You are on page 1of 299

PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC

)
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org

Tuesday, January 12, 2010, 7:30 PM,
Native Sons Hall, 112 Stage Road, Pescadero CA 94060

1. CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL, CHANGES TO ORDER OF AGENDA
2. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA
3. PRESENTATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS
A. Supervisor Rich Gordon will present an award to Kathy Webster and TomKat Education
Foundation for the locally-produced School District food program. Representatives of the agricultural
community are invited.
B. Announcement about County green jobs programs which will be presented in more detail at the
February PMAC meeting.
4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF LAST REGULAR MEETING
5. FINANCIAL REPORT – Financial Report- Pattie Brixen
6. CORRESPONDENCE – Correspondence – Rodger Reinhart
7. REPORTS FROM CURRENT COMMITTEE CHAIRS
A. Emergency Preparedness – Certified Emergency Response Training– Lary Lawson
B. Housing Committee – geotechnical study progress - Catherine Peery
C. School Board Meeting liaison – Don McDermott
D. Environmental Committee – next steps -Jackson Robertson
E. Liaison to Puente, County Health & Human Services – Kate Haas
F. Communications Committee – R. Skinner
8. LAND USE COMMITTEE MEETING – ALL MEMBERS OF PMAC
A. Sewer System: Meeting scheduled with School District representatives to tour San Lorenzo High
School system, maintained by Fall Creek Engineering – Catherine Peery
B. Review of Permits – if any
9. NEW BUSINESS-
A. Election of Officers
B. Review of ByLaws –establishment of committee
10. Adjournment , Next meeting Feb 9, 2010, Green Jobs presentation

This site is NOT wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including
auxiliary aids or services) to participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting
notice, agenda packet or other writings that may be distributed at the meeting, should contact Catherine Peery at least 3 working days before the
meeting at 650-879-0150, fax 650-879-1847, cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org. Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make
reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 1
Green Jobs Academy Overview
The primary outcomes for the Green Jobs Academy are:

 Quality Training linked to green industries
 Access to Employment in a sustainable economy
 Opportunities to Gain Experience in a career pathway of choice

The Green Jobs Academy is a 16 week program designed to serve low
income residents of San Mateo County who are not ready to go directly into
subsidized employment. Participants increase employability from soft and
hard skills training while they study emerging green industries.

 8 weeks of Academy Training in Cohorts of 25 participants at 20 hours
per week=160 hours, Academy graduates will continue to:

 8 weeks of Transitional Employment (20-40 hours per week). The
employee’s wages are 100% subsidized during the paid internship. The
employer and employee may mutually agree to continue this
arrangement beyond the 8 week internship.

Curricula: Hard Skills (e.g. basic green building construction), Soft Skills
(e.g. job readiness/life skills), Environmental Literacy, Math & English

The Green Jobs Academy is a program within the SMC Works Subsidized
Employment Program, an ARRA funded program for low income residents
with dependent children. We will provide this subsidized employment
program to 125-150 CalWORKs clients from October 2009 to September
2010. We will rotate training locations (in North, South and Coastal regions).

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 3
January 5, 2010

Eliana Falk
Operations Supervisor
First National Bank
239 Stage Rd.
Pescadero, CA 94060

Dear Eliana,

As we were discussing yesterday I’m asking the bank to sponsor a set of flags for the
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council. As you know when we have a formal affair we
borrow your set of flags, the American and California flags for our meeting at the Native
Sons Hall. At our January monthly meeting next Tuesday we’re honoring Rich Gordon
for his services to the community and we’d like to have the flags for the occasion.

If your company can see fit to sponsor a set of flags for us we’ll be able to display them
at every meeting and also pledge allegiance before each meeting. We will always
recognize verbally the sponsorship of our flags by our local bank, The First National
Bank of Northern California.

Please let me know if this gift is possible and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Best personal regards,

Rob Skinner

Member
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
Rob.skinner@gmail.com

P.S. We are a 501(c)(3) Charitable Corporation

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 5
December 11, 2009

John Pliska
Alto Velo Bike Club
VIA E-Mail

Re: Annual Pescadero Classic Road Race, June 13th, 7:00 am – 1:00 pm

Dear John:

Thank you very much for contacting PMAC concerning the proposed Alto Velo bicycle race in Pescadero
at 7:00 AM – 1:00 PM on Saturday, June 13, 2008. We appreciate your continued cooperation with the
community, and the benefit the race provides for South Coast Children’s Services as in years past.

We reviewed your proposal at the December 8, 2009 meeting of PMAC, and the consensus was that your
organization has been exemplary in its efforts to cooperate with the Pescadero community in the planning
of your event. We appreciate your attempt to make this race as safe as possible for both bicyclists and
motorists, and that you have been responsive to the need to monitor parking. As we mentioned, please
request that your downtown monitors treat residents as they would if they lived here.

We encourage Alto Velo to publicize the event as widely as possible so motorists will be aware of the need
to avoid the impacted roads that morning, and we will notify the local radio station to announce the route of
the race. Announcements in the weekly Half Moon Bay Review and the monthly Coast Views would be
helpful. We also have an online news site: coastsider.net. Contact Barry Parr, and there is a calendar on
www.pescadero.com.

We appreciate the participation of the California Highway Patrol and San Mateo County Sheriff’s office in
the race, especially since no road area can be reserved for bicycles only.

PMAC and the community look forward to the race and a long association with Alto Velo. We urge the
Board of Supervisors, Caltrans, and any other public entity involved in this event to facilitate the
processing of any required permits.

Again, we especially appreciate your support of South Coast Children’s Services.

Sincerely

Catherine M. Peery, Chair,
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 6
From: David Pegos [mailto:DPegos@cdfa.ca.gov]
Sent: Thursday, January 07, 2010 11:33 AM
To: David Pegos
Subject: 2010 Specialty Crop Block Grant Workshops

Hello,
We want to make sure you were aware of the following workshops for 2010 Specialty
Crop Block Grants. Please see below for more details.
Let us know how we can be of assistance.
All the best

David A. Pegos 
California Department of Food and Agriculture 
Executive Office 
1220 N Street, Suite 400 
Sacramento, California 95814 
Phone: (916) 654‐0321 
Fax: (916) 651‐7417 
Email: dpegos@cdfa.ca.gov 

Follow CDFA on Twitter: www.twitter.com/cdfanews

APPLICATION WORKSHOPS SCHEDULED FOR 2010 SPECIALTY CROP
BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM
Workshops to be held in Sacramento, Fresno, Salinas and Ontario

SACRAMENTO, January 7, 2010 — The California Department of Food and
Agriculture will hold application workshops the week of January 11, 2010, to assist
interested parties in applying for the 2010 Specialty Crop Block Grant Program. The
department expects to award up to $17 million in projects to enhance the competitiveness
of California specialty crops this year.

“The Specialty Crop Block Grant Program is an important tool to assist California
specialty crop growers,” said Secretary A.G. Kawamura. “These application workshops
will provide important information to organizations and entities interested in applying for
grant funding.”

Workshops will be held in the following locations:

January 11, 2010 (Monday) – 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
California Department of Food and Agriculture – Main Auditorium
1220 ‘N’ Street – Main Auditorium
Sacramento, CA 95814

January 12, 2010 (Tuesday) – 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Fresno County Farm Bureau

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 7
1274 West Hedges Avenue
Fresno, CA 93720

January 13, 2010 (Wednesday) – 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Laurel Inn
801 West Laurel Drive
Salinas, CA 93906

January 14, 2010 (Thursday) – 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Hilton Ontario Airport
700 North Haven Avenue
Ontario, CA 91764

In addition to the workshop locations, CDFA’s Federal Funds Management Office will
be hosting an online webinar, covering the same information, on Monday, January 11,
2009, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Webinar information will provided upon registration.

There is no cost to attend a workshop or webinar, but space is limited at each location.
Individuals planning to attend should send an e-mail to grants@cdfa.ca.gov with their
contact information, number of seats required and the location you will be attending.

The 2010 Specialty Crop Block Grant Program is funded by the United States
Department of Agriculture (USDA) and authorized by the Food, Conservation and
Energy Act of 2008 (farm bill). The purpose of the program is to solely enhance the
competitiveness of specialty crops. Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree
nuts, dried fruits, horticulture, and nursery crops.

-30-

The California Department of Food and Agriculture protects and promotes
California’s agriculture.
Media Contact:
Steve Lyle
CDFA, Public Affairs
(916) 654-0462

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 8
From: Joe Lo Coco [mailto:jlococo@co.sanmateo.ca.us]
Sent: Tuesday, December 29, 2009 8:44 AM
To: Catherine Peery
Cc: 'PMAC Members'; Steve Fischer
Subject: RE: Weed management

Catherine,

Thank you for your looking into this and getting back to me.

I am not sure which chemicals were previously proposed for use, so I can not say whether the
current proposal deviates from what was previously considered.

Our current proposal would include the application of "Aquamaster" and "Milestone VM" and it
would be our intent to use the chemicals this winter, though not while there is standing water,
nor when rain is in the forecast.

These are considered premium products. We utilize them specifically because of how benign
they are to all but weeds. If it would be helpful, I would be happy to gather and send you
applicable product information. Just let me know if you would like me to do so.

We respect whatever the community determines its preferences to be and will plan
our maintenance efforts accordingly. This request was simply generated as a result of our
concerns relating to roadway preparation efforts in advance of our proposed 2010 chip seal,
especially since mowing can not effectively be performed during the wet season, essentially
forcing us to wait until there is further vegetation intrusion into our roads before we react.

Thanks again for considering our request and best wishes for the new year!

>>> "Catherine Peery" <catherine@ben-e-fit.com> 12/28/2009 10:27 AM >>>

Joe, 

A couple of key questions have come up.  When do you plan to do this (rainy season, later?) and 
what is the chemical you were wanting to use as the spray herbicide. 

So far, reaction from PMAC members is negative, and I don’t know if you’re aware of the history 
on this.  Maeva Neale was Chair of the PMAC when all PMAC council members went to the 
Board of Supervisors meeting requesting in very dramatic fashion that no spraying be done in  
our area.  The Board of Supervisors agreed not to spray going forward, so we have always said 
no to this up to now. 

If there is something new about this chemical or about the timing that would perhaps make this 
less harmful, please let us know. 

Thanks, 

Catherine M. Peery, Chair 
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council 
P.O. Box 249, Pescadero CA 94060‐0249 
650‐879‐0150, f: 650‐879‐1847  

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 9
 
From: Joe Lo Coco [mailto:jlococo@co.sanmateo.ca.us]
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2009 3:44 PM
To: Catherine Peery
Cc: Steve Fischer
Subject: Weed management

Catherine,

Among the roads that we plan to chip seal this year are Pomponio Road and Stage Road from
Pomponio Road to Highway 84.

We are concerned with weed growth that is encroaching into the road areas, as allowing the
weeds to encroach into the roadway areas can significantly impact the overall effectiveness of a
road chip seal treatment.

Currently, there is weed growth immediately adjacent to these roads with some growth
extending into the roadways themselves. Where growth has extended into the roadways, we do
not have an effective way of managing the weeds, other than through the application of an
herbicide.

Any chance we could get the PMAC's approval to spray for weeds at these two locations since
both road segments in question would be in entirely different watersheds than the one that
ultimately flows through town.

I would be happy to review with you information on the products that we would use in such an
application.

Please let me know your thoughts and in the meantime, have a joyful holiday season!

Warm regards

Joe LoCoco

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 10
Addendum 2 PACIFICA MEDICAL
SERVICES

Medical-related services in
CCS Medical
Half Moon Bay Therapy Unit Medical-related services in
Health System Health System - SpecialNeeds Physical San Mateo/Santa Clara
Family Health Services Therapy
SMMC Coastside Clinic
- Pre-3 Team
- AFLP
- Primary Care
- Family Planning
- Field Nursing
- Women’s Health Stanford/Lucile
(Referrals)
- Pediatric Clinic
Packard Hospital
Coastside Rotacare Clinic - Nutrition - Births/Delivery
- Urgent Care - Mental Health Services
- Wednesdays, 5-7:30 p.m. - STD Screening & therapy
- @ SMMC Coastside Clinic

Sonrisas Dental Clinic
- 4-5 week waiting list; same
Coastside Family Medical Center
- Caring for Coastside Kids
day urgent/ER appts
- Family Health Program (clinic 2 ½ days/week)
- Just for Teens Clinic (Mon., 5-6:30pm)
Community Health - Immunizations
- Mobile Health Van - Shot Clinics
- Nursing Mother’s Program (WIC)
(Wednesday, 9-4 p.m.)
- Parent Education Programs

Medical-related services
in Pescadero
Health System
Family Health Services:
Emergency Medical - Pre-3 Team Community Health
Services/911 - AFLP - Mobile Health Van
- Ambulance services - Field Nursing (Tuesdays, 1-7 p.m.)
(Referrals)
Behavioral Health & SANTA CRUZ MEDICAL
Recovery Services SERVICES
Erwin www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts
- Mental 01/12/2010
Health Services Page 11
12/23/2009
www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 12
Results of the Coordinated County Services to Pescadero/South
South Coast Working Group Effort, 2008-2009

The Coordinated County Services to Pescadero/South South Coast Working Group
(hereafter “Working Group”) was formed in July 2008 in response to community advocacy
for more County services. In a tough budget climate, the South Coast Working Group
focused on health and social service needs, engaged in a rigorous process and delivered
numerous improvements, described here.
To focus its efforts, the Working Group established the following goals:
ƒ Short term: “To respond to the needs of the Pescadero, Loma Mar, La Honda,
and San Gregorio (South-South Coast) communities in a coordinated fashion.”
ƒ Long term: “To support and enhance existing community capacity aimed at
population level prevention efforts.”
A socio-ecological model was employed to help frame the work of the committee, with
initial meetings analyzing the South Coast communities from the Individual, Interpersonal,
Organizational, Community and Society level, and assessing each for Strengths, Needs,
Barriers, Work in Progress, and Proposed Ideas.
Based on this in-depth exercise along with extensive data gathering from all of the
agencies involved, the Working Group settled on four strategies to try and achieve its short
and long-term goals, as follows:
1. Enhancing awareness of medical and social services issues.
2. Improving access and linkages to resources.
3. Increasing capacity of County and community resources.
4. Bridging the geographic isolation.
The following provides a summary of the progress made by the Working Group in each
of the strategic areas.

Enhancing Awareness of Medical and Social Service Issues

Activity 1-1 – Form working group to address the needs of the South Coast.
ƒ The Working Group and its ad hoc committees met 11 times from July 2008 until
November 2009 and involved a total of 34 individuals from 16 County and
community based agencies (see Addendum 1).

Activity 1-2 – Obtain and share data on scope of medical and social services
needs of the South Coast.
ƒ Data was obtained from a variety of sources to cover the following information:
o Births by Zip Code, including percentage on Medi-Cal
o Puente health insurance enrollment
o Puente health care navigation requests
o South Coast residents seen at Half Moon Bay Clinics
o Referrals to Family Health Services
o Referrals to and clients seen by Health System staff in Pescadero (Family
Health and Behavioral Health & Recovery Services)

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 13
o Children and Family Services child abuse and neglect referrals by City
o Medi-Cal, CalWORKS, and Food Stamps requests by Zip Code
o Transportation arranged by Puente for medical and dental appointments
o 9-1-1 calls from South Coast
o Health Plan of San Mateo – South Coast diagnoses for chronic diseases
o Health Plan of San Mateo – South Coast health insurance enrollment

Activity 1-3 – Convene a series of one-on-one meetings with medical
providers regarding chronic disease care and management, including
MH/AOD issues.
ƒ Not completed; proposal submitted for this activity but unsuccessful.

Activity 1-4 – Hold one Parenting Class (Strengthening Multi-Ethnic Families –
14 weeks) in Pescadero targeting Puente and Pre-3 clients.
ƒ Parenting class held in 2009 with 14 enrollees from the South Coast region. Family
Health Services Pre-3 provided the instructor and support for child care; Puente
provided support for limited English proficient students. All enrollees graduated.

Activity 1-5 – Ongoing activities towards reducing the stigma associated with
identification and treatment of mental health (MH) and alcohol and other drug
(AOD) issues.
ƒ A Behavioral Health and Recovery Services task force has been focusing on this
issue in the Pescadero area. The task force completed a community survey and a
needs assessment.

Activity 1-6 – Increase awareness of, and access to, County programs by
participating in Health Fairs in the South Coast.
ƒ Ongoing; CALFire has agreed to participate in Health Fairs in the South Coast and
to provide blood pressure, body-mass index (BMI), and other checks.
ƒ No Health Fairs have been scheduled to date.

Activity 1-7 – Activities to provide education to residents for prevention and
management of chronic disease care.
ƒ Community Health is pursuing funding to implement a 6-week Diabetes Self
Management Workshop in Pescadero. Plan includes providing the workshop for
identified residents and training local providers in order to ensure ongoing
dissemination.

Improving Access and Linkages to Resources

Activity 2-1 – Increase time of County employees within Puente and increase
computer availability.
ƒ Family Health Services increased support as follows:
o WIC increased presence at Puente from one time per month to two times per
month

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 14
o Provided additional computer services at Puente
ƒ Human Services Agency increased support as follows:
o Provided a Benefits Analyst (BA) to Puente three days per week
o Provided a Social Work Supervisor to oversee other HSA staff on site
o Designated Puente as a County Core Service Agency

Activity 2-2 – Map available health related services to the South Coast.
ƒ The Working Group focused on the communities of Pescadero, La Honda, San
Gregorio, and Loma Mar – a geographically isolated part of San Mateo County.
ƒ Addendum 2 provides a map of the current health services available in the South
South Coast region.

Activity 2-3 – Identify health gap for residents of South Coast.
ƒ A grant proposal to the California Health Care Foundation (unfunded) clearly
outlined the gaps in health care for South South Coast residents. (The Coastside
Health Committee has also recently completed (November 2009) a separate needs
assessment of the entire Coastside.)

Activity 2-4 – Streamline County resource and referral process and timeliness
of referral process to ensure easily accessible medical, mental health, and
social services.
ƒ Ongoing. Service referrals have been streamlined with identified staff from both
HSA and Family Health working closely with Puente to help navigate the County
system.
ƒ Access to medical services continues to be a challenge and was exacerbated by
the closure of the Coastside Family Medical Center in Half Moon Bay. However, the
San Mateo Medical Center has worked to provide additional hours at the County
Clinic in Half Moon Bay (HMB), including obtaining additional exam rooms from
BHRS. In December 2009, the San Mateo Medical Center was awarded federal
funding to expand clinic services in HMB.

Activity 2-5 – Investigate ways to increase insurance accessibility, include
accessibility of the ACE program.
ƒ The Human Services Agency (HSA) placed staff at Puente and has increased
enrollment of South Coast residents in health insurance programs. Additionally,
when the private clinic in HMB closed, the Health Plan of San Mateo worked as
quickly as possible with private practitioners and others to provide alternatives for all
residents. Limitations remain for those residents who cannot access medical
services and for ACE enrollees who may want to use out of County services.

Activity 2-6 – Coordinate contract in the South Coast to share data between
HSA, Health System, County Office of Education, La Honda-Pescadero
Unified School District and community based organizations – Puente and
Sonrisas.
ƒ Not completed. Though raised as a desirable outcome, the group never prioritized
this to an activity.

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 15
Activity 2-7 – Assist Puente in building out trailer to house additional County
employees.
ƒ Not completed. Focus shifted to HSA making Puente a County Core Service
Center in 2009, which solidified funding to Puente.

Increasing Capacity of County and Community Resources

Activity 3-1 – Increase capacity of medical services by increasing Mobile
Health Van hours in Pescadero.
ƒ Mobile Health Van hours were initially increased in Pescadero to one day a week.
However, budget reductions in the summer of 2009 made this no longer feasible
and the Mobile Health Van hours were suspended in both Pescadero and Half
Moon Bay.

Activity 3-2 – Increase capacity of County nutritional services.
ƒ Women, Infant and Children (WIC) hours doubled form one- to two-times per
month. However, despite advocacy by WIC staff, there are no grocery stores in the
Pescadero – South Coast region which sell WIC foods.

Activity 3-3 – Increase language capacity of County departments.
ƒ Health System implemented a Language Access Policy effective July 2008 for all
employees covering both interpretation and translation of documents.

Activity 3-4 – Support Touchpoints and/or other parent support groups to
South Coast.
ƒ A Stress Management Workshop was held in November 2009 for the graduates of
the Parenting Class; 12 parents attended the workshop. The workshop was co-
presented by Pre-3 and a mental health clinician from BHRS.

Activity 3-5 – Expand RotaCare services to Pescadero and/or South Coast,
explore idea of clinics focused on episodic or specialty care.
ƒ RotaCare explored the feasibility of expanding to Pescadero but was unable to do
so. However, in the wake of the closure of the private clinic, RotaCare expanded
HMB hours and provided dedicated hours to South Coast residents.

Activity 3-6 – Expand services by Fire Department personnel to include blood
pressure screening and monitoring.
ƒ CALFire is willing to provide blood pressure screening and additional services at
Health Fairs in the South Coast region.

Activity 3-7 – Submit proposal to the California HealthCare Foundation for
increased chronic disease care training and management.
ƒ Proposal submitted and not funded.

Activity 3-8 – Invite CALFire/EMS units in rural/Coastside ares to BHRS Crisis
Intervention Training (CIT).

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 16
ƒ Invitation extended to CALFire.

Bridging the Geographic Isolation

Activity 4-1 – Increase alternatives to transport residents to routine medical
and related appointments.
ƒ Puente received additional funding from the Health System – Health Policy and
Planning and Sequoia Health District to coordinate transportation for South Coast
residents to medical and dental appointments.
ƒ Providing an average of approximately 300 rides annually.

Activity 4-2 – Expand access to dental services through mobile clinic.
ƒ Sonrisas Dental Clinic purchased a mobile dental chair and has provided additional
screening services for residents. In addition, the clinic is now open 5 ½ days per
week with the wait for services reduced from several months to 4-5 weeks; same
day appointments are now available for urgent or emergency patients.

Activity 4-3 – Expand access to primary medical care services for South
Coast residents. Explore options of Health Plan of San Mateo providers in
Santa Cruz County.
ƒ An ad hoc group met to explore this issue.
ƒ Health Plan of San Mateo (HPSM) is contacting primary care providers in Santa
Cruz County to pursue interested in contracts as Primary Care Providers for HPSM
members.
ƒ SMMC – Coastside Clinic obtained additional exam rooms.. Starting at the end of
December 2009, the clinic will expand pediatric care.
ƒ With new funding from federal government, SMMC will expand Coastside Clinic
services.

The South South-Coast community has fewer unmet needs today than before this effort
began and work will continue to fill those needs. The Working Group brought focus to a
geographically isolated population of San Mateo County and helped to maximize the
strengths of the organizations already present in the region. While there remain challenges
in meeting the primary medical needs of the South South Coast, the outcomes of the
Working Group show that even with strained budgets, collaborative efforts are worthwhile
towards improving the overall health and well-being of a community.

5
www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 17
Group – Meeting List and List of Attendees

Meetings held:

ƒ 2008:
o July 3
o August 7
o August 29
o September 25
o November 3

ƒ 2009
o January 9
o February 27
o April 13
o July 1 (Primary care and Mobile Health Van Services ad hoc meeting))
o August 26
o November 20 (Expansion of primary care services ad hoc meeting)

Total of 9 regular meetings and 2 ad hoc meetings; 11 meetings total.
34 people attended all or some of the meetings.

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 18
Group – Meeting List and List of Attendees
List of participants:

#
NAME AGENCY
MEETINGS

Belinda Arriaga Behavioral Health Puente de la Costa Sur 5
Children & Family
Gary Beasley Human Services Agency 1
Services
Children and Family
Ellen Bucci Human Services Agency 1
Services
Chronic Disease
Edith Cabuslay Prevention, Community Health System 5
Health
Maternal and Child
Anand Chabra Health, Family Health Health System 4
Services
Public Health,
John Conley Health System 1
Community Health
Self Sufficiency
Elsa Dawson Human Services Agency 4
Services
Trish Erwin Family Health Services Health System 11
Ambulatory Clinics,
Rob Fleming San Mateo Medical Health System 8
Center
Ambulatory Clinics,
Linda Franco San Mateo Medical Health System 2
Center
Mary Hansell Family Health Services Health System 9

Linda Holman Self Sufficiency Human Services Agency 3
Third District, Office of
Matt Jacobs Supervisor Rich Board of Supervisors 5
Gordon
San Mateo Sheriff’s
Lt. Ken Jones Coastside 1
Department
Chronic Disease
Gabriela Lemus Prevention, Community Health System 1
Health
Children & Family
Jerry Lindner Human Services Agency 1
Services
Kerry Lobel Puente de la Costa Sur 11
Aging and Adult
Lisa Mancini Health System 1
Services

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 19
Addendum 1 – Coordinated County Services to Pescadero – South South Coast Working
Group – Meeting List and List of Attendees

#
NAME AGENCY
MEETINGS

Julia McKeon Puente de la Costa Sur 2

Kate Meyer-Haas Pescadero Municipal Advisory 8

Lorraine Moriarty Society of St. Vincent de Paul 3
Emergency Medical
Jan Ogar Health System 4
Services
Home Visiting
Ronell Reyna Programs, Family Health System 7
Health Services
Behavioral Health &
Louise Rogers Health System 5
Recovery Services
Sandra Santa- Behavioral Health &
Health System 6
Mora Recovery Services
Behavioral Health &
Linda Simonsen Health System 6
Recovery Services
Children & Family
Renee Smylie Human Services Agency 1
Services
Mobile Clinic,
Ellen Sweetin Health System 2
Community Health
Carolyn Thon Health Plan of San Mateo 2
Prevention & Early
Deborah Torres Human Services Agency 7
Intervention
Child Health and
Dorothy Vura-
Disability Prevention, Health System 1
Weiss
Family Health Services
David Wade CAL-Fire 1
La Honda-Pescadero Unified
Amy Wooliever 3
School District
Brian Zamora Community Health Health System 7

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 20
Environmental Committee Report 
January 9, 2010 
 

Notes 
RCD will be helping PMAC to understand the TMDL study, the 
watershed plan, and giving us advice toward a remedy for the fish‐kill 
and flooding issues ‐ as it related to the Marsh.  
RCD’s contract with the Regional Board is to host two meetings per year 
for two years with the option of additional meetings if the budget 
allows. Kellyx is seeking funding to coordinate an ongoing stakeholder 
group fore more in‐depth participation for those who are interested. 
Jill Marshall, the project manager, left the Regional Board and turned the 
project over to Mike Napolitano.  
Safety concerns may be opportunities for some sources of funding, 
whereas resource protection provides different funding sources.  
Tim Frahm recommended that we contact Kit Crump is with the NOAA 
Restoration Center to help us collect information. Kit’s boss, Pat Rutten 
might also be a useful resource for us. 
 
Questions  
Will flooding be addressed in the TMDL study?  Is there grant money to 
follow? 
The TMDL was required under the Clean Water Act as a response to 
impaired water quality due to sediment.  It is outside the scope of the 
TMDL to focus on assessing the flooding issue or developing a plan to 
address flooding.  However, it is important that this resource 
management concern is noted in the TMDL, (1) as the context in which 
the TMDL will take place, (2) as a significant local concern, and (3) as a 
consideration to ensure that recommendations in the TMDL do not 
exacerbate the problem.  There is great value in having this concern 
noted in the report.  Also, the TMDL may be able to make 
recommendations for additional projects or work that are outside the 

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 21
scope of the TMDL.  We should try to get a recommendation in the 
report to address flooding. 
 

