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IN DWARF LAND AND

CANNIBAL COUNTRY

BY THE SAME AUTHOR

Demy 8vo, cloth, 10/6 net.

UGANDA TO KHARTOUM

LIFE AND ADVENTURE ON THE UPPER NILE.

With a Preface by Victor Buxton, a Map, and Eighty-one Illustrations.

Second Impression.

" A most entertaining and instructive book of African travel. is the best type of the missionary and of Christian manhood."

Mr. Lloyd

Westminster

Gazette.

" A book of real imperial and humane interest."

Outlook.

" A book which is fiiU of strange incidents and thrilling adventures in a

remote and little-known corner of the British Empire."

Standard.

LONDON: T. FISHER UNWIN.

Parnell Pr^f.

IN DWARF LAND AND

CANNIBAL COUNTRY

A RECORD OF TRAVEL AND DISCOVERY IN CENTRAL AFRICA

BY

A. B. LLOYD

AUTHOR OF "UGANDA TO KHARTOUM"

WITH INTRODUCTION BY THE

RT. HON. SIR JOHN H. KENNAWAY, BART., M.P.

PRESIDENT OF THE CHURCH MISSIONARY SOCIETY

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS

THIRD IMPRESSION

LONDON: T. FISHER UNWIN

ADELPHI TERRACE. MCMVII

First Edition, 1899. Second Impression, 1900. Third Impression, 1907.

(All rights reserved.)

UMVr^

'ORNU'

I HUMBLY DEDICATE TO

MY MOTHER,

WHOSE SAINTLY LIFE AND EARNEST PRAYERS

HAVE EVER BEEN MY ADMIRATION AND SUPPORT,

PARTICULARLY DURING MY MANY AND VARIED EXPERIENCES

IN CENTRAL AFRICA

PREFACE

AS

President of

the Church Missionary Society, I

gladly accede to Mr. Lloyd's request that I should

write a few lines of introduction to his book.

He has been bearing his share of

"

the white man's

burden" of ruhng,

civilising, and Christianising the

" silent peoples,"

of whom

John

Bull carries no

less

than 350 millions on his back.

The duty is no light one, but it gives an outlet for the

energies of our people, an object worthy of an Imperial

race, of a Christian country,

a call to put forth the

highest qualities of the Anglo-Saxon character.

Mr.

Lloyd has been for four years and a half engaged as one

of our missionaries in the grand work of helping to build up the Church in Uganda and the regions around it,

within the confines of the British Protectorate.

It is a church whose foundations were laid by Bishops

Hannington and Parker, by Mackay, Shergold Smith,

Pilkington, and many others

a church rich in martyrs,

now numbering more than 20,000 baptized members,

besides catechumens and readers, with 15 native clergy

and

1,000 lay Evangelists

a church self-supporting,

possessing

the

Bible

and Prayer-Book

in its own

tongue, and spending £1,500 a year in the purchase

of books.

7

8

IN DWARF LAND

What hath God wrought ? During his sojourn in Africa Mr. Lloyd has been

witness of the stirring scenes of the Soudanese rebeUion,

which he assisted in repressing.

He was privileged to

close the eyes of his friend and brother, Mr. Callis, so

early

struck down in Toro, and to him was dictated the

wonderful letter from King Daudi Kasagama to " The

Elders of the Church in Europe," thanking them for

sending teachers, and telling them that he wanted very

much to arrange all the matters of his country for God

only, that all his people might understand that Christ

Jesus is the Saviour of all countries, and

that He is the

King of all kings.

To his role as a missionary Mr. Lloyd has added that

of an explorer.

Last year, when the time of his furlough

had

come, he determined to strike out a Hne for himself

and make through Belgian territory for an exit on the

West Coast.

This brought him to the Pygmy Forest,

where Stanley spent so much time, and reviewed the old

memories of Herodotus.

Much

progress has been made, even since the later of

the two historians, and it speaks well that our traveller

was able to make his way through the midst of Pygmies

and cannibals, unharmed and unharming. The knowledge

he has gained cannot fail to be of use to him when he

returns to Uganda, and it will certainly be of interest to his readers, to whom I heartily commend his book.

