INVESTING IN FOOD SECURITY

FINANCING INNOVATIVE SMALLHOLDER BUSINESS MODELS
8 July 2010
Veiverne Yuen Rabobank International

1 Rabobank International 2 Trends in Food & Agribusiness 3 Agriculture as an Asset Class 4 Developing a Platform for Engagement

The information contained in this document is confidential and intended only for use by the intended recipients of this document. No person shall be authorized to copy, disseminate or distribute this document (in  whole  or  in  part)  or  the  information  contained  herein  to  any  unauthorized  persons.  The  distribution  of  this  document  in  certain  jurisdictions  may  be  restricted  by  law  and  the  persons  whose  possession  this  document comes into should inform themselves about and observe any such restrictions. The material contained in this document is drawn from information provided by the client and its group companies and  from generally recognized or available public sources which has not been independently appraised or verified by Rabobank International for its accuracy or completeness.  Certain statements in this document contain words or phrases that are forward‐looking statements. All  forward  looking  statements  are  subject  to  risks,  uncertainties  and  assumptions  that  could  cause  actual  results to differ materially from those contemplated by the relevant forward looking statement. Any opinion, estimate or projection herein constitutes current beliefs as of the date of this document and there can  be no assurance that future results or events will be consistent with any such opinion, estimate or projection. Rabobank International undertakes no obligation to and does not intend to revise forward‐looking  statements to reflect future events, changes in circumstances or changes in beliefs.]  Rabobank International does not represent or warrant, and assumes no responsibility for and accepts no liability whatsoever with respect to the accuracy and completeness of the information herein, the use of or  reliance upon this document or its contents. Any material provided herein, including indicative terms (if any), are provided for information purposes only and does not constitute an offer, a solicitation of an offer,  or an advertisement to subscribe, purchase or sell any product or securities or constitute any advice or recommendation to conclude any transaction. The recipient of this document remains solely responsible for  making any determination or decision to enter into any transaction based on the information contained in this document. By accepting this document, the recipient agrees to be bound by the aforesaid terms and  conditions.

2

Investment Forum for Food Security in Asia and the Pacific, 7‐9 July 2010, Manila, Philippines

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Contents

1 RABOBANK INTERNATIONAL

Rabobank International
• Present in 48 countries worldwide with 1,633 offices  • Over 59,000 staff serving over 9.5 million clients • Ranked 6th safest bank in the world
Global Finance, October 2009

• AAA / Aaa / AA+ rated
Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s, since 1981 Dominion Bond Rating Service, since 2001

• Best Developed Markets Bank in the Netherlands
Global Finance, February 2010

• Total assets of EUR 607.7 billion 
Rabobank, December 2009

• Net profit of EUR 2.3 billion 
Rabobank, December 2009

4

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Rabobank International

F&A Banking for Over a Century
Subsidiaries service their own client base and  customers of Rabobank under their own labels
Wholesale and Retail Banking

Asset &  Investment  management

Real estate financing &  development Leasing Mortgage  brokerage Insurance
Rabobank is 39% shareholder

5

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Rabobank International

Products and Services
Corporate Finance • • • • Private Placements Structured Finance Trust Preferred Securities Securitization Corporate Lending • Senior Term Debt • Revolving Credit Facilities • Working Capital Lines  Leveraged Finance • Acquisition Finance • LBO/MBO Finance

Treasury Products • Derivative Products • Investment Products

Advisory & Research • Mergers & Acquisitions • F&A Research • Strategic Advisory

Global Products • Asset Securitization • Debt/ Equity Underwriting • Asset Management

Structured Commodity & Trade Finance • • • • Export/ Import Foreign Receivables Inventory Finance Inventory Price Risk Management Leasing • Cross‐Border Leases • Tax‐oriented Leases

Syndication • Debt Underwriting & • Syndication

6

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Rabobank International

FAR: Global Network of Agribusiness Specialists
Animal  Protein Beverages Clean Tech Dairy Farm Inputs Food Fruit, Veg &  Flowers Grains &  Oilseeds Non‐food Soft  Commodity

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

FAR in Asia FAR in Asia
Over 20 professionals  Over 20 professionals Over 20 professionals  covering 10 offices covering 10 offices covering 10 offices Specialists in all key F&A  Specialists in all key F&A  Specialists in all key F&A sectors sectors Providing primary  Providing primary  Providing primary research and analysis research and analysis research and analysis Servicing broad network  Servicing broad network  Servicing broad network of F&A companies of F&A companies of F&A companies Linked to a global team  Linked to a global team  Linked to a global team of 80+ analysts of 80+ analysts of 80+ analysts