Action Items  
Read the Cook Report, Develop Mission Statement, Create a list of 
talking points for discussion with stakeholders. 
Collect literature/reports/history of the Pescadero Marsh and upload to 
the PMAC website 
Kellyx sent a request to Kit Crump and Pat Rutten and Army Corps and 
many others, including State Parks and resource agencies, asking them 
what should be included in a library.  She sent the Committee their 
compiled responses.  We should not reinvent the wheel on this, as it 
appears that most of the work has already been done and PMAC can 
simply link to it and ask the WRC to update if there are any new reports 
to add.  WRC will also scan original documents. 

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 22
Puente Updates 
January 12, 2009 
 
 
• Jan 28th‐‐ H1N1 seasonal flu clinics will be offered in La Honda at the 
Post Office 2‐5pm and in Pescadero (same day) at the Pescadero 
Community Church, 3‐7pm 
 
• Via a partnership with the Institute for Human and Social 
Development, Norma Zavala will provide home visits for 11 families 
with children, 0‐3. She will also continue to do socialization activities 
with children at Puente such as Story Time.  This means Puente will 
again be offering a fully functional parent involvement program.  
 
• Food distribution is the 28th 
 
• Tax preparation help to be offered, February ‐ March.  Qualified 
beneficiaries earn less than 52,000.  Volunteers are also needed to 
help prepare returns. 
 
• New semester language classes ‐‐ Spanish for English speakers began 
yesterday, on Mondays 5‐6pm.  ESL classes 7‐9pm, Mondays and 
Wednesdays.  TBA (but coming soon) a Spanish Conversation and 
Cooking class 
 
• In December Puente worked with the County to distribute $200 food 
cards to 77 low income families in our community 
 
• Puente distributed 306 holiday stockings and gift bags 
 
Donation requests 
• Always looking for school supplies, bicycles (in excellent working 
condition please,) toiletries sleeping gear 
 
• A baby wipe donor!  Someone willing to donate 1 – 5 cases of baby 
wipes each month.  

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 23
www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 24
FALL CREEK ENGINEERING, INC.
Civil• Environmental• Water Resource Engineering and Sciences
Tel. (831) 426·9054 P.O. Box 7894, Santa Cruz, CA 95061 Fax. (831) 426-4932

December 10, 2009
Catherine M. Perry
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
P.O. Box 249
Pescadero', CA 94060

Subject: Review of Facilities Planning Report for Pescadero Community Sewer Project
March 2008, Prepared by HydroScience Engineers, Inc.

Dear Catherine:

Fall Creek Engineering, Inc. (FCE) has conducted a review of the above referenced document.
Based on our review, FCE would recommend that the facilities plan (Plan) be revised to include
alternative sites for a new wastewater treatment system, some additional wastewater
treatment schemes, and additional options for effluent reuse and disposal.

In summary, FCE recommends the following:

1. As outlined in the Plan, the proposed wastewater project would include installing a
force main to pump raw sewage to a relatively remote location. This scheme will result
in high costs to implement the project. FCE would recommend considering some
additional sites that are in closer proximity to the community. This option would reduce
the costs associated with the pipelines and would allow water to be reused locally for a
variety of purposes, such as a source for fire suppression, irrigation of the elementary
school playfield and as a source of water to the local nursery/greenhouse operations.
This revision would require identifying alternative sites for the treatment system and
modifications to the collection and conveyance system.

2. The three alternative wastewater treatment systems considered by HydroScience
Engineering are all relatively expensive, energy intensive, and operationally complex
treatment schemes considering the volume of wastewater treated and the relatively
remote location of the systems. FCE would recommend that a few additional
wastewater treatment schemes be considered that are lower cost, easier to operate and
maintain, have been shown to be reliable, and are substantially more energy efficient.
FCE would recommend revising the plan to include a comparison of a two- or three-
stage trickling filter system, a combined trickling filter and constructed wetland system
or sma ll pond/wetland system . The trickling filter systems could be installed in a small
area comparable to the SBR system selected by HydroScience Engineering. A trickling
filter wetland and or pond/wetland system would require more area than the systems
identified in the Plan, but would be the easiest to operate and maintain and would
require the least amount of energy.

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 25
FALL CRE E K
ENGIN EERING, INC.

3. FCE is aware that the community of Pescadero presently does not have an adequate fire
suppression system. FCE recommends that the Plan be revised to consider the reuse of
treated effluent as part of a new fire suppression system for the community. FCE
suggests that a combined fire water and water reclamation storage tank and reclaimed
water distribution system could be installed that would allow treated effluent to be
used in the town for fire protection and to supply local reuse areas.

4. FCE recommends that the Plan be revised to evaluate additional water reuse options, as
previously mentioned, for a variety of uses, including irrigation of the school playfield, as
source water for local nurseries, greenhouses and agricultural fields in close proximity to
the town center.

5. FCE recommends that the Plan be revised to evaluate alternative winter disposal
options, such as installing a subsurface disposal system(s) in the elementary school
playfield and/or other lands adjacent to the town center.

Thank you for the opportunity to assist you and provide our review of the Plan. As you are
aware, FCE is a local engineering firm that specializes in small community water and
wastewater engineering projects. FCE would be happy to provide you and the County of San
Mateo a proposal for services to update the Plan to incorporate the recommendations
presented in this letter.

I have enclosed a copy of our Statement of Qualifications focused on our recent wastewater
engineering projects. If you have any questions or require additional information, please do
not hesitate to contact me at (831) 426-9054.

Principal Engineer

Enclosures

2

www.pescaderocouncil.org Handouts 01/12/2010 Page 26
03/09/2010 Page 1
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org

Tuesday, March 9, 2010, 7:30 PM,
Native Sons Hall, 112 Stage Road, Pescadero CA 94060

1) CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL, CHANGES TO ORDER OF AGENDA
2) PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA
3) PRESENTATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS
a) Santa Cruz bicycle club asking for support for bike route through Pescadero (5 minutes)
b) Green Jobs, and Jobs Subsidies Presentation by County representatives
4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF LAST REGULAR MEETING
5) FINANCIAL REPORT – Financial Report- Pattie Brixen
6) CORRESPONDENCE – Correspondence from Pescadero Middle School, and others – Rodger Reinhart
7) REPORTS FROM CURRENT COMMITTEE CHAIRS
a) Emergency Preparedness – CERT Training graduates– Lary Lawson
b) Housing Committee – geotechnical study, Bolinas field trip, RCAC - Catherine Peery
c) School Board Meeting liaison – Don McDermott
d) Environmental Committee – meeting report -Jackson
e) Liaison to Puente, County Health & Human Services – Kate Haas
f) Communications Committee – discussion of Town sign
8) LAND USE COMMITTEE MEETING – ALL MEMBERS OF PMAC
a) Sewer System: Recent developments with Public Works, RCAC – Catherine Peery
b) Review of Permits (if any)
9) NEW BUSINESS
a) Request for letter of support from Celeste Worden, licensee, KPDO radio station
b) Letter, response to Middle School children
10) OLD BUSINESS -
a) Review, acceptance of revised By-Laws for PMAC
11) Adjournment, Next meeting April 13, 2010, Middle School Students, County Road Spraying

This site is NOT wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including
auxiliary aids or services) to participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting
notice, agenda packet or other writings that may be distributed at the meeting, should contact Catherine Peery at least 3 working days before the
meeting at 650-879-0150, fax 650-879-1847, cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org. Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make
reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
03/09/2010 Page 2

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
03/09/2010 Page 3

~aunty Manager's Office BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
MARK CHURCH
CAROLE GROOM
RICHARD S. GORDON
ROSE JACOBS GIBSON
ADRIENNE TISSIER

DAVID S. BOESCH

COUNTY OF SAN MATEO COUNTY MANAGER
CLERK OF THE BOARD

COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER • REDWOOD CITY • CALIFORNIA 94063-1662 (650) 363-4123
WEB PAGE ADDRESS: hllp://www.co.sanmateo.ca.us FAX: (650) 363-1916

Februa1y 11, 2010

Catherine M. Peeiy, Chair
Pescadero Municipal Advisoiy Council (PMAC)
PO Box 249
Pescadero, CA 94060-0249

Subject: A111111a/ Allocatio11for PMAC Operations
Dear Ms. Catherine:

The County Manager's Office has been informed by Supervisor Richard Gordon's Office that PMAC would like
to continue to receive its amrnal appropriated amount of $3 ,000 in one lump sum payment. In order to disburse
the funds in this manner, PMAC will need to once again agree to the following conditions:

1. The PMAC remains an Advisoiy Commission, and has no authority to obligate or to act on behalf of, San
Mateo County.
2. The funds received from San Mateo County need to be placed in a separate bank account, not commingled
with other funds, and we would recommend access only by you and one back up person.
3. The funds need to be spent only for lawful PMAC meeting purposes and accounted for in the following
categories: Printing and Copy Service; Postage and Mailing; Other Office Expense; Meeting Expense; Office
Equipment Rental (if any); and, Telephone Service Charges.
4. At the end of the fiscal year, the PMAC needs to account for all funds spent by submitting to the San Mateo
County Manager, a written report including original receipts and a written reconciliation of the account
including all original bank statements and all original voided and/or cancelled checks.
5. This account and all transactions will be subject to audit by the San Mateo County Controller.

If you accept the terms listed above, please sign and return to my office and a check will be sent to your Council.

Sincerely,
Agreed and Ag ted by the Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council:

. \ ~,X §\.Catherinb
'~4vi M. Peeiy, Chair PMAC
David Boesch
County Manager

cc: Honorable Rich Gordon, Supervisor, District 3
Honorable Tom Huening, Co_u nty Controller
Michael Murphy, County Counsel
03/09/2010 Page 4

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
03/09/2010 Page 5

San Mateo County
Final Report: Results of the Coordinated County Services to Pescadero/South
South Coast Working Group Effort, 2008-2009

The Coordinated County Services to Pescadero/South South-Coast Working Group
(hereafter “Working Group”) was formed in July 2008 in response to community advocacy
for more County services. In a tough budget climate, the South Coast Working Group
focused on health and social service needs, engaged in a rigorous process and delivered
numerous improvements, described here.
To focus its efforts, the Working Group established the following goals:
ƒ Short term: “To respond to the needs of the Pescadero, Loma Mar, La Honda,
and San Gregorio (South-South Coast) communities in a coordinated fashion.”
ƒ Long term: “To support and enhance existing community capacity aimed at
population level prevention efforts.”
A socio-ecological model was employed to help frame the work of the committee, with
initial meetings analyzing the South Coast communities from the Individual, Interpersonal,
Organizational, Community and Society level, and assessing each for Strengths, Needs,
Barriers, Work in Progress, and Proposed Ideas.
Based on this in-depth exercise along with extensive data gathering from all of the
agencies involved, the Working Group settled on four strategies to try and achieve its short
and long-term goals, as follows:
1. Enhancing awareness of medical and social services issues.
2. Improving access and linkages to resources.
3. Increasing capacity of County and community resources.
4. Bridging the geographic isolation.
The following provides a summary of the progress made by the Working Group in each
of the strategic areas.

Enhancing Awareness of Medical and Social Service Issues

Activity 1-1 – Form working group to address the needs of the South Coast.
ƒ The Working Group and its ad hoc committees met 11 times from July 2008 until
November 2009 and involved a total of 34 individuals from 16 County and
community based agencies (see Addendum 1).

Activity 1-2 – Obtain and share data on scope of medical and social services
needs of the South Coast.
ƒ Data was obtained from a variety of sources to cover the following information:
o Births by Zip Code, including percentage on Medi-Cal
o Puente health insurance enrollment
Addendum03/09/2010
2 PACIFICA MEDICAL
SERVICES Page 6

Medical-related services in
CCS Medical
Half Moon Bay Therapy Unit Medical-related services in
Health System Health System - SpecialNeeds Physical San Mateo/Santa Clara
Family Health Services Therapy
SMMC Coastside Clinic
- Pre-3 Team
- AFLP
- Primary Care
- Family Planning
- Field Nursing
- Women’s Health Stanford/Lucile
(Referrals)
- Pediatric Clinic
Packard Hospital
Coastside Rotacare Clinic - Nutrition - Births/Delivery
- Urgent Care - Mental Health Services
- Wednesdays, 5-7:30 p.m. - STD Screening & therapy
- @ SMMC Coastside Clinic

Sonrisas Dental Clinic
- 4-5 week waiting list; same
Coastside Family Medical Center
- Caring for Coastside Kids
day urgent/ER appts
- Family Health Program (clinic 2 ½ days/week)
- Just for Teens Clinic (Mon., 5-6:30pm)
Community Health - Immunizations
- Mobile Health Van - Shot Clinics
- Nursing Mother’s Program (WIC)
(Wednesday, 9-4 p.m.)
- Parent Education Programs

Medical-related services
in Pescadero
Health System
Family Health Services:
Emergency Medical - Pre-3 Team Community Health
Services/911 - AFLP - Mobile Health Van
- Ambulance services - Field Nursing (Tuesdays, 1-7 p.m.)
(Referrals)
Behavioral Health & SANTA CRUZ MEDICAL
Recovery Services SERVICES
- Mental Health Services
Erwin 12/23/2009
03/09/2010 Page 7

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Robyn Thaw (650) 573-3935
March 9, 2010 San Mateo County Health System

Continued Demand for H1N1 Vaccine Prompts County to Offer Additional Free Clinics
Free H1N1 Flu Vaccine Clinics Extended through March 2010

SAN MATEO, Calif. — High turnouts at the County’s free H1N1 flu vaccination clinics in
February has prompted San Mateo County health officials to offer 10 additional free vaccine
clinics now through the end of March. Though the number of new H1N1 cases has dwindled in
recent weeks, flu viruses are always unpredictable, and the County continues its efforts to ensure
the public is protected.

The H1N1 virus is not expected to disappear anytime soon, so it remains important for people to
continue getting vaccinated – especially children, pregnant mothers, and individuals with
underlying chronic medical conditions. Children who receive their first dose now may only need
one dose next fall, when flu season ramps up again. It is also important for children under age 10
to get two doses of H1N1 flu vaccine – at least three weeks apart – because two doses provide
better protection against the H1N1 virus for the less mature immune systems of younger children.

“I still encourage everyone to get vaccinated,” said Dr. Scott Morrow, Health Officer for San
Mateo County. “High numbers of residents taking precautionary measures to get themselves and
their families vaccinated directly contributes to a milder flu season.”

H1N1 flu is a vaccine-preventable disease; therefore, the County Health System is urging the
public to get vaccinated now. A flu shot is still the single best defense against the flu, and can help
reduce the spread throughout the community. For individuals in high-risk groups, the vaccine
prevents serious health complications, and in some cases, death. There have been 10 H1N1-related
deaths and 95 hospitalizations in the County since the outbreak began last year.

The H1N1 (swine) flu vaccine is widely available throughout the County, including doctor’s
offices, retail stores and pharmacies, and free County public vaccination clinics. For a full list,
visit www.smhealth.org/flu/vaccines.

###
_____________________________________________________________________________
Clinic Locations and Times – No Appointment Necessary

Half Moon Bay
Wednesday, March 10th 6pm-8pm
Moonridge Mid-Peninsula Housing, 2001 Miramontes Point Rd.

-- MORE --
03/09/2010 Page 8

Menlo Park
Friday, March 12th 11am-12:30pm
St. Anthony's Church, 3500 Middlefield Rd.

San Mateo
Sunday, March 14th, 12pm - 5pm
Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center, 725 Monte Diablo Ave.

Daly City
Saturday, March 20th, 12pm-2pm
Fernando Rivera Middle School, 1255 Southgate Ave.

Half Moon Bay
Sunday, March 21st, 10am - 4pm
Ted Adcock Community Center, 535 Kelly Ave.

South San Francisco
Sunday, March 21st, 10am-4pm
Joseph A. Fernekes Recreation Building, 781 Tennis Dr.

Menlo Park
Tuesday, March 23rd 11am-12:30pm
St. Anthony's Church, 3500 Middlefield Rd.

Pescadero
Thursday, March 25th, 4pm-6pm
Pescadero Community Church, Stage & North St.

East Palo Alto
Saturday, March 27th 10am - 1pm
YMCA, 550 Bell St.
03/09/2010 Page 9

San Mateo County H1N1 Flu
Vaccination Clinics

FREE H1N1 flu vaccine
For all San Mateo County residents – 6 months & older
No appointment needed - No I.D. required
Menlo Park
Thursday, March 4th, 11am–12:30pm
Friday, March 12th, 11am–12:30pm
Tuesday, March 23rd, 11am–12:30pm
St. Anthony's Church, Padua Dining Room, 3500 Middlefield Rd.
Redwood City
Saturday, March 6 th, 10am–4pm
Fair Oaks Community Center, 2600 Middlefield Road
Half Moon Bay
Wednesday, March 10th, 6pm–8pm
Moonridge Mid-Peninsula Housing, 2001 Miramontes Point Rd.
Sunday, March 21st, 10am–4pm
Ted Adcock Community Center, 535 Kelly Ave.
San Mateo
Sunday, March 14th, 12pm–5pm
Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center, 725 Monte Diablo Ave.
Daly City
Saturday, March 20th, 12pm–2pm
Fernando Rivera Middle School, 1255 Southgate Ave.
South San Francisco
Sunday, March 21st, 10am–4pm
Joseph A. Fernekes Recreation Building, 781 Tennis Dr.
Pescadero
Thursday, March 25th, 4pm–6pm
Pescadero Community Church, Stage & North St.
East Palo Alto
Saturday, March 27th, 10am–1pm
East Palo Alto YMCA, 550 Bell Street

Flu season is not over. A flu shot is the most important step to
protect against getting the flu.
IMPORTANT: Children under age 10 need two doses of vaccine– at least 3 weeks apart

For more information about H1N1 (swine) flu and vaccine updates visit
www.smhealth.org/flu or call the County Flu Hotline at (650) 573-3927.
03/09/2010 Page 10

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
03/09/2010 Page 11

Strawberry Marin 24
1
Tamalpais- Richardson Albany Grizzly
Ave
Homestead Bay Peak
Blvd Mount Diablo
Ave Lafayette
San Francisco Berkeley University State Park

Shattuck
Mo Reservoir

Sacramento
Ave
Bay ra
Alamo

Moraga Rd
123 Wa ga

d
Angel Island

Dan
rys R
Mount Tamalpais 80 y

SAN
State Park e
Ashby Av

Sk

ville
a
ylin
State Park 101 Sto

St M
Vall ne

Blvd
e
St
Diablo

Blv
ey R Mount Diablo
Emeryville 24

d
e d
FRANCISCO
ak
Sn Rd Moraga Diablo Scenic Blvd

y

Pin Rd
dwa

yon
eh
Rd Blac

u rs
Treasure Island

Broa
17 khaw
Blackhawk

Can
Rd
COUNTY

t
Naval Station Oakland Piedmont Rd k

t
Army Base

tS
980 13

Marke

Blv rk
Pa
Golden Gate Oakland Naval 14th

d
Nat'l Rec Area 80 Supply Center St Danville
th Camino Tassajara
Seal Rocks 101 13 e Upper San Leandro
Av 580

Ave
State Beach Alameda Naval 680
Reservoir
Oakland

Pacific
Geary Blvd Air Station Oakland Inner

vale
n Rd Tassajara

St h
Inte o

Hig
Fulton St Harbor any

Fruit
Golden rna er wC

Ma
Cro Highla
Lincoln Way tion Kell nd Rd

ca
Gate Park al B
Carlsbad State Ave

rth
lvd

ur

ajara
er

Ocean
Beach d

B
erg nR

lv d

Re
nyo

Dougherty Rd
Alameda nb

Sunset Blvd

o Tass
a

Alc
ge y

dw
280 He Exw ve ris C
Nor

oo
San

os
d

ta B
61 A

Camin
Rd
98th
Ramon

lvd
Wa
Monterey Blvd Lake

t

shin
3rd S
St
Golden Gate Ocea Chabot
n

ion

gton
Ave Mclaren La

s

Rd
Nat'l Rec Area 1 rt Davis ke Castro

Mis
Gene Park po

B
Ch

n
Air Dr

lvd
va Av St ab lley

Canyo
280 e ot
Rd Valley r Va
ado d Dublin
John d 14 Am Blv Santa
Ashland

Crow
Thornton Blv 101 th
Daly Daly Brisbane 880 St Rita

Bay d
State Beach San Castro Valley Blvd 580

shore
City

Blv
Broadmoor Leandro 238 Stoneridge Blvd

El
35 Hil
lsid San Bruno Mtn itas

Santa

Ch
Dr Pos
San Cherryland

a
e B State Park Las
Fairview

rro
lvd Valley
Colma Div

Rd
Rita R
Lorenzo

Footh
t isio Ave
Grand AS nS Stanley Blvd
t

Palo Rd

d
ill Rd
Ave
South San Ave

Vin Ave
1 h inton

ma
ug Bernal

ey
W

St
oro

ard
res
stb d Francisco Ave

son
k We Blv San Francisco Pleasanton

Jack
ar

Clawiter Rd
rp P Hayward
Sha Rd 380
35
San Bay Tennyson Rd Kilkare
Bruno 92 Industrial
84
238
Pkwy
Pacifica 280 Whipple Rd Union
Millbrae

Union City Blvd
1 Burlingame Alva City Sunol/
92 rado
Niles 84
San Andreas Rd Scotts
Gray Whale
Cove
Lake
au
101 Corner
State ate
Ch Dr San Foster
Fre
mo Fremont
nt B
Beach Mateo City lvd
Hillsborough rin
gs Pas 680
Montara Pilarcitos Sp
eo
Pad
tal Beach Ne re P
ys Rd

Calaver
Montara Lake 238
Cr ale Park Blvd y Blv wark kwy
State lsd d

Ave
Hil Ct Pkw
Ala Pulga

Lower Crystal

as Rd
Beach rine Mission
Las

wry
me

Po
Ma

Blv son
Springs Reservoir lhe C

Mo
da s

ton herry

y
1 San Jose
ore od
Rd mus

kw
Thorn e

ven
De

El
Sh dwo 84 St

d

Fremo
sP

Ste
Av
Moss
Re

ton
Granada Highlands
Rals Newark

nt Blv

Mission Blvd
Durham
Beach Ave
Belmont Redwood
Rd

Bo Rd

d
92

yc
San

e
City Menlo
Carlos Warm
Half Moon Bay
North Fair Park
State Beach Upper Crystal 280 Springs

University Ave
Springs Reservoir Edgewood
Oaks Mid East Palo
Half Moon Rd ve dle Alto
on A

d
84 field
Emerald Lake
wR
Bay Jeff
ers
Atherton Rd
Hills Willo Milpitas
35
Ave aiso

82 d
ero R
ar

Ala
rcad eras
Valp

680 Calav
K
Mou ings Las meda Emba
Kings 101
wy
ntain Pu De Rd
Rd lga Ex Mid Mountain Santa Clara Naval Felte
Mountain
on
s dle

Old
Air Reserve r Rd
View Alviso
eg

Alm field
Woodside Menlo

P
Or

aS Rd

iedm
t
Park Stanford Caribbean
Rd hill

Rd ston
Ave

ont
ess
nd

Pied
Dr
Palo
e

Sierra R
237 Land

Rd
Sa

880
arl
ek

Cen d

Lafa
Ch
Cre

mon
tr
Alto Exw al

yett
Blvd ne
as

t Rd
y
nte Antonio Rd

Po
it

reli
Tun

e St

Old Oak
rto
East
ro

Sho
San

la
trade

Sunnyvale
Foo

Av phy
Sky Rd

a Ave
Foothills

r
Rd

Mu
thill

e
Aras

land R
Londa

1st
e
Exw

Mathild
Central Exwy
Av

Rd ssa
Miramonte Ave
l Rd

s Expy

St
Los 101
y

e
d

rry
Mo
e Mil

Old San Francisco Rd
Portola

Be
Altos
SAN MATEO
El

San Toma
Los Altos d
Pag

eR
Valley ke

Wh
Hills Mc

Lawrence Rd
Fremont Ave

ite
13th
84 82 St

Was
Wolfe Rd

Rd
COUNTY

St
1 an
St yes

Cap
Ke

hin
Loyola Homestead Rd Santa Juli

gton

itol
San Jose
280 Clara

Exw
Kin
St
35 Arena

Pa

gR

y
San Gregorio

rk
Saratoga Sunnyvale Rd

d
Stevens Creek Blvd

Av
State Beach

e
La Honda Rancho
San Aborn
Pomponio Cupertino Rinconada Burbank low
St Rd
State Beach Wil Jose Tu
lly Rd
Rd

Se
y
ine

xw

nte
Rd
Bascom Ave
lE

Meridian Ave
Alp

Prospect Rd Hamilton Ave

r
pito
Ave Ca
ve

Campbell Ave ner
Ste on Rd
Ca

aA

Cox Ave Curt
ven
ny

og

Rd
rat
s

reek Campbell Ave
Sa

101
Rd

Pescadero ro C orthy
cade
rce

Pes Foxw
Pie

State Beach
Saratoga 85 am Ln
Union Ave

Branh
Portola Redwoods
Pescadero State Park 9 9
Sa
rato
ga
Cambrian Blossom Hill Rd
Los
Ga Park
tos Blossom Hill Rd
Clov

Monte Rd
Camden

Bean Hollow Castle Rock Santa Teresa Blvd
Ave
erda

State Beach State Park Sereno
le Rd

Alm

Los
ad
Butano
en

Gatos
Ex
State Park
wy

17
San L

236
Gaudalupe
Cozzens
New
orenzo

d
kR
Rd

Reservoir
Lake
ek

Almaden
e
Cre
Cre

River

Bear
zos

Rd
Ga

Big Basin Redwoods
reek

State Park Lexington
C

Hills
Bear

9 Redwood
236 Estates
Charlie Rd
Mountain

Boulder
Creek
Ben
San

Lomond
d
Jose R

Alba Rd
Soquel

Hig
Glenwood

17 hla
nd
Dr

Wa
SANTA CRUZ Henry Cowell
Redwoods
Scotts
Valley
y
Rd

COUNTY
State Park
Zayante
Rd

Vall otts
Dr
Flat

Mountain View
He Moun
Sc
ey
Em
Pine

rm t Rd Nisene Marks
pire

on
Felton
Granite Creek Rd

Glen R
Laurel

Rd Forest State
Gra

Park
rte Dr
Graha
de R

9
d

Davenport
Sm

1
d

Brancifo
it
hG

m Hill

Henry Cowell 17
rad

Day
Rd

Can
Eure Rd
e

Redwoods State
Rd

se Rd
on

yon

Valley
Do

Park
ka
Old San Jo
nny

Soquel
Bo

Live
Oak
Soquel Dr Aptos Corralitos
Wilder Ranch Water Cap
itola
State Park St Rd Aptos Hills-
41st Ave

High St
e
17th Av

Capitola Larkin
7th
Ave

L ark
in V
Portola Dr alle
Fre

yR
Opal d
ed

Rio Del
o m

Cliffs Freedom
Blv

Mar
d

1
Vista na
Dr
Bue

Manresa
State Harkin
Beach Slough s
Rd
Watsonville

Stage 3
San Francisco to Santa Cruz Start Time: 11:15 am
Tuesday, May 18, 2010 Total Distance: 113.7 mi./182.9 km
Finish ETA: 3:23-4:04 pm
Presented by

© AEG Cycling Revised 2/1/10
03/09/2010 Page 12

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
03/09/2010 Page 13
03/09/2010 Page 14
03/09/2010 Page 15
03/09/2010 Page 16
03/09/2010 Page 17
03/09/2010 Page 18
03/09/2010 Page 19

PPRS and KPDO‐FM: A Brief History 

 

March 1, 2010 

Pescadero Public Radio Service was founded in 1994 in order to develop a community‐based radio 
station for Pescadero and outlying communities.  In 2003, we were granted our license. This is our story. 