Church Missionary House, Salisbury Square, E.G.

JOHN H. KENNAWAY.

PREFATORY NOTE

THE

to

writer of the following pages makes no pretensions

literary ability, and he intends this work merely

to be a plain, unvarnished

story, simply told, of life lived

under many conditions in Africa. He hopes no apology

will be deemed necessary for the imperfections which

may appear in the telling of his narrative.

The writing

of such a book was far enough from his thoughts when he went off upon his mission to that benighted continent,

and nothing would now induce him to do so but the con-

viction that the knowledge he has gained of unknown

countries and unknown tribes should not be kept to him-

self.

As one who has laboured, and still hopes to labour,

among the helpless and friendless millions of the Dark

Continent, his natural desire, if writing a book at all,

would be to treat with missionary enterprise exclusively,

and to establish and enforce the claims of the perishing

heathen.

But this is not what he has set himself to do

in producing this volume. The other side of missionary

life must sometimes be told, and to this task he has put

his hand.

It has been a difficult one, but however imper-

fectly it has been accomplished the writer simply asks

that the reader will bear in mind that the intentions of

the author are to introduce facts in such a wav as to

10

IN DWARF LAND

interest the most casual reader; and he is not without

hope that it will in some measure procure for the dark,

perishing milHons of

Central

Africa

an increase

of

sympathy from the Christian public of Great Britain.

INTRODUCTION

Africa

Past and Present

the past century no country has opened up to

DUKING

the

civilised world in so marvellous a manner as

Africa.

Not many years ago the Map of Africa was

almost a blank.

The great desert and the Nile seemed

to be the only natural features known.

And yet, looking

back upon the Africa of the past, we behold her greatness

the nursery of science and literature ; the seat of an

Empire almost as great as that of Rome, and

one which

contended with Rome for the kingdoms of the world ;

and we think of

Egypt, the great stronghold of the early

Church, with its archbishop and bishops, its churches,

and its learning.

The old Egyptians of the bygone ages seemed to know

more about the centre of Africa than did our grandfathers.

There on the tombs of their kings, far back in the Sixth

Dynasty, we get a record, not only proving the know-

ledge of the Egyptians of those remote ages, of a great

lake at the sources of the Nile, but of the existence of the There is described on the tomb of Aswan how

Pygmies.

the King Mer-en-Ra sent his servant to fetch a Pygmy

from the country of Punt by the lake Punt, supposed to

be the source of the Nile, and it is recorded how that the

u

12

IN DWARF LAND

King Assa, five reigns earlier, is spoken of as having seen

a Pygmy from this land brought by his servant.

This means that

about

3,200 years B.C.

the very

centre of Africa was known to the then civilised world.

The writings of Herodotus seem but as yesterday before

such inscriptions as these ; he, however, was called the

"

dreamer," and his account of the Pygmies dwelling

near the great

Mountains

of the Moon

was scarcely

believed, and yet to-day we know the truth of what he wrote.

The Portuguese will tell us of great cities built by them

centuries ago in the very heart of Africa, and on the west

there still remain traces of what once must have been a

flourishing mission ; and these traces may yet be found in the centre.

We speak to-day of the great explorations for the

opening up of the Dark Continent ; our proposed railways,

increased trade, and our civilising agencies.

But what is

the true state of

affairs ?

alas !

it must

still be called

Darkest Africa.

Thousands of square miles still un-

explored, huge forests absolutely untouched, millions

of her dusky sons in as gross a state of darkness as they

were a thousand years ago.

And this for all that more

lives have been laid down for Africa, and a greater sacrifice

of men to the enterprise of discovery than in

land.

The border

is

yet hardly touched.

any other

Civilised

countries have been made the richer by her gold, and

where is the recompense that has been paid to her ?

Her

tribes are sunk in deepest depths of ignorance and sin, and alas ! the white man's greed for her gold, her rubber, and her ivory has only deepened her guilt, for often it has

brought within her domains drunkenness, lawlessness, and

vice, and all this rushing in upon a defenceless people. And still her hands are stretched out, and it is to us that she looks ; to us who have taken her wealth, and

IN DWARF LAND

13

the blood of thousands of her sons, and who, in exchange,

have given to her gin, and a handful of missionaries.

