a faculty at the Department of Psychology. A small tag next to Dr. Berger’s profile link says “new”, that intuitively tells the user that he is a new faculty member of ICOS. Keith follows the link inquisitively, and learns that Dr. Berger is currently working on a research that deals with “victimization in organizations, focusing in particular on how those experiences intersect with gender”. This subject instantly engages Keith in deep thought. He realizes that he had often mused on those lines, but had never really given his thoughts any concrete form. Dr. Simons then decides to introduce himself to Dr. Berger at the next ICOS seminar and have a chat with him about mutual interests.

David, Industry Executive, Interested Visitor
David, 34, lives and works in nearby Detroit, where he is a Human Resources Executive in one of the major automotive companies. He enjoys living in the Detroit area, as he’s a big music fan, and all the major tours stop in Detroit. While David is unmarried, he’s been thinking about asking out a woman he met at the last concert he went to. Even though working in HR isn’t the most exciting job, he enjoys it and hopes it leads to further advancement in the future. While having lunch together, one of David’s fellow HR managers tells him about a paper he just read dealing with a new way of organizing work groups within a company structure. Curious, David looks up the author, whose website states that the author will be presenting at an upcoming ICOS lecture. This leads David to the ICOS website, where he notes the scheduled date for the author’s appearance, and the topic of his presentation. After reading a bit of the attached paper, he decides it could be interesting to see the presentation. While visiting the site, David is interested to see what the past topics have been. Looking through the archives, several of the paper titles catch his eye. After reading some of the comments made by other users, he makes a note to come back and peruse the papers and download the recordings of the presentations. Some of them looked quite interesting, but he doesn’t have time to read them right now. As he is about to leave the site, David spots an RSS feed logo on the site, and decides it might be a good idea to be kept informed of upcoming speakers. After adding the feed address to Google Reader, David marks his calendar with the date of the upcoming presentation by the author he was interested in hearing.

Team-ICOS Jonathan Cohen Anindita De Nik Rozaidi Rashid Benjamin Worrel

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture
First Submitted: February 11, 2008 Revision: February 17, 2008

CONTENT TYPES................................................................................................................................1 TAXONOMY ......................................................................................................................................3 SITE NAVIGATION .............................................................................................................................4

CONTENT TYPES
The site will include the following content types. All content types include a brief description and are further divided into sub content types as listed below. Additional fields are specified below. USER PROFILE • Name • Email • Photograph • Affiliations • Interests / Research (tags) • Expertise (tags) • Courses taken (tags) • ICOS Subgroups • Mailing lists associated with (linked to mailing list) • Personal blog (linked to blog)

BLOGS • Blog author (link to user profile) • Blog URL • Blog classification – group, student, faculty • Blog entry date • Blog entry title & description • Blog tags / category

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MAILING LIST • Name • Email • Mailing List Groups • Preferences – daily or weekly digest, HTML or text-only, full text or teaser w/link

LECTURE • Start Date • End Date • Title of Lecture • Venue • Lecture Promo Description • Name of Speaker • Speaker’s Photo • Speaker’s Homepage • Speaker’s Affiliation • Background reading papers • Screencast Recording • Tags

SPONSORS • Name of sponsor school • Description of sponsor school • Courses offered (related to ICOS) • Course description • Faculty members • Link to faculty profile

COURSES • Name of School • Course title • Course code • Course description • Course tags • Faculty / Resource persons (link to user profile) • List of relevant reading materials

