I.E.S. Francisco de Goya "Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History.

Item 2: THE PERIOD OF CLASSIC GREEK SCULPTURE History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the Class ical period. 1 I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . 1 .- General characteristics of Greek sculpture. 1.1 Introduction and chronology . 1.2 Features general. 2 .- Historical Development 2.1 The beginning: the Archa ic period. 2.2 The transition to the severe style classicism classicism 2.4 2.3 Hellenism (IV-III century BC) 1 .- General characteristics of Greek sculpture. 1.1 Introduction and chronology The most novel contribution of Greek sculpture compared to the eastern (Egyptia n, Mesopotamian) is the discovery of aesthetic contemplation. The figures outsid e their meaning (usually religious), attracted by its own beauty. The art become s an activity, valuable in itself. Most of the works that have reached us of the great masters of the classical period are not original but Roman copies which s hows great admiration for the Roman people Greek art. In the historical developm ent of Greek sculpture are the same three periods we have seen in the architectu re: 1 .- Archaic (until the V century BC) 2nd .- Classic and Postclassic: V and IV centuries BC .. 3 .- Hellenistic: From the late fourth century BC 1.2 Feature s General General characteristics of Greek sculpture bearing in mind that some o f these vary depending on the different periods are: a) The cult of the man who becomes the center of the sculpture. It is a figure size "human" even though they represent gods or important figures. b) The concern for capturing the physical beauty and spiritual balance (what Greek philosophers called "sophrosyne"). The beauty is conceived as a harmony be tween the parties, and is an idealized beauty (especially in the classical perio d). History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the Class ical period. 2 I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . c) The search for the expressiveness of the face is an achievement to get full the classical period. d) The representation of movement, also the result of a long evolution and reach es to fruition during the Hellenistic period (The reliefs of the Pergamon Altar and the group Laooconte and their children are two examples) e) f) Concern about the volume and appearance of multiple terms. Use of color in the s culptural decoration. The reliefs and sculptures in the round, whether in stone, bronze or marble, were living polychromy of which only remains scarce. The cost umes, lips, eyes, hair and even meat, had a special color to bring realism to th

e figure g) The use of bronze (cast) as the most common material. However, most of the works we know are marble copies of the originals in bronze. They used col ored glass embedded in his eyes and lips painted red. Used on special occasions chryselephantine technique (gold and ivory materials). h) But the sculptors did not merely reproduce their models more naturalist and accurately as possible, seeking the beauty ideal prototypes and n umerical calculations performed for this very subtle and geometric to get the pe rfect proportions (eg the Canon of Polykleitos) 2 .- Historical Development 2.1 The beginning: the Archaic period . During the S. IX-VIII a. BC, the Greeks tryi ng to draw their own language through the first ivory votive offerings, bronze o r terra cotta in the round, and made the first relief. From this period scarcely any remains. In S. VII a. C. They get some Expressionism with Xoana (religious statues made of wood) that resemble tree trunks with a slight narrowing at the w aist. They looked very hieratic (rigid) as a result of Eastern influence. We kno w from literary evidence and by later stone sculptures (Lady of Auxerre, Hera of Samos). The initial phase of Greek sculpture, which was a learning phase, is re presented by statues of athletes or Kuroi (singular: Kuros) and dressed female r epresentations or Korai (singular: Kore) History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the Class ical period. 