Double-Cuffed Pillowcase ~

Featuring French Seams And an Elegant Reverse Double Cuff.

Supplies:
(For Two Pillowcases ~ 31” x 21” each)

Main Case: 1 3/4 Yards (Medium Print) Trim: Cuff: 1/4 Yard (Small Print) 3/4 Yard (Medium Print)

Coordinating Thread Basic Sewing Supplies & Equipment Optional: Rotary cutter, ruler, & mat

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Notes:

Cutting Instructions:
(For Two Pillowcases)
Main Case Trim Cuff Cut 2 - 57” x 22” Cut 2 - 42” x 4” Cut 2 - 42” x 10”

French Seam

Seam Allowances:
The seam allowances for this pattern are listed in each section. Please read carefully and follow the seam allowances given. Where we’ve used the term “Scant 1/4” seam allowance…,” we mean, “Slightly less than 1/4” seam allowance…”

Trim Each Seam as Sewn:
Check your work after each piece is cut and seam is sewn, and trim raw edges to be exactly even. Trim stray or frayed threads from the fabric to ensure none poke out through the French seams.

Fabric Choices
Use quilter’s cottons, poplins, stretch poplins, percale, sateen, or flannel. This case would also be stunning as an accent using silks.

Why use a French Seam on a Pillowcase?
French seams are used in applications where it is undesirable to see stitched edges of fabric from the outside of the project. They also add an element of stiffness to the seams. We’ve used French seams on the cuffs of the pillowcases so that there are no visible seams, even when the cuff is open at the end of the pillow. In addition, the French seams keep the cuff from being floppy, adding an elegant, stylish finish to the case. After all, why add an artistic cuff to a pillowcase if it won’t stand up and be noticed? When sewing French seams, you’ll be sewing through more layers of fabric than you would with a traditional seam finish. It’s helpful to use a new, sharp needle, a slightly elongated stitch, and if available, a walking foot (commonly used in quilting to assist the fabric through the feed dogs). Sew slowly to prevent skipped stitches, Press often during the construction process, and if necessary, tame bulkiness using a rubber mallet. Never done a French seam before? It’s easy—we guide you through the process, step-by-step! You’ll love the way your pillowcase looks and feels using French seam construction!

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Assembly:
(One Case)
Main Case: 1. With wrong-sides-together, fold the fabric for the main case in half, align raw edges, and press to a sharp crease. 2. Unfold and turn the fabric so that rightsides are together. Using a 1/2” seam allowance, stitch the two long sides. 3. Finish the seams with a serger or zig-zag stitch. 4. Turn the case so that right-sides are out, carefully working out the corners. 5. Press the seams flat. Set aside. Trim: 6. With wrong-sides-together and raw edges aligned, fold the trim in half lengthwise and press to a sharp crease. 7. Unfold and with right-sides-together, using a 1/4” seam allowance, stitch the short edges together, creating a loop. Finish the seam with a serger or zig-zag. 8. Press the seam to one side. 9. Re-fold the trim along the crease line with wrong sides together. Re-press the crease if necessary. 10. Carefully aligning raw edges and seams, pin the circular trim piece to the right side of the pillowcase. 11. Using a scant 1/4” seam allowance, stitch the trim to the case. If necessary, trim the resulting seam so the raw edges are even and trim any stray fibers from the raw edge.
Raw Edges Aligned Wrong-sides-together; press to a crease.

Fabric is rightsides-together. Fold

Stitch the two long sides.

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Cuff (French Seam): 12. With wrong-sides-together and aligning raw edges, fold the cuff in half lengthwise and press to a sharp crease. 13. Unfold and turn so the fabric is right-sidestogether. Using a 1/4” seam allowance, stitch the short edges together, forming a loop. Finish the seam with a serger or zigzag. 14. Press the seam to one side. 15. Re-fold the cuff on the crease line with wrong-sides-together. 16. Aligning seams and raw edges, pin the cuff to the wrong side (inside) of the case. 17. Using a scant 1/4” seam allowance, stitch the cuff to the case and trim piece. 18. Trim edges even and trim any stray fibers from the raw edge. 19. Unfold the cuff. The raw, seamed edge will be on the right side of the pillowcase. Press the seam toward the trim piece, flattening it as much as possible. 20. Fold the cuff back to the right side of the case, using your fingers to roll the seam flat, and press. 21. To encase the raw seam, use a 3/8” seam allowance from the folded (seamed) edge. 22. Turn back the cuff and inspect the seam to ensure the raw edges are enclosed into the seam. Press the seam allowance towards the case. Folded (seamed) Edge After unfolding the cuff, the raw, seamed edge will be on the outside of the case.

Cuff Trim Case

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Finishing:

Topstitching:

Topstitch the cuff and the trim, close to the folded edges. Topstitch the trim over the turnedunder French seam allowance. Tip: When stitching over a bulky seam, it’s best to put the seam directly between the presser foot and the feed dogs., not off to the side of the presser foot. Stitch very slowly to prevent skipped stitches.

Topstitching

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Want pre-cut kits for these pillow cases? Our friends at Over the Rainbow can provide you with pre-assembled kits and can also tell you how to donate finished pillow cases to Children’s Hospital!

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