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TAXONOMY
From our interviews and research, we envision the need for four vocabularies: topics/interests, courses & departments, and qualitative ratings. The topics/interests vocabulary would allow user controlled, free tagging. While we plan to let users create any tags they wish, content managers may pre load the vocabulary with a set of terms likely to be used by the site users. This will allow ICOS to reinforce the intended use of this particular vocabulary, which is to tie together numerous content types together by topic. Users will be able to tag their own profiles, lecture recordings, blog posts, linked courses, etc with the topical tags. This will allow other members to quickly and efficiently find related content or other users with similar interests. A courses vocabulary is intended to relate the site content to courses affiliated with or related to ICOS. Throughout the University there are numerous courses that have content which could be of interest to the ICOS community. Students in particular have interest in finding useful courses. In addition to tagging their own user profiles with courses that they have taken, users will be able to tag content on the site with course names. Student will then be able to find which courses they should look into based on a recording of an ICOS lecture or a user’s listed interests. To help with consistency of tagging, we intend to provide examples of a standardized format, such as using the department/course number (e.g. SI 631). Additionally, users would be able to tag content as relevant or related to particular departments. Not only would this help the recommendation process for students, but also it would provide a way to further highlight the sponsoring departments. Users could use the tags to search for upcoming events related to say, the communications department. Using both courses and departments would provide users with a means to branch out from ICOS to the resources available elsewhere on campus. Finally, a vocabulary based around qualitative ratings, such as “interesting”, “amusing”, “boring” would allow users to easily sow how they feel about a piece of content. As we are attempting to build a community based website, allowing users to add the human touch is an important step. Additionally, such tags let users to better reflect their own tastes and interests, and to share these with others. Students could find what their classmates think is worth looking at or what to avoid. While these vocabularies give site users a great deal of freedom in tagging content, we believe that the user community is invested enough to be responsible taggers. If for some reason this wasn’t the case, some form of moderation could be implemented. Implementing an auto-complete aid while entering tags would increase consistency when entering tags by reducing different versions of tags (singular/plural, capitalizations, etc). Additionally, we intend to place a tag cloud in a sidebar beneath the main navigation menu. Not only will this highlight commonly used tags, but also it will allow users to find content by topic rather than a traditional hierarchical tree.

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SITE NAVIGATION The Home Page
This document provides a look inside our development process. It does not represent a final configuration. Some, but not all of the design strategies and features will be available in the iteration we deliver at the end of this semester. The paper prototype home page in this document is designed with the goal of fast access to a rich history of 200+ lecture recordings, upcoming events, member information, and making vibrant community activity visible. The home page also hopes to foster exploration, discovery, and serendipitous connections between members. Member content is prominently displayed to encourage collaboration, participation, and the sharing of ideas.

Pretty Rotating Image

Persistent Content Blocks • ICOS Logo – A clickable graphic that links to the home page. Due to the common implementation of this practice across many web sites, visitors may intuitively click here to navigate home rather than look to a navigation menu. • Pretty Rotating Image – Displays a random community highlight from a library of image files. The image changes on each page load or refresh.

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Log In and Search – Login and Password fields enable members to access and edit their personal content and information. New members can click on “Sign Up” to create an account, while “Forgot PW” will lead members who misplaced or can’t remember their password through a series of steps to authenticate their identity and receive an email with a password reminder. Search queries redirect to a page with results from all content types (blog, lecture, profiles, etc.), where visitors can also opt to use an advanced search and narrow their query. Personal Information – Create Content allows members with appropriate access privileges to add content like seminar recordings, blog articles, and schedule information. My Content directs to an archive of individual contributions. Account Management allows members to edit profile information and other administrative details. Navigation – Links are grouped into three categories: Administrative, Content, and Resources. o Administrative – Home directs to this landing page, About/Contact includes information from the current page “ICOS Abbreviated”, and Schedule/Syllabus includes current course information, the event calendar, and access to past ICOS seminar syllabi. o Content – Seminar Recordings directs to the existing archive of past ICOS seminars, Blog Directory directs to a list of group and individual blogs, and People Directory directs to a list of member profiles and filter options (faculty, student, speaker, guest, etc.) o Resources – Find Related Courses directs to a tag cloud of course titles. By clicking on a course title such as SI 631, visitors will see a list of other courses that members enrolled in who took that course. Sponsors directs to a page of affiliated departments. Seminars of Interest directs to content adapted from the original ICOS page of the same title. Mailing List directs to a page that offers notification options.

Local Content Blocks • Next Lecture – The current ICOS web site notably displays information about the next seminar on its home page. Echoing this design will extend the current practice of immediately providing visitors with information about upcoming events with the additional benefit of aiding the transition from the old layout to the new. • Spotlight Recording – Displays a link to download a random seminar recording from the archive. With over 200 recordings and growing, this feature should help people become more aware of the wealth of content ICOS has to offer and a decade’s worth of history. Most Recent Recording – Displays a link to download the most recent seminar recording uploaded to the archive. This feature should help people quickly find a recent seminar recording, as well as help acclimate newcomers and prospective speakers.