3 I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . The Kuroi were long regarded as representations of the god Apollo (today they ar e still called Apollo) owe their existence to the custom which existed among the Greeks to erect statues in honor of the victors in sporting competitions. They are therefore Greek statues of athletes. They are not real portraits but its fea tures are repeated (prominent eyes, ears, unnatural hair is a compact mass, trav ersed by geometric lines and falls on the back and a fringe of curls on the fore head, the mouth is represented or a straight line or bending upward in a smile ( smile archaic). Obey the Law of the frontal, rigid arms are attached to the body , shoulder high and horizontal. They are in a walking position, with left leg fo rward . The body is naked. Kuroi Among the best known and which meet the specifi ed characteristics can include: group and Biton Cleobis dating to 600 BC found i n the Museum of Delphi and is characterized by the strength of the figures The K uros to Anavyssos representing a young athlete named Krois and represents a clea r step forward towards naturalism even more evident in the so-called Apollo of P iombino folding his arms, breaking the frontal and Critias Efebo. Sometimes kuro i carry on their shoulders a sheep for slaughter (Moscoforo). The Korai female r epresentations are wrapped or dressed in a long robe that are placed on the wide covered with a blanket or shawl. The dress appears very geometric folds is the represents smiling, smiling stereotypical (also called archaic smile) and her ha ir tied back. They are of varying size. Its evolution towards naturalism is part icularly evident in the ever more perfect organization of the folds of the garme nts and the hair, the bulging chest and narrowing of the hips. it was painted an d were made by different schools of sculpture (Ionian, Attic and Peloponnesian). Among the korai best known and best preserved we can cite the Lady of Auxerre, the Hera Samos, the Kore of the Kore Peplos and 675 with abundant remains of pol ychrome 2.2 The transition to classicism and the severe style in the last phase of the Archaic period are moving toward greater naturalism and presented to the human figure in motion to adapt compositions to the triangular shape of History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the Class

ical period. 4 I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . pediments. Of these the most interesting is the Fronton Aphaea temple on Aegina. This is a collection of the late Archaic period: it is dated 490 BC It is locat ed in Munich. It represents the struggles of Aeginetans led by Ajax against the Trojans, chaired by Pallas Athena. Sculpture is an example of dynamic, full of m ovement and muscle study and knowledge of anatomy. But the faces are still not v ery expressive (stereotyped smile) One of the first attempts to adapt to the spa ces sculptural compositions of the pediments. Here the two pediments order their dynamic battle scenes around the central figure of Athena. After an evolutionar y process towards naturalism already indicated, this phase begins in the sculptu res of the first third of SV ac in the style known as severe, which already anno unced the classical world. The most representative works of this final moment of transition to classicism is the Charioteer of Delphi, the Ludovisi Throne and t he rider Rampin The charioteer of Delphi is a very representative example of the severe style. Its author was probably Pythagoras of Samos. Made of bronze and o nly figure that remains of a sculpture complex. Represents the driver of a chari ot victory. Polizalos could be the tyrant of Gela in Sicily, which immortalized and his triumph at the Games of 474 BC Pythias Of great elegance and beauty, he still has some stiffness and hair archaic plano.Lo best sculpture is the study o f the head that presages the Discus Thrower. The treatment of the chiton (tunic) is more archaic and their folds resemble the striations of the Doric column but are all different. The materials used are brass, glass eyes and traces of silve r in the headband. It has 180 cm. Height and comes from the Sanctuary of Apollo at Delphi. The Ludovisi Throne Artwork clear transition to classicism, it is a m arble triptych first third of the V a.c's in Rome (Terme Museum) The central mai n board represents the birth of Aphrodite from the sea helped by two maids and f oreshadows the technique of wet cloths, leaving transparent anatomical forms of Aphrodite, and the two maidens holding it. This technique was brought to perfect ion by Phidias in the reliefs of the Parthenon The two side plates are two femal e figures sacred symbols of love and profane love in similar positions, playing a double flute naked and one clothed and burning incense. Rampin Rider (or Rampi n Caballero) History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the Class ical period. 5 I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . As a final example of this transition to classicism cite one of the few equestri an portraits of Greek sculpture: it is the rider Rampin archaic traits that repr esents an important personage (laurel crown, beard and mustache carefully.) It w as painted and is approx. 