In the academic school year of 1993‐1994 I was hired as a long‐term substitute teacher for the language 
arts students of Pescadero Middle School. Having only a substitute credential and no fulltime classroom 
experience working with the California standards, I was having great difficulty getting my students to 
write even the most basic assignments. At that time, PMS (an unfortunate monogram to begin with) was 
divided into Magnet students, and everyone else. There was a subtle resentment of the status quo by 
the kids belonging to the ‘everyone else’ category, and rightfully so. By virtue of a questionable test, or 
the demands of some particularly noisy parents, half the students were pulled out for more advanced 
studies by long‐term middle school teacher, Ms. Short, a formidable and exemplary teacher.  I was given 
the rest, and they were having none of it. 

We struggled with antiquated textbooks and dated worksheets for almost two weeks, while the Magnet 
students next door were studying literary giants and the classics. A day came when I knew I had to come 
up with something or lose my tenuous control over the situation and descend into anarchy. On a sunny 
afternoon, while driving across the San Mateo bridge with my son Matt, himself a magnet student, we 
fought as usual over the radio dial: I wanted to listen to NPR and he was determined to listen to the new 
format on KSAN: Rap. 

Rap was new. Rap was hot. Rap was all over the dial. The Rap revolution had happened so quickly, we 
adults, who found it offensive and decidedly non‐musical, found ourselves arguing daily over what the 
kids were listening to and the effect it was having on their vocabulary. The more we protested, the more 
enticing the music became, so that soon the kids would listen to nothing else. 

As we topped the rise of the bridge, the Bay clear of fog in the distance, my son and I literally fighting 
over the push‐button radio controls, I had an epiphany: if this is what they want, even my own literate 
and intelligent son, then I would find a way to make it work for me… in my classroom. 

I had worked in radio as a young woman many years before, cutting my teeth at KTYD‐FM in Santa 
Barbara, and later at various stations up and down the state of California, even as far as Reno, Nevada. 
Teaching was actually a new career path for me, having learned the appalling fact that ‘Truth’ was in the 
eye of the advertiser. For some reason, I thought ‘Truth’ might be better served in the schools, but I 
have since been disabused of that naïve notion. 

A blast of light hit me and I heard a loud “Hosannah, my homie” go up around me. We would make a 
mock station, complete with station staffing, program hour, DJ’s, sales creatures, the works. The kids 
would develop their program philosophy, target market, write copy, select music, determine advertising 
prices and guidelines: the works, just like real people.  
03/09/2010 Page 20

I floated the idea, still unfolding in my mind, to my son as we drove. He was immediately excited and 
wanted to join in. Then came a most interesting moment: “No, Matt, it’s only for my class, not the 
Magnet students… unless Ms. Short wants to do it with me, which I highly doubt.” He was crushed. 

I knew I had a hit and set about writing down as many of the details as I could imagine for Monday’s 
presentation to the class. And they went for it, lock stock and microphone. We began immediately: I 
divided the class according to their interests into Programming, Sales, and Technical staff. They chose a 
Station Manager, who took himself very seriously right out the gate. I outlined the concept of a 
‘program hour’: we had to decide how many minutes were devoted to music, news and advertising. 
Then I stood back and watched the classic battle begin.  

It was hilarious! Sales wanted 30 minutes, and Programming wanted 50 minutes. They went back and 
forth, until the Manager had to jump in to stop a fight. They argued over minutes vs. pricing: if they 
needed a hypothetical budget, then they had to have so many minutes of ads. Or else they had to bump 
up the price of ads, but who was going to pay that kind of money? Well, then get out there and sell! It 
was classic! In the end, we compromised (I say ‘we’ as I’m always on the side of more music, less ads!) 
and the hour was divided 40/20 music/ads.  

Now Programming had to decide what they were going to play. Pescadero is a mostly rural community 
with a large Hispanic population, hence the bi‐lingual emphasis of our programming. But there was the 
Rap thing, and then the Country thing, and there were a few Alternative Rockers  and Metal Heads in 
the group as well. The battle over genre was legendary. I had to jump in this time, or there would have 
been a fist fight. Sales looked on warily: they realized they had to sell whatever format Programming 
came up with. 

This tug of war lasted for days. It wasn’t until the second week that we actually arrived at a variety of 
compromises, and a few strokes of genius, that allowed us to get down to business: writing copy. 
Remember, this is a Language Arts project, which means we have to write. 

We studied commercials on our favorite stations for days, brought in examples of ads we’d heard on the 
radio, and developed Traffic logs from stations we felt were in keeping with our 40/20 split. Traffic logs: 
minute‐by‐minute lists of what ads are played when. We identified legal requirements for top‐of‐the‐
hour station id’s and PSA’s (Public Service Announcements), mandated by the FCC.  

Then we began to identify what made a good, i.e. memorable and effective, ad vs. one that was 
forgettable, or worse, a ‘tune‐out’ factor. We argued (and this I couldn’t quite believe) about whether or 
not to have military ads! We discussed the advantages of 30 second vs. 60 second ads, and even the 
effectiveness of 15 seconds.  

Then the real work began: kids had to start writing their own copy, first for a product they liked, then 
one for themselves, and one for a friend. These were priceless, and integrated the station staff more 
than I had imagined. Finally, having figured out what made an ad ‘tick’, they were given a homework 
assignment that lasted a week: talk to no less than 5 local businesses, find out what they would want for 
03/09/2010 Page 21

an ad, and write it in drafts until it shines, in both English and Spanish. After revisions in class, take it 
back to the business and clear it. If it clears, it’s an “A”. If not, an “F”: that’s real world.  

Now came the biggest carrot I could have found. I made a phone call one day to a young Hispanic jockey 
at the biggest Rap station in the Bay Area, Chui Gomez, knowing that he was the closest thing to a 
“Hero” my students had. Relaying the events of the past few weeks, and my history in radio, I begged 
him to come all the way to Pescadero and listen to the kids’ work. He agreed, without hesitation, and 
earned my eternal gratitude and respect. 

The next day I gathered the ‘station’ in a meeting and gave them the news. They came unglued! They 
jumped up and down, whooped and hollered until an emissary from the Magnet class next door was 
sent to quiet us down. Talk about bragging rights. You have never seen such strutting as went on that 
day, and for days after. It actually created a problem between the Magnet students and mine, which 
was unfortunate, but a necessary breakthrough for my ‘dumb’ students. It was also a heads up for the 
administration to see what the unintended consequences of a Magnet class in such a small school led to. 

About this time, my tendency to speak truth to power got me un‐hired. After a particularly malevolent 
student threatened me physically in another class, I demanded his suspension. I was rebuked and told 
the sheriff needed him in school or he’d be out breaking into houses, again. I, both teacher and mother, 
wrote a furious letter to the School Board demanding action. I got it: the funding for my position had 
mysteriously evaporated, and there would be a shuffling of existing staff to cover my removal. Clearly, 
as a sub and a novice, I had stuck my neck out, and the sword was swinging. 

Well, I’ll be damned, I thought. But the kids went nuts. They wrote letters and threatened to strike. 
Seemed I’d given them a reason to be in school, and a reason to fight for themselves. As far as I could 
tell, I had been wildly successful, and being fired only proved it. My husband thought I was an idiot, we 
needed the money. I found a waitressing job and got on with life. But the story wasn’t over. 

The administration, receiving questioning letters from my students’ families, realized they had made a 
critical mistake. The district had at that time duel‐superintendents whose combined salaries weren’t 
sustainable given the budget shortages they were experiencing even then. Questions were arising over 
budget shuffling and the purchase of an unnecessary school van in spite of the lack of adequate books 
and materials. The Radio Project had become popular and well‐known. Things were getting sticky. I 
suggested yet another compromise: let me come back for 3 days to finish, let us have our visit from Chui 
Gomez and our party, and I’ll go quietly into the night. It was agreed.  

We had copy, a play list with the cd’s already in place, we had written transitions and announcements, 
we had a budget completely developed and being adhered to, and all we needed was two days of 
practice and we were ready to roll. We had no equipment except a rudimentary microphone, and two 
boom boxes: our plan was to record the entire hour in one take. We had no other choice. We had no 
real budget, no real equipment, no access to a station without an act of at least several gods, and no 
time left. We went for it.  
03/09/2010 Page 22

Our class was the old band room.  There was a stage at one end filled with junk, and under it an entire 
orchestra of instruments we discovered one day… but that is another story. 

We set up the stage with the microphone and a desk, got everybody lined up, stacked the cd’s in order 
next to the boom box and got ready to roll: Welcome to KLAS‐FM, Free Radio Pescadero! 

They did it! They recorded an entire hour of live radio without a single glitch. It was a thing of beauty. I 
was crying. They were so proud of themselves and each other. As we wrapped up and signed off, they 
looked around in shock and then went crazy. Minutes later, the emissary returned to remind us that this 
was actually a school, after all… and how did it go?? 

A week later, I returned for one last session. I arrived at 8:00 am with donuts and juice. The kids were 
dressed in their best clothes, and were strikingly quiet for a change. Chui Gomez was expected within 
the next 15 minutes. They were as nervous as newlyweds. When he arrived, they couldn’t even speak, 
but just stared as this star, this 30‐something, scruffy‐faced, round‐bellied homeboy who had driven 
more than 2 hours to listen to their radio broadcast. 

And he did. He listened without interrupting for the first 20 minutes, then stopped the tape. 

“Who wrote this copy,” he asked. 

I pointed to the kids, looking strangely tongue‐tied.  

He looked at them and asked again, “Who wrote this copy?” 

“They did, the students,” I answered, proudly.  

He paused, looking from me to them, and finally said, “That’s some of the best copywriting I’ve ever 
heard.” 

I swear, a nuclear bomb could have gone off and they wouldn’t have budged. 

I said, “Could you say that one more time…” 

“That’s some of the best copywriting I’ve ever heard,” 

I looked at the kids. They looked at the floor. “Ladies and gentlemen, you’ve just been complimented by 
a professional radio personality… on your writing. Congratulations!” 

Chui looked around and took in this tableau, and then said, “Can we hear the rest?” 

We were SUCCESS! 

 

Time went by and I found other work, but the impact the Radio Project had had on the kids kept nagging 
at me. Finally, I had another epiphany: why not make a Real Radio Station in Pescadero for the kids and 
everybody else? I remembered my old radio friend from Monterey, Don Mussel, First Class radio 
03/09/2010 Page 23

engineer, and decided to look him up. It turned out he was 45 minutes away in Bonnie Doon. We 
chatted on the phone and I asked him if it would be feasible to start a station. He did a little checking, 
and found out that there was a frequency available, by some miracle, in exactly our area. Not only that,, 
but my concept would satisfy the FCC in terms of an underserved population. All we needed was a non‐
profit to apply for the license, and we were on our way. It was in fact, Don’s business to put non‐
commercial community stations on the air. What luck! 

And that is exactly what we did: Pescadero Public Radio Service was founded by myself, my husband 
Don, and a new teacher at the school, Darwin Horn. It took a year for me to get my act together, but 
finally we got our California non‐profit status, and Don Mussel began the unbelievably long process of 
applying for our license. During the years that the app wound its way through the bowels of the FCC, 
Darwin came and went, as did other board members, and one, Carol Cady, died at too young an age. By 
now it was 1999, and I was the mother of a new daughter, and soon to be divorced. The station was the 
last thing on my mind, but I kept it going with Don Mussel’s constant help. 

And the years, they go by.  Clinton, George W., new faces at the FCC, Clear Channel, 9/11… I’d begun the 
credential program at Chico State in 2003 when I got the excited news from Don Mussel that the FCC 
had Finally granted our license, and KPDO‐FM was free to go on the air. 

So for the next few years we kept the dream alive by filings and intermittent 24hr broadcasts, almost 
sold the station to KQED, almost handed it over to KZSC, almost lost it to threats from parties who stand 
to make a great deal of money if KPDO dies, but still we hung on, hoping that one day we would either 
go back and get it going or find someone to take it over and make the dream come true. 

November, 2009, Don Mussel tells me he has a young man, Daniel Roberts, a Bay Area radiophile, who 
would like to take the station over. At the same time, a local from Pescadero makes it known he would 
like to take the project to fruition. The Board of PPRS, consisting of my younger son Dan, formerly a PMS 
student now working on his BS in Oregon, and his longtime partner Cara, had to make a difficult 
decision: turn this over to a longtime Pesky resident with a lengthy history in radio, or a young upstart 
from the Bay Area with the skinny pants and metro‐hairdo.  

On February 23, 2010, in an emergency meeting of the PPRS board, Daniel Roberts of Pirate Cat Radio 
was offered the newly created board position of Station Manager for KPDO. His work in the community 
to garner letters of support for his bid, and the development of a thorough Program overview taking 
into consideration the best interests of the students and Hispanic communities of Pescadero won our 
trust and support.  

The rest will be history. I look forward to the successful flowering of a lifelong dream: a station that gives 
purpose and voice to the youth of Pescadero and beyond, that supports the migrant workers who toil in 
the fields of California’s coastline and for whom radio is a vital lifeline, and that provides access to the 
people of Pescadero to a community‐building medium of exchange for the free flow of ideas and 
culture. 

Thank you all who made this happen: Long live free radio! 
03/09/2010 Page 24

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
03/09/2010 Page 25

PMAC Environmental Committee 
March 2010 
 
TMDL Development–Mike Napolitano recently replaced Jill 
Marshall at the Regional Water Quality Control Board – their study 
will look into the natural and human‐induced causes of 
sedimentation, whether or not and where it is harming fish, and 
whether or not reasonable efforts to control excessive 
sedimentation are feasible.  Development of the TMDL will take 
years. 
Kellyx submitted a placeholder request for funds to develop 
designs to control the flooding.  She noted that marsh restoration 
and flood control would likely have different sources of funding 
In her request, she also asked for funds to help form a Watershed 
Council.  This would be a long‐term, ongoing way for those who are 
interested to stay informed about the various efforts and provide 
continuous input about our resource priorities.  
The group discussed watershed plans.  One was completed for the 
Pilarcitos watershed and one for San Gregorio is almost finished. 
Joanne from State Parks is leading a hike through the marsh 
Wednesday March 10 ‐ after our noon environmental committee 
meeting at Duarte’s. 
Bill Cook has summarized what he feels are some of the problems 
and potential solutions for the short and long‐term. 
For the Agenda next month, I think we should review Bill Cooks 
recent summary, Pescadero Marsh Restoration and Flood Control 
Project” and consider what changes, if any, could be made to earn a 
letter of support from PMAC. 
Jake Bowman – Green Jobs – Jim Jacquez working with Jake.  
03/09/2010 Page 26

Pescadero Marsh Restoration and Flood Control Project

Problem: The Pescadero Marsh has been modified by levees, ditches, beaver dams
(introduced in 1938 - not native), the effects of historic man made sediment input upstream
(man made sediment production upstream has been addressed), roads built across the
floodplains, and other hydrologic blockages of the natural flow of water. These modifications
have filled Butano Creek to the top with sediment (previously a 100 foot wide by 1O+foot deep
channel) and completely diverted Butano Creek into the Butano Marshes approximately one-
quarter mile down stream from the Pescadero Road bridge. These blockages have created a
completely-unnatural and chronic flooding of the main road access for the town and adjacent
private property
They have severely decreased the overall health of the Pescadero Marsh... most notably
illustrated by the annual death by suffocation of the best of the young steelhead trout
produced in the entire watershed each and every year.

Goal: To restore the natural hydrology, improve the health of the Pescadero Marsh and
decrease, the chronic unnatural flooding using the 1854 U.S. Geodetic Survey Map as our
guide b/taking the following actions:v ~~ ~!!)
• Moving the low spot in the road to the location of the current bridge (by raising the
road profile on either side of the bridge on both Pescadero and Bean Hollow Roads)
• Filling/damming the man-made ditches that provide the toxic water that kills the young
steelhead each year (using material from the levees) This process is probably
underway naturally due to the relocation of Butano Creek into the Butano Marshes, the
area where the man-made ditches are located. They are now being flushed 24 hours a
day by the new flow introduced into the area, and the sediment in the new flow is
undoubtedly being deposited into the ditches and the area as well. This may have a
very positive impact on reducing the fish kill when the mouth opens.
Re-connecting the channel to its primary and secondary flood plains (through levee
removal/modification)
• Clearing the creek in the area of the Pescadero Road Bridge -50 feet upstream and
downstream and maintaining that opening. This will maximize the flow capacity of the
bridge and intercept sediment before it enters the lower creek channel and the Butano
Marshes.
• Creating a~~Qillway/breach in the Pescadero Creek levee just below the 90 degree turn
at the~~Qf Watertane,on State Park property. This will significantly reduce the
floodingin°majOr'eventsTn)he downtown area of Pescadero. In past major events
(1984 and 1998) when the levee broke the flooding in the downtown area immediately
receded. This would also be a natural restoration and reconnection of Pescadero
Creek to its floodplain. The private property on Water Lane would need to be protected
by a short levee.
03/09/2010 Page 27

Pac ific
n ce1m

I

Primary Flood Plain: Green
Secondar) Flood Plain: Yellow

Phiiic Willi.ams & A.ssociata. Ltd. Pescadero Marsh, as mapped by the U.S. Coast Survey FlGURE:
~it.ant'! :tJ ~V'Ct"OtiCX!:I
in 1854. Stippling indicates wetland . 3-1

Pescadero Marsh Map of 1854
5
03/09/2010 Page 28
[=1 Levee, Road & Fire Station Fill
Butano Creek
.. Primary Flood Plain
[=1 Secondary Flood Plain
[=1 Breaks Cut in Levees

0

\'O
~o
,~
,,
8 .,,
0 \\
,, ......
\~
, , '4


l
J' f!l

CDF Fire Station and Fill
:ri-ilJ ci
~
f~cM~-WL
Pescadero Marsh Diagram - January 2001
Cross-Sections of Creek at Pescadero Bridge

03/09/2010
16
15
14 {?
13 TOP OF BRIDGE (13' NGVD)
12
11 UNDERfilQE OF BRIDGE (11' NGVD)
10
c 9
>
C)
z 8
s::: 7
0
;:; 6
rn
> 5
-w
Cl>
4
3
2
1
0
1
-2
-3
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Page 29
Horizontal Dista
~~·-·' --~

1854 U.S. COAST SURVEY
COOK -APRIL 21, 1999 DAWDY 1987
BRIDGE AS BUILT 1961 COOK -JANUARY 10, 2001
- C.OoK- f.J4.A~'{ 'l..0\0
03/09/2010 Page 30

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
03/09/2010 Page 31
03/09/2010 Page 32

CSA 11 Actual FY2006-07 Actual FY2007-08 Actual FY2008-09 Adopted FY09-10

1521 Interest Earned 5,235.46 4,450.56 (3,143.16) 1,800.00
1500 Use of Money and Property 5,235.46 4,450.56 (3,143.16) 1,800.00

2063 Returned Check Charges 25.00
2424 Connection Charges
2436 Surcharges & Penalties 1,800.00 1,740.00 1,600.00
2437 Water Sales 41,951.68 43,422.00 42,405.16 40,000.00
2438 Water Service Charges 50.00 100.00
2439 Other Special Charges 35.00
2000 Charges for Services 43,836.68 45,162.00 44,130.16 40,000.00

2632 Sale of Surplus & Salvage 77.06 231.00
2600 Miscellaneous Revenue 77.06 231.00

TOTREV Total Revenue 49,072.14 49,689.62 41,218.00 41,800.00
333 Fund Balance * 151,396.00 129,509.85 111,888.00 59,778.00
TOTSRC TOTAL SOURCES 200,468.14 179,199.47 153,106.00 101,578.00

5184 Refund - Prior Year Revenue 35.00
5191 Outside Printing & Copy Svc 646.06
5194 Books, Manuals, & Literature
5197 Postage & Mailing Expense 48.18
5215 Software License/Maint Expense 3,062.50 3,062.50 3,300.00
5231 Maintenance Tools & Equipment 117.40 573.26
5428 Misc Repairs & Maintenance 1,204.28 1,000.00
5435 Concrete, Tile & Masonry Exp 16.38
5438 Plumbing & Piping Expense 962.33 243.63 950.00
5439 Paint, Solvents & Chemicals
5445 General Electrical Expense
5449 Motor, Pump & Generator Maint
5455 Other General Maintenance Exp
5456 Water Systems Maintenance 722.24 1,050.00
5459 Misc Other Maintenance Expense
5631 Electric & Gas Utilities 6,663.95 7,130.15 6,050.66 7,700.00
5722 Misc Employee Exp Reimbursemnt 9.28
5826 Contract Laboratory Services 731.00 1,946.25 990.50 2,000.00
5849 Contract Inspection & Testing 5,462.00 1,892.00 836.00 5,000.00
5851 Contract Construction 5,857.00
5861 PW - Engineering Services 23,100.67 24,511.37 33,446.40 25,000.00
5872 In-House Admin & Acctg Service 2,880.26 7,537.64 5,722.69 7,500.00
5955 Registration & Filing Fees 400.00
5963 Other Marina Operating Expense 181.71
5969 Other Special Dept Expense 794.89 471.98 1,364.29 1,000.00
5000 Services and Supplies 50,469.05 46,635.07 51,170.33 54,900.00

6322 Retirement of Long Term Debt 16,615.35 17,173.73 17,769.80 18,361.00
6332 Interest on Long Term Debt 3,860.69 3,302.31 2,706.24 2,108.00
6722 Copy Center Charges 12.73
6813 Uncollectible Accounts 200.60 150.08
6817 Depreciation - Water & Sewer 21,531.85 21,531.85 21,531.85
6000 Other Charges 42,020.62 42,208.49 42,157.97 20,469.00

GRSAPP Gross Appropriations 92,489.67 88,843.56 93,328.30 75,369.00

NETAPP Net Appropriations 92,489.67 88,843.56 93,328.30 75,369.00
8611 Appropriation for Contingency 107,978.00 90,356.00 59,778.00 26,209.00
8612 Departmental Reserves
8500 Contingencies/Dept Reserves 107,978.00 90,356.00 59,778.00 26,209.00

TOTREQ TOTAL REQUIREMENTS 200,467.67 179,199.56 153,106.30 101,578.00

* For FY 2006-07 to 2008-09, fund balance amount equal to the sum of Line Items 8500 & 6817 (Contingencies/Dept Reserves plus Depreciation-Water & Sewer) from prior fiscal year.
03/09/2010 Page 33

Pescadero Lighting District Actual FY2006-07 Actual FY2007-08 Actual FY2008-09 Adopted FY09-10

1021 Current Yr Secured 7,001.42 8,212.64 8,711.92 6,578.00
1027 ERAF III Shift
1031 Current Yr Unsecured 410.62 472.67 514.04 402.00
1033 Prior Yr Unsecured (25.93) (3.14) (17.10)
1041 CY SB 813 Secured Supplemental 246.28 252.94 203.90
1042 CY SB 813 Unsec Supplemental 7.83 2.94
1043 PY SB 813 Redemption 8.32 5.63 26.72
1045 PY SB 813 Unscured Supplemntal 1.39 0.86
1046 Non-Departmental ERAF Rebate 3,384.00 3,997.00 4,511.00
1000 Taxes 11,026.10 12,945.57 13,954.28 6,980.00

1521 Interest Earned 5,164.36 5,448.86 (4,456.88) 3,656.00
1500 Use of Money and Property 5,164.36 5,448.86 (4,456.88) 3,656.00

1831 Homeowners Property Tax Relief 54.94 59.18 57.18 46.00
1600 Intergovernmental Revenues 54.94 59.18 57.18 46.00

2657 PG&E Rebates 43.35
2600 Miscellaneous Revenue 43.35

TOTREV Total Revenue 16,245.40 18,453.61 9,597.93 10,682.00
333 Fund Balance 114,049.00 125,983.00 140,867.00 145,862.00
TOTSRC TOTAL SOURCES 130,294.40 144,436.61 150,464.93 156,544.00

5428 Misc Repairs & Maintenance 2,117.39 931.59 2,327.69 3,400.00
5441 Lighting & Fixtures Expense 1,200.00
5631 Electric & Gas Utilities 1,348.95 1,458.85 1,256.67 2,700.00
5861 PW - Engineering Services 816.39 1,141.51 966.85 1,500.00
5872 In-House Admin & Acctg Service 100.00
5969 Other Special Dept Expense 28.14 37.41 52.24 500.00
5000 Services and Supplies 4,310.87 3,569.36 4,603.45 9,400.00

6819 Depreciation - Lighting
6000 Other Charges

GRSAPP Gross Appropriations 4,310.87 3,569.36 4,603.45 9,400.00

NETAPP Net Appropriations 4,310.87 3,569.36 4,603.45 9,400.00
8611 Appropriation for Contingency 125,983.00 140,867.00 145,862.00 147,144.00
8612 Departmental Reserves
8500 Contingencies/Dept Reserves 125,983.00 140,867.00 145,862.00 147,144.00

TOTREQ TOTAL REQUIREMENTS 130,293.87 144,436.36 150,465.45 156,544.00
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 1
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org

Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 7:30 PM,
Native Sons Hall, 112 Stage Road, Pescadero CA 94060

1) CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL, CHANGES TO ORDER OF AGENDA
2) PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA
3) PRESENTATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS
a) Middle School Students Q&A
4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF LAST REGULAR MEETING
5) FINANCIAL REPORT – Financial Report- Pattie Brixen
6) CORRESPONDENCE – Correspondence – Rodger Reinhart
7) REPORTS FROM CURRENT COMMITTEE CHAIRS
a) Ad Hoc Town Sign Committee – Shannon Webb
b) Housing Committee – geotechnical study results are in - Catherine Peery
c) School Board Meeting liaison – Don McDermott
d) Emergency Preparedness – no report
e) Environmental Committee – meeting report -Jackson Robertson
f) Liaison to Puente, County Health & Human Services – Kate Haas
g) Communications Committee – Rob Skinner
8) LAND USE COMMITTEE MEETING – ALL MEMBERS OF PMAC
a) Sewer System: Recent developments with Public Works, RCAC – Catherine Peery
b) Review of Permits – if any

9) NEW BUSINESS
a) Letter of appreciation for early roadside mowing in Pescadero.

10) OLD BUSINESS –

11) Adjournment , Next meeting May 11, 2010, County Road Spraying (postponed from prior mtg)

This site is NOT wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including
auxiliary aids or services) to participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting
notice, agenda packet or other writings that may be distributed at the meeting, should contact Catherine Peery at least 3 working days before the
meeting at 650-879-0150, fax 650-879-1847, cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org. Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make
reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 2

April 7, 2010

County of San Mateo
Human Services Agency
Attention: Becky K. Arredondo
2500 Middlefield Road
Redwood City, CA 94063

Dear Ms. Arredondo,
 
I am delighted to write this letter of unqualified and strong support for
Puente de la Costa Sur. In my role as Chair of the Pescadero Municipal
Advisory Committee, I have had the opportunity to work directly with the
staff and board at Puente and to experience the importance of their work to
our community. As a grandmother of two small children, I’ve also seen
firsthand the benefits of their programs for mothers and their children. 
 
Puente de la Costa Sur brings together residents of Pescadero, La Honda,
Loma Mar and San Gregorio. Their work with families, especially those
with children 0-5, is essential to the health of our greater community. Their
work with Anglo and Latino families provides an important community
bridge that strengthens and sustains our region. 
 
The Puente staff is innovative and creative, and determined to provide first-
rate services to all the residents of our region. They are trusted and respected
by our community for their hard work and dedication.  
 
Please do not hesitate to contact me if I can provide additional information
about Puente or its work in the community. 