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Upcoming Lectures – Displays a list of upcoming seminar topics. If visitors aren’t interested in next week’s lecture, they can quickly see which upcoming seminar may interest them. Tag Cloud (Popular Tags) – Displays recent tags across all content: blog articles, related courses, seminar recordings, etc. Clicking on a tag directs to a list of related items, which should help visitors discover content. Frequent tags are represented with larger font sizes. All Blog Posts – Aggregates posts from all group and individual blogs to give visitors and members a quick view into the pulse of the community. Top Contributors – Displays a list of members who participated the most during a recent timeframe. This may help give members an incentive to tag seminar recordings and related courses, as well as create blog posts and other content.

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Scenario 1
The visitor views website to find information about upcoming lecture, download reading material, learn about ICOS, etc.

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Public views upcoming lecture Friday, Feb 12, 2008
Upcoming ICOS Lecture
Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Log In
Username Password Create New Account Forgot password

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

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ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming ICOS Lecture
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Log In
Username Password Create New Account Forgot password

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008)

News Highlight / Spotlight

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Public views on Regulating Online Lecture Behavior previous and (Friday, Jan 8, 2007) See discussion featured lecture See recording

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Public Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Online Communities learns Lecture onof Colorado. School ofby Prof Markley, University Education. Jude about Yew will introduce the speaker. ICOS See reading list Community & Previous Lecture News Highlight / Spotlight • Groups community Lecture on Drupal CMS Lecture on Regulating Online • People Directory
• Blogs
(Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Upcoming ICOS Lecture

Log In
Username Password Create New Account Forgot password

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

8

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming ICOS Lecture
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Log In
Username Password Create New Account Forgot password

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

Public views future events

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

9

Scenario 2
Administrator creates new content for Lecture node – as part of the next term’s calendar, or to update content with new information (e.g. upload photo, paper)

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming Events
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Log In
Username Password Create New Account Forgot password

STEP 1

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

10

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming Events
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Webmaster Create content • Lecture Log out News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

STEP 2

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Submit Lecture
Start Date Title Venue Topic (tags) Speaker’s Name Speaker’s Homepage Speaker’s Affiliation Reading List Screencast Recording Browse Browse Upload Upload End Date

Webmaster Create content • Lecture Log out

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Upcoming Events

STEP 3

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Submit

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

11

Scenario 3
Public wishes to create new account to join ICOS community and participate Administrator will need to approve first.

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming Events
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Log In
Username Password

STEP 1

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Create New Account Forgot password

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

12

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Create New User Account
User Name Email address

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

STEP 2

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Create new account

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Create New User Account
Thank you for applying for an account. Your account is currently pending approval by the site administrator. In the meantime, your password and further instructions have been sent to your e-mail address.

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

STEP 3

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

13

STEP 4 (User gets email)

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming Events
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Log In

Username Password

STEP 5 (Admin)

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Create New Account Forgot password

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

14

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming Events
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Webmaster

Administer • User Management • Users

STEP 6

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Activate New User Account
View
Name Email address Status • Blocked • Active Groups • ICOS Student • Researcher • Speaker • Unaffiliated member • ICOS Administrator Update

Webmaster

Bio Profile

Edit
Administer • User Management • Users

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Upcoming Events

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

STEP 7 Approve

Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

15

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Activate New User Account
View Bio Profile Edit
Browse Upload

New user

New user log in
Create content • Blog post Log out

Upload Photo Research Interest Courses taken Upload CV Other information

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

STEP 8 User update Own profile
Browse Upload

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Update

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

16

Scenario 4
Member reads discussion forum / blog and participate – create comment or post blog entry

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming Events
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Log In

STEP 1 Member Password logs in
Username Create New Account Forgot password

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

17

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming Events
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Member Create content • Blog post Log out News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion

Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008)

Member reads Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) discussion Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Create New Blog Entry
Title Tags Body

Member Create content • Blog post Log out

Member posts blog entry

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs Upcoming Events Post blog entry
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

18

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

A Blog Entry
This is blog entry. Whatever you read here is a blog entry. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. Bla ipsum dolor sit bla bla ipsum dolor sit bla bla ipsum dolor sit. dolor sit bla bla ipsum dolor sit bla bla ipsum dolor sit Tags: community, research

Member Create content • Blog post Log out

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Reply to blog
Name Subject Comment Member