560 year A.C. 2.3 The Classic:. (V and IV centuries BC) a) V Century BC:. Myron, Phidias Polyc leitus and artistic production of the Classical period is characterized by ideal ization (ideal human type, according to Plato's ideas), the equilibrium (not int erested in violence but Serenity), and dignity in the treatment of gods, both of which summarize the ideals of the sculpture of S. V. Will look for a canon of b eauty. (That is, the beauty ideal). The three great sculptors of this period are Myron, Phidias Polycleitus and whose output coincides with control of Pericles on the Athenian polis. Athens was the main (though not sole) artistic center of Greece. 1 .- Miron is chronologically the first sculptor of classicism why his w ork still has some archaic tone. Myron was a bronze-smith and worked in the firs

t half of S. V. He was interested mostly to the study of human body in motion, s o do not hesitate to put the figures in violent attitudes, as in the "Group of A thena and Marsyas" and especially in his most famous and copied: "The Discus Thr ower" representing an athlete in the time prior to the release of the album, lea ning forward in an unstable equilibrium and supported only on the sole of his ri ght foot and left toes But despite what is innovative composition, treatment of the anatomy is not fully achieved: your muscles are flat her face is expressionl ess and her hair is archaic in its treatment (geometry). 2.-Polykleitos History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the Class ical period. 6 I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . Polykleitos was a native of Argos in the Peloponnese where there was a very pres tigious school bronzesmiths. He was a contemporary of Phidias and was interested in the theoretical foundations of the sculpture: for him, the human body is cal culated and proportion. Each body part should be of adequate size in relation to the others. He wrote a treatise in which he explained the Canon, or proportiona l system had developed in his sculptures: established the canon of seven heads, in which the proportion of the human body should contain seven times that of the head. The work in which she put into practice the aesthetic ideas Doryphoros li terally "spear carrier." It was cast bronze copies but only preserved in marble. Made approximately to the 450-440 A.C. Ms measured 2'12 tall and depicts a youn g under way, with smooth movement. The overall height is between 7 and 8 head to this harmonious relationship of parts with other symétrie called. Another novel ty is the way to move the figure to counterbalance or contraposto. The bronze fi gure facilitates lean on one foot. The left arm is bent, so the figure gains in depth. The right arm (in opposition) verticalmentev falls. Left leg forward and the figure is based on the right. The head is off to the left of the viewer. The other major work for which is recognized as one of the Polykleitos peaks of cla ssicism is "the Diadumenos" who is an athlete win Adhering tape (although it has been said that is a representation of the god Apollo). It a.C. 440-430 His tors o is bent more than the Doryphoros, his legs are shorter and the expression on h is face is sweeter. Also expresses here the Greek ideal of beauty in both the an atomy and proportion. 3 .- FIDIA is the most important sculptor of the classical Greek.€His work culminated earlier attempts to achieve the ideal balance expres sive anatomic as Athens had been sharing the cultural and artistic leadership of Magna Graecia, Sicily and the Peloponnese, but eventually imposed on them due t o the economic prosperity achieved by the victory of Salamis against the Persian s. The role of art director penthouse is in relation to the figure of the great Phidias, whose influence determines Greek art over a long period. History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the Class ical period. 7 I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . Phidias masterfully served all branches of art. His work represented a breakthro ugh because it decided how to decorate the lower corners of the pediments, he tu rned the body so that the movement was observed from different points of view, e tc. But it was in the treatment of drapery which revealed Phidias fertility and refinement of his visual imagination. The abundant and sinuous folds of the fabr ics that cling to the body as wet cloths to the artist did not stop a study of t he anatomy are in fact an excuse that it uses to achieve an effect of naturalnes s in the treatment of human body . . Pericles (495-429 BC) commissioned Pheidias address the work of the Parthenon and several sculptures in the round to the Ac