7

Food Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Rabobank International

2 TRENDS IN FOOD & AGRIBUSINESS

The Long‐Term Demand & Supply Imbalance
Trends in Food & Agribusiness
While population growth is expected to slow, urbanisation and land degradation  will mean that less land is available to feed a larger number of people.
Global Population & Available land Per Capita
10

Today

0.5

8

0.4

Population ( billions)

6

0.3

4

0.2

2

0.1

0 1965 1980 1995
Population

0 2010
hectare/capita

2025

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

hectare/capita

The need for continued yield enhancement
Trends in Food & Agribusiness
A growing population and limited available arable land is pressuring agricultural  resources...
The ‘Yield Gap’
1.6 1.5 1.4 1.3
Index

Historically, yield increases have kept pace with consumption

Demand set to increase faster than yield increases

1.2 1.1 1.0 0.9 1990

Downside in yield due to confluence of weather mishaps globally Increased arable land availability limited
1993 1996 1999 2002
Yield

2005

2008
Arable Land

2011

2014

Food Consum ption

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Agribusiness Sector Fragmentation
Farm Numerous
Participants Profit levels

Trading

Aggregation / Market Systems Direct Export Contract Farming

Logistics

Distribution Food Service Retailers

Retail Luxury Mid‐Range

Large‐ Scale

Collection /  Transport Small‐ Scale Many

Large Wholesale Markets

Sorting,  Packaging,  Handling,  Etc Wet Markets

Regional  Markets Other

Low‐ Income

Several

Several Fewer

Becoming  integrated  downstream However, up and mid‐stream  segments remain fairly disorganized
Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Aggregator

11

Logistics

Trader

Retail

Farm

Trends in Food & Agribusiness

Number of Participants

Asian Fresh Produce Value Chain

Small‐Scale Value Chains
Trends in Food & Agribusiness
The Old Model – Numerous Participants along any Supply Chain

Farmers

Collection Points

Collection Centres

Distribution centres

Retail

Reduced value, caused by long and fragmented value chains: • Higher cost of food ‐ Increased shipping time and shipping cost • Lower perceived value of food ‐ Lack of traceability and transparency in handling and storage • Lower realized value & profit ‐ Perishable goods see high freight cost, undesirable spoilage rates, reduced shelf time • Capital pooling in the mid‐stream reduces stable cash flows ‐ Volatility in goods prices especially in the mid‐stream • Loss of revenue ‐ Risk to distributors, processors and producers of profit loss due to food safety failures

12

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

4 AGRICULTURE AS AN ASSET CLASS

Ways to Invest in Agriculture
Agriculture as an Asset Class
There are three primary instruments providing exposure to Food & Agribusiness...  each have their +’s and –’s! 1.Direct investment in Commodities 
• through futures, etf’s or traditional commodity index products

2.Investing in Equities
• • Through a basket of companies with exposure to Agriculture There are also a number of agricultural equity indices  

3.Primary investment in Agriculture 
• • A number of managed Agricultural land funds have been initiated – these are looking to  capture the capital appreciation of agricultural/farming assets Direct investment in agriculture through ownership of either farming or downstream supply  chain assets

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Indexed Commodity Prices
Index of Various Commodity Indices
200 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 Jan 09

Mar 09

May 09

Jul 09

Sep 09

Nov 09

Jan 10

Mar 10

May 10

S&P GS Agri Index

S&P GS Sof ts

S&P GSGrains

RJ/CRB Commodity Index
Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Agriculture as an Asset Class

Softs have performed well over the last 18 mths, but the complex has been highly  dependent on sugar.