Warm regards,

Catherine M. Peery, Chair,
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 3

From: Steve Simms
To: cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org;
Subject: CSA 11 WELL
Date: Friday, April 09, 2010 6:03:33 PM

Catherine,

I talked with P/W director Jim Porter, and he referred me to Mark Chow who is
handling the well monitoring. I left a message on his voice mail to return a call to
me. My concerns are:

1) Verification of well failure. We helped (pro bono) with once a month
monitoring from 9-22-02 thru 11-23-05 we recorded a drop in standing water
level of only 1’-4”, these were not heavy winter years. I would request current
standing water at this date to compare to our last known recorded reading.
2) We currently have the best quality of water of any well I am aware of on
the coast. Drilling a new well is a crap shoot. Going deeper or in another
location may lead to water heavy in minerals and salts, as are commonly
present in most coastal wells.
3) $500,000 is a lot of money. Show me estimates to justify this
expenditure.

Steve
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 4

From: Wolf Hillesheim
Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 6:51 PM
To: cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org
Cc: JIM GIRAND; Deborah Lozano
Subject: May 8

May 8th
We would like to have a duathlon starting at the High school.
I have permission form the school and signed a contract with them using the Junior High school
parking lot,gym and bathrooms.
Along with that i am contributing $300.00 to the senior class for exchange of 6-8 people helping
at the event.
I am applying for permit with he San Mateo county ,and other services.
We have booked all the rooms and the cottage at the PESCADERO CREEK INN.
Our plan is as follows.
Friday May 7 the,set up bike racks at the Junior high school parking lot,
The following morning the race will start on front of the High school run around the country block
2.1 miles,jump on the bike and make a left on Cloverdale follow Cloverdale to Gazos creek road
till we get to Hwy 1 and then all the way to Pescadero road back through town and then make a
right on Butano Cut off rd.to the high school.
We will be spread out on the bike,there is no drafting on the bike.The racers should be done by
!11:30 am latest.
We expect people from the Bay area and maybe a total of 150 competitors at the most.
I am asking for your permission to have this event .
Thank you
Wolf Hillesheim
WWW.WOLFPACKEVENTS.COM
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 5

May 8th 2010 Du.athlon
Wolfpackevents

Catherine Peery

After many hoUIS of dealing with the mwiicipa1ities, finally getting the o.k. From the San
Mateo county to have the d.1.lathlon May the glhttilOW Cal Trans is in the picture and there
is no way we can afford their requirements.. Since part of the race is on Hwy 1~ Cabrillo
hvvy the extra PoJice and co~ off 3 miles of Hwy is not pmctfole or affordable for the
small venue we were planning on having.
So sad to say we will not be able to have our Duathlon at you nice city and friendly
atmosphere.
We are however going to spend Friday night at Peseadero Creek inn
So please take me off YQUt:' calendar for your next meeting.
Thank you for ALL your time,
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 6
Pescadero Municipal

I
' If""-~::,.-,._
"ll',~'·,,~,,..., i'l' rert~~·-'

March 23, 2010

Ms, Carina Cain
c/o Ms, Pat Talbot
Pescadero Middle School
350 Butano Cut-Off
Pescadero, CA 94060

Re: Your Letter to PMAC

Dear Carina,

Many thanks for your recent Jetter to the Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
and your suggestion for establishing a library in the Pescadero/La Honda area, I agree
with you 100% that a local library could bring a number of wonderful benefits to the area
and be a source of inspiration to children and adults alike, Reading and the world that
books can open up for individuals is a wonderful objective and would certainly be a
tremendous addition to the community, We appreciate the other possible benefits you
outlined in your well-written and creative letter and your observations about how a local
library could substantially improve our community,

Unfortunately, PMAC has very limited funding and establishing a new library is
beyond the scope of what we can accomplish ourselves. However, we can certainly
recommend your suggestion to the town and the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors
and try to come up with creative fundraising ideas.

Thank you for your suggestions and your efforts to improve our local community!

Yours truly

~ 1.ozL-
David K Lee, Member
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council

cc: Ms, Pat Talbot
PMAC Members

PO Box 249 Pescadero CA 94060 www,pescaderocounciLorg
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 7

Pescadero Municipal Advisonr

Council ,t
,......,
:-·~ :·~.:- -;:-, -~:;;-_;S::

29 March 2010

Danna Gonz.alez
c/o Pat Talbot's Class
Pescadero Middle School
350 Butano Cut-off
Pescadero, CA 94060

Dear Danna:

I read with great interest the suggestions you and your classmates put forward. You all should be
congratulated, they were all well done.

My guess is your teacher wanted you to learn something about the democratic process of change.
In this case you and your classmates took the first three and perhaps most important steps;
1. Identify a need, problem or opportunity.
2. Make a suggestion for change.
3. Deliver your suggestion (s) fo r review and consideration.
Considering the scope of your assignment you were successfu_l. But change does not come quite
so easily. Getting something like your ice skating rink built is a very involved process that would
most probably take years and cost millions of dollars. Further this being a community project it
would need to be prioritized and accorded a level of importance and urgency. You might say
what's more important that the lives of the children in our community and I tend to agree. But
taken in the grand scheme of things for Pescadero where would your suggestion rank among the
following:
• Providing clean safe drinking water for the community
• Control flooding
• Build affordable housing
These are just three projects currently being discussed.

You've taken the first important steps. That's wonderful. Perhaps the next part of your
assignment will be for your teacher to show you how to debate your ideas and come up with one
unified suggestion, one that you and your classmates could support. I for one would be very
interested in seeing that result.

A word about PMAC: We are an unfunded advisory committee. What that means is PMAC can
only make recommendations and/or support a project submitted to the San Mateo County Board
of Supervisors. Perhaps it would be a good idea for you and your classmates to attend one of our
meetings to learn more about PMAC and our community.

PO Box 249 Pescadero CA 94060 www.pescaderocouncil.org
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 8

Christobal Cruz
P.O. Box 249
Pescadero, CA 94060

March, 25, 2010

Hi Christobal,

Thank you for your thoughtfully composed letter. You and your classmates have done an
excellent job of instigating an important conversation among us PMAC board members. And I
hardily agree, a recreation center as you suggest would be wonderful addition to our town.

You’ve also done a very good job of outlining the obstacles to opening a rec center in
Pescadero. Unfortunately there are a couple more challenges. (Sorry!) Without getting into
too long description I’d like to explain what hinders our building the awesome center you
propose:

First we have a difficult time building in Pescadero because we don’t have an adequate water
system for meeting our state’s fire requirements. We need a larger pipe bringing water to
town. And second, we need to improve our waste disposal system. Both of these are
significant challenges for a small, rural community like ours to meet.

Also you should also know that PMAC does not have the say or the money to build a building
as you suggest. Rather we are a group of community members who’s job it is to make
recommendations from our community to the Board of Supervisors of San Mateo County.

But the good news is there are a number of people on PMAC and in the community who are
working on these problems so we can build some of the excellent things you and your fellow
classmates have suggested. Personally I do think we will get these basic difficulties addressed
but it will take some time, unfortunately.

Sorry for the long-winded explanation Christobal. Thanks again for taking the time to write
to us -- I think your idea would we an awesome addition to our town.

Best,

Kate Haas
PMAC Board Member

CC: Pat Talbot’s class
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 9

Pesccidern I'v1unicipal Advisory Council,
I
.t -•
:
.'•·
...-
~;r
... ~ ·.
I -- -~ ~
:.n
I - . '
;,,~: I
'-·-
·~
(;.-.., ~

March 23, 2010

Lupe Marcelo
c/o Pat Talbot's Class
Pescadero Middle School
350 Butano Cut-off
Pescadero, CA 94060

Dear Lupe,

Thank you for sharing your idea with PMAC and the community. A park is a great idea,
and I'm especially impressed with your infomrntion gathering skills - I had no idea that
young people spent so much time in front of the TV. You also touch on a key point when
you said that, "kids need a park to hang out and get more active". I'd have to agree,
staying active is an important part of staying healthy as we grow up.

There was talk of a skate park about a year ago, but for some reason - perhaps because of
the land or the money - it hasn't been built yet. What kind of park were you thinking
about? Something with built-in exercise equipment, or picnic tables and BBQ pits?

Next time you think of another way to improve life in Pescadero, you should write it
down and over the years, I encourage you to continue sharing your thoughts ... I'd be very
curious to know how you see our town's challenges.

We all appreciate the time that you took to research and write this letter. I hope to see you
at the next PMAC meeting at 7:30pm - April 13, 2010.

All the best,

~~
Jackson R. Robertson, Member
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council

Cc: Pat Talbot
PMAC Members

PO Box 249 Pescadero CA 94060 www.pescaderocouncil.org pl /2
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 10

March 23, 2010

Thomas Allen
c/o Pat Talbot’s Class
Pescadero Middle School
350 Butano Cut-off
Pescadero, CA 94060

Dear Thomas:

Thank you for your letter to PMAC suggesting a metal arts workshop at the school. I
contacted Dan Geraci about this, a metal and jewelry artist in town who actually holds
metal arts workshops at the High School. He is probably someone you should know, and
maybe you can also contact him. The metal arts workshop is incorporated into the art
curricula at the High School and is funded by South Coast Artists Alliance (SCAA).
Meredith Reynolds is on the Advisory Committee of the SCAA and I can give you her
contact information if you would like more information.

Thank you for your valuable suggestion, and I wish you luck in your future High School
career. Maybe I will see you at the next PMAC meeting on April 13, 2010.

I look forward to meeting you.

Sincerely

Catherine M. Peery, Chair,
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council

Cc: Pat Talbot
PMAC Members
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 11

Arianna Namini
C/O Miss Talbots Class,
Pescadero Middle School
350 Butano Cut-off
Pescadero CA 94060

Dear Arianna

Thank you so much for your letter and your interest in improving our community
with a full service recreation center. Your many excellent suggestions regarding
funding methods are well taken and appreciated, and PMAC would make every
effort to support your endeavor. But unfortunately, PMAC has no funding, but can
make recommendations to the town and to the Board of Supervisors to support any
renovations or improvements that can be funded through Puente, our local
nonprofit organization, or through private grants or donations.

The community recreation center you are proposing would be a major financial
and organizational undertaking for our town, and if brought to fruition, no doubt
would provide many wonderful benefits for our youthful residents.

Again, our thanks for your interest and ingenuity.

Sincerely Yours,

Michael C. Berthiaume, Member
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council

Cc: Pat Talbot, Teacher
PMAC Members

PO Box 249 Pescadero CA 94060 www.pescaderocouncil.org p1/3
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 12

March 22, 2010

Estaban Mateo Cabrera
C/O Miss Talbot’s Class,
Pescadero Middle School
350 Butano Cut-off
Pescadero CA 94060

Dear Mr. Cabrera,

Thank you very much for your fine letter to we members of the PMAC. I’m sorry to say
that we are strictly an advisory committee to the supervisors of San Mateo County, but
that won’t stop us from passing along your suggestion and desires. Having been a boy
your age and wanting something to do after school myself, I totally relate to your wishes.

Unfortunately PMAC is not allowed to raise money and therefore can’t offer any toward
solving or supporting your rec center. However, I think some of your ideas for
fundraising are great. I especially like the carwash idea as most cars in this town really
need a bath at least once a week. If you can find a merchant to support you and your
efforts I promise to have my cars washed by your group.

Maybe you and your classmates can take on trying your hand at grant writing or
approaching some of the more wealthy people in our community and get a rec center
started?

Thanks again for contacting us and maybe you would like to attend one of our meetings
sometime. We meet the 2nd Tuesday of each month at the Native Sons Hall in town.
Please bring some of your classmates and come sometime if you can.

Sincerely,

Rob Skinner
PMAC Member
PMAC Handouts 4-13-2010 Page 13
Puente updates from Kate Haas 
 
• Appropriations Requests 
o Congresswoman Eshoo has submitted Puente’s request for $310,000 for a “green” 
mobile health van for the South Coast to the House Appropriations Committee. While 
there are many hurdles ahead, Puente was pleased to have had this community request 
considered for the first time. Kerry attended a small luncheon with Congresswoman 
Eshoo and thanked her for her work to submit the mobile van request as well as the 
request for the Pescadero water improvements. 
 
• South Coast counts! 
o Puente teams continue to partner with the Census to outreach to hard‐to‐reach 
communities.  This has become especially important because the Postal Service is 
unable to distribute census forms to Post Office boxes. Nearly 500 census forms were 
returned by the Pescadero Post Office alone! To date, more than 174 people have been 
counted at local farms and nurseries ‐‐ BJ’s, Ano Nuevo, Cascade, Colorado, Pigeon 
Point, Jacobs, Oku, Gallinas, Cevasco, Los Amigos and at Puente Programs.  
 
• Rebuilding Together, April 24 
o Please reserve April 24 for Puente’s building makeover. Puente has been selected by 
Rebuilding Together (formerly Christmas in April) for a number of makeover projects, 
including exterior painting. All volunteers needed! Thanks to the paint selection 
committee – Kate Haas, Ann Timm, Cotton Skinner, Judy Berthiaume, and Rita Giannini. 
 
• Subsidized Employment 
o Puente has received permission to use subsidized employment funds from the County of 
San Mateo to underwrite salaries for our summer youth employment program 
(approximately 40 youth ages 14‐19 for a total of $219,000 in wages paid directly to 
students). Puente will also receive training from the County so that we can do the 
screening and eligibility process for prospective employees – not only for Puente, but 
any employer in the region. 
 
• Puente funding updates 
o Puente has been recommended for safety net funding from CDBG and the Emergency 
Food and Shelter Program.  
 
• Youth Updates 
o Puente staff took 18 High School Students to Notre Dame De Namur’s first annual 
Latino/a Leadership Conference.  
o 18 students from K‐5 attended Puente’s first‐ever Spring Break Club.  
o Puente will sponsor Día de los Niños (Children’s Day) at Pescadero Elementary on April 
30 – already, the Coastside Mother’s Club has donated 200 children’s books for this 
community‐wide literacy event. 
o 50 middle school and high school students participate in Puente‐led youth groups at 
Pescadero middle and high schools; 47  3rd, 4th and 5th graders at La Honda elementary 
participate in weekly sessions on team building, conflict resolution and bullying. 
 
• Zumba! Pilates! 
o Join with Puente on Thursdays for Zumba! Zumba combines Latin and International 
music to create a dynamic, exciting, and effective fitness system. Pilates taught by Kim 
Salera continues to meet at Puente on Wednesday mornings.  
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org

Tuesday, May 11, 2010, 6:30 PM,
Native Sons Hall, 112 Stage Road, Pescadero CA 94060
PRE-MEETING: ORIENTATION FROM COUNTY COUNSEL RE: BROWN ACT
1. CALL TO ORDER AT 7:30/ROLL CALL, CHANGES TO ORDER OF AGENDA
2. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA
3. PRESENTATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS
A. Possible Middle School Students Q&A
4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF LAST REGULAR MEETING
5. FINANCIAL REPORT – Financial Report- Pattie Brixen
6. CORRESPONDENCE – Correspondence –
7. REPORTS FROM CURRENT COMMITTEE CHAIRS
A. Ad Hoc Town Sign Committee – Shannon Webb
B. Housing Committee – meeting with RCAC today- Catherine Peery
C. School Board Meeting liaison – Don McDermott
D. Emergency Preparedness – no report
E. Environmental Committee – meeting report -Jackson Robertson
F. Liaison to Puente, County Health & Human Services – Kate Haas
G. Communications Committee – Rob Skinner
8. LAND USE COMMITTEE MEETING – ALL MEMBERS OF PMAC
A. Sewer System: Recent developments with Public Works, RCAC – Catherine Peery
B. Review of Permits – if any
9. NEW BUSINESS-
A. Resignation of Rodger Reinhart, looking for new council member for District 1
10. OLD BUSINESS -
A. Public Works is waiting on Board of Supervisors recommendations re: road spraying
11 Adjournment , Next meeting June 8, 2010, County Road Spraying (postponed from prior mtg)

This site is NOT wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including
auxiliary aids or services) to participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting
notice, agenda packet or other writings that may be distributed at the meeting, should contact Catherine Peery at least 3 working days before the
meeting at 650-879-0150, fax 650-879-1847, cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org. Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make
reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
San Mateo County Elections Page 1 of 1

May 11, 2010
Search

Home Voter Registration Voting Options Candidates & Campaigns Elections Election Officers Resources Español Contact Us

Regional Offices Text Size: + A - A
San Mateo Citizen's Guide to Elected Officials
Guide to Elected Officials
Regional Offices Shown Below: Decision Makers
Midcoast Community Council, Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
Select an address below to obtain a map or driving directions. Federal Offices

State Offices
Midcoast Community Council (All-District Email: mcc@sanmateo.org)
County Offices
P. O. Box 64, Moss Beach, CA 94038-0064
Regional Offices
Phone: 650-728-2129
Fax: 650-728-2129 Judicial Offices
Website: http://mcc.sanmateo.org/
City Offices
Member, Board of Directors
School Offices
(4-Year Term, Next Election: Nov. 2009, Elected by voters in unincorporated Montara, Moss Beach, El Granada, Miramar, and
Princeton) Special District Offices
Vacant

Ms. Kathryn Slater-Carter
Email: kathryn@montara.com Elections
California Law
Vacant
Election Results Archive
Ms. Gael Erickson
Email: Gael_e@hotmail.com Election News & Developments

Member, Board of Directors Find Your Elected Representatives
(4-Year Term, Next Election: Nov 2011, Elected by voters in unincorporated Montara, Moss Beach, El Granada, Miramar, and
Regularly Scheduled Elections
Princeton)
Ms. Deborah Lardie Voting Law Changes
Email: dlardiemcc@gmail.com
Smart Voter
Mr. Neil Merrilees
Email: mermade4@yahoo.com

Mr. Leonard D. Woren
Email: mccmember@ldworen.net

Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council

P. O. Box 249, Pescadero, CA 94060

Councilmember at Large
(4-Year Term, Next Election: Nov 2012, Elected by all voters in the Pescadero Municipal Area)
Mr. Donald Mc Dermott

Councilmember, District 1
(4-Year Term, Next Election: Nov 2010, Elected by all voters in the Pescadero Municipal Area)
Geoff Allen
Email: gallen@pescaderocouncil.org

Ms. Pattie Brixen, RN
Email: pbrixen@pescaderocouncil.org

Councilmember, District 1
(4-Year Term, Next Election: Nov 2012, Elected by all voters in the Pescadero Municipal Area)
Mr. Michael Berthiaume

Mr. Rodger Reinhart
Email: rreinhart@pescaderocouncil.org

Vacant

Councilmember, District 2
(4-Year Term, Next Election: Nov 2010, Elected by all voters in the Pescadero Municipal Area)
Mr. Jackson Robertson
Phone: 650-879-0218
Fax: 650-879-9244

Councilmember, District 2
(4-Year Term, Next Election: Nov 2012, Elected by all voters in the Pescadero Municipal Area)
Mr. David Lee
Phone: 650-298-6002
Fax: 650-298-6099

Councilmember, District 3
(4-Year Term, Next Election: Nov 2010, Elected by all voters in the Pescadero Municipal Area)
Ms. Catherine M. Peery
Phone: 650-879-0933
Fax: 650-879-9531
Email: cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org

Member, District 3

http://www.shapethefuture.org/elections/electedofficials/regional.asp 5/11/2010
April 19, 2010

Sierra J. Shalgh
c/o Pat Talbot’s Class
Pescadero Middle School
350 Butano Cut-off
Pescadero CA 94060

Dear Sierra:

Your letter regarding student discounts in the commercial area of Pescadero
was a very good idea. Many communities have such a program, and the
Pescadero Muncipal Advisory Council heartily endorses this approach. If
you would like to find out more about this, the group called Greater
Pescadero, which is trying to promote local businesses would probably be
interested in helping you. One of the contacts for that group is Kate Meyer
Haas, who is also on PMAC, and Irma Rodriguez Mitton.

I will pass your idea on to them, and I think you should also contact them
directly, along with any retail stores or restaurants in the area.

Kate’s e-mail address is katebee@pacbell.net, and Irma’s e-mail address is
Irma@themittongroup.com.

I wish you luck in your endeavors. Please keep us posted on your progress.

Thanks for the great idea.

Sincerely

Catherine M. Peery, Chair,
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
Cc: PMAC members, Pat Talbot

PO Box 249 Pescadero CA 94060 www.pescaderocouncil.org p1/1
From: Fernandez, Nicole [Nicole.Fernandez@asm.ca.gov]
Sent: Thursday, May 06, 2010 3:11 PM
To: 'cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org'
Subject: Meeting request
Hi, Ms. Peery,

I recently joined the staff of Assemblymember Jerry Hill and I’m going to be his liaison to Pescadero and
some of the outlying coastside areas. I was wondering if I could arrange a meeting with you. I would like
to learn more about the issues the coastside area is facing right now, along with priorities and anything
else of importance that the PMAC concerns itself with.

Regards,
Nicole Fernandez
Senior Field Representative
Office of Assemblymember Jerry Hill
1528 S. El Camino Real, Suite 302
San Mateo, CA 94402
E-mail: Nicole.Fernandez@asm.ca.gov
Phone: (650) 349-1900
Fax: (650) 341-4676
Have you signed up for Assemblymember Hill's e-updates?
http://www.assembly.ca.gov/hill

5/11/2010
Strawberry Marin 24
1
Tamalpais- Richardson Albany Grizzly
Ave
Homestead Bay Peak
Blvd Mount Diablo
Ave Lafayette
San Francisco Berkeley University State Park

Shattuck
Mo Reservoir

Sacramento
Ave
Bay ra
Wa ga Alamo

Moraga Rd
123

d
Angel Island

Dan
rys R
Mount Tamalpais 80 e y

SAN Ashby Av
State Park

Sk

ville
a
ylin
State Park 101 Sto

St M
Vall ne

Blvd
e
St
Diablo

Blv
ey R Mount Diablo
Emeryville 24 e

d
ak d
FRANCISCO Sn Rd Moraga 36”x36” signsDiamounted
blo
Scenic Blvd
on

y

Pin Rd
dwa

yon
eh
Rd Blac

u rs
Treasure Island

Broa
khaw
both sides of a Type II barricade k Blackhawk
17

Can
Rd
COUNTY

t
Naval Station Oakland Piedmont R d

t
Army Base

tS
980 13

Marke

Blv rk
Pa
Golden Gate Oakland Naval 14th

d
Nat'l Rec Area 80 Supply Center St Danville
th Camino Tassajara
Seal Rocks 101 13 e Upper San Leandro
Av 580

Ave
State Beach Alameda Naval 680
Reservoir
Geary Blvd Oakland

Pacific
Air Station Oakland Inner EXPECT DELAYS

vale
on R
d Tassajara

St h
Fulton St Inte any

Hig
Harbor

Fruit
Golden rna er BIKE w C RACE Highla

Ma
Lincoln Way tion
al B Kell Cro nd Rd

ca
Gate Park Carlsbad State Ave

rth
lvd
5/18/10

ur
er

ajara
Ocean
Beach
erg Rd

B
n

lv d
nb nyo

Re

Dougherty Rd
Alameda

Sunset Blvd
a

o Tass
ge y ris C

Alc
dw
280 He Exw ve Nor

oo
San

os
A

d

ta B
61

Camin
98th

Rd
Ramon

lvd
Wa
Monterey Blvd Lake

t

shin
3rd S
Ocea Placed by 5/11/10

St
Golden Gate n Chabot

ion

gton
Ave Mclaren La

s

Rd
Nat'l Rec Area 1 rt Davis ke Castro

Mis
Gene Park po Ch

B
Air Dr lley

n
va Av

lvd
St ab

Canyo
280 e ot
Rd Valley r Va
ado d Dublin
John d 14 Am Blv Santa
Ashland

Crow
Thornton Blv 101 th
Daly Daly Brisbane 880 St Rita

Bay d
State Beach San Castro Valley Blvd 580

shore
City

Blv
Broadmoor Leandro 238 Stoneridge Blvd

El
35 Hil
lsid San Bruno Mtn Dr itas

Santa
Pos

Ch
e B State Park San Cherryland Las

a
Fairview

rro
lvd Valley
Colma Div

Rd
Rita R
Lorenzo

Footh
t isio Ave
Grand AS nS Stanley Blvd
Ave t

Palo Rd

d
ill Rd
South San Ave

Vin Ave
1 ug
h inton Bernal

ma

ey
W
oro

St

ard
res
stb d Francisco Ave

son
ark We Blv San Francisco Pleasanton

Jack
Clawiter Rd
rp P Hayward
Sha Rd 380
35
San Bay Tennyson Rd Kilkare
Bruno 92 Industrial
84
238
Pkwy
Pacifica 280 Whipple Rd Union
Millbrae

Union City Blvd
1 Burlingame Alva City Sunol/
92 rado
Niles 84
San Andreas Rd Scotts
Gray Whale
Cove
Lake
au
101 Corner
ate San Fre
State Ch Dr Foster mo
nt B Fremont
Beach Mateo City lvd
Hillsborough rin
gs Pas
eo 680
Montara Pilarcitos Sp Pad
tal Beach Ne re P
ys Rd

Calaver
Montara Lake 238
Cr ale Park Blvd y Blv wark kwy
State lsd d

Ave
Hil Ct Pkw
Ala Pulga

Lower Crystal
rine

as Rd
Beach Mission
Las

Po

wry
me

lhe Ma C

Blv son
Springs Reservoir ton herry

Mo
da s

Rd mus

y
1 San Jose
ore od Thorn e
kw

ven
De

Sh dwo 84 St
El

d

Fremo
sP Av

Ste
Moss
Re

ton
Granada Rals Newark Durham
Highlands

nt Blv

Mission Blvd
MSSG. 1 MSSG. 2 Beach Ave
Belmont Redwood
Rd

Bo Rd

d
92

yc
HWY 1 MAY 18 San

e
City Menlo
EXPECT 11:30AM- Carlos Warm
Half Moon Bay
North Fair Park
State Beach Upper Crystal 280 Springs

University Ave
DELAYS 1:00 PM Springs Reservoir Edgewood
Oaks Mid East Palo
Half Moon Rd ve dle Alto
on A field

d
Emerald Lake ers 84

wR
DISPLAY MESSAGE BEGINNING 5/11/10 Bay Jeff Atherton Rd
Hills Willo Milpitas
35
Ave aiso

82 d
ero R
ar

Ala
rcad eras
Calav
Valp

680
K
Mou ings Las meda Emba
Kings 101 Rd
wy
ntain Pu De
MSSG. 1 MSSG. 2 Rd lga Ex Mid Mountain Santa Clara Naval Felte
Mountain s dle
on