ropolis, where his major works. He made several sculptures of the goddess Athena , the only known copies: Promachos Athena, goddess of war, with helmet and spear . It was huge (15m high), made in bronze to be placed in front of the Parthenon. Lemnians Athena, in bronze, in the shape of Athenian girl wearing a simple robe . For Athena Parthenos inside the Parthenon, which was a large-scale sculpture c risoelefantina. It represents Athena standing, victorious, giving an impression of movement. His attributes (shield, spear and helmet surmounted by sphinxes and winged horses) are decorated with reliefs and paintings. It appears that Phidia s was accused of being left with gold and ivory for this sculpture and have dare d portray the shield. However, their major program is the set of sculptural reli efs made to decorate the Parthenon and which can be grouped as follows: a) The two gables: the East represents the birth of Pallas and the West reflects th e struggle between Athena and Poseidon for dominance of Athens, in the presence of the families of Cecrops and Erechtheus and where are represented the Fates ex ample of adaptation to the environment and the Wet clothes technique b) The exterior frieze of the naos or cella. (160 ms. In length, 1.06 ms high an d 5 cm deep) Let's look at some of the most significant works of this great set: 1. Panathenaic Procession (maidens or ergastinas) is part of the exterior friez e of the cella of Athena in the Parthenon. This is a scene that is achieved, as all the frieze in low relief, the procession of the Panathenaic represents History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the Class ical period. 8 I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . Athenian maidens, daughters of the best families, offering a robe, woven by them to the goddess Athena's ideal of beauty, the serene balance and the treatment o f the folds is perfect. Each year, ergastinas repeated this ceremony. This fragm ent, which is in the Louvre Museum, presents the Archons setting the pace that t he damsels are in pairs, with step and gesture often modest. All healthy ideal o f beauty and freedom, is reflected in these Athenian girls. The scene opens at t he apex of the west and south walls and then splits in two directions that conve rge on the eastern side, where the Assembly of Gods of Olympus provides the scen e. 2.-The horsemen of the Parthenon frieze. Dealing with their horses the north of the frieze and are reliefs of high quality. The animalistic study of horses i n various positions, as well as human anatomy, show a considerable mastery of sc ulpture. Other participants in the procession, carrying offerings, water, young men with cattle and utensils for sacrifices. The relief presents a perfect drive and has a plastic model insurmountable. Two thirds of the frieze are in the Bri tish Museum., Since 1801. 3.-Gods of the exterior frieze of the naos. This is th e scene on the eastern side of the frieze ran around the naos. We referred to th at scene when dealing with the procession of the Panathenaic€which is regarded b y all the gods of Olympus, at the time of the offering to the goddess of the rob e. The court of Zeus, invisible to mortal eyes, is the scene. Is divided into tw o groups of six gods to each side. On the right are Athena, Hephaestus, Poseidon , Apollo, Artemis and Aphrodite, with her son Eros, and Zeus placed his left han d, Demeter, Dionysus and Hermes. Along with the gods is a group of men standing, which could be heroes, noble-looking Phidias effortlessly seems to have opened the gates of Olympus to summon the sacred citadel, but his respect for the Olymp ics, has made him stop here . The positions of the gods are apathetic, indolent. In the detail of frieze depicting Apollo, Poseidon and Artemis (Acropolis Museu m), the first two talking languidly, as Artemis, wrapped in a thin robe, his pla cid gaze directed elsewhere. c) The metopes of the temple exterior. Reliefs were made in the 92 metopes. Were grouped into four series: The Centauromachy, the T rojan War, the Amazonomachy. and Gigantomachy. History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the Class