Index

Commodities Have Outperformed
Index Comparing Agri Commodities vs. Other Assets
250

200

150

100

50

0 Jun 05

Dec 05

Jun 06

Dec 06

Jun 07

Dec 07

Jun 08

Dec 08

Jun 09

Dec 09

S&P GS Agri Index US Generic Govt 10 Bond

Dow Jones Ind. Avg. S&P GS Commodity Index
Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Agriculture as an Asset Class

Index

But Commodities are Volatile
Agriculture as an Asset Class
Volatility in agri markets has receded but is highly dependent on stock levels ‐ periods of low supply have tended to result in extreme price shocks and a strong  rebound in production.
1200
Monthly CBOT Wheat Prices

1000 800

Monthly CBOT Corn Prices

US¢/bu Million tonnes

600 400 200 0 100 80 60 40 20 0 ‐20 ‐40 ‐60 ‐80 ‐100

Grain Market Surplus/Deficit

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Direct investment in commodity markets
Positives
• Relatively inelastic demand makes agricultural commodities less reliant on global economic conditions. • Price dynamics tend to be more supply driven. Variations in supply are  predominantly subject to weather and as such have no direct relationship to other  asset classes  • This has lead to the argument of counter cyclicality • Increases in commodity prices have a relatively good correlation with inflation 

Negatives
• High volatility relative to alternative asset classes • Correlation with other assets has been high in recent years • The carry nature of forwards curves in Agricultural commodities has negative yield roll  implications • Scope for forecasting supply & demand imbalance limited due to weather impacts

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Agriculture as an Asset Class

Investing in agricultural equities
Agriculture as an Asset Class
The performance of agri equities relative to other benchmark indices has been  extremely impressive. 
700 600 500

Axis Title

400 300 200 100 0 Jan 02

Jan 03

Jan 04

Jan 05

Jan 06

Jan 07

Jan 08

Jan 09

Jan 10

MSCI Global Equity Index

S-Net ITG Agri Equity Index

DJ Industrial Index

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Although strongly influenced by commodities!
Agriculture as an Asset Class
The relatively strong correlation between agri commodities and a basket of  agricultural equities can ‘commoditise’ an equity portfolio.
7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 Jun 05 550 500 450 400

Index

300 250 200 150 100 Mar 06 Dec 06 Sep 07 Jun 08 Mar 09 Dec 09 S-Net Global Agri Equity Index S&P GS Agri Commodity Index

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Index

350

Yet equities outperform underlying commodities
Agriculture as an Asset Class
There is value attached to human capital and intellectual capital involved in value  addition
400 350 300 250

Index

200 150 100 50 0 Jun 05

Mar 06

Dec 06

Sep 07

Jun 08

Mar 09

Dec 09

S-Net Global Agri Equity Index

S&P GS Agri Commodity Index

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Direct investment in Agricultural land
Recent trends: 1.Governments
• Increased concern surrounding food security • Net food importers have become increasingly concerned about their exposure to  international markets & ‘government intervention’ in markets • This has seen increased interest in Agricultural land from sovereign entities – particularly in Asian and the Middle East looking to ensure food security

2.Private Investors
• The long‐term supportive drivers for Agriculture have also attracted the interest of  investors seeking a more accessible way to invest directly in Agriculture • This gap has been increasingly filled by banks and investment firms offering  managed land funds that focus on either enterprise return or rental return as well as  the major focus the capital appreciation of the underlying agricultural asset. 
Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Agriculture as an Asset Class

Investors chasing real assets in Agriculture

Rabo FARM

Pharos Miro Agriculture Fund

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Agriculture as an Asset Class

The Agricultural funds management space is growing extremely strongly...

And its not too hard to see why!
800 700

% Change +658%

Index 1998 = 100

600 500 400 300 200 100 0

+181% 126% 117% 87%

Iowa (cropland) São Paulo (pastureland)

NSW (broadcare) Argentina (soy/corn regions)

NZ (dairy)

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Agriculture as an Asset Class

Capital appreciation for agricultural land has been astonishing... 

4 DEVELOPING A PLATFORM FOR ENGAGEMENT

A Structural Look at the Food & Ag Value Chain
Farm Participants Retail / End User

UPSTREAM
• Highly fragmented  smallholders • Poorly financed  • Limited land availability and scope for  productivity growth • Increasing requirement for pre  financing, and provided by off‐takers • Although  farm gate prices are expected  to improve, small farm size limits  viability
26

MIDSTREAM
• Numerous participants involved in  all manner of logistics and handling • Excess logistics capacity with lack of  traceability and transparency • Thin margins with significant  volatility lead to severe mispricing  and non‐delivery • Room for consolidation and  systems integration

DOWNSTREAM
• Evolution of modern retail and food service • Elevated awareness of food safety and  supply chain integrity • Imposition of tighter specifications and  credit terms on suppliers • Brands and private labels become more  prominent • Increasing market power can lead to  stronger supply chain control
Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