Old
Alm field Air Reserve r Rd
View Alviso
eg

TRAFFIC USE Woodside Menlo aS

P
Or

Rd

iedm
t
DELAY ALT Park Stanford Caribbean
Ave
Rd hill

Rd ston

ont
ess
nd

Dr

Pied
Palo Sierra R
Land
e

237

Rd
Sa

880
arl

d
ek

Cen
AHEAD ROUTE

Lafa
Ch
Cre

mon
tr
Alto Exw al

yett
Blvd ne
as

y

t Rd
Po
nte Antonio Rd
it

reli
Tun

e St
rto

Old Oak
East
ro

Sho
DISPLAY MESSAGE ON 5/18/10 la
San
trade

Sunnyvale
Foo

Av phy
Rd
Sky

a Ave
Foothills

r
Rd

Mu
thill

e
11:30 am-1:00 pm
Aras

land R
Londa

1st
e

Central Exwy
Exw

Mathild
Av

Rd ssa
Miramonte Ave
l Rd

s Expy

St
Los 101
y

e
d

rry
Mo
e Mil

Old San Francisco Rd
Portola

Be
Altos
SAN MATEO
El

d

San Toma
Los Altos eR
Pag

Valley ke

Wh
Hills Mc

Lawrence Rd
Fremont Ave

ite
13th
84 82 St

Was
Wolfe Rd

Rd
yes
COUNTY

St
1 St
an Ke

Cap
hin
Loyola Homestead Rd Santa Juli

gton

itol
San Jose
280 Clara

Exw
Kin
St
35 Arena

Pa

gR

y
San Gregorio

rk
Stevens Creek Blvd
Saratoga Sunnyvale Rd

d
Av
State Beach

e
La Honda Rancho
St
San Rd Aborn
Pomponio Cupertino Rinconada Burbank low lly
State Beach Wil Jose Tu Rd
Rd

y

Se
xw
ine

nte
Rd
lE

Bascom Ave
Prospect Rd

Meridian Ave
Alp

Hamilton Ave
pito

r
Ave Ca
ner
ve

Campbell Ave
Ste on Rd
Ca

Cox Ave Curt
aA
ven
ny

og

Rd
rat

reek
s

Campbell Ave
Sa

ro C 101
Rd

Pescadero
cade orthy
Foxw
rce

Pes
Pie

State Beach
Saratoga 85 am Ln
Branh
Union Ave

Portola Redwoods Sa
Pescadero State Park 9 9 rato
ga
Cambrian Blossom Hill Rd
Los
Ga Park
tos Blossom Hill Rd
Clov

Rd
Monte
Camden

Bean Hollow Castle Rock Santa Teresa Blvd
Ave
erda

State Beach State Park Sereno
le Rd

Alm

Los
ad
Butano
en

Gatos
Ex
State Park
wy

17
San L

236
Gaudalupe
d Cozzens
New
orenzo

kR
Rd

Reservoir
Lake
ek

Almaden
e
Cre
Cre

MSSG. 1 MSSG. 2
River

Bear
zos

Rd
Ga

Big Basin Redwoods
reek

HWY 1 MAY 18 State Park Lexington
C

Hills
Bear

EXPECT 2:00- 9 Redwood
DELAYS 3:30PM 236 Estates MSSG. 1 MSSG. 2
TRAFFIC USE
Charlie Rd
Mountain

DISPLAY MESSAGE BEGINNING 5/11/10 Boulder DELAY ALT
Creek
AHEAD ROUTE
Ben
San

MSSG. 1 MSSG. 2 Lomond DISPLAY MESSAGE 5/18/10
d
Jose R

Alba Rd
Soquel

Hig
Glenwood

17 TIME TBD by CHP hla
TRAFFIC USE nd
Wa
Dr

DELAY ALT SANTA CRUZ Henry Cowell
Redwoods
Scotts
Valley
y
Rd

AHEAD ROUTE
COUNTY
State Park
Zayante
Rd

Vall otts

Mountain View
Dr
Flat

He Moun
Sc
ey

DISPLAY MESSAGE ON 5/18/10
Em

Rd
Pine

rm t Nisene Marks
on
pire

Felton
Granite Creek Rd

Rd
Glen R
Laurel

1:30PM- 3:30 PM Forest State
Gra

Park
rte Dr
Graha
de R

9
d

Davenport
Sm

1
d

Brancifo
it
hG

m Hill

MSSG. 1 MSSG. 2 Henry Cowell 17
rad

Day
Rd

Can
Eure Rd
e

Redwoods State
Rd

se Rd

HWY 1 MAY 18
on

yon

Valley
Do

Park
ka
Old San Jo
nny

EXPECT 2:00- Soquel
Bo

DELAYS 3:30PM Live
Oak
Soquel Dr Aptos Corralitos
Wilder Ranch Water Cap
itola
DISPLAY MESSAGE BEGINNING 5/11/10 State Park
High St
St Rd Aptos Hills-
41st Ave
e
17th Av

Capitola Larkin
7th
Ave

L ark
in V
Portola Dr alle
yR
Fre

Opal d
ed

MSSG. 1 MSSG. 2 Rio Del
o m

Cliffs Freedom
Blv

TRAFFIC USE Mar
d

1
Vista na

DELAY ALT
Dr
Bue

AHEAD ROUTE Manresa
State Harkin
Beach Slough s
DISPLAY MESSAGE ON 5/18/10 Rd
Watsonville
TBD by CHP - 3:30 PM

Stage 3
San Francisco to Santa Cruz Start Time: 11:15 am
Tuesday, May 18, 2010 Total Distance: 113.7 mi./182.9 km
Finish ETA: 3:23-4:04 pm
Presented by

© AEG Cycling Revised 2/1/10
Stage 3 - San Francisco to Santa Cruz
Tuesday, May 18
Presented by

Estimated Arrival Point Miles
Miles KM
24 mph 26 mph 28 mph Course Directions to to
Ridden Ridden
38.6 kph 41.8 kph 45 kph Point Go
11:15 AM 11:15 AM 11:15 AM Race Start on Great Highway 0.0 0.0 113.3 0.0
11:20 AM 11:20 AM 11:19 AM cs at Sloat Blvd. 2.2 mile/3.5 km neutral section
11:20 AM 11:20 AM 11:19 AM Race Start at Sloat Blvd. 0.2 0.0 113.3 0.0
11:22 AM 11:21 AM 11:20 AM vRight onto CA 35/Skyline from The Great Highway 0.8 0.8 112.5 1.3
11:25 AM 11:24 AM 11:23 AM Enter San Mateo County 1.2 2.0 111.3 3.3
11:26 AM 11:25 AM 11:24 AM Enter Daly City 0.4 2.4 110.9 3.9
11:32 AM 11:31 AM 11:29 AM vRight onto CA 1 South from CA 35 2.4 4.8 108.5 7.7
11:33 AM 11:32 AM 11:30 AM Enter Pacifica 0.4 5.2 108.1 8.4
11:46 AM 11:44 AM 11:41 AM Herbalife Sprint - Pacifica 5.5 10.7 102.6 17.2
12:08 PM 12:04 PM 12:00 PM Enter Half Moon Bay 8.5 19.2 94.1 30.9
12:08 PM 12:04 PM 12:00 PM Herbalife Sprint - Half Moon Bay 0.2 19.4 93.9 31.2
12:37 PM 12:31 PM 12:25 PM Left onto Tunitas Creek Rd. from CA 1 11.4 30.8 82.5 49.6
12:42 PM 12:35 PM 12:29 PM Right to continue on Tunitas Creek Rd. 2.0 32.8 80.5 52.8
cs over CA35/Skyline - now on Kings Mt. Rd.
12:59 PM 12:52 PM 12:44 PM California Travel and Tourism KOM 7.1 39.9 73.4 64.3
Tunitas Creek Rd. - Cat. 2 at 1562’/476m
01:12 PM 01:03 PM 12:55 PM Right onto Woodside Ave./CA 84 from Kings Mt. Ave. 5.0 44.9 68.4 72.3
01:16 PM 01:07 PM 12:58 PM vRight onto CA 84 from Woodside Ave. 1.6 46.5 66.8 74.9
cs over CA 35/Skyline on CA 84
01:24 PM 01:15 PM 01:06 PM California Travel and Tourism KOM 3.5 50.0 63.4 80.4
CA 84 - Cat. 3 at 1427’/435m
01:41 PM 01:30 PM 01:20 PM Left onto Pescadero Rd. from CA 84 6.7 56.7 56.6 91.3
California Travel and Tourism KOM
01:48 PM 01:37 PM 01:26 PM 2.7 59.4 53.9 95.6
Pescadero Rd. - Cat. 4 at 1053’/321m
02:10 PM 01:56 PM 01:44 PM Left onto Butano Cutoff from Pescadero Rd. 8.6 68.0 45.3 109.4
02:11 PM 01:58 PM 01:45 PM Left onto Cloverdale Rd. from Butano Cutoff 0.5 68.5 44.8 110.2
02:23 PM 02:09 PM 01:56 PM vRight onto Gazos Creek Rd. from Cloverdale Rd. 4.9 73.4 39.9 118.1
02:28 PM 02:14 PM 02:00 PM Left onto CA 1 from Gazos Creek Rd. 2.1 75.5 37.8 121.5
02:43 PM 02:27 PM 02:13 PM Enter Santa Cruz County 5.8 81.3 32.0 130.8
03:04 PM 02:46 PM 02:31 PM Enter Davenport 8.3 89.6 23.7 144.2
03:08 PM 02:51 PM 02:34 PM Left onto Bonny Doon Rd. from CA 1 1.9 91.5 21.8 147.2
03:15 PM 02:57 PM 02:41 PM cs onto Pine Flat Rd. from Bonny Doon Rd. 2.9 94.4 18.9 151.9
California Travel and Tourism KOM
03:25 PM 03:06 PM 02:49 PM 3.9 98.3 15.0 158.2
Bonny Doon/Pine Flat Rd. - Cat. 2 at 2135’/651m
03:25 PM 03:06 PM 02:49 PM vRight onto Empire Grade from Pine Flat Rd. 0.05 98.3 15.0 158.2
03:50 PM 03:29 PM 03:10 PM Right onto Western Dr. from Empire Grade Rd. 9.7 108.0 5.3 173.9
03:53 PM 03:32 PM 03:13 PM Left onto Mission St./CA 1 from Western Dr. 1.3 109.3 4.0 175.9
03:54 PM 03:33 PM 03:14 PM Right onto Swift St. from Mission St. 0.4 109.7 3.6 176.6
03:56 PM 03:34 PM 03:15 PM Left onto W. Cliff Dr. from Swift St. 0.7 110.4 2.9 177.7

© AEG Cycling All course logs subject to change. Revised 4/13/10
May 1 , 2010

Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
Catherine Peery

I am resigning form the PMAC effective May 1, 2010. I would like to
offer my continued support to the PMAC managing the PMAC web site,
email and mailing list.

I appreciate how well run the PMAC has been during my time on the
council. Thank you Catherine.

Sincerely

Rodger Reinhart
April 19, 2010

Sierra J. Shalgh
c/o Pat Talbot’s Class
Pescadero Middle School
350 Butano Cut-off
Pescadero CA 94060

Dear Sierra:

Your letter regarding student discounts in the commercial area of Pescadero
was a very good idea. Many communities have such a program, and the
Pescadero Muncipal Advisory Council heartily endorses this approach. If
you would like to find out more about this, the group called Greater
Pescadero, which is trying to promote local businesses would probably be
interested in helping you. One of the contacts for that group is Kate Meyer
Haas, who is also on PMAC, and Irma Rodriguez Mitton.

I will pass your idea on to them, and I think you should also contact them
directly, along with any retail stores or restaurants in the area.

Kate’s e-mail address is katebee@pacbell.net, and Irma’s e-mail address is
Irma@themittongroup.com.

I wish you luck in your endeavors. Please keep us posted on your progress.

Thanks for the great idea.

Sincerely

Catherine M. Peery, Chair,
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
Cc: PMAC members, Pat Talbot

PO Box 249 Pescadero CA 94060 www.pescaderocouncil.org p1/1
From: Catherine Peery
Sent: Tuesday, May 11, 2010
To: PMAC
Subject: Housing Committee Report
RCAC reps visited with the housing committee today.  We toured the Warheit site, and found out all 
about the various ways that self‐help (sweat‐equity) housing and/or multi‐family (rental) housing is 
structured, the different sponsorships required, the avenues we could take in getting sponsorship, 
funding, etc.  It was a 2 ½ hour meeting and will require a lot of follow up, but the beginning of a lot of 
training on how to actually get the housing done.  Apparently, to start with we have to decide whether 
we’re going to go in the direction of self‐help home ownership, or in the direction of rental.  I think 
based on our housing meetings from the previous years, we are leaning towards self‐help housing, 
which would go towards people willing to help build their own homes, with local construction people 
involved. 
  
Also, as a correction to last month’s report, it turns out that the water requirements of the 14 homes 
would be approximately $50,000 gallons per day, which is about 1% or less of the water output of the 
town well.  Just to be clear, a different well would be drilled, but some people worry that it would 
deplete the aquifer, which is not really an issue.   
  
We have been working on this now for nearly 10 years and have researched many aspects of the 
project, but one thing we have to remember is to respond to concerns of people who are just becoming 
aware of the project.  Although we have long ago researched the land fill, and we know that we have to 
be 750 feet away from it, which will be accomplished based on the current site, we need to publish 
some facts about the project and our findings as concerns arise. 
  
  
  
Catherine Peery 
d: 650‐879‐0150; f: 650‐879‐1847  
catherine@pescaderocouncil.org
  

5/11/2010
FALL CREEK ENGINEERING, INC.
Civil• Environmental• Water Resource Engineering and Sciences
Tel. (831) 426·9054 P.O. Box 7894, Santa Cruz, CA 95061 Fax. (831) 426-4932

December 10, 2009
Catherine M. Perry
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
P.O. Box 249
Pescadero', CA 94060

Subject: Review of Facilities Planning Report for Pescadero Community Sewer Project
March 2008, Prepared by HydroScience Engineers, Inc.

Dear Catherine:

Fall Creek Engineering, Inc. (FCE) has conducted a review of the above referenced document.
Based on our review, FCE would recommend that the facilities plan (Plan) be revised to include
alternative sites for a new wastewater treatment system, some additional wastewater
treatment schemes, and additional options for effluent reuse and disposal.

In summary, FCE recommends the following:

1. As outlined in the Plan, the proposed wastewater project would include installing a
force main to pump raw sewage to a relatively remote location. This scheme will result
in high costs to implement the project. FCE would recommend considering some
additional sites that are in closer proximity to the community. This option would reduce
the costs associated with the pipelines and would allow water to be reused locally for a
variety of purposes, such as a source for fire suppression, irrigation of the elementary
school playfield and as a source of water to the local nursery/greenhouse operations.
This revision would require identifying alternative sites for the treatment system and
modifications to the collection and conveyance system.

2. The three alternative wastewater treatment systems considered by HydroScience
Engineering are all relatively expensive, energy intensive, and operationally complex
treatment schemes considering the volume of wastewater treated and the relatively
remote location of the systems. FCE would recommend that a few additional
wastewater treatment schemes be considered that are lower cost, easier to operate and
maintain, have been shown to be reliable, and are substantially more energy efficient.
FCE would recommend revising the plan to include a comparison of a two- or three-
stage trickling filter system, a combined trickling filter and constructed wetland system
or sma ll pond/wetland system . The trickling filter systems could be installed in a small
area comparable to the SBR system selected by HydroScience Engineering. A trickling
filter wetland and or pond/wetland system would require more area than the systems
identified in the Plan, but would be the easiest to operate and maintain and would
require the least amount of energy.
FALL CRE E K
ENGIN EERING, INC.

3. FCE is aware that the community of Pescadero presently does not have an adequate fire
suppression system. FCE recommends that the Plan be revised to consider the reuse of
treated effluent as part of a new fire suppression system for the community. FCE
suggests that a combined fire water and water reclamation storage tank and reclaimed
water distribution system could be installed that would allow treated effluent to be
used in the town for fire protection and to supply local reuse areas.

4. FCE recommends that the Plan be revised to evaluate additional water reuse options, as
previously mentioned, for a variety of uses, including irrigation of the school playfield, as
source water for local nurseries, greenhouses and agricultural fields in close proximity to
the town center.

5. FCE recommends that the Plan be revised to evaluate alternative winter disposal
options, such as installing a subsurface disposal system(s) in the elementary school
playfield and/or other lands adjacent to the town center.

Thank you for the opportunity to assist you and provide our review of the Plan. As you are
aware, FCE is a local engineering firm that specializes in small community water and
wastewater engineering projects. FCE would be happy to provide you and the County of San
Mateo a proposal for services to update the Plan to incorporate the recommendations
presented in this letter.

I have enclosed a copy of our Statement of Qualifications focused on our recent wastewater
engineering projects. If you have any questions or require additional information, please do
not hesitate to contact me at (831) 426-9054.

Principal Engineer

Enclosures

2
1. Discuss why the facility is needed.  Include an accurate description of the existing facilities and the 
proposed improvements. 

The Town of Pescadero is located in the unincorporated portion of San Mateo.  Currently, each parcel 
has it’s own individual septic system.  Presently there are estimated to be 78 residential and 16 onsite 
wastewater systems in the community.   The community does not have a centralized sewer collection, 
treatment or disposal system.  In 2004, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board issued 
Resolution 04‐R2‐0088 supporting a 2004 Public Health Declaration by the County of San Mateo Health 
Department that the soil and high groundwater conditions in the community are inadequate for 
treatment of septic wastewater from the existing residences and businesses in the community.  And that 
this condition was resulting in a threat to public health.  Based on this resolution the County Public 
Works Department completed a Facilities Planning Report for the Pescadero Community Sewer Project.  
The Facilities Plan presented a recommended plan for installing a centralized sewer, treatment and 
disposal system; however, the proposed projects were cost prohibitive and determined infeasible by the 
Community.  Subsequently, the Community has identified several alternative site locations, treatment 
and wastewater reuse options that may significantly reduce the cost of the project.  The County is 
seeking funds to complete a Facilities Plan Update to consider and evaluate the new options identified 
by the community.   In summary, the proposed improvements will include a new centralized sanitary 
sewer system, a wastewater treatment plant, and land disposal system. 

 

2.  If the project is required to meet health and/or sanitary standards imposed by a local, State, or 
Federal Agency, discuss the specific standards/violations that will be corrected by the proposed 
project (if available, attach pages as necessary, including any regulatory Agency correspondence). 

As previously discussed in Item 1 the State has issued Resolution 04‐R2‐0088 supporting the County of 
San Mateo’s Declaration that has determined that the onsite wastewater systems serving the residences 
and businesses in the community threaten public health and water quality.  A copy of these documents 
is attached. 

 
a.IB NPl'D'"al ~::i. 0348-004
BUDGET INFORMATION - Const ruction Programs.
N07E: CEJ1Jifr. Fec.\:'mf sssJsl'!ll7c1:'pmi;rnms ~wrom-aoosr CGli'\Wl':itb llS ro fil11re st tt1e t='roS'Sf mre ot.cn:fet:r CllSIS effG1tfeJr:r fElti:ftsrfai. rr slJCl':I s me mse. ya.•v.illbe 110rmro.
COST CLASSIFICATION a. Tolal Cost b. Costs Not Allowable c. Total All:wable Costs
fer Participation (Columns a-bl

1. .~.dministrative and legal expen&?S $ .00 $ .00 s 0 .00

2. Land, struc11.Jres, rights-Of-way, apJTaisal9, etc. $ .00 $ .00 s 0.00

3. Relocation expenses and pa~menll3 $ .00 $ .00 s o.oo
4. .A.rchitecb.Jral and ergineering fees $ '2.S> ooo .00 $ .00 s 'L ~» O c:>O .oo

5. Otho:r architectural and engineef"irg fees $ .00 $ .00 s 0 .00

6. Project in~tion fees $ .00 $ .00 s 0 .00

1. Srtewcrk $ .00 $ .00 s o.oo
"'ti
8. D.:rnolition and remova I $ .00 $ .00 s 0 .00
::0
rn
l>
"'ti
9. Conslrn:tbn $ .00 $ .00 s 0 .00
"'ti
r
c=; 10. Equi~Eflt $ .00 $ .00 s o.oo
~
0
2
G")
11 . Mi&::ellan EOJS $ .00 $ .00 s 0.00
c=
0rn 12. SUBTOTAL (sum ofiines: r-i 1) $ 0 .00 $ 0 .00 s 0 .00

:1E
Q)
13. Contirgendes $ .00 $ .00 s 0.00
~
Q)
::I
14. SUBTOTAL $ o .oo $ . o.oo s 0.00
a.
~
(/)
15. Proj.:d 1;i:ro<Jran) incx:me $ .00 $ .00 s o.oo
~
Q)
16. TOT.i!i.L PROJECT COSTS (subtract #15 from :#14) $ 0 .00 $ 0.00 s 0.00
~
"'ti
0 FEDERAL FUNDING
co
a; 17. Federal assis1ance requested, cak:ulate as follows: Q
3
(/)
(Consult Fed:ral agemy for Federal percentage share.)
En1er the resulting Fed:ral share.
Enter elg ible costs from line 16c Multiply X _ __'!~ s --Z..s- b
)
o o.oo
"'ti
Q)
To auto calculate. press TAB key afterentflring percent. Th959 instructions '•'•ill not print.
t.C
CD
en Pr~\'IOU 5 Ed ltton Usable Autlicorized for Lcu:·-01 Repri::idui:tion standard Form 424C (Re•,-. 7·9TJ
PrescnbeCI tr~· OMS Circular A·102
PREAPPLICATION PROCEDURE
Send the original Preapplication items and one copy to USDA-RD
Applicants must submit an original and one copy of Preapplication information items 1
through 9 described below. Send it to the USDA Rural Development office serving your
area as shown on page 19. Note also that you can call in advance and get personal
assistance from your local USDA-RD office.

REQUIRED PREAPPLICATION ITEMS - 1 through 9

1. Completed Standard Forms (SF) 424, 424-C, 424-D -Application for
Federal Assistance, see pages 4-9.

NOTE: in block 10 of SF 424, insert the appropriate Catalog of Federal Domestic
Assistance (CFDA) number as follows:
Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant Program - 10.760
Emergency and Imminent Community Water Assistance Grant - 10.763
Colonias and Native Americans Section 306C Grants - 10.770

NOTE: in block 5 of SF 424, DUNS stands for "Data Universal Numbering
System." It is a unique nine-character number that identities your organization. It
is a tool of the Federal government to track how Federal money is distributed.
Most large organizations that receive Federal funds already have a DUNS
numbers. If your organization does not have a DUNS number, call
866-705-5711 or use the following Dun & Bradstreet (D&B) online registration web
link to receive one free of charge at
http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform/displayHomePage.do

2. Evidence that the State and Local Clearinghouses have been notified. Show
that you have submitted a cover letter and a copy of the completed first page of
Form SF 424 to both the State Clearinghouse and the appropriate local
clearinghouse agency, by attaching copies of those documents with this
preapplieati9n., see page 10-11 .

3. Water and Wastewater Preapplication Certification, see page 12.

4. Financial information including a description of any existing debt, see page 13.

5. Organizational information on applicant, see page 14.

6. Project Narrative that provides information on why the facility is needed
and discuss specific standards/violations that will be corrected by the
Project, see page 15.

7. Loan Security to be offered, see page 16.

8. User Information, see page 17.

9. Rate Structure, see page 18

OPTIONAL PREAPPLICATION ITEMS (Only if available)

a. California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) documentation
b. Preliminary Engineering Report

PREAPPLICATION GUIDE: Water and Wastewater Programs · Page 3
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org

Tuesday, June 8, 2010, 7:30 PM,
Native Sons Hall, 112 Stage Road, Pescadero CA 94060

CALL TO ORDER AT 7:30/ROLL CALL, CHANGES TO ORDER OF AGENDA
2. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA
3. PRESENTATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS
A. Artist/Designers will describe their Town Sign concepts and answer questions
4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF LAST REGULAR MEETING
5. FINANCIAL REPORT – Financial Report- Pattie Brixen
6. CORRESPONDENCE – Correspondence – Catherine Peery (Corresponding Secretary needed)
7. REPORTS FROM CURRENT COMMITTEE CHAIRS
A. Ad Hoc Town Sign Committee – discussion of Town Sign concepts submitted - Shannon Webb
B. Housing Committee – latest developments- Catherine Peery
C. School Board Meeting liaison – Don McDermott
D. Emergency Preparedness – Lary Lawson
E. Environmental Committee – schedule for next meeting -Jackson Robertson
F. Liaison to Puente, County Health & Human Services – Kate Haas
G. Communications Committee – Rob Skinner
8. LAND USE COMMITTEE MEETING – ALL MEMBERS OF PMAC
A. Sewer System: Status of Grant Ap with Public Works, RCAC – Catherine Peery
B. Review of Permits – if any
9. NEW BUSINESS-
A. Elections Office requirements for existing members due this Summer.
B. Establishment of Nominating Committee for new members.
C. Town Sign recommendations regarding next steps and budget support.
10. OLD BUSINESS -
A. Need to elect Corresponding Secretary from our members.
11. Adjournment , Next meeting July 13, 2010

This site is NOT wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including
auxiliary aids or services) to participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting
notice, agenda packet or other writings that may be distributed at the meeting, should contact Catherine Peery at least 3 working days before the
meeting at 650-879-0150, fax 650-879-1847, cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org. Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make
reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
DESIGNERS WANTED
Parameters for Town Sign *Drive By viewing
Announcements large enough to
TOWN SIGN PROJECT Budget is r,9.pghly $5,000.' see driving by
:'' 'i\:'' 71:
SOME IDEAS BROUGHT UP SO
A centralized down town sign Budget is based on 'private
FAR: Feel free to research price, size,
contvtbutions froIJ11;~rganizations
or kiosk is in the design phase. needing a sign for announcem1mts to color, options etc.
vehicle traffic. Examples:
Please enter your design for
• Plastic, white, 4x4 marquee= $3200-
Pescadero's town sign. Over all cobsiderations $3500.
• Chalk board
1. Weather resistant (Rain Proof)
The sign will sport the name of • LCDs for out door use.
2. Vandal proofing • current research found this exceeds
the designer! the budget in terms of initial cost
3. Editable @;
and upkeep.
Parameters are listed here. ,>I 4. Room {or multiple • Insert your idea here.
announcements
I

Designs should be submitted by 5. ~ocated at the Intersection of **Pedestrian Viewing
Pescadero & Stage Rd. For Local map
5/31/2010, Memorial Day
instance at the parking area, or
the pocket park, etc. merchant information
Designs will be on display for town 6. Drive by Viewing*
Cork board pin up area
viewing & comment prior to the 7. Pedestrian viewing**
For more detailed
June PMAC meeting, 6/8/2010. announcements, and classifieds

Please submit your entry to: Notions:
Peery & Associates, Inc Sign can have multiple sides like + Designs should be to scale, and
at 213 Stage Rd. office or e-mail to a kiosk; it should be nice to look preferred location should be
cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org at. It can be artful and/or indicated
If you have any questions please contact sculptural, or conform to the ++Please, indicate if you are able
Shannon Webb at 650-766-6239 or town's architectural "look". to build your design, or not.
webbsrus l 998@gmail.com
www.greenwoodlandscape.com

PESCADERO SIGN
 This sign is designed to wrap the corner in front of the community garden at the
intersection of Pescadero Road and Stage Road.
 Overall, it is about 10’ long, curved, and about 6’ tall, so it will be easily visible to both
pedestrian and automobile traffic at a range of angles.
 The placement at the corner of Stage and Pescadero Roads is the best possible location
for automobiles that come to a stop at the intersection, as well as ideal for pedestrian
access from the Post Office parking lot and pedestrian viewing from the garden. It is also
well away from any other buildings or signs that might compete visually for attention.

THE ART-Y CONCEPT-Y PART
 The local sandstone rocks and ornamental grasses recall the beach, the sandblasted
wooden letters tie in with the original carved wooden signs out by the highway; the
galvanized metal relates to the local agricultural buildings.
 At night, the lights will reflect off the curving corrugated and galvanized metal sheets and
backlight the letters of PESCADERO, like a full moon over the swells of the ocean.

DOUBLE-SIDED SIGN
This sign is designed to be accessed from two sides. The front side is easily readable by auto
traffic, the back side is easily accessed for pedestrian interaction.
 The front side, a low stone wall (to 24” high) with 12” high sandblasted wood letters
placed 18” in front of a sheet of galvanized metal makes a bold statement. The wooden
letters of PESCADERO are backlit by the low-voltage exterior lights washing the
galvanized steel. LED fixtures could be used for long, low-maintenance life.
 6” tall magnetic letters can be easily assembled on the galvanized steel by any volunteer
and easily read by passing auto traffic.
 Custom magnetic letters, numbers, logos, images, ANYTHING can be affordably digitally
printed by any local sign shop, using the same technology used to print magnetic car
door signs. These magnetic images are weather resistant and easily reprinted if lost or
damaged. They are affordable enough for multiple volunteers to have sets of alphabets.
The wide range of creative options also allows for full color, multiple languages, and
much more.
 If pedestrian access from the back side is desirable, an additional piece of smooth
galvanized steel could be added to the back, and painted with chalkboard paint for a
magnetic chalk surface.
• • «J •

:,.:~ 1 } ~ ~.. l
. o I

..