ical period. 9 I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . In its implementation is aware of the hand as disciples of Phidias and Myron Cri tias. In the best preserved metope see a Lapita, attacked by a Centaur, which ta kes him by the neck with an attitude of attack with the sword. In metope appears an old man with energy of Titan, which could be Phidias. The composition is wit hin the classic lines. The relief is very large and are really sculptures in the round, which touch the bottom level. Not all space is filled. Thus, most figure s highlight gaps. In addition to the reliefs of the Parthenon is also attributed to Phidias or campus decorating the frieze of the Temple of Athena Nike is curr ently at the Museum of the Acropolis in Athens. The temple was built in 421 a. C . and relieves stresses between their representation of Athena unleashing a sand al. One of the most famous classical reliefs. Probably the author was the sculpt or Phidias Kallimachos disciple. Ideally represented his garments, conveys the s ame restless movement and is another example of the technique of wet cloths. b) The fourth century A.C. The Peloponnesian War marked the political collapse of A thens. It had faced Sparta and its allies. The social and political changes tran sformed the religious sentiment and philosophical thought. All this impacted on the art, which echoed the worries and concerns and addressed existing issues dif ferently. Idealization, serenity and balance, constant in S. V. BC, led to the s earch for naturalness and the interest in showing the feelings and moods of the subjects. Increased expression and emphasis of the movement are also features of the sculpture of this stage appears at this time realistic portrait type as opp osed to the SV ac purely archetypal or ideal. Faced with the stylistic unity of the previous century, there is a greater diversity of schools. The major sculpto rs of this period are Praxiteles, and Lysippus Scopas whose important works we w ill analyze 1.PRAXITELES History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek Sculpture Classical pe riod 10. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . Athenian. Modeled his figures in marble and bronze, composing soft forms, smooth ing fine lines with gently curved. His relationship with the courtesan Fine, mod el and companion of the artist, makes this the sculptor of Aphrodite, the goddes s of love and beauty. The gods of Praxiteles indolent attitudes towards describi ng soft curves and long known as Praxitelean, is recreated in the model helps to give their figures a vague and dreamy. Praxiteles breath worried about psycholo gical influence their work. He preferred the bodies of adolescents with extreme delicacy modeled on a technique that matches the sfumato in painting and helps t o give the feeling of lassitude is so characteristic. One of his most significan t works is Hermes and Dionysus child. This sculptural group was discovered in th e excavations of Olympia in the S. XIX. Some think that is the original and othe rs say is a Roman copy. Completely naked with a slight bend forming arching his hips Praxitelean the gentle curve shows a bunch of grapes he had in his right ha nd to Dionysus a child, you want to catch it. The piece of cloth that covers the trunk where Hermes supports, contributes,€with its quality and vertical folds, to enhance the value of the modeling of his body, while the trials of her hair, and fairly intense, shows, by contrast, the youthful face sfumato. It also highl ights in its production a curious work: it is Apollo Sauroctonos representing a youthful Apollo, god of light, winner of the night and that is about to launch a n arrow on the lizard (symbol of the night), located in the trunk of a tree on w hich it relies Apollo himself. Praxiteles giving here a characteristic of the sc ulptor solution: separating both legs of the figure which if not based on strong support, the figure would fall. Is this the curve Praxitelean. The original was bronze. The copies that remain are marble (Louvre and the Vatican) and bronze (

Villa Albani). His most important female representation is the Aphrodite or Venu s of Cnidus. In ancient times it was considered the most beautiful statue in the world. It is the first time that represents a naked goddess. To do this he soug ht the guise of the goddess is out of the bath, a fully human act. Thus, natural ism justifies the nudity. With a smooth movement of the jar making the cloth on his left, which is a resource that ensures the stability of the figure. It is th e perfect expression of female beauty. The work was painted and had blond hair. History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the perio d 11 classic. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . Are known fifty copies. For the first time in the history of the great sculpture reveals the nature of the goddess of love, which displays Praxiteles unveiled: fully developed breasts, wide hips, shapely legs and finely articulated ankles. Everything about her proclaims love. But in the noble head there is the slightes t hint of lewdness. Only a great artist could perform this miracle. The top righ t arm and left sex takes the cloth to dry. Left leg forward and bend the knee. S copas 2.SCOPAS is another of the great sculptors of S. IV a. C. He was born on t he island of Paros. It belongs to the school of Praxiteles of Athens as it was c ontemporary yet he has more ability to display the most exalted sentiments as lo ve, sensuality, despair, longing, anxiety, desire, ultimately what the Greeks ca lled Pathos. I felt pathetic predilection for expressions, with parted lips and anguished, bitter grin, pointed to the valuation of chiaroscuro, which begins ar ound the eyes to highlight the brow bone. The Maenad his best known work is a co py of something over half a meter that is in the Dresden Museum. Represents the priestess of Dionysus (the Roman Bacchus) in religious delirium, agitated by vio lent convulsive movements, her hair loose and exposing much of his body. In one hand he takes the knife to be opened to channel the kid that was in the other. T his work begins a frenzied expressionism called Pathos scopásico, which influenc e both Hellenism, the Renaissance and the Baroque. Scope was also an architect a nd participated in the decoration of the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, with Leocha res, Bryaxis and Timothy. Lysippus 3.LISIPO part of the second half of S. IV a.C . and it is very clear the influence of Scopas and Praxiteles. It was an extraor dinary bronze-smith and sculptor preferred by Alexander the Great, who was the o fficial portraitist. He brought elegance and flexibility in the representation o f athletes (it was his favorite subject). He repeated the type of athletes matur e at the time of transition from movement to stillness (eg your "Farnese Hercule s") amended the Canon adopted by Polykleitos, establishing a more slender (9 hea ds), which achieved great success. History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the perio d 12 classic. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . The Apoxyomenos (Vatican Museum), which is his most famous work of an athlete in a situation unheroic removing dust and oil, which cover his body with a scraper after finishing their competition. Bronze was performed in 330 a. C. but retain the copy is made of marble. It measures 2'05 and slender proportions, the head is rather small and flexible body, with arm outstretched, his figure includes mo re laterally than the front. The composition varies completely, as we turn aroun d it. His face is full figure, mouth and small eyes do not reflect the passion o f Scopas or the dream of Praxiteles. Compared Doryphorus€offers a full body musc le mobility vibrant. The movement is more suggested than real, more internal tha n external c) Hellenism (IV-III century BC) The conquests carried out by Alexand er the Great and his successors assumed the diffusion of Greek culture over a wi de area. The artistic evolution continued after the death of Alexander the Great , and even after the conquest of Corinth by the Romans. At the end of S. IV a. c

there was a sudden change: Greek art he had pursued in his work balance between reality and ideal beauty, began to abandon these ideals. The sculpture off the traditional spirit of the V and IV a. C., and adopted other features: • • • 1-Tendency to orientalization. (Influence of Oriental art) 2-syncretism (mixture of various influences) that is an example of the Venus de Milo. 3-accentuation of the movement, the pathos and the tensión.Ej. Dying Gaul, which is characteriz ed by its great expressiveness. 4-Special predilection for fantastic themes. 5-I ntroduction scenes from everyday life. Eg El Niño de la Espina (d) 6-Development of realistic tone pictures that recreate themselves in the physical defects in the ugly, in old age. Eg Demosthenes, Diogenes, Seneca. 7-Dispersion of sculptur al centers. There are four schools of sculpture: Pergamon, Rhodes, and Alexandri a Tralles. • • • • Among the most important works of the Hellenistic period we will highlight and a nalyze the following: 1.La Victory of Samothrace. History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek Sculpture Classical pe riod 13. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . It belongs to the School of Rhodes. Is believed to date from the beginning of S. II (190 BC) and was part of the figurehead of a ship, hence the clothes go back as windswept. It is in the Louvre Museum. His body is wrapped in a thin chiton and a mantle shaken by the wind. Roll is very characteristic that makes up the m antle on the right thigh after falling between the legs in a provision figures l ook much the same time. Until now it has been considered statue commemorating th e victory in a naval battle that took place in 305 BC Eastern 2.Friso Altar of Z eus at Pergamum. This Altar dedicated to Zeus built in the first half of the II century BC when Pergamum reached its greatest expansion and wealth under Eumenes II. It is decorated with large reliefs of 2'30 m. high that surrounded three si des by a frieze of 112 m. length. The best preserved reliefs belong to the easte rn frieze. They are kept in the Berlin Museum and represent the struggle between gods and giants, children of Gaia. Zeus and Athena battling their opponents for ming a figure comparable to the fury of the unchained elements. . There is a fan tastic mix of old and young men. The background of the relief disappears behind the tangle of human bodies floating robes, weapons, cars and animals. The sculpt ural technique reveals the influence Scopas style look in those faces visionary and eager mouth. 