A Platform for Engagement

Number of Participants

Margins

Long Run Price Volatility

Organizing the Value Chain
A Platform for Engagement
The New Model – Organized Market & Value‐Added Platforms in Cold Chain Hubs, integrated into Managed End‐to‐End Networks

Producer  Groups

Organized Marketing Platform  and Value‐Addition Centre

Retailing  Groups

Reorganizing primary production capabilities and distribution channels to achieve greater efficiencies and scale,  increasing access to competitive markets through yield management and short value chains: •Increased revenue stream ‐ Maximum shelf time for perishables, by minimizing time in spent in transit •Lower cash flow volatility ‐ A reduction in wastage and spoilage during handling and transport •Lower cost of food ‐ A reduction in transport and shipping fees •More profit transferred to smallholder ‐ Purchases direct from producer groups to reduce intermediation fees •Greater buy‐in from all downstream participants ‐ Mitigate reputational risk to brand owners and retail distributors  by maximizing transparency and traceability along the value chain and allowing independent checks

27

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

New Pricing Models Driving Growth
A Platform for Engagement
Payment and System Ownership Models

Producer

Exporter

Shipping

Importer

Retailer

CNF
• Disintermediation creates value through: • lower cost • reduced spoilage • shorter transport times  • longer shelf‐life • Disintermediation requires ownership over the supply chain for: • Streamlining • Introduction of controls (transparency and traceability)

FOB

• Appropriate payment terms can align of reputational stake in the final product with ownership over the supply  chain  • CNF = producer ownership • FOB = retailer ownership
28 Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

What If We Did It All Over Again?
Financing Issues
•Large operators access to traditional  debt and equity capital markets •SME and rural enterprise players are  disadvantaged •Significant initial investment size •Often seen as public goods •Not all jurisdictions can utilize REITs •Microfinance not widely available •Rural lending schemes rely heavily on  relationship capital •Not all borrowers see need to repay •Ultra‐long term investment horizon •Often viewed in the same category as  infrastructure, but with scale issues •Lack of liquidity for investor
Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

A Platform for Engagement

Hierarchy of Agribusiness Development Needs

East Coast Economic Region, Malaysia
Designed flagship poultry clusters in the ECER Primary research:
• • • • Site visits Meetings with brown‐field stakeholder companies On‐the‐ground analysis of production & processing capability  Comparisons with overseas companies in Thailand, Brazil

Develop strategic blueprint:
• Flagship projects to demonstrate competitive advantage • Build relationships along the value chain • Identify high‐value export markets

Integrate potential players and existing stakeholders:
• • • • Access global network of Agricultural companies Bring in global expertise  Develop an implementation plan & investor strategy Align stakeholder interests and strategies

30

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

A Platform for Engagement

Northern Corridor Economic Region, Malaysia
A Platform for Engagement
• A designed agribusiness development roadmap identified  cornerstone projects by sector.   • Identification of local partners key to easing of transition into  Malaysia by a foreign investor. • Opportunity analysis: • Aquaculture • Animal Husbandry • Fruits and Vegetables • Specialty Crops • Paddy • • • • • • • • •
31

Comprehensive business plan: Identify local comparative advantage Develop a framework for an aggregation and distribution Identify downstream value‐add industries Integrate potential players and existing stakeholders: Access global network of Agricultural companies Bring in global expertise  Develop an implementation plan Align stakeholder interests and strategies
Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

Cause for Optimism: The Greenery, Netherlands
1,500 members
• Primary production • On‐farm cleaning &  packaging facilities • Own brand products • Negotiated bulk  purchase of farm  inputs through  supporting co‐op • • • • •

Aggregation Hubs
Further packaging Aggregation  Sorting Quality control Bulk branding • • • • • •

Trading Hubs
Marketing Procurement Perishables handling Trading Export certification  Each hub specializes  in different export  markets

32

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

A Platform for Engagement

Food Zones: The Public‐Private Nexus
China Jilin Food Zone
• Product verticals based  on agronomic strengths • Fruit & vegetables a  large component; NE  China is home to largest  fresh produce wholesale  markets in Asia • Identified current  constraints and  proposed solutions to  improve productivity • Market‐driven business  models to drive long‐ term growth • Similar models will have  a huge impact on fresh  produce markets across  South East Asia

33

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory

A Platform for Engagement

Veiverne Yuen
Deputy Manager, South East Asia Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory Rabobank International, Singapore Branch T:  +65 6230 6755 M:  +65 9736 8370 E:  Veiverne.Yuen@Rabobank.com

Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory Asia