But the day is at hand, and darkest Africa shall yet be

enlightened.

Already from her very heart a tiny streak

of Hght has commenced to glow in the British Protectorate of Uganda. Thank God ! Britain's sons have planted the Union Jack in her very centre, not to suck her life-blood

for the sake of her wealth, but to bring to her the priceless

treasures of Peace, Prosperity, and Religion.

Africa shall yet hold up her head ; her down-trodden

sons and daughters shall leap into a new-found freedom, and the fiercest spirits that ever trod her burning sands

shall be brought into complete subjugation ; not by the

military fort and the roar of cannon and the rattle of

musketry, for it will require a mightier power than this

to bring peace to this troubled land.

That which has

made our Empire what it is to-day " The Word of

God"

this is the power that

shall

transform Africa

from the tenfold horrors of her millions and make her

a land of peace.

We may make our railways and establish the claims of

our nation and open up her dark recesses to our commerce,

but if we Britons forget to send her that which has made our own land so great, then will the sorrows of Africa

lay at our own door.

CONTENTS

PART I

ENGLAND TO UGANDA

CHAPTER I

ENGLAND TO ZANZIBAR

The

Gaul Passengers The Doctor as an entertainer

Musical

talent, &c. Lisbon The Portuguese

Teneriffe

Sunday on

PAGE

board Cape Town We meet with friends Algoa Bay Durban

The Kaffirs

Delagoa Bay

Beira

Mozambique

Zanzibar

Hotel d'Angleterre—Change of plans We secure porters, boys,

&c. "Mission boy" We select donkeys

Ramazan

Tippu-Tib

Ready to start

Universities' Mission

 

.

.

.

.25

CHAPTER II

THE START

Eleven hours in an Arab dhow Waiting and whistling for the wind

Ashore at last First night in Africa A restless night

Final

preparations K'shimba

Reviewing our porters Our first camp

Great oration by K'shimba The lion's roar

Discomforts of

camp life Famine ahead We send

for

fresh supplies

Dr.

Baxter A ministry of love A pot of porridge And what came

of

it The power of

an

Englishman Letters from home

Scarcity of water The horrors of human porterage

Leopard in

the tree Lost in the forest .

.

.

.

.

.40

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16

IN DWARF LAND

CHAPTER III

GLIMPSES OF CAMP LIFE

the tamarind tree

Eefreshment for the cows

Hope deferred

  • i Mbuzini river The Wami

First real wash in Africa Famine

PAGE

tares us in the face

Fever

Crossing river on African bridge

nt left behind The cook's story

Overtaken by Bishop Tucker

^he wild ass The Bishop to the front Long solitary march

reception

il Africa The

Lions in the path "

"

Mission boy

Mamboya

Hospitality in

again

Practical Chris-

We

split our caravan The porters

rebel How we

led the rebels Peace making Mpwapwa Kisokwe

ne and its horrors

.

.

.

.

.

.54

CHAPTER IV

CAMP LIFE (co7itinued) Wagogo thieves K'shimba in distress Trouble in the forest The

Martini rifle Our hunting expeditions When the boots wear

out Burungi, the land of plenty Rains are upon us

Buying

food The Warungi The warriors and my dog

Sally How

troubles come Irangi A courteous reception We tend the sick

The Governor as a patient An African's gratitude

K'shimba

turns up He relates his troubles Bwana Kitangi to the rescue .

73

CHAPTER V

THE LAST

STAGES

Farewell to Bwana Kitangi Rains Washed out

Floods

Swampy

ground The porter's slave

Sandawi

More troubles

Con-

sidered himself a dead man A hostile people

Turu

Poisonous

roots Christmas Day The Wanyamwezi country

Sickness

We reach Nera Meeting with Messrs. Gordon and Nickisson

Carried in a hammock

Arrival at Nasa

Rest at last

Native

cloth Embarkation on Lake

Our canoes

Hippopotami

Ukerewe Mr. Stokes A narrow escape The German Station

The stormy - winds do blow The Wasese—Crocodiles The last

day

.,

,

... ..