3.Laocoonte and their children. The best known copy is in the V atican Museum in Rome (first century AD marble). Agesander is the work of Rhodes and their children and Atanadoro Polidoro (the original was a bronze century BC ). It represents one of the most dramatic moments of Greek mythology, when two s nakes curl the body of Laocoon and his sons. Poseidon is the punishment sends th e Trojan priest by fear of the Trojan horse that the Greeks wanted to introduce in the city. It is a very realistic scenario in which we have tried to make a re presentation of pain, with superhuman stress. The pain is physical and moral pri est to see innocent children suffer. There are psychological and plastic unit in this composition. When it was discovered the group lacked the right arm of Laoc oon and one of their children. The rebuilt a Renaissance author who led them int o the sky. In the epitome of the baroque in the History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: 14 Greek sculpture of the cl assic period.

I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . Greek sculpture and its influence on the Renaissance sculptor Michelangelo (See the Moses) is more than evident. GREEK SCULPTURE (1) History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek Sculpture Classical Pe riod 15. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . ARCHAIC PERIOD: THE "kuroi" Greek sculpture (2) History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the perio d 16 classic. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . ARCHAIC PERIOD: THE "Korai" THE TRANSITION TO THE CLASSIC: THE TEMPLE OF AFAI FRONTON (EGIN) History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: 17 Greek sculpture of the cl assic period. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . GREEK SCULPTURE (3) EL ESTILO SEVERO (Charioteer of Delphi, Rampin And Ludovisi Throne CABALLERO) 2.3 The Classic:. (V and IV centuries BC) a) V Century BC:. Voyeurism, and Phidi as Polykleitos History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: 18 Greek sculpture of the cl assic period. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . MIRON: Apollo and Marsyas and the Discus Thrower GREEK SCULPTURE (4) History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek Sculpture Classical pe riod 19. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . Polykleitos: CANON, Doryphoros And Diadumenos Phidias (1) Athena Promachos, Athena Parthenos and the Fates (Elgin Marbles).

GREEK SCULPTURE (5) Phidias (2) Elgin Marbles: Panathenaic Procession History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: 20 Greek sculpture of the cl assic period. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . Phidias (3) Elgin Marbles: Horsemen Phidias (4) Elgin Marbles: THE ASSEMBLY OF THE GODS GREEK SCULPTURE (6) Phidias (5): metopes of the Parthenon History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek Sculpture Classical pe riod 21. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . Phidias (6): METOPA the Parthenon (CENTAURO old) and tying his sandal ATENEA The fourth century A.C. Praxiteles: Hermes and Dionysus, Aphrodite of Cnidus (2) Y APOLO art.2 Saurocton os History Course No. Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek sculpture of the period 22 classic. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . GREEK SCULPTURE (7) Scope: Menad, the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus and Portrait of Meleager Leochares: APOLO. Lysippus: Hercules Farnese and Apoxyomenos History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek Sculpture Classical Pe riod 23. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History . GREEK SCULPTURE (8) Hellenism (IV-III century BC) Victory of Samothrace RELIEF OF THE ALTAR OF ZEUS (Pergamon) History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: 24 Greek sculpture of the cl assic period. I.E.S. "Francisco de Goya" Department of Geography Molina de Segura. and History .

LAOOCONTE AND THEIR CHILDREN MOISES (M. Angel) History Course art.2 º Bl. 2008-2009.Tema Course 2: Greek Sculpture Classical pe riod 25.