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008)

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Member comments
Post comment

Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

19

Scenario 5
Tag searching: Researcher tries to locate people; look for courses with similar tags Student looking for recommended courses;

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming Events
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Log In

STEP 1 Member Password logs in
Username Create New Account Forgot password

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

20

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Upcoming Events
Friday, Feb 12, 2008 Lecture on Online Communities by Prof Markley, University of Colorado. School of Education. Jude Yew will introduce the speaker. See reading list

Member Create content • Blog post Log out News Highlight / Spotlight
Lecture on Regulating Online Behavior (Friday, Jan 8, 2007)

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Previous Lecture
Lecture on Drupal CMS (Friday, Feb 1, 2008) See discussion See recording

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

Latest Blog / Forum Discussion
Online Communities by mhanratt (Feb 22, 2008) Content Management System by joshua. (Feb 23, 2008) Adamician Statistics by ladamic (Feb 12, 2008)

Member clicks tag

ICOS Logo

Search

Navigation
• • • • • Home About ICOS Course Info Recordings Schedule

Search Results for Tag: “community”
People • Paul Resnick • Mark Ackerman Lecture

Member Create content • Blog post Log out

Community
• Groups • People Directory • Blogs

Member reviews tag search results

• Lecture on Online Communities, Prof Markley (Feb 8, 2008) Blogs

Upcoming Events
Lecture on Online Communities (Friday, Feb 8, 2008) Tuesday (Feb 15) Dissertation defense

Popular Tags
blogs community communication computers research information

• A blog entry (Feb 12, 2008) • Another blog (Feb 2, 2008) • Yet another blog entry (Jan 2, 2008)

SI631 Deliverable 3: Information Architecture

21

SI 631

Deliverable 4

ICOS Workflow Analysis
Updated 4/19 – reflects final configuration

Personas indicate a need for five access privilege-based roles: 1) Site Director- i.e., super-admin, can create and remove Site Coordinator privileges. 2) Site Coordinator – moderates member-generated content and adds/removes top-down info. 3) Contributors – Masters/PhD students enrolled in seminar, U of M faculty, Friends 4) Contributors (Group Managers) – Same as contributors – but these roles manage groups. 5) Anonymous Visitor – Any visitor without a site account.

Please see the next page for tables that list Read and Create/Update/Delete privileges by intended action. Note: These controls represent the intended default state for initial deployment at the end of the Winter 2008 semester. Following the tables are draft workflow charts for adding, categorizing, and removing each content type. Workflow Analysis (4/20): Lecture Recordings, Schedule / Calendar, Sponsors, Syllabus, Blog (Individual and Group), Comments, Profiles, Tags, Related Events, About / Contact, Groups (Content), Groups (Admin), Groups (Mail), RSS Subscriptions, Access Control (User), Access Control (Site Coordinator), Static Pages, Announcements, People Directory

SI 631

Deliverable 4

Chart Legend: Y = Yes, N = No Read Director Coordinator Contributor Cont – Group Admin Lecture Recordings Y Y Y Y Schedule / Calendar Y Y Y Y Sponsors Y Y Y Y Syllabus Y Y Y Y Blog Y Y Y Y Comments Y Y Y Y Profiles Y Y Y Y Tags Y Y Y Y Related Events Y Y Y Y About / Contact Y Y Y Y Groups (Content) Y Y Y Y Groups (Admin) Y Y N Y Groups (Invites) Y Y N Y RSS Subscription Y Y Y Y Access Control (User) Y Y Y Y AC (Coordinator) Y Y Y Y Static Page Y Y Y Y Announcements Y Y Y Y People Directory Y Y Y Y Create/Update/Delete Director Coordinator Contributor Cont – Group Admin Lecture Recordings Y Y N N Schedule / Calendar Y Y N N Sponsors Y Y N N Syllabus Y Y N N Blog Y Y Y Y Comments Y Y Y Y Profiles Y Y Y Y Tags Y Y Y Y Related Events Y Y N N About / Contact Y Y N N Groups (Content) Y Y Y Y Groups (Admin) Y Y N Y Groups (Invites) Y Y N Y RSS Subscription Y Y Y Y Access Control (User) Y Y N N AC (Coordinator) Y N Y Y Static Page Y Y N N Announcements Y Y N N People Directory Y Y N N Anonymous Visitor Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y N N Y N N Y Y N Anonymous Visitor N N N N N N N N N N N N Y N Y N N

About / Contact
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator and Co-Directors collaborate to write About text

Coordinator browses to site admin node

Coordinator browses to content management

Coordinator browses to content

Coordinator browses to About

Coordinator updates ICOS description

Coordinator updates contact information Coordinator saves updated content.