0

,. 0 ' I
' ;: ' '. '

. D
,.i· '

..
. ~¥'.'•

~L. DD' DD D
vS

{_. -;.- /
·- L. "'
~

I f r: i

·~woo d_ .(oo-F'
-------
I \.J

---- ~- - ~

."" \ - -- - -

,_,
.,..,.- .
l

,

\
\ \
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)

Environmental Committee Meeting
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org
Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 12:00 noon,
Duarte’s Tavern (in the back), 202 Stage Road, Pescadero, CA 94060

1. CALL TO ORDER AT 12:00 INTRODUCTIONS, CHANGES TO ORDER OF AGENDA

2. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA

3. PRESENTATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS
A. Kellyx – TMDL’s & Grant Update?

4. Bill Cook’s Proposal?

5. Native Sons Proposal/Update?

6. State Parks Update –

7. Puente - Watershed Education & Planning

8. Fire Preparedness – coming into the fire season…

9. Preparing Formal Recommendation to PMAC Æ SMC Board of Supervisors

10. New Business –

11. Adjournment, Next meeting July 14th, 2010

This site is wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including auxiliary aids or
services) to participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting notice, agenda packet or
other writings that may be distributed at the meeting, should contact Jackson Robertson at least 3 working days before the meeting at 650-879-0072, or email
jrobertson@pescaderocouncil.org. Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this
meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
P.O. Box 554    Pescadero, CA. 94060    www.mypuente.org   650.879.1691 
 
 
JUNE PUENTE REPORT 
 
Marchi Farms/Campinotti 
The situation at Marchi Farms continues to deteriorate.  As of this writing, Marchi Farms water has been 
tested at high levels for nitrates, bacteria and E. coli. Several of the residents of Upper and Lower 
Campinotti have secured the legal services of California Rural Legal Assistance (CRLA).  The County has 
offered hotel/motel vouchers to residents at the farms, however, this is not a practical solution for 
those who have children in school in Pescadero (21 total students)   or who work on the South Coast. 
Most families remain in their homes at the Farms, drinking and cooking with bottled water.  
 
KPDO 
This Week on the South Coast is a weekly Puente radio program on KPDO on Thursdays from 4‐6 PM. 
 
New Leaf Day 
Puente held its second New Leaf Community Day and raised $1832.20 for our programs. 
 
Rebuilding Together Project 
More than 136 people assisted Puente with its Rebuilding Together Project which included painting as 
well as installing new gutters and drains. . A final painting day is scheduled for Saturday, June 12. The 
value of the materials provided by Peninsula Rebuilding Together and Mediterraneo Design and Build 
was valued at over $20,000. 
 
Youth Employment 
Forty‐four South Coast youth will be working at Puente this summer, thanks to funding providing from 
generous individuals, San Mateo County Workforce Investment Board, and federal stimulus funds 
designated for employment. Youth will staff summer camps, youth and adult literacy efforts, food 
distribution, and provide support for Puente’s offices. In addition, they will receive extensive training 
and mentoring. Sponsors for our youth employment program are needed – please contact Kerry for 
more information. 
 
Subsidized Employment 
As it turns out, the program is much more complicated than any of us had imagined. That said, Puente is 
available to help employers determine if potential employees qualify for the program. If you have a 
potential employee or if you have a job opening, please let Puente know. 
 
Youth Bridges Awards 
For the second year, the Puente Board of Directors (and friends) will honor graduating seniors who have 
worked at Puente with Youth Bridges Awards. This year, the following students will receive the awards: 
Rachael Schneider, Tim Cook, Cristina Salgado, Monica Amezcua, Edith Flores & Isabel Guzman. 
 
Literacy/Education 
Puente provided ESL classes to 103 unduplicated adult students in the 2010 winter/spring semesters in 
La Honda and Pescadero. 20% of students advanced one level in their ESL studies. Puente also arranged 
one‐on‐one tutoring for 20 unduplicated adult students that met on weekly basis to study English, 
Citizenship, GED and Plaza Comunitaria Adult Literacy Modules, as well as homework club which met 
twice a week. 
 
Middle School Groups 
Twenty‐one middle school students participated in spring youth groups sponsored by Puente and led by 
Suzie Hughes. They attended a weekly seminar on self empowerment. It was important to the students 
to give something back to the school and they chose to provide other middle school students with 
thumb drives and school supplies as well as to purchase gift certificates for middle school teachers. Suzie 
and the students raised funds for the supplies and Pure Beauty, Peninsula Beauty Supply and Bob 
Bredel at Remax Realty generously provided hair care products, school supplies, etc. 
 
Pescadero Elementary School After School Program 
More than 100 hours of staffing support (valued at over $1,000) was provided to the After School 
Program at Pescadero Elementary School  by Puente youth staffers. 
 


 
~~~ 1 San Mateo County
5/21/2010
2:43PM
-,, ...,i.:&11•...

Planning & Building Department• 455 County Center• Redwood City
California 94063 • Planning: 650/363-4161 • Building: 650/599-7311 • Fax: 650/363-4849

Payment Receipt
Check Number # :481362
Receipt # : 00000000000000051161

Name: SILICON VALLEY TOUR DE CURE
Address: COUNTYWIDE

Parcel#: 000000000

DPW2010-0011945240-1251 Special Event Rd Closure 5/21/2010 103.00 103.00

Total Paid: $103.00

FeeReceipt.rpt
PUBLIC WORKS PERMIT Page 1 of 1
Department of Public Works Permit Number: DPW2010-00119
Road Operations - Permits Issued: 5/21/2010
Inspection Request: (650) 599-7273 (Bayside)
455 County Center, 2nd Floor (650) 599-7296 (Coast)
Redwood City, CA 94063
(650) 363-1822 or 363-1852 MUST CALL FOR INSPECTION 48 HOURS BEFORE
COMMENCING WORK

APPLICANT NAME: SILICON VALLEY TOUR DE CURE

SITE ADDRESS: COUNTYWIDE AREA: WOODS

APPLICANT INFORMATION CONTRACTOR INFORMATION

SILICON VALLEY TOUR DE CURE
ATTN: ALLYSON SCHLOMING
111 W. ST JOHN ST, SUITE 1150
SAN JOSE, CA 95117

PHONE#1: 408-241-1922 X7 468 PHONE#1:

PHONE#2: PHONE#2:

PROJECT NAME: BIKE RACE PARCEL NUMBER: 000000000

PROJECT DESCRIPTON: On June 13, 201 O; bike race through various roads under County jurisdictions (see attached routes); NO
STREET CLOSURE; clean the streets and adjacent areas and return them to their prior or better conditions.

TYPE OF PERMIT UNDERGROUND SERVICE ALERT (USA) NO.:
ENCROACHMENT: DATE OF USA INQUIRY:
CONSTRUCTION (NMRW): SEWER DISTRICT:
STREET CLOSURE: X COUNTY SIP REQ'D?:
TRANSPORTATION: SURETY DEPOSIT AMOUNT: $
LANDSCAPING: INSPECTION DEPOSIT AMOUNT: $
OTHER:
PERMIT EXPIRATION DATE: 6/14/2010
FEE AMOUNT PAID:

The work authorized by this Permit shall be subject to all the terms, conditions, and restrictions set forth herein. This
permit consists of the Special Provisions and Standard Details of San Mateo County as applicable, attached and made
a part hereof. The project, as specifically described, is to be strictly construed and no other activity shall be permitted.
Notify County Road Inspector 48 hrs prior to starting work.

The Permittee and/or his contractor shall indemnify and save harmless the County, its officers, agents, employees and
servants from all claims, suits or actions of every name, kind and description, brought for, or on account of, injuries to or
death of any person or damage to property resulting from the performance of any work authorized or required by this
Permit of Permittee and/or his contractor, their officers, agents, employees and/or servants.

Permittee is required to maintain property damage and liability insurance in amounts equivalent to or exceeding the legal minimums as a
condition of this permit.

This permit was issued by me on:
() •* FOR OFFICE USE ONLY**
~~~D-a-t-e:-_-_-=._5_1~_t_t2_o~_0======~~~~~s-i~--..-=-.~~_..,~)..,/'-~~,_,_~~r2~~~---~-~D-,a-t_e_C_o_m~p-le_t_e_d_:~~~~~~~-I-~~~~
~-------

Rlee ~
-~(~
Name: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ Title: r-rv '-".
kJZfl r I
.:::....:..Q.

fdpwprm
• I ISIQUUil'O!IIJ!UICLOIUftl
~ Vitti~
•UllNOtl;
"i°" 31101 O(e). CallfOl'lllA C(ldt
,TIHU:t. IJWI ~ Qounty Qrodl!WWlt c;~

flHi
Thi. !!:!!'r. ~ bo filc!d ""1h ttie ll'ennlt hotton Clf the a.n MllltO counw Put& Worir• Dlrpaftm9nl
CO\lnty Coftlar. MC!Mood City. CA. it !Mlt IN lrl0!\11\ ~IN~ - !111 . . ~'-·
1
Dolcrlbtd fD" Mellon IC ti. cfl'IAd. IAfl*ltttld l'll"P Qr ~ if •V~ IJ'f" a~),

::::-~hJ&~~~
~ 0ii'Xi~~~5 ...... a . a . =
....... , ................ t ..•~ . . . m~ ..... -'-"'='"""""""°'WU
I t1~ lhil' I anO my~110ft n..... wcomply 'Miil IM ~8 ~!l:

- ~ aourtty °'SM llltM ~ ttnV GAG ell ~ f t aliiiml \Ml "'Dll an. out el lh!il lllolil'l!l of
~rit!IQ llM or 1.11 u mull et UUf ltlllM!ln. ·

(7) dllY!ll. in~• .ii~ di~lly ~ 1M Cdtomil
~ !11111 ~ ~fof"ltl@~ filfld~ fllftFIJl'le.
Hit'""""'*°' (eHP) ~ i"

~(-IMll'l) .
-·------·-1·---··-·A11~1e-ttM-fDltow1rvldd1t1Ma1'l:Ofld~lfirl£---.--·-·----·--. ~--,-
.. - · - - · · - - - - · · - · -
i

I

.
~·-;.,,.f-~=~·--'=--··~-"-~'-~---------"""""~
~~: .~ ....u.<.. ¢u-J,.,............ ·" BlQ<llh.af'*: ~---~~~=
ii Mlllll• ~ T~: ------...-=====c.c===

I
1 - ""- - ·- ·- -···-· - ·-·'

l
i
I
Enero1~hmtnt P•nnlt ChoekJl~t
for
Ttmponry 8trtKtf Clolan

:lA; 1/i11rJ1,,,J~ ~-'~- ~/),
ltc our ~UC brlna the fullowln~ lnfomtatlQn with yo-.. f(lr y<>l,lf 9-.£) I 0
the PubJlc Worb Phm Reviewer,

PleltiC note tba l.\n lno41mpletc ch(Hlklist liUbrnitWI will dcloy ynur review.

Chcok if comp ctod:

s1'".""" '1Lo p;trtcf ~
~bmwl the
or sk"1Ch ishowlflJ IOCfttion of propoaed etoau.re. date•. DD times tlf
cloimro. lntlll e infQnnatkm regttrdlng C1'9!i8 Ktrcet.. DCIU'by churchei, li~hool~. etc.

~ Oraw g ~r liketeh shall 1how tyPQ of closure dev I~~. d¥tu1. etc that yt)U f1flil
propo1dna tu 1e to oloBe th" road.

~Ota Jn1 shall Include Anrnp Dilly Tmmo IADTsJ courns and $peed data.
Plcuo visit tie County or San Mitteo Puhlic Works Wl..'bsirc under Pul>lic Wnrb ;:- ffo.<td
;;crv ie~.~ > T tfo: Sen ii.:e,;> Speed and Volume Dal a or indicate Ni A if dala is not
available,
NOTE: Ir gr aicr than 35 11iph anti/or I OOOADls" a lraflic 1.:ontrnl plan will bt: r~quircd,

l the foUowlaa qoncl~ on tb• Strocit Clotttl'lll PtrmJt

.._,.~~Fire Pepiutment (lb1tCi\OJc) L~h _" ~-
m,.

ftfOnc:y! COlllltsidv. Wost Monlo etc.)

,,__~,,_California ffillhWtlY Plllrol Oeimrtment PauQ rf1 {~
...--~~Ccmnty Sherlff Oepnrtmunt ~~~
l:A./7'~-'

_ Otht!r ~Pe1cmdcro Munlclp1d Advlaory CtuincU
!ISl'\'l'il',I
UrlJll with Pubfh: Wora Pltlri Revi,,..,.,

pleted Stratt Cfg1mro Permit AppUcfttlon

~···-,.------,.--~---,.~-------!:::J;,__=Sl03 Permit P.!f: ple..se make chock J.ID)'ftble to the Cuunty of San MttteQ
.....- - - ~ ~--,.-----,. 11,.~rh·---------~-,.-,.--h··--~--·--~------J-~_.

OPW CP. No~,.·~._. _ _ _ _ O.te,___,..---,.,.,,_.~-_,,,_~ Rev lower
(301.) 795-6600 FA:C:
CEI lTIFICATE OF LIABILITY INSURANCE
(301) 795-6610 llffS CERTIFICATE IS 186UEI> AS A MATTI!R OF INFORllATION
I
The NoV:ick Group ONLY AND CONFERS NO RIGHTS UPON lffE CEi;rJFICATE
HOLDER. n11s CERTIFICAl'E DOES NOT AMEND. EXTEND OR
One Church Street ALTER THE COVEAAOE AFFORDED B'r THE P0l ICIE$ BELOW.
Suite 400 r-------------~· ····-
Rookvil.lQ
t---~ ··---
HD 20850 l INS.IJR~AFS:ORDfN..G CO~GE.. ··-- __ ,!"AIC._!__ _
INl'llJRiD
111-1.svRf:~A: ~t .. F&.ul ..Tr"._vel.ars Companies
A1aorican Oiabeta8 Association , lt.1$1.1Rt::R B:
Nati.Ol\Ql. Center
1701 N. Bel!iu~agai:d StrMt
~~::: ~; . . ·~~ ,.-:. _:.--~---·· ·-==-- -=e·· ~~- ·-::=_
JUuxan~ia VA ~2311
,-~·'· ··-- ·--~· ...--- ---·- ·-··· ··--··· ·--· --
1INSUl<!iR E:
COVERAGES
TI1E POLICIES OF INSURANCE LISTEO I ELOWHAVE BEElll ISSUEO TO THE INSURED NAMED ABOVE FOR THE POUCV PERIOD INDICATED. NOTWllliSTANDING
"'NY REQUIREMENT. TERM OR COND TION OF ANY CONTRACT OR OlttER DOCUMENT WITH RESPECT TO \NHICH THIS CERTIFICAU:. Ml\V BE ISSUF.!D OR
MAY PERTAIN, THE INSURANCE AFFOI OEO BV TIE POLICIES DESC~l8EO HEREIN IS SUIM::CT TO AU. THE TERMS. EXCLUSIONS ANO CONDITIONS OISUCH
POLICll:S. AGGREGATE LIMITS SHOW!\ MAY HA\IE BEEN REDUCED BY PAID ClAIMS.
'~=..:. ·-· ·~f'IF:=~·- ~--_:-- ..- ~~U.;;;· ··-i-;~!"V'iffiCTiV~f:ii~'"iiiilrJ.'00~·· ·--· ·-UUm ··-
.. DENmAILUAl!ILNT ' f~~~~i=-· .-'-·· 1.,000,0QQ.

A __·_COMl>!ERCfl\LGEl'E~UA81lt
,_x.
. ICli\IMS u...."" ~ 'i OCCI vR r090()8011 1· f::o~~."'P.~C'.~.
~.,_.,,,,
.. ,__ _L·· .·.: ·-
''"' ':" A···~~-·-·-:::::__ ~ - - ·
... ·-_.3.Q!L...OOOO-

·=·
' 1/1/20101. 1/1/2011 ·-
x' l'!lX'tieioant L:iab. : F'ERSONA,l. &_AO
.. VIN_.JV!tY _s-···· 1,_,00Q, o...o_o
l!:j -;..., -~~ ---=:
GEN'l "C-OREGATE LIMIT "f>PUES PllP!:. l ,!'R00UCT9~Pl0P.~
GE!"l:RA~ ~REGA~.
...s
~--±0, _o~.o~
__2 / tlQ~.00
I i'X: 1f"Ol.ICY1 ·1 ~ r· ~~----~-""+-~--+· ·----J...-------1--~------j
I AUTOM()OIL£UAl'llUTY
1w
I
1
CO'MlllNED $1N()lE LIMIT l s

I 1-- =~~OM~OS I I ~~;-I~-.,-·· 1' ··-·

---~--~.-+-1---~---~---~-r-- ·~---..;~-~~---1~~--~~---t---~~-----j ..
QARAaEUAllll.JlY I AIJiQ_ONLY,fAA_CClOEMT , __
I"""
I! '

. "trro ,' OTHE:R THAN ~Ace:. ' -
I --~~--~---iH-~---~--~---1:--~--~~..,--~----r-A-U_TO_o_N_Lv_:
1-~1---+- ........ _ _ _AG~·+"t--~----1
1;JtcNs1l1'1111lu.uu11aUTY I 1
EA~~JlReNcE ---· .~ ··--· ···--··
I OCCUR [ ] CV.IMS MAI.le ' ' AGOREOATE ·- $ _.. ·-

11 ::.::: ' [---__ - -#- ~- -
c' i-- ,_ _ . -··--· "-
l--l-oWo:-Oc-1'1::1.li:-~-ll.i,.coal:;,:;.:,=.!>E=-'°-.....;:;.;..:..TION,._,.,.c=-----H------------J- .. ····----,.__------t---rl-.l/llC~S"'T""A"'TU=-='.-Jr--.!.:()iH..;;:::-;-t-'--------j
APIO~Q'f91$'UUIU'N ~-- 'l'QR1JJMIIJl. . J.-EIL. -·-- ···--
/'il'lY PROPRili:TOIWARThlERIEJ(EOJTlVS LL. EllCH ACCIDSlll't $

I QFACE~Er.lllER EXCLVP!<O?
1~ In NH) 1 E.L DISf;A$E. t::A EMl>l.OVt::I
t--.
s ··-" "
--

i-........,·~~~'f:.=e~~·~~~~eg;';~,,.n~·~~:~~!O~N~S.y.......
~-"1---~--+t·-~--------~-~;--~---, ~--+l·~~.:l.:~:5:i;l\~·~~-E~·~~~":-ll::C~Y·~~l=M~l~~-r---~l.~-·-~----j

~-=-::::-::------:-::-:'."~~===~!=-:!=-:=-\_____..______ · -
l:Jl!l!Cl!IPTIOll OF O"'l!AATIONS I l.OCAl!ON8 I V£Hll t.SJ l!lCUllllOHI! AOll&.D WY llMlOR8£MDff I 5J'E<;""L l'ltO~B
U: IWA UST D.l.'itision; County o San Hliteo t>arlta and Jl4.(:roation :i.• an ~tional .tnau_,ud but: only •ltb rt1!1~¢t to
el..al..911 a.ri•ing out of' th• neq11<~nce of t:htt N-d In11w:"lld at: Si1.lcon Val.1..-y Tour da CUra on 6/13/2010.

CERTIFICATE HOLDER CANCELLATION
l!HOUUIANYOI' TlfEAli!OVI! OEl!IC'llRO POUCllL9 911 CAllCEU.EO lllU'O~~!OO'!Mt!Oft_ - - - -
- San M'!!l_toQ__Q:.)_unt¥'--·-·--- !-------·-··.. ---·-..----·-----··-·" -1rlittli'A~THmleOF.Tii1-~..--Sllllru;;;;:;_...;;~;;~-~ IWl 30- DAY$ WRJfTiiH
~--DQpart:ment of Pa.cks NOTICli:TQ1'"1!Ct:f!TIFIC.AT! HOLDE"~Nl<t:l'l'Qllfll.IB'T. BUTFAllUft!!lODO S03HAJ,J.
455 County Cicw.ta.r: lllPOU NO OIWGATIDH (Ht UAl!ILl'f'W Of' ANY l(INI:! UPON 'l'H!! ....u-. m; AG!fHTS 011
4th Floo.r:
Rmdwood C1ty, CA 940~3
A~RfiJ'«li81!NTAT'lllll
Louis Novick/HDI.1.u:
ACO~D 2tl {2009/01)
IN8028 (:1009011 The ACORD namo 11nd 1090 &N regl&torod m•lil• of ACORD
REST TourdeCur
STOP 50 :k Rl1DERS
FOLLOW THE
THE GREEN SIGNS
Pleue No«r.· Hltirool(;. are miaM8101Y - Obty a~ wmc lawal1
• StQp at all GtQP ai.Qnfl. (Pob WILL ~. '-$100 line) · A'®
Singtfi: File • Fmu1e ~ 11 2l00PM. • II" ca~ of fillJliW'Oaf!cy
call {66\1~3-491 t · rn ~of non.m.rgencycd (660)
39t·OOSI'

START I FINISH
Ai
HP CORE'OM TE CAMPUS
3000 HANOWA Si., PAW ALTO

i
TourdeCur
75 k RIDERS
FOLLOW THE
THE LIGHT BLUE SIGNS
Pk:1ue Note~ Htlilmeta are mandatory -Ob£!1 all traft!c ~Wiili
• S'°P at a~ :S'°P signs (Polki& WIU. ticket, "'$100 firw) • Rkle
Single Fu , Roote ciQses at 2~00P.M. , In casa of emergency
oo~ (650):363-4911 - In ease of ru:m~mergericy eall (650)
391·5057

~

RESi-lMjJ
. STOP START I FINISH
AT
HP CORPORATE CAMPUS
3000 HANOVER ST., PALO ALT
'TourdeCure
120 k RIDERS
FOLLOW
ORANGE START I
SIGNS FIN·ISH
AT
HP CORPORATE CAMPUS
3000 HANOV€''R ST.
PALO At.TO

WATER STOP
AT
THE' BIICE HUT

Pkwl$9 Nola! H~~lll 1ue f!!andafory • Obey alt
traffic lawsll • Stop at all stop signs (Nice WILL
Ucket, ~$100 lme) • Ai® Slngta Ale· Route~$
al 4:00P.M. · In oaroo of .emergeooy ooll
(650)36349t1 • In ~ of notH1rmrgency eaU
(650) 39MID57
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org

Tuesday, August 10, 2010, 7:30 PM,
Native Sons Hall, 112 Stage Road, Pescadero CA 94060
1. CALL TO ORDER AT 7:30/ROLL CALL, CHANGES TO ORDER OF AGENDA
2. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA
3. PRESENTATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS
A. New Planning and Building chief, Jim Eggemeyer, will introduce himself to the council.
B. Drawings/Plans and budget for Town Sign to be presented by Cody Soules.
C. Matt Jacobs will report on new ballot measure from the County for November.
4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF LAST REGULAR MEETING
5. FINANCIAL REPORT – Financial Report- PMAC Account: $8,231.71; Copier: $1,123.61
6. CORRESPONDENCE – Resignations from two council members, and request for underwriting – Catherine
Peery (Corresponding Secretary needed)
7. REPORTS FROM CURRENT COMMITTEE CHAIRS
A. Housing Committee – Coastside Community Builders -synopsis- Catherine Peery
B. School Board Meeting liaison – Don McDermott
C. Emergency Preparedness – Lary Lawson
D. Environmental Committee – summary of last meeting -report from Jackson Robertson
E. Liaison to Puente, County Health & Human Services – Kate Haas
F. Nominating Committee – and Elections office news - Rob Skinner
8. LAND USE COMMITTEE MEETING – ALL MEMBERS OF PMAC
A. Sewer System: Status of Grant Ap with Public Works, RCAC – Catherine Peery
9. NEW BUSINESS-
A. Elections of Treasurer and Corresponding Secretary from among council members.
B. Request for underwriting from KPDO
C. Town Sign –permit approval process, confirmation of design and budget support.
D. Elections office has confirmed there are no term limits—should we amend bylaws to include 4 4-year
terms as term limit for council members?
E. We received a copy of the LCP, and a letter regarding requirements for amendment. If it doesn’t require a
county vote, should we request addition of Reynolds parcel with their house on it (and possibly their neighbors
parcel) to be included in rural/urban boundary?
10. Adjournment , Next meeting Sept. 14, 2010

This site is NOT wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including auxiliary aids or services) to
participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting notice, agenda packet or other writings that may be
distributed at the meeting, should contact Catherine Peery at least 3 working days before the meeting at 650-879-0150, fax 650-879-1847, cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org.
Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
DATE: July 28th, 2010

TO: Ciatherine Peery, Chair PMAC

FROM: Pattie Brixen

SUBJl~CT: PMAC Resignation

Please accept this memo as my official resignation from the Pescadero Municipal
Advisory Committee (PMAC), effective July 30th 2010. Health reasons prohibit
me from seNing out my term or filing to run for office again.

It has !been a pleasure working with you over these last six years. There has
been :some meaningful progress on important issues relative to life in Pescadero.
Hopeflully, at some time in the future, I will be healthy enough to serve once
again.

Thank you.

Pattie! Brixen
PMAct Member
From: Jackson Robertson
Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 9:59 AM
To: Catherine Peery
Subject: PMAC

Hi Catherine,

After much thought, my growing business and current day to day will not allow me to
continue with PMAC. The last 5 years on the council has been a great experience for me
and do plan on attending meetings when possible and staying active in the community,
but I need to minimize my volunteer time right now - especially with the new baby on the
way next month.

I know this comes at a bad time with the other recent resignations, but I really need to
prioritize my life right now. Thanks for understanding,

Jackson
Daniel Roberts
KPDO 89.3 FM
P.O. Box 893
Pescadero, CA 94060
(650) 646-KPDO
Daniel@kpdo.org

August 15, 2010

Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
P.O. Box 249
Pescadero, CA 94060

Dear Council Members,

KPDO 89.3 FM Community Radio for Pescadero and the South Coast would like to
promote PMAC’s monthly meetings though on-air underwriting messages. For $49.00 a
month KPDO would play one message per hour from 10am to 8pm on Friday, Saturday,
Sunday, Monday, and from 10 am to 7pm Tuesday prior to the meeting (a total of 49
messages a month). All contributions are tax-deductible.

These underwriting messages would promote PMAC meetings to our estimated 5,000+
on-air and online listeners, encouraging Pescadero resident participation, and
announcing critical agenda items or presentations.

This is an investment in your community that allows us to educate high school students
in broadcast engineering and D.J. skills, and to broadcast world, national and local
events and news in Spanish and English. Having a local community-supported radio
station has already proved to be a valuable resource for our youth and for our nonprofit
organizations. Please help us to continue providing these and many more services for
both PMAC and the community at large.

Thank you for your time and consideration!