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17

UGANDA. THE SOUDANESE WAR

CHAPTER VI

UGANDA

Our entrance into Mengo The four hills of Mengo

Kampala

The

British

Government of Uganda

Troubles from without

Missionary occupations Native customs The Waganda

Woman's position

Missionary efforts

Loyalty of

the native

Christians Medical work The chief dresser

Native industries

PAGE

Iron-working

Wood-working

Pottery Efforts to catch zebra

Basket work

.

bark cloth The native market

The

.

110

CHAPTER VII UGANDA TO TOBO

Experiences gained ToroRuwenzori A lay missionary's work

Valedictory feasts Obtaining porters The boys

Mika's con-

version A leopard scare The Mayanja

Mosquitoes— Mitiana

 

Crossing the Mpamujugu

Elephant country

Antelope steak

Forest glades— Elan

Sally, a distinguished guestr— Unfriendly

Papists I nurse a black baby Cow stealing

Fishing for break-

fast Mwenge Byakweyamba The banquet An embarrassing

welcome to Toro

....... ,, ..

CHAPTER VIII

TOSO

Developments in Toro

Liberation

Attending the

Leopards of

Cupping

Brief history of Toro

of

slaves

sick

Kasagama

Ruwenzori, Mountains of the Moon

Wanted, a hospital

Burning

"

Njoka

"

I build a dispensary

Toro A midnight scare—Lions The little heroThe Watoro

Toro customs

Drinking parties

Teeth breaking

...

2

128

14g

18

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CHAPTER IX

A TRAMP INTO THE UNKNOWN

PAGE

Footprints of the lions Snake in the grass Bavages of the lions A

narrow escape Dry and thirsty land— I meet the Captain— The

Soudanese guard

Following the compass

Hunting water-buck

Between heaven and earth A fine specimen A picturesque

camp

Elephants

Carving our way

Up a

rewarded Tropical vegetation The Captain

tree

and

Patience

I

part

company We camp in the wilderness Mount Edwin Arnold

Mpanga river A hostile people Heathen sacrifice Home again

to Toro

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.158

CHAPTER X

AT HOME IN TORO

Climate of Toro Brick-making House-building A tornado A

disaster The Government fort Missionaries and the Govern-

ment officials A Christmas feast The Mission garden

My

first elephant The Batatela rebellion

Adventures of a French

priest

Belgian officer takes refuge in British protectorate

Fort

George attacked A splendid victory Death of Rev. John Callis

Lions again A lucky shot

.....

171

CHAPTER XI

RAMBLES ROUND ABOUT TORO

Visiting the craters A day on the lake A bicycle experience

Lion

in the path Visiting Mwenge The " Speed-away " A swollen

river

Exhaustion

Kindly help

Fever

I am hailed as a

"

rain

producer"

I go to see Prince Matu

I overhear an interesting

conversation— Sally to the rescue A would-be assassin —To the

Semliki Valley A black man's gratitude A magnificent view

Albert Lake

Hunting reed-buck

I start for

Mboga

Elephant

hunt Over the Mountains of the Moon

Fresh meat

Among

the Bamba The hot springs

Crossing the Semliki

Elephant

camp A morning call

Alive with game

Mboga

Church

history

........

185

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19

CHAPTER XII

SOUDANESE REBELLION

FAOB

Political troubles Mwanga's flight Major Ternan wounded

Mwanga's capture by the Germans Uganda regents A record

journey

Major Macdonald's expedition

Soudanese rebellion

Its causes—British pluck Battle of Luba's Hill—Murder of

Major Thurston Disarming the Soudanese in Mengo

Native

auxiliaries Night attack Battle on the plain at Luba's —Some

one has blundered Keinforcements Destroying banana gardens

Death of George Pilkington and Lieutenant Macdonald

CHAPTER XIII

.