Access Control
ICOS - Workflow Co-Director browses to Administer -> User Management -> Access Control Coordinator browses to Administer -> User Management -> Access Control

Co-Director changes user permissions from and to Coordinator, Member, Faculty

Coordinator changes user permissions from and to Member and Faculty

Co-Director or Coordinator saves new access controls.

Announcements
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator or Admin browses to Create Content

Click “Announcement”

Add text, expiration date

Save content

To update, browse to announcement, click “edit” tab.

Save or delete content

Blog Post
ICOS - Workflow Author browses to My Content

Author creates a new blog post

Author writes content. Member applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if comment is profane; if he/she flags as inappropriate:

Author publishes content.

Content appears without approval

Coordinator receives alert

Author edits or deletes content.

Coordinator applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if comment is profane; if he/she judges as inappropriate:

Content updates without approval

Coordinator deletes blog post

Comment
ICOS - Workflow Author browses to a lecture recording Author browses to a speaker’s paper.

Author browses to a blog post

Author creates a new comment

Author writes comment

Author publishes comment

Member applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if comment is profane; if he/she flags as inappropriate:

Comment appears without approval

Coordinator receives alert

Author edits or deletes comment.

Coordinator applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if comment is profane; if he/she judges as inappropriate:

Comment updates without approval

Coordinator deletes comment

Groups (Admin)
ICOS - Workflow Member navigates to My Account

Member navigates to Groups

Member creates a Group

Member decides whether group is public or private

Group appears on public directory without approval

Group remains restricted to invited members

Coordinator receives alert about group creation

Groups (Content)
ICOS - Workflow Member navigates to My Groups

Member navigates to desired Group

Author writes content. Member applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if comment is profane; if he/she flags as inappropriate:

Author publishes content.

Content appears without approval

Coordinator receives alert

Author edits or deletes content.

Coordinator applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if comment is profane; if he/she judges as inappropriate:

Content updates without approval

Coordinator deletes group blog post or comment.

Groups - Invites
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator browses to groups node Group creator browses to group admin node

Coordinator creates a new mailing list

Group creator updates an existing mailing list

Coordinator or Group Creator adds members

Coordinator or Group Creator invites members

Member receives mail alert

Member participates or unsubscribes

Lecture Recording
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator receives a recording file from the Co-Director

Coordinator browses to Create Content

Coordinator creates a new lecture content item

Coordinator uploads the recording file to the site.

Coordinator publishes the recording to the site.

Coordinator links recording to the event node.

People Directory
ICOS - Workflow Member, Coordinator, Administrator browses to People Directory

Member, Coordinator, Administrator may opt to browse by role.

Member, Coordinator, Administrator may opt to sort by name, username, city, or affiliation. Member, Coordinator, Administrator may browse to profile.

Profile Management
ICOS - Workflow Logged-in member browses to Account Management

Logged-in member browses to Edit Profile

Member edits profile fields

Member uploads photo

Member publishes content

Coordinator deletes photo or text

Content appears without approval

Coordinator applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if photo or text is profane; if he/she judges as inappropriate:

Member applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if photo or text is profane; if he/ she flags as inappropriate:

Coordinator receives alert

Related Courses
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator browses to site admin node Faculty member browses to My Account

Coordinator updates courses in “Related Courses”

Faculty member browses to edit profile

Faculty member adds course to “Related courses I’m teaching”

Content appears without Coordinator approval

Coordinator removes outdated courses at his/ her discretion

RSS Subscription
ICOS - Workflow Member clicks syndicate content icon local to specific block Member browses to RSS Feed Listing in MainNav

Member clicks syndicate content icon for specific item of interest

Browser parses feed information

Browser loads subscription URL into user’s RSS reader

Member confirms subscription

Schedule / Calendar
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator receives speaker confirmation

Coordinator browses to Create Content

Coordinator browses to Event

Coordinator fills out calendar item fields, including date, topic, and speaker

Coordinator submits new event

Seminars / Events of Interest
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator receives notice regarding nonICOS seminar or event of interest

Coordinator requests approval from CoDirectors to add new content to seminar/ event interest block.