Sincerely,

\signed
Daniel Roberts

KPDO 89.3fm • (650) 646-KPDO • P.O. Box 893 • Pescadero, CA 94060
Business Plan
Agenda 
Introduction 
Vision and Goals 
Background and History 
Strength of Founding Members 
Plan for staff and Board members 
Housing Options 
Community Buildings and Infrastructure 
Financial 
Community Relations and Communications 
Next Steps

2
Introduction 
Pescadero Foundation (501c3)
 Umbrella organization for community projects
 Art and Fun Festival to Workforce Housing 
Over 10 years of focusing on Affordable Housing 
New name is Coastside Community Builders

3
Vision
To retain the economic viability and diversity of the South Coast
communities of Pescadero, La Honda, Loma Mar and San Gregorio
by:
developing,
maintaining and
managing:

Home ownership
Rental properties
Leasehold properties
Community centers, like Native Sons Hall
Infrastructure, like Waste Water Treatment
Utility services
Self-sustaining businesses
Emergency shelters

4
Goals
 Meet the diverse infrastructure needs
 Provide affordable
 home ownership, rental housing and emergency shelter
 Include families and single residents
 Income fall below median income for the county
 Develop layers of financing
 Public and private funds
 Seek qualification as a CHDO under HUD’s HOME program
 Largest federal block grant to state/local government
 Exclusively for affordable housing

5
Allocation of funds in San Mateo county
“ Affordable housing in the County primarily serves households that are low, very low, or extremely low income.” (Note 1)

HUD Funds
(Federal)

CPD

HOME
In San Mateo county

15% HOME funds
reserved for CHDOs

US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO)
Home Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) ( a CPD program)
Community Planning and Development (CPD) (HUD Office of) Note 1: San Mateo County Housing, “How To Guide”
6
Community Housing Development Organization
CHDO
 Definition
 Meet strict qualifications set by HUD
 Benefits
 15% of federal HOME funds reserved for CHDOs
 Purpose
 Must be home ownership, building, repairing & rental
 Affordable housing and related activities

7
CHDO continued 
Requirements to obtain CHDO status
 Be a non-profit
 Has purpose of affordable housing in its charter
 Conforms to sound financial practices
 Has demonstrated capacity for carrying out activities if
funded
 Has a history of serving the community
 Has low-income residents on its Board
 Provides way to inform clients of project details

8
San Mateo County
Department of Housing

2010 SAN MATEO COUNTY INCOME LIMITS
as defined by US Housing & Urban Development (HUD) and State of CA HCD

Income 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Category
Extremely
Low* $22,600 $25,800 $29,050 $32,250 $34,850 $37,450 $40,000 $42,600
Very Low* $37,650 $43,000 $48,400 $53,750 $58,050 $62,350 $66,650 $70,950
HOME limit
(60% AMI)* $45,180 $51,600 $58,080 $64,500 $69,600 $74,820 $70,980 $85,140
HERA Special $41,700 $47,700 $53,650 $59,600 $64,350 $69,150 $73,900 $78,650
VLI***
HERA Special
HOME limit
(60% AMI)*** $50,040 $57,240 $64,380 $71,520 $77,220 $82,980 $88,680 $94,380
Low * $60,200 $68,800 $77,400 $86,000 $92,900 $99,800 $106,650 $113,550
Median** $69,600 $79,500 $89,450 $99,400 $107,350 $115,300 $123,250 $131,200
Moderate** $83,500 $95,450 $107,350 $119,300 $128,850 $138,400 $147,950 $157,500

9
Coastside Demographics

Data provided by 2000 US Census Bureau
10
Background and History 
Community meetings 
Virginia Warheit and the site
 Surplus county land for affordable housing
 County is supportive 
2004 Workshop
 Over 100 local residents in attendance
 Gained agreement on location, appearance and size

11
Background continued 
Housing research 
County grants
 2001 To determine feasibility of septic and water
 2009 Do engineering work on the site 
Local grants
 S.H. Cowell Foundation
 Designed an engineering project to eliminate flooding
for downtown Pescadero
 Determined OK to build waste water treatment system

12
Housing Options 
Potential Home Ownership sites
 Warheit, In-Fill and Cottage Courts 
Rental Housing
 Heirloom homes

13
Community Buildings and
Infrastructure 
Native Sons Hall 
Waste Water Treatment system 
Fire Suppression system for businesses

14
Financial 
Federal, state and county grants 
Private foundations 
Loans 
Private Contributions 
Sustainable Source

15
Community 
Outreach meetings 
Communications for clients of project details

16
Strength of Founding Members 
Lynne Bowman 
Catherine Peery 
Ginny Nile 
Motivated, capable and dedicated 
No affordable housing between Half Moon Bay and
Santa Cruz county line

17
Staff and Board 
Find staff experienced in CHDO, development and
management 
Add part-time staff as funding becomes available 
Board needs experience in:
 CHDO
 Finance/mortgage/banking
 Legal
 Housing development
 Property management

18
Next
steps

19
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org

Tuesday, October 12, 2010, 7:30 PM,
Native Sons Hall, 112 Stage Road, Pescadero CA 94060
1. CALL TO ORDER AT 7:30/ROLL CALL, CHANGES TO ORDER OF AGENDA
2. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA
3. PRESENTATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS
A. Voting on Town Sign will continue until Old Business
4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF LAST REGULAR MEETING
5. FINANCIAL REPORT – Financial Report- Treasurer, Greg Bonaparte
6. CORRESPONDENCE –Report, Corresponding Secretary, Kate Meyer Haas
7. REPORTS FROM CURRENT COMMITTEE CHAIRS
A. Housing Committee –status of Native Sons and Warheit grants- Catherine Peery
B. School Board Meeting liaison – Don McDermott
C. Emergency Preparedness – Lary Lawson
D. Liaison to Puente, County Health & Human Services – Kate Haas
E. Communications Committee – Rob Skinner
8. LAND USE COMMITTEE MEETING – ALL MEMBERS OF PMAC
A. Sewer System: Status of Grant Application with Public Works, RCAC – Catherine Peery
9. NEW BUSINESS-
A. In the winter months the Native Sons Hall can be cold and the heater can drown out the council members.
What is the best solution for this?
10. OLD BUSINESS –
A. Finalize vote on town sign location.
B. Permit process going forward for Town Sign—may take up to 3 months. The Friends of PMAC as a
nonprofit will have to do this, with support and direction from PMAC. Matt is trying to eliminate costs.
11. Adjournment. Next meeting Tuesday, Nov 9th, 2010

This site is NOT wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including auxiliary aids or services) to
participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting notice, agenda packet or other writings that may be
distributed at the meeting, should contact Catherine Peery at least 3 working days before the meeting at 650-879-0150, fax 650-879-1847, cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org.
Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
Minutes
Tuesday, September 14, 2010 7:30 P.M.
Native Sons Hall, 112 Stage Road, Pescadero, CA 94060
www.pescaderocouncil.org

1. Call to order/Roll Call: Meeting called to order at 7:30pm by Chair, Catherine Peery
Present: Catherine Peery (CP), Kate Haas (KH), Don McDermott (DM), Geoff Allen (GA),
David Lee (DL), Greg Bonaparte (GB) and Rob Skinner (RS) Excused: None. Absent: None.

2. Public Comments not on the agenda:
Daniel Roberts of Radio Station KPDO outlined recent activities at the Station.
3. Announcements/Presentations:
A. Cody Soules unveiled the town sign and substantial discussion followed on the placement
of story poles in the various proposed sign locations. Matt Jacobs was requested to obtain
clarification from the County on the process that should be followed with respect to the
installation of the story poles.
B. Jered Lawson of Pie Ranch provided background information on the formation of Pie
Ranch and activities that Pie Ranch was pursuing in the Pescadero community
C. Matt Jacobs outlined a possible ballot measure for the next election, including how
County Supervisors would be elected.
4. Approval of Minutes of regular meeting on: August 10, 2010

GA GB KH DL DM CP RS

Motion XX
Second XX
Ayes/Nays X X X X X X X
Abstain
Carried XX
Failed

5. Financial Report:
GB reported on the current bank balances, including $6,662.18 in the main checking
account and $1,123.61 for the copier account. Pattie Brixen also submitted an annual checking
account summary for the main account from the period of July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010.
6. Correspondence:
CP provided an update on certain permits and on the County chip seal project.
7. Reports from Current Committee Chairs:
A. Housing Committee – CP gave a report on the status of the efforts to raise funds for
Native Sons.
B. School Board – DM outlined recent Board activity, including the school improvement
grant and the selection of a new principal.

1
C. Emergency Preparedness – Lary Lawson reported that the La Honda Ham Radio Club
was working on getting a second ham radio repeater installed in Pescadero.
D. Environmental Committee – No report.
E. Puente – KH gave an update on activity at Puente, including an update on various job
programs that were being worked on, a review of health programs, various education
programs and miscellaneous other programs.
F. Nominating Committee – RS gave an update on possible candidates to fill open
PMAC seats. Those potential candidates include Carolyn Shade, David Lustig and Jake
Bowman.
G. Communications Committee – No report.
8. Land Use Committee Report:
A. Wastewater Treatment – CP provided an update on the status of the sewer system
feasibility study proposal.
B. Planning & Building – Permits were submitted for review by the County and
responded to by various members of PMAC by email. No County response was to
PMAC feedback was received.

9. New Business:
A. Support for Pescadero Foundation/Pescadero History Society. Upon motion by GA
and a second by RS, PMAC agreed to write a letter of support in connection with a grant
application to be submitted to the County.

B. PMAC Term Limits. Following discussion, this matter was removed from the agenda.

C. Local Coastal Plan Amendment. Following discussion, it was proposed that PMAC
be given legal guidance on this matter from County counsel

10. Old Business:
Town Sign. Extensive discussion took place on the process for installing story poles and
the process that needs to be followed at the County level to install the town sign. Upon
motion made, amended and seconded, PMAC recommended putting up story poles in
four separate locations. PMAC requested Matt Jacobs’ assistance in getting guidance
from the County on the process to complete the installation of the town sign.
11. Next Meeting: October 12, 2010 at 7:30pm

12. Adjournment: Meeting adjourned at 9:30 p.m. by Chair, Catherine Peery
Submitted by Recording Secretary, David Lee

2
From: Matt Jacobs [mailto:MJacobs@co.sanmateo.ca.us] Sent: Tuesday, September
21, 2010 10:20 AM To: Skinner, Rob Subject: Fwd: Highway 1 lighting in Pescadero
Rob,
Per your inquiry on the light, I believe the lighting itself is now working again. I will say I
am surprised as the cause of all this... must have been a fun night for someone...

Matt
"Gidget Navarro" <gidget_navarro@dot.ca.gov> 9/21/2010 10:02 AM >>> Hey
Matt, Here is a response to the lighting on Highway 1 in Pescadero as you can see in
the supervisors response she said you can contact her directly with lighting issues in the
future for that area. Hope this information is helpful. Thanks, The crew checked this
light outage report yesterday, Thursday, September 16th. They found that the lights had
been shot out. The wiring in the pull boxes had shorted and burnt and the service
wiring vandalized and disconnected. Also the three flasher and the photo electric
controls there, had been vandalized and were full of bullet holes. The crew repaired the
field and service wiring and the photo electric control. They replaced the damaged
fixtures and relamped them. The roadway lighting is now working. We will assemble the
replacements for the flashers & benjamin lights and return next week to repair
them. This area is at the far end of our service area. In the future if the citizen sees
other needed repairs, he can contact me directly at 415 - 330 - 6521. We will then be
able to address his concerns in a more timely manner.
"Matt Jacobs"
<MJacobs@co.sanm
ateo.ca.us>

To benjamin_delanty@dot.ca.gov 09/09/2010
11:49
cc AM

Subject Question on street lights on HWY 1

Ben, How are things? Sorry to keep coming to you with questions, but I am not 100%
on who to contact for some things. My question is who would I contact at Caltrans
regarding a street light out on Highway 1 in Pescadero? Thanks, Matt (Embedded
image moved to file: pic12818.gif)Save Paper. Think before you print. >>> "Rob
Skinner" <rob.skinner@gmail.com> 9/9/2010 9:38 AM >>> Good morning... Matt, the
two street lights at the intersection of Highway 1 and Pescadero Creek Rd have been
out and not working for about two-three months now and it's a concern. Could you
please look into that for us?

Gidget Navarro Caltrans Public Affairs Public Information Officer San Mateo County 510-
286-5574 (office) 510-715-7181 (cell)
San Mateo County Boards and Commissions Training
The Brown Act: A Night with County Counsel
Tuesday, October 19, 2010
5:00-6:00 P.M.
455 County Center, Room 101
Redwood City

AGENDA

5:00-5:05 p.m. Announcements
Mary McMillan, Deputy County Manager
Beverly Thames, Webmaster

5:05-5:10 p.m. Welcome
David Holland, Director, Parks Department

5:10-5:40 p.m. The Brown Act
Judith Holiber, Deputy County Counsel
Carol Woodward, Deputy County Counsel

5:40-5:55 p.m. Brown Act Compliance Questions
Judith Holiber, Deputy County Counsel
Carol Woodward, Deputy County Counsel

5:55-6:00 p.m. Closing Remarks
Mary McMillan, Deputy County Manager
September 16, 2010

Duane Bay, Director
San Mateo County Department of Housing
264 Harbor Boulevard, Bldg. A
Belmont, CA 94002

Re: Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council Certificate of Support for Grant Application
to Rehabilitate Native Sons’ Community Hall

Dear Duane:

The Pescadero Municpal Advisory Council, at its regular meeting on Tuesday, September
14, 2010 passed unanimously a resolution to provide a Certificate of Support for this
Grant Application. The Native Sons’ Community Hall is vital to the civic life of the
whole community, and is a central location for the delivery of services by nonprofit
organizations to the community, and also services as the Town Hall, where our monthly
meetings are held.

We see the replacement of the foundation of the Native Sons’ Hall as critically important
to our community. The community has shown its support over the years by first
contributing the funds to buy the building, and in the last year or two, contributing about
$70,000 towards this project. We urge the Department of Housing to give this project the
highest priority in your allocation of grant funds.

Thanks very much for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Catherine M. Peery, Chair
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council

PO Box 249 Pescadero CA 94060 www.pescaderocouncil.org p1/1
October 6, 2010

California Department of Conservation
Division of Land Resource Protection
801 K Street, MS 18-01
Sacramento, CA 95814-3528

RE: Letter of Commitment for San Mateo County RCD Application for 2010
Watershed Coordinator Grant

To whom it may concern:

The Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council (PMAC) enthusiastically supports the San
Mateo County RCD’s application for a Watershed Coordinator grant. As local leaders in
watershed planning, project development, and public outreach, RCDs are the bridge
between agencies and landowners to meet long-term watershed goals. We are proud that
our RCD was the first in the state of California, established in 1939, and that is has a
number of innovative projects underway to improve lands management and water quality.
The work of the RCD is accomplished through strong voluntary partnerships with land
owners and managers, technical advisors, area jurisdictions, government agencies,
advocates, and others.

As an elected council to advise the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors on issues
affecting residents of Pescadero, Loma Mar, Butano Canyon and other South Coast
communities in San Mateo County, we urge you to support the RCD in their watershed
coordination role. This service has been invaluable to us and to our constituents.

In the area represented by PMAC, the RCD provides conservation technical assistance to
public and private landowners and implements projects to conserve natural resources
ranging from assisting farmers with water conservation to working with landowners to
improve and winterize rural roads. The RCD convenes diverse stakeholders and
facilitates dialogue to help us understand and give our voice to esoteric and complex
environmental issues and regulations, provides us with access to scientists developing
Total Maximum Daily Loads for the Pescadero-Butano watershed, and participates on
PMAC’s Environmental Quality Committee. The RCD has a commitment to watershed
education, partnering to provide outreach and watershed literacy programs in Spanish to
local farmworkers, giving presentations in our local high school, and developing a
“Green Jobs” training program for teens in a local juvenile detention facility.

PMAC commits to continue our partnership with the RCD- assisting with community
outreach, providing input and advice regarding issues of concern to residents of our
constituent watersheds, supporting grant applications, and providing feedback regarding
programs and documents.

A challenge faced by the RCD is that tax revenues supporting the district, approximately
$50,000 per year, are inadequate to accomplish their ambitious workplan. The remaining
funds are primarily derived from project-oriented government grants, which are severely
restricted in how they may be used and are tied to very specific tasks. As a result, there
are limited funds available for operating support, capacity building, and programs that are
delivered by the RCD that are not “billable” under the restricted grant funds.

Thank you for your consideration of the RCD’s request for support in their essential role
coordinating watershed conservation activities.

Sincerely,

Catherine Peery
President
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council
From: geoff Allen <geoff@foglinenursery.com>
Subject: Re: RCD letter of support
Date: October 11, 2010 6:21:13 PM PDT
To: Catherine Peery <catherine@ben-e-fit.com>, greg bonaparte
<gbonaparte@yahoo.com>, Kate Meyer Haas <katebee@pacbell.net>,
mcdermott.don@gmail.com, Rob Skinner <rob.skinner@gmail.com>, David Lee
<dlee@whiteandlee.com>
Reply-To: geoff Allen <geoff@foglinenursery.com> Katherine,

I won't be at the meeting tommorrow, I think supporting Kelix, and the RCD are important
for the people of Pescadero, now, and as we try to move forward in the future to solve
our town's problems. Most of them center around the creeks, rivers, marsh, beach, and
tidal areas. The Rescource Conservation district can be a powerful ally for us, in that
they can be the "Lead agency" to get funding and bring people and rescources
together to help us through the red tape surrounding anything we as "Local property
owners" want to try and accomplish, to protect our town, and ourselves and ours and our
neighbors property, and property rights.

San Mateo county, Lennie Robrts, Committee for Green Foothills, POST, Midpen, and
all of the other "Save the planet organizations" have their own agendas, out there do not
recognize Pescaderans rights. They all have their vision of what Pescadero should be,
regardless of our property and our property rights. They have worked together for the
past 25 or 30 years, to stall anything that might move our town in the direction of solving
the flooding problem. The RCD gives us a chance at taking the reigns, and solving the
problem.

There was a plan at one point in the past, to dam Butano creek, and create a large water
source for San Mateo County, for drinking water, and recreation. Guess where that left
property owners in Butano Canyon.

Likewise, 12 years ago, Rich Gordon promissed to take the lead in solving the flooding
issues in Pescadero. Guess where that leadership has led us.

To my knowledge, the only project that has taken place to help solve the flooding, in the
past 25 years, was the locally lead project with Bill Cook and other neighbors building
the sandbag wall, which was effective, while it lasted, and hasn't done much lately,
because no one has repaired it, or increased it's water holing capacity.

If we don't find a way to stick together, and work out "Our issues", there are plenty of
other people out there who are willing to take that right away from us. Supporting Kelix,
and the RCD at least gives us a chance at having a voice, and a vote in our future.
Please ask the other board members to support RCD, so we have a voice, ad an
organization to help us help ourselves.

I will be there in spirit Tommorrow night, and If you need my input, you can call me, I'll be
at home. The number is 879-0843, or if it's busy, 879-0264.

Thanks,

Geoff Allen
 
San Mateo County Resource Conservation District
Current Project List
September 16, 2010

Project Description Partners Funding Key Staff Status

Agricultural producers, NRCS, Farm
Implement over 30 conservation
Bureau State Water Resources Control  30+ projects completed on 19 farms
Agricultural Water Quality projects to improve water quality and
1. Project water conservation on irrigated
Board (federal stimulus funds via  Marti  Upcoming watershed outreach in Spanish to
RCD is project manager. EPA) farm laborers about water quality
agricultural lands.
Biochar Field Trials proposal  Marti
2. Farm Bureau? CCA, AWQA?  In early development
development  Karissa?

Provide a forum to share ideas and
Community at large  Last event Sept. 22nd
information for resource  Marti
3. Blue Circle management, education, and
Silent auction at events  Results of Ag Water Quality Project and
RCD is project manager.  Kx creek monitoring project
stewardship.

Farm Bureau (project manager), NRCS,
Improve irrigation efficiency on  Installed irrigation improvements on 5
Cooperative Conservation agricultural producers.
4. specialty crops in San Mateo County NRCS Cooperative Agreement  Marti farms
Partnership Initiative (CCPI)
on five farms.  Workshop in Spanish to irrigation foremen
RCD provides assistance.
California Coastal Commission (project
manager); Midcoast Community Council;
Montara Water and Sanitary District;
Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary;
Fitzgerald Marine Reserve Assess condition of all watersheds
Moss Beach Ranch; Regional Water
Critical Coastal Area Pilot contributing to the Fitzgerald Marine State Water Resources Control
Quality Control Board; San Francisco Bay  Completed assessment and some
5. Project Reserve and Pillar Point Harbor and Board via subcontract to San  Kx
Regional Water Quality Control Board; San confidential pollution reduction projects.
develop plan for best management of Francisco Estuary Institute
Mateo County (SMC) Department of Public
non-point source pollution.
Works; SMC Planning Department; SMC
Parks Dept.

RCD is local host and subcontractor.
Fitzgerald Marine Reserve Prop 84 ASBS, via subcontract to  Karissa
6.  Waiting for contract
Pollution Control San Mateo County  AmeriCorps

Provide technical assistance for
Landowners, NRCS, SMC Planning
landowners undertaking conservation
Grading Permit Exemptions Department
7. projects, exemption from County Fee for service  Kx  None currently pending
Grading Permit requirements, and
RCD issues permit exemptions.
reduced permit fees.

Provide watershed literacy and job Puente de la Costa Sur, Pescadero High
Federal stimulus funds through
training in natural resources to low School  Marti
8. Green Jobs Corps income high school students in
San Mateo County via subcontract  Classes scheduled throughout fall.
with Puente de la Costa Sur  AmeriCorps
Pescadero. RCD is subcontractor
UC Davis, Balance Hydrologics, SMC
Public Health Laboratory, Regional Water
Quality Control Board, Granada Sanitary
District, SMC Environmental Health
Identification and  Collected data regarding harbor circulation,
Services, City of Santa Barbara Creeks
Remediation of Fecal fecal indicator bacteria quantity and source
Assess and identify sources of fecal Division, Natural Resources Conservation
Pollution in Pillar Point State Water Resources Control  Karissa  SWRCB considering additional funds on
9. Harbor pollution in Pillar Point Harbor and Service (NRCS), Sewer Authority
Board (Clean Beaches Initiative) 10/18
recommend plan for remediation. Midcoastside, Coastal Commission, SMC
 AmeriCorps
 Harbor commission awarded $15,000 to
Harbor District, San Francisco Estuary
complete circulation study
Institute, Surfrider SMC, County of Santa
Cruz Environmental Health Services

RCD is project manager.
10. Integrated Watershed California Coastal Conservancy; RCD of Funding from California Coastal  Kx  Moving forward with three high priority

1 of 3
Restoration Planning (IWRP) Facilitate and coordinate projects to Santa Cruz County, RCD of San Mateo Conservancy via subcontract to projects. One restores pond for agriculture
improve fish and wildlife habitat and County; federal, state, and local resource RCD of Santa Cruz County and frog/ snake habitat in Pilarcitos
water quality. Bring together various agencies. watershed. Two improve fish passage- one in
funding and permitting agencies to Pescadero watershed, one in San Gregorio
better coordinate how projects are RCD is project manager for San Mateo watershed.
funded and permitted. Create a forum County.
for collaborative problem solving to
complete resource conservation
projects.

Recruit, train, and support citizen
It Takes A Community to volunteers to collect water quality Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary
 Karissa  Completed 12 months of monitoring and
11. Care for a Watershed data and learn how pollution enters NOAA B-WET
the Sanctuary from their RCD is project manager.
 Marti presented results at public meeting.
communities.

Provide outreach and technical
assistance for operators of livestock Ecology Action, Central Coast RCDs
State Water Resources Control
12. Livestock and Land Program and equestrian facilities to implement
Board Proposition 84 ASBS
 Karissa  Identified early projects.
best management practices to protect RCD is contractor.
water quality.

Coordinate and manage data
 Public comment period closed.
collection for the Phase 3 Midcoast
San Mateo County  Coordinating entities that monitor water in
Groundwater and obtain any
13. Midcoast Groundwater Study additional baseline information
San Mateo County  Marti Midcoast
RCD is contractor.  Tracking funding for groundwater basin
needed to develop a groundwater
management plan development
management plan for the region.

California State Parks, Philip Williams &
Conduct a cross-sectional survey of
Associates.
14. Pescadero Marsh Survey the main channels, creeks, and lagoon California State Parks  Kx  Gages installed
at Pescadero State Beach.
RCD is fiscal manager.

Provide education and outreach to
stakeholders (particularly Pescadero
 Facilitated 1 public meeting, working with
community members), researchers, Regional Water Quality Control Board,
Regional Board to set up another one.
and Water Board staff interested in Pescadero Municipal Advisory Committee Regional Water Quality Control  Kx
15. Pescadero TMDL Outreach ongoing and future technical studies Board
 Exploring sediment market pilot opportunity
 Marti  Regularly updating PMAC Env Qual
in the watershed that pertain to the RCD is project manager.
Committee
development of Total Maximum Daily
Loads.

SF PUC, CA State Parks, NOAA, City of
Half Moon Bay, Coastside County Water
Convene Pilarcitos Restoration  Completed Lagoon project
District, Committee for Green Foothills,
Workgroup and implement plan to  Completed road assessments for private
County of San Mateo, MROSD, CA Coastside County Water District,
Pilarcitos Creek Integrated promote balanced solutions to landowners, now doing more
Department of Fish and Game, National San Francisco Public Utilities
Watershed Management effectively manage the Pilarcitos
16. Plan Creek watershed that satisfy
Marine Fisheries Service, POST, Pilarcitos Commission, Sewer Authority  Kx  Stream surveys nearly complete
Creek Advisory Committee, San Mateo Midcoastside, and Caltrans  Workgroup meeting in September
environmental, public health,
County Farm Bureau, Sewer Authority settlement fund held by RCD  Developing new MOUs for funding RCD
domestic water supply, and economic
Mid-Coastside, Surfrider Foundation work and stream gage
interests.
RCD is project manager.
Restore and enhance ponds that
NRCS, public and private landowners, Kx
benefit agriculture and support the   Working on restoration of 7 ponds on two
agricultural operators. Caltrans mitigation, IWRP,
17. Ponds Program recovery of the California red-legged
USFWS
 Jim Robins? ranches in agricultural production to
frog and the San Francisco garter  AmeriCorps improve ag viability as well as habitat.
RCD is project manager.
snake.
Address existing regulatory RCD of Santa Cruz County
Addressing Regulatory
(subcontractor), San Mateo County Weed
18. Barriers to Management of constraints to eucalyptus removal in Management Area
 Kelli Camara  In process, to be complete March 2011
Eucalyptus San Mateo County. RCD is project manager.
California Coastal Conservancy; RCD of California Department of Fish and  Held two public workshops in Gazos
Rural Roads Program  Karissa
19. Provide education and technical Santa Cruz County, RCD of San Mateo Game, Caltrans settlement fund watershed
assistance to road associations, County; NRCS; land owners and California Coastal Conservancy via  AmeriCorps  Completing geospatial analysis
2 of 3
homeowners’ associations, managers. subcontract to RCD of Santa Cruz,  Conducting road assessments for
landowners, and land managers to NRCS grant and in-kind support landowners this winter
improve rural road conditions, RCD is project manager for San Mateo via Agricultural Water Quality
resulting in winterized roads County. Alliance
requiring less maintenance and
reduced sediment delivery into
riparian habitats.

Implement critical priorities of the
San Gregorio Watershed Plan (e.g.  Coordinating with stakeholders to eradicate
off-stream water storage, off-channel San Gregorio Environmental Resource purple loosestrife in Reflection Lake
San Gregorio Watershed habitat, large woody debris Center, American Rivers, Fish and  Contracting with American Rivers for off-
20. Enhancement Program enhancement, water conservation Wildlide Service, land owners and
FWS, American Rivers  Kx stream water storage project
strategies, lagoon protection, managers, NRCS.  Submitted funding request to DFG
sediment remediation, fish passage).  Awarded $40K from FWS

Provide on-the-ground workshops to Public and private land managers, NRCS
Technical Workshops
21. land managers to protect, restore, and RCD is sponsor, presenter, assists with Varies  Marti  Pond maintenance workshop in spring.
conserve natural resources. coordination.