201

SOUDANESE REBELLION {continued)

The Major leaves for Budu—Christmas Day in camp- The mutineers

raid the gardens

Vigorous attack upon the Waganda camp

Mwanga's escape from Germans

Evacuation of rebel fort

I am

sent to Ripon Falls Attempts to blow up

the dhow—Fort

building Rebels attempt to cross into Uganda Indian troops

arrive All into Mengo With Major Macdonald to Kabagambi

A responsible charge A night scare A brush with Moham- medans—Off again to the front Rifle-stealing A kind oiler

More fighting Severe struggle at Kabagambi— Death of Captain

Maloney

.......

PART III

217

UGANDA TO THE WEST COAST

CHAPTER XIV

UGANDA TO CONGO FREE STATE

Westward Ho Uganda escort An alarm Blackened ruins

Ele-

phants—My reasons for journey through Pygmy landThe

Bishop's consent

Preparations for the start

Farewells

Escorts

The start—Violent earthquakes Elephants again A glorious

sight A faithless donkey Sally submerged An elephant hunt

Another snake story Wakonjo village—Kikorongo— Chased

by a

hippo

Katwe— Hospitality of

loyalty

No. 10 Company

Their

234

20

IN DWARF LAND

CHAPTER XV

KATWE TO KILONGA-LONGA. THE GREAT PYGMY FOREST

PAGE

The boundary river Lions Meeting with the Belgian officer We

have a little hunt Sporting yarns Fi'ontier settlement Women

slaves Abundance of game

Traces of Mr. H. M. Stanley

Crossing the Semliki Fort Mbeni

Preparing for the plunge

The forest

Its

extent

Pygmy area

Vegetation

Clearings

Animal life

Rivers

Birds

Insects

Darkness

An Arab

settlement Cutting our way Sakarumbi

Our camp in the

forest Elephants Wading through rivers Red ants

Adventure

with a snake " A man-monkey !

"

Visit from the Pygmies

Friendly intercourse Mode of Life A Pygmy hunt An

attempt at photography An Arab chief

Tippu-Tib

Kilonga-

Longa

........

252

CHAPTER XVI

KILONGA-LONGA TO AVAKUBI

Kilonga-Longa or Mawambi The donkey sold

Gymnastics in the

forest A narrow escape Falling trees The Pygmies again Renewed friendship Bows and arrows A Pygmy settlement

Pygmy women

Pygmy temples

Fever

My black nurse

Elephant scatters the porters Wild pig Snake adventure

Fishing Crossing river on fallen tree The

guide kills an

elephant— A hungry panther Two days through water

Pengi

Canoes awaiting us

Socks versus stockings

First experiences

on river

Shootings the rapids

Canoe men submerged

Canoe

 

smashed up A miserable night

Avakubi....

274

CHAPTER XVII

AVAKOBI TO BASOKO

Houses Gardens Coffee Rubber— Ivory Another start A struggle

for dear life A great loss Cannibals of the Upper Aruwimi

An anxious night

Another canoe swamped

Among the canni-

bals Their

dress Their habits The kola nut

Iron work

Panga

Falls Our warrior boatmen We make rapid progress " The

European is coming

"

Bangwa weapons

Choosing

a

tender

spot—Mukopi Gymnastics in the forest A cannibal dance

Mupe Cannibals and the bicycle Banalya A headstrong Belgian I visit the cannibal chief An eye-opener What it will

lead to

Basoko

.......

288

IN DWARF LAND

21

CHAPTER XVIII

BASOKO TO ENGLAND

Captain Guy Burrows Ten days' rest The palm grove

Shooting

our dinners The

steamer arrives Mode of progress

Missionary

friends at Upoto The captain drunk

Stanley Pool

Leopold-

PAGE

ville^Kind friends Catching the train The saloon car— A

strange sensation Matadi Kind

hospitality Boma The

Governor-General's compliment Cabenda The mail-boat

arrives —The lazy Portuguese Getting passport signed On

board the ioanda—Lisbon Sud express Conclusion

.

.

to Paris Home at last

....

307

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

DUTHONG .... ZANZIBAR AFTER BOMBARDMENT .

Frontispiece

Facing page

34

A PORTER WITH HIS LOAD

36

WASUKUMA PORTERS

36

EAST AFRICAN HUT