Coordinator receives approval Coordinator browses to Create Content Coordinator browses to Seminar of Interest

Coordinator adds information to seminar/ event interest block

Coordinator publishes information

Coordinator receives updated event/ seminar information

Coordinator changes relevant listing

Speaker Availability
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator receives email with speaker’s available times

Coordinator browses to site admin node (by module)

Coordinator adds speaker’s available times

Faculty reserve meeting times by checking desired slot

Coordinator mails interested faculty Coordinator receives automatic email alert

Previously available slot is automatically removed to prevent potential conflict

Faculty receive mail

Interested faculty browse to ICOS site and log in

Faculty browse to Speaker Availability menu item

Coordinator notifies speaker

Sponsor Information
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator receives mail from a sponsor contact with organizational information

Coordinator browses to Create Content

Coordinator creates a sponsor block

Coordinator browses to an existing Sponsor block

Coordinator enters information into fields

Coordinator uploads organization images

Coordinator publishes sponsor content

Static Page
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator or Admin browses to Create Content

Click “Page”

Add text, menu settings

Saves content

To update, browse to page, click “edit” tab

Save or delete content

Syllabus
ICOS - Workflow Coordinator receives new syllabus from Co-Directors

Coordinator browses to Create Content

Coordinator creates a new syllabus page

Coordinator enters syllabus information

Coordinator publishes new syllabus

Coordinator browses to Administer -> Site Building -> URL Aliases Coordinator changes paths to current syllabus (e.g., /fall08 to / winter09 Coordinator adds path to previous syllabus in archive

Taxonomy
ICOS - Workflow Member browses to Courses Member browses to Speaker’s Paper Member browses to Lecture Recording Member browses to a blog post Member enters their courses as profile information

Member tags content

Tag appears without approval

Member applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if tag is profane; if he/she believes tag is inappropriate:

Member browses to My Account

Member mails Coordinator with alert

Member browses to My Tags

Coordinator applies his/her subjective criteria to judge if tag is profane; if he/she judges as inappropriate:

Member updates or deletes tag. Coordinator deletes tag

SI631

Deliverable 5

ICOS

Modules Requirement Analysis
This document lists the various Drupal modules that our team has installed on the new ICOS website. A set of basic core modules that have enabled on our site have been listed under the title “ Core Modules” or “Core-optional”. The modules that were downloaded separately from the Drupal site and enabled on our ICOS site have been labeled as the “Non- Core”. These were installed on the site by the site administrators to achieve various kinds of functionality to the site. We have presented the modules used in terms of the overarching functions they contribute towards. Below is a list of the same.

Categorization of content
• Taxonomy (Core-optional): The taxonomy module allows one to classify content into categories and subcategories; it allows multiple lists of categories for classification (controlled vocabularies) and offers the possibility of creating thesauri (controlled vocabularies that indicate the relationship of terms), taxonomies (controlled vocabularies where relationships are indicated hierarchically), and free vocabularies where terms, or tags, are defined during content creation. For example on the site, we have defined “Courses” as a vocabulary term, with its type as “Faculty Details” and “Student Details”. The purpose of the vocabulary term “Courses” is to list courses related to ICOS. Thus on the nodes of type “Faculty Details” and “Student Details” this vocabulary term will be offered. • Tagadelic (Non-core): This module makes weighted tag clouds from our taxonomy terms. For example, the Interests field contents on our site are considered as tags and appear within a tag cloud on the homepage, sorted by title in an ascending order. For example, we have allowed users to tag entries such as “Courses I teach related to ICOS” and “My interests”. These usercontributed tags are also terms belonging to vocabularies.

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ICOS

Content Taxonomy options (Non-core): This module defines an option widget type for content_taxonomy for selects, radios/checkboxes. For example, let us suppose we have created an email field with the name “Email”. To ensure that a user enters only an email into the field in an email format, we choose fieldwidget type as Email textfield and choose the following options to mould the email textfield. Here the size of texfield has been set to 60 characters.

Content Taxonomy Autocomplete (Non-core): this module defines an autocomplete widget type for taxonomy under content. In the example below, for the vocabulary term “Courses I’ve taken”, the autocomplete widget has been added.

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ICOS

Registration process and login
• Registration modifier (Non-core): This module allows the admin to setup different membership types. Each uses a unique pageroute (URL) such that with every different membership a use chooses, he is directed to a different URL to fill up his details. The example below shows a registration instance, which asks the user his choice of membership type ie Faculty, Student or Friend. If the user chooses “Faculty” as his membership type he will be guided to a registration page for a faculty that will ask him(among other things) to fill into the “Courses I teach” textfield. Whereas, if the user chooses to have a Student account, he will be asked to fill up a “Courses I have taken” textfield.

Logintoboggan (Non-core): This module offers several modifications of the Drupal login system in an external module by offering the following features and usability improvements, like allowing users to login using either their username OR their e-mail address etc. An example of the above is shown below

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ICOS

Look and Feel
• Panels (2.0) (Non-core): This module allows one to create pages that are divided into areas of the page. The layout of a user profile shown below is the result of using the Panels module

Content template (Contemplate) module (Non-core): This module allows modification of Drupal's teaser and body fields using administrator defined templates. For example, with the help of this module we defined the size of the pictures that will be displayed in the view of user profile and next lectures, such that irrespective of the size of the picture that the user uploads, the picture ultimately displayed will be of uniform size and dimensions.

Automatic Node Title (Non-core): This module allows hiding of the node title field and automatic title creation. To prevent empty node title fields it sets the title to the content type name or to a configurable string.

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Create/customize Profiles
• Advanced Profile (Non-core):: The Advanced Profile module uses Panels 2 to display customized user information on the user view tab. The information is taken from nodeprofile, the core profile module. Node Profile (Non-core): This module builds user profiles as nodes, which opens the opportunity to use the Content Construction Kit (CCK). So it's possible to make use of the field types, which are available for CCK. For example in the screenshot below we can see that for the profile of a user with username mpatrick, a new node has been created. Thus, at the end of the URL the users’s username is added and this makes a separate node for his profile.

Image (Non-core): This module allows uploading of image We made use of this module to be able to upload images of speakers, as well be allow users to upload their pictures in their profiles

5

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Deliverable 5

ICOS

Encouraging community interaction
• Blog (Core-optional): This module enables keeping easily and regularly updated user web pages or blogs.

Comments (Core-optional): This module allows users to comment on and discuss published content Tagadelic (Non-core): has been discussed earlier under Define categorization of content Userpoints basic (Non-core): This module enables users to earn points as they post nodes, comments, write blogs and tag items. On this site, we have removed the “points” corresponding to each user on request of our client, and instead have enabled just a list of users under “Most active users”

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6

SI631

Deliverable 5

ICOS

Search feature on site
• Search (core-optional): This module is the Drupal search module and enables site-wide keyword searching. Faceted search (Non-core): The Faceted Search module provides a search API and a search interface for allowing users to browse content in such a way that they can rapidly get acquainted with the scope and nature of the content, and never feel lost in the data. More than a search interface, this is an information navigation and discovery tool. The main reason for us using this module was to enable search within the CCK fields as well, something that the Search module was not being able to do.

Event (lecture) Management
• Basic event (Non-core): This provides an event API to allow other modules to store and work with date data. Below is an example of an event created by customizing the API

7

SI631

Deliverable 5

ICOS

Groups management
• Organic groups (Non-core): This module enables users to create and manage their own 'groups'. On the ICOS website we have implemented “groups” in such a way that members may be able to create groups constituting other members with a common interest. These groups can then be given different mailing addresses, subscribers may be allowed to post blogs on these groups etc. Organic groups mandatory group (Non-core): This module makes one group mandatory for new users and/or requires new users to pick a group. On the ICOS site, we have made the ICOS main group as the mandatory group that every registered member automatically subscribes to.

Other modules:
• Menu (Core-optional): Allows administrators to customize the site navigation menu Beside are two menus on the site, which have been placed in the left sidebar

Pathauto (non-core): Provides a mechanism for modules to automatically generate aliases for the content they manage. Views (Non-core): The views module creates customized views of node lists. This tool is essentially a smart query builder that, given enough information, can build the proper query, execute it, and display the results.

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