Collect water samples on private Monitoring water quality on three streams.
Water Quality Monitoring Landowners, equestrian boarding Fee for service, in-kind 
properties where requested and make  Karissa
22. Agreements recommendations to landowners for
facilities, SMC Public Health Laboratory. contributions from Public Health One is a collaboration, one is a public
RCD is project manager. Laboratory  Jake
remediation of water pollution. agency, and one is a single private landowner

 Helping private landowner south of
Control or eradicate priority invasive  Kx
Pescadero with control of Hypericum
23. Weed abatement non-native plants in priority Landowners, WMA, CDFA FWS, WMA  Jim Robins?
locations. infestation
 AmeriCorps
 Purple loosestrife project (above)

In the wings:
1. Watershed Coordinator- submitting funding request in October
2. Energy audits- waiting for funding opportunity
3. Solutions to Pescadero flooding- submitted funding request
4. Pescadero Watershed Council- submitted funding request

3 of 3
San Mateo County Resource Conservation District
FY 2011 Financial Budget

REVENUE
Grant-funded Projects
Improving Ag Water Quality 51,505
Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative 10,778
Critical Coastal Area 13,000
Fitzgerald Pollution Reduction 50,400
Green Jobs Corps 30,000
It Takes a Community to Care for a Watershed 12,900
Integrated Watershed Restoration Program 25,200
Livestock and Equestrian Water Quality 164,161
Midcoast Groundwater Study 21,047
Pescadero TMDL Outreach 1,694
Pillar Point Harbor Pollution Study 193,992
Ponds Program 100
Rural Roads Program 64,000
San Gregorio Watershed Plan 780
San Gregorio Watershed Enhancement 7,000
Unrestricted 0
Contracts/Grants Subtotal 646,556

Fines and Mitigation Funds
Pilarcitos funds 6,742
Fines and Mitigation Subtotal 6,742

Individual Contributions 1,000
Interest Income 300
Misc. Income 400
Property Taxes 51,000
Service Fees 24,462
Subtotal Other 77,162
TOTAL REVENUE 730,460

EXPENSES
Personnel
Salaries 222,954
Benefits 18,839
Subtotal Personnel 241,793
Operating
Accounting 13,084
Bank Fees 900
Computer Services 2,000
Communications 4,500
Discretionary 1,500
Equipment 9,000
Insurance - Liability 1,900
Legal 2,000
Membership, Dues & Subscriptions 1,500
Mileage 500
Postage & Delivery 1,000
Printing & Copying 1,500
Professional Development 1,500
Public Relations & Outreach 250
Rent 17,700
Supplies 250
Travel/ Accommodations 600
Subtotal Operating Expenses 59,684
Program Expenses
Improving Ag Water Quality 43,500
Blue Circle 800
Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative 8,000
Critical Coastal Area 10,000
Fitzgerald Pollution Reduction 20,000
Green Jobs Corps 4,000
It Takes a Community to Care for a Watershed 6,700
Integrated Watershed Restoration Program 200
Livestock and Equestrian Water Quality 129,687
Midcoast Groundwater Study 250
Pescadero TMDL Outreach 100
Pilarcitos IWMP 12,200
Pillar Point Harbor Pollution Study 137,734
Ponds Program 0
Rural Roads Program 39,200
San Gregorio Watershed Plan 0
San Gregorio Watershed Enhancement 0
Workshops 1,500
Subtotal Program Expenses 413,871
TOTAL EXPENSES 715,348
NET 15,113

Footnotes to the Proposed Financial Budget:

FY ‘11 Budget
p. 2 of 8
REVENUE ASSUMPTIONS

Grant-funded Projects
Improving Ag Water Quality: This is the anticipated remaining amount in the grant that will
be billed this year, anticipating $35,000 will be paid for construction work that has been
completed but not yet billed; $9,500 for subcontracts for remaining workshop and
outreach requirements; $3,360 for staff time for project administration and management;
and $3,375 in direct project expenses that are billable on this grant.
$51,505 = $35,000 + $9,500 + $3,360 + $3,375

Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative: This is the total amount left in the contract. It is
assumed that all funds will be spent before the contract expires this year.

Critical Coastal Area: This is the total amount left in the contract. All funds may be spent
this year.

Fitzgerald Pollution Reduction Project: The workplan and contract are not yet complete for this
project. This estimate is based on dividing the total amount of the contract over the 46
month duration of the contract, anticipating no more than 8 months of the fiscal year to
be billable under the contract, and assuming that the project will start slower and ramp up
in intensity.
$50,400 = ($483,000/46) x 8 x .6

Green Jobs Corps: This is the total amount of the contract, which will begin and end this
fiscal year.

It Takes A Community to Care for a Watershed: This is the total amount left in the contract. It
is assumed that all funds will be spent before the contract expires this year.

Integrated Watershed Restoration Planning: This estimate assumes planning for two priority
conservation projects this year, with assistance from RCD staff, a consultant provided by
the Coastal Conservancy, and the AmeriCorps volunteers. It assumes that the RCD will
earn the $16,097 remaining in the grant agreement that expires in September and receive
an estimated additional $20,000 under a new agreement thereafter. It also assumes that the
project will ramp up in intensity.
$25,200 = ($16,000+ $20,000) x .7

[Note that this is the estimate for Tasks 1 and 3 of the IWRP grant. Task 2 of this grant is
allocated to the Rural Roads Program and counted separately below.]

Livestock and Equestrian Water Quality: The workplan and contract are not yet complete for
this project. This estimate is based on dividing the total amount of the contract over the
27 month duration of the contract, anticipating no more than 8 months of the fiscal year
to be billable under the contract, and assuming that the project will start slower and ramp
up in intensity.
$164,161 = ($923,405/27) x 8 x .6

FY ‘11 Budget
p. 3 of 8
Midcoast Groundwater Study: This is the total amount left in the contract, multiplied by a 60%
probability that we will able to bill the total amount this year (based on external variables
beyond our control).
$21,047 = $35,078 x .6

Pescadero TMDL Outreach: $3,387 remains in the agreement to facilitate two remaining
workshops. It is anticipated that only one of the workshops will be required this fiscal
year.
$1,694 = $3,387/2

Pillar Point Harbor Pollution Study: The amended contract is not yet complete for this project.
This estimate is based on dividing the total amount of the requested new amount over the
30 month requested duration of the contract, anticipating being able to bill for work
retroactively to the beginning of the fiscal year, and assuming that the project will ramp up
in intensity. It then includes $35,682 for revenue earned in the last fiscal year that will be
paid in this fiscal year.
$193,992 = ($659,623/30) x 12 x 0.6 + $35,682

Ponds Program: This is the total amount left in the contract. All funds may be spent this
year.

Rural Roads: This estimate assumes completion of a $20,000 road assessment project under
a contract that will complete by February, the remaining funds under Task 2 of the IWRP
contract that expires in September, an estimate of $25,000 additional funds in a new
agreement thereafter, and the $4,000 AWQA mini-grant that has been awarded to this
program and expires this year.
$64,000 (approx.) = $20,000 + $15,135 + $25,000 + $4,000

San Gregorio Watershed Plan: This is the anticipated remaining amount in the grant that will
be billed this year.

San Gregorio Watershed Enhancement: This is the anticipated amount under two agreements
that will be billed this year: We assume that an interagency agreement with USFWS for
$39,994 will not begin before March and that we will not bill more than $5,000 to the
agreement this fiscal year. We assume that we will not bill more than $2,000 to a pending
subcontract with American Rivers for $8,200- $10,000 (total amount still under
negotiation).
$7,000 = $5,000 + $2,000

Fines and Mitigation Funds
This is the amount we estimate that we could bill to the Caltrans mitigation fund for
implementation of the Pilarcitos Integrated Watershed Management Plan if the interagency
funding agreement for that work is not renewed or a similar funding source is not found.
This estimate is based on the amount billed to this project last year for the Executive
Director, subtracting ¼ for anticipated maternity leave during this fiscal year.

Individual Contributions

FY ‘11 Budget
p. 4 of 8
We will pilot a direct mail campaign at the end of this calendar year, with a goal of receiving
$400 in gifts to the RCD as a result. We anticipated $600 in gifts from directors towards the
purchase of a computer.
$1,000 = $400 + $600

Interest Income
We anticipate earning $300 interest from all accounts this year.

Miscellaneous Income
This estimate is based on the expectation of earning $200 from the silent auction at each of
two Blue Circle events to help offset expenses to coordinate and host the program.
$400= $200 x 2

Property Taxes
The RCD expects to receive $51,000 in property taxes this year.

Service Fees
We will bill California State Parks an administrative fee of $5,674 for contract management
for the Pescadero Marsh survey. We will bill for water quality monitoring services with
private entitities, estimated to be $5,288. We will bill at least $12,000 to partners in the
Pilarcitos Restoration Workgroup who have agreed to reimburse us for funding the
Pilarcitos stream gage. We anticipate collecting approximately $1,500 in fees for workshops
we host.
$24,462 = $5,674 + $3,288 + $2,000 + $12,000 + $1,500

EXPENSES

Personnel
Salaries: This estimate assumes employment of a full-time Executive Director at 40 hours
per week for 8 months (due to anticipated maternity leave), a full-time Fiscal Manager at
32 hours per week, a part-time Conservation Project Manager at 20 hours per week, a part-
time Conservation Associate at up to 30 hours per week beginning in August, a part-time
Conservation Assistant at 5 hours per month, two full-time AmeriCorps interns beginning
in October at a cost of $7,500 each, and the estimated remaining hours for two staff
members that are leaving the RCD. The subtotal of these estimated salaries is $206,516.
Payroll taxes on that amount is approximately $16,438.

Holidays, vacation and sick time are included in the salary amount. Workers compensation
and payroll taxes are estimated to be approximately 15% of the Fiscal Manager’s salary.

Benefits: Benefits include Workers Compensation for all employees; pro-rated contributions
to medical benefits for the Conservation Project Manager, who is a shared employee with
RCD of Santa Cruz County; medical benefits for the two full-time staff members;
retirement contributions for the two full-time staff members at $150 per month per

FY ‘11 Budget
p. 5 of 8
person; and dental, vision, and life insurance for the Executive Director at $78.69 per
month.

Operating Expenses
Accounting Services: The RCD owes $6,000 for the currently underway biennial audit for FYs
‘08 and ’09. $2,084 is past due for the biennial audit for FYs ’06 and ’07. If funds are
available, this estimate includes $5,000 for a single year audit for FY ’10.
$13,084 = $6,000 + $5,000 + $2,084

Bank Fees: This is the estimated potential cost for using the RCD line of credit to address
cash flow shortages while waiting for reimbursement from grants and contracts.

Computer Services: This item is for technical support as needed. This estimated is based on
the amount spent for this item in the previous fiscal year as well as the set up of new
computers for additional staff this year, a new off-site data storage service, and technical
assistance for seven computers rather than four previously.

Discretionary: This item is intended to cover unforeseen situations or take advantage of
arising small-scale opportunities.

Equipment: This is for a new NRCS-compatible work station, furniture for new staff and
necessary upgrades, paint, rental of a carpet washing machine, three phones and a phone
system.

Insurance/ Liability: This is the amount that is charged to the RCD for liability insurance.

Legal: The RCD contracts with County Council for legal services. This is an estimate of
the amount of services that may be required.

Membership, Dues and Subscriptions: Memberships include California Association of Resource
Conservation Districts, Local Areas Formation Commission, California Special Districts
Association, National Association of Conservation Districts, Bay Area Open Space
Council, Special District Risk Management Authority, and San Mateo County Food
Systems Alliance.

Mileage: This is for mileage expenses that are not billable to specific projects or use of the
NRCS vehicle through a partnership agreement.

Postage and Delivery: This is for postage and delivery that is not supplied by the NRCS, and
anticipates a direct mailing fundraising request this year.

Printing and Copying: This is for flyers, business cards, brochures, and the direct mail
campaign.

Professional Development: This is for registration and materials for workshops, training, and
conferences for staff and board members, such as the annual CARCD conference,

FY ‘11 Budget
p. 6 of 8
technical workshops throughout the year, County trainings available to special district staff,
and specialized training as needed, e.g. specific software.

Public Relations: This is for costs, including advertising fees, associated with promoting
workshops, outreach, and general communications.

Rent: This item is for monthly rent for office space, $5,400 owed in deferred rent, and
monthly costs for off-site storage.

Supplies: Although most office supplies are provided by the NRCS, there is occasionally a
need for RCD-provided supplies.

Travel/Accommodations: This is to cover travel costs associated with professional
development, such as AmeriCorps mentor training, CARCD conference attendance, and
technical workshops that are not reasonable attended within a day.

Program Expenses (i.e. other than Personnel)
Improving Ag Water Quality: To facilitate implementation of accepted conservation practices
to reduce agricultural nonpoint source pollution and financial assistance to private land
owners and agricultural producers participating in Farm Bill contracts. The cost estimate
assumes $35,000 for construction and $1,300 to subcontractors for education and outreach
assistance.

Blue Circle: To provide a forum twice this year for sharing ideas, information and resources
for the goal of natural resource management, education, and stewardship. The cost
estimates assume $200 in expenses per event, twice this year.

Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative : To improve irrigation efficiency on specialty
crops in San Mateo County on five farms. The cost estimate is for a subcontract with the
Farm Bureau to implement the project.

Critical Coastal Area: To improve water quality contributing to the Fitzgerald Marine
Reserve and Pillar Point Harbor. The scope of work is yet to be determined.

Fitzgerald Pollution Reduction: The workplan and contract have not yet been determined.
This amount is an estimate of the amount of construction that might be completed this
year.

Green Jobs Corps: To provide watershed literacy and job training in natural resources to low
income high school students in Pescadero. $4,000 of the total budget is estimated for
program expenses such as transportation and materials.

It Takes A Community to Care for a Watershed: To recruit, train, and support citizen volunteers
to collect water quality data and learn how pollution enters the Sanctuary from their
communities. This is the amount that is estimated for laboratory fees.

FY ‘11 Budget
p. 7 of 8
Integrated Watershed Restoration Program: To facilitate and coordinate projects to improve fish
and wildlife habitat and water quality, bring together various funding and permitting
agencies to better coordinate how projects are funded and permitted, and create a forum
for collaborative problem solving to complete resource conservation projects. This
estimate is for conference calls and local mileage.

Livestock and Equestrian Water Quality: To provide assistance for operators of livestock and
equestrian facilities to protect water quality. 79% of the total contract is allocated to
program expenses. This estimate is 79% of the total amount estimated to be brought in as
revenue this year.

Midcoast Groundwater Study : To take steps towards development of a groundwater
management plan for the Midcoast region. This amount is the estimate of what will be
needed for conference calls, mileage, and materials.

Pescadero TMDL Outreach: To provide education and outreach to stakeholders interested in
studies in the Pescadero watershed that pertain to the development of Total Maximum
Daily Loads. This is the amount estimated that will be needed for workshop expenses.

Pilarcitos Creek Integrated Watershed Management Plan: To convene Pilarcitos Restoration
Workgroup and implement watershed plan. We anticipate that $12,000 will be paid to
continue stream gaging through September and $200 will be needed for conference calls.

Pillar Point Harbor Pollution Study: To assess and identify sources of fecal pollution in Pillar
Point Harbor and recommend plan for remediation. 71% of the total contract is allocated
to program expenses. This estimate is 71% of the total amount estimated to be brought in
as revenue this year.

Rural Roads Program: To improve rural road conditions, resulting in winterized roads
requiring less maintenance and reduced sediment delivery into riparian habitats. This
estimate assumes that $4,000 will be spent on a GIS work station, $200 for conference
calls, and $35,000 for road assessments completed by subcontractors.

Workshops: To provide on-the-ground workshops to land managers to protect, restore, and
conserve natural resources. We estimate that this amount will be needed for workshop
expenses including presenter fee, facility rental, and associated materials.

FY ‘11 Budget
p. 8 of 8
Work Plan Form

Applicant: San Mateo County Resource Conservation District

Watershed Name: San Francisco Coastal South Watershed (18050006)

Watershed Goal #1: Improve, protect, and enhance natural resources for fish, wildlife, agriculture, and public safety.

Objective # 1: Improve, protect, and enhance water quality.
Performance Measurements:
(a) Ongoing water quality data will be collected from 15 locations.
(b) Achieve benchmarks in 35% of water quality improvement projects.
(c) Reach 60% of residents and landowners in priority sub-watersheds.

Implementation
Task Number Description of Task Task Completion
Schedule
Monitor parameters that may impair chemical, physical, or
1.1
biological aspects of water quality to identify nonpoint source Spreadsheets of data March 2011- March 2014
(NPS) contaminants and establish baseline monitoring data.

1.2 Establish benchmarks for water quality improvements. Benchmarks established March 2012

1.3 Work with partners and develop new partnerships to identify List of potential projects September 2011- March
opportunities to reduce NPS contributions. 2014
1.4 Write and submit grant proposals to fund implementation of best 2 grant proposals March 2011- March 2014
management practices (BMPs). submitted
1.5 Provide or assist with acquisition of necessary technical expertise Minimum of 20 partners March 2011- March 2014
(including workshops) for landowners and land managers to receiving technical
implement BMPs. assistance and 2
workshops
1.6 Partner with landowners, land managers, and other stakeholders to Minimum of 20 projects March 2011- March 2014
develop and implement BMPs. in development or
implemented
Watershed Goal #1: Improve, protect, and enhance natural resources for fish, wildlife, agriculture, and public safety.

Objective # 2: Improve and protect water availability by improving instream flow and groundwater management.
Performance Measurements:
(a) Reach 60% of residents and landowners in priority sub-watersheds.
(b) Scope of work developed for a Midcoast groundwater basin management plan.

Implementation
Task Number Description of Task Task Completion
Schedule
Work with partners and develop new partnerships to identify September 2012-
List of potential March 2014
2.1 opportunities to conserve water. projects
2.2 Write and submit grant proposals to fund implementation of water 2 grant proposals March 2011- March
conservation best management practices. submitted 2014

2.3 Provide or assist with acquisition of necessary technical expertise for land Minimum of 12 March 2011- March
owners and managers to implement BMPs. partners receiving 2014
technical assistance
2.4 Partner with landowners, land managers, and other stakeholders to Minimum of 10 March 2011- March
develop and implement BMPs. projects in development 2014
or implemented
2.5 Work with partners and develop new partnerships to assist San Mateo Scope of Work September 2011
County by developing scope of work for a Midcoast groundwater basin
management plan.
Watershed Goal #1: Improve, protect, and enhance natural resources for fish, wildlife, agriculture, and public safety.

Objective #3: Improve, protect, and enhance aquatic, riparian, and upland ecosystem function.
Performance Measurements:
(a) Implement 4 habitat improvement projects.
(b) Develop 6 additional habitat improvement projects to design phase.

Implementation
Task Number Description of Task Task Completion
Schedule
Work with partners and develop new partnerships to identify ecosystem March 2011- March
List of potential 2014
3.1 improvement projects. projects
3.2 Write and submit grant proposals to fund ecosystem improvement 1 grant proposal March 2011- March
projects. submitted 2014

3.3 Partner with landowners, land managers, and other stakeholders to Minimum of 10 March 2011- March
implement projects. projects in development 2014
or implemented
Watershed Goal # 2: Reduce barriers to conservation project implementation.

Objective #1: Facilitate cooperation and improve efficiencies in watershed stewardship.
Performance Measurement: Track and disseminate information about target watersheds to 100% of identified stakeholders at least twice
annually.

Implementation
Task Number Description of Task Task Completion
Schedule
Maintain and share spreadsheet compiling resource inventories, watershed
March 2011- March
1.1 plans and stakeholder priority lists. Summary spreadsheet
2014
1.2 Participate actively in collaborative watershed workgroups. Share Participation in a March 2011- March
relevant information from other watershed groups and stakeholders minimum of 15 2014
regarding watershed stewardship. watershed workgroup
meetings
1.3 Meet regularly with stakeholders and stakeholder groups that are not Participation in a March 2011- March
formally associated as watershed groups. Share relevant information minimum of 20 2014
regarding watershed stewardship. meetings

1.4 Work with partners to coordinate development and implementation of 20 projects in March 2011- March
projects identified in completed watershed plans. development or 2014
implemented
Watershed Goal # 2: Reduce barriers to conservation project implementation.

Objective # 2: Support local watershed partners in developing projects.
Performance Measurement: Facilitate development of at least 2 new watershed projects by local partners.

Implementation
Task Number Description of Task Task Completion
Schedule
Coordinate agencies that provide technical assistance, permits, and funds
2.1
via San Mateo County’s Integrated Watershed Restoration Program 10 meetings with IWRP March 2011- March
(IWRP). team 2014

2.2 Work with local partners and IWRP team to identify and cultivate project 50 potential projects March 2011- March
opportunities. Visit potential project sites to brainstorm possible project identified 2014
alternatives and project viability. 30 site visits completed

2.3 Once key projects are identified, work with partners to develop RFPs and 5 projects in September 2012-
project teams and to develop project-specific work programs. development or March 2014
completed
2.4 Work with IWRP team on outstanding technical issues. Summaries of technical September 2012-
considerations March 2014
2.5 Meet quarterly with leaders of San Mateo County Planning Department 12 meetings March 2011- March
about projects that are in development. 2014
Watershed Goal # 3: Innovate, groundtruth, and share findings to determine best strategies for watershed management.

Objective #1: Utilize the RCD exchange network to coordinate watershed resources statewide.
Performance Measurement: 100% of RCDs that receive Watershed Coordinator grants will exchange resources, provide support to each
other, and otherwise coordinate watershed protection.

Implementation
Task Number Description of Task Task Completion
Schedule
Share documents and strategies for watershed management with 103
1.1
RCDs throughout the state utilizing the California Association of Contributions made to
Resource Conservation Districts (CARCD) wiki website. 25 new wiki pages

1.2 Provide technical assistance to CARCD and other RCDs for 4 training meetings August 2011-
implementation and adoption of wiki website. with wiki December 2013
administrators and 3
training workshops at
CARCD state
conferences
1.3 Participate in quarterly conference calls, regional meetings, and a special Attendance and October 2011- March
session at the CARCD annual conference. participation in 2014
minimum of 15
meetings
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
P.O.  Box  554        Pescadero,  CA.  94060        www.mypuente.org      650.879.1691  
 
 
October 2010

Ribbon cutting!
Thanks to __________, Puenteʼs new toddler playground, complete with 3 groovy slides will be
completed by the end of the week. Stop by!

Anna Eshooʼs support
Kerry attendee a meeting with our congresswoman regarding our health care needs on the South Coast.
The congresswoman acknowledged our communityʼs need to amend our Health Care FQHC status and
promised to do some “fact finding” around the issue and asked Kerry to supply some background data to
her office.

Community Health News
nd
Important to mention again: November 22 Puente is partnering with the Health Dept to offer seasonal
flu vaccines and the TDAP (Combined Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis) vaccine in Pescadero at the
community Church from 3pm to 8pm and in La Honda at the post office from 2pm to 6pm. These are of
course offered with no income requirement.

Good enrollment in English & Spanish language classes and Zoomba is being offered every
Tuesday and Thursday at 6pm, Class is open to all. It is a very popular offering, and sort of a “Latino
Jazzercize!”
th
Save the Date! Friday, December 17 , La Posida Procession and Community Party!
Puente is holding a holiday celebration beginning at St. Anthonyʼs commerating the trek of Joseph and
Mary looking for safe quarters. The progression moves to the Community Church where there will be an
art event sponsored by Logan Payne and others and then on to a holiday bash across the street at 350
Stage where there will be music, food and fun.

Opportunities to contribute
Work day
th
This Sunday, October 17 is another chance to wear those paint duds and help with some projects at
Puente. Join the Social Action Community of Palo Altoʼs Fist Presbyterian Church. The plan is to paint
the childrenʼs area and tackle some yard work.

Ongoing offer to join La Sala every Thursday evening from 6-8pm and Sunday, 4-6pm
Meets at the Native Sonʼs it is an opportunity for the workers from the ranches and new members of our
community to come together in a welcoming environment and learn of the services available in
Pescadero. As always, everyone is welcome, home made food offered and many opportunities to
improve your English or Spanish
th
Food distribution, generally the 4 Thursday of each month in Pescadero, available to anyone in need
that day or that week. Additionally, St Anthonyʼs Church is distributing Second Harvest staples three
Saturdays a month. Please spread the word.

Holiday Stockings
Puente will be again gifting 200 stockings. Please help us by contributing fun stuff to stuff them with—
school supplies, small toys, the cool, fun stuff kids appreciate!
From: Karen McBride [mailto:KMcBride@rcac.org] Sent: Friday, October
08, 2010 2:16 PM To: Catherine Peery Cc: 'Matt Jacobs'; Jim
Porter Subject: Re: Request to re-submit application  
   
Hi  Jim  and  Catherine,  
So  the  October  1st  submittal  for  the  SEARCH  Grant  from  USDA/RD  has  
opened.  I  would  like  to  re-­‐summit  the  application  that  you  (Jim)  filled  
out  for  Pescadero.  Since  that  one  was  returned  to  me  as  it  turned  out  
to  be  a  loan,  we  can  now  submit  the  same  app  for  the  SEARCH  Grant.  
Since  the  County  has  applied,  I  wanted  to  ask  permission  to  re-­‐submit  
this  one  but  for  the  Grant.  I  will  be  off  next  week  but  when  I  return  
would  like  to  send  it  over  to  Santa  Rosa  USDA/RD  offices  on  Monday  
10/18.  
Let  me  know  if  you  approve.  
Thanks  
   
Karen  D.  McBride  Rural  Community  Assistance  Corporation  Rural  
Development  Specialist-­‐Environmental  Office  (916)  447-­‐9832  ext  
1012  Cell  (916)  549-­‐3265  www.rcac.org  www.rcap.org  

Rural Community Assistance Corporation (RCAC) provides
technical assistance, training and financing so rural communities
achieve their goals and visions.  
 
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org

Tuesday, December 14, 2010, 7:30 PM,
Community Church Social Hall, Stage Road, Pescadero CA 94060
1. CALL TO ORDER AT 7:30/ROLL CALL, CHANGES TO ORDER OF AGENDA
2. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA
3. PRESENTATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS
A. John Pliska—annual Alto Velo Bike Race
B. Joe La Mariana from the County – status of transfer station, introduced by Matt Jacobs
C. Geoff Allen is retiring from PMAC after 12 years—comments from Geoff, and remembrances
and congratulations from Council members and the Community

4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF LAST REGULAR MEETING
5. FINANCIAL REPORT – Financial Report- Treasurer, Greg Bonaparte
6. CORRESPONDENCE –Report, Corresponding Secretary, Kate Meyer Haas
7. REPORTS FROM CURRENT COMMITTEE CHAIRS AND COMMUNITY LIAISONS
A. Pescadero Foundation/Housing –status of Native Sons and Warheit grants- Catherine Peery
B. School Board Meeting liaison – Don McDermott
C. Emergency Preparedness – Lary Lawson
D. Liaison to Puente, County Health & Human Services – Kate Haas
E. Communications Committee – Rob Skinner
8. LAND USE COMMITTEE MEETING – ALL MEMBERS OF PMAC
A. Sewer System: Status of Grant Application with Public Works, RCAC – Karen McBride
9. NEW BUSINESS-
A. Letter of support for Alto Velo
B. Letter of support for Native Sons, second-step application
C. Schedule goal-setting session, and viewing of community plan workshop for new and old council members.
D. Sand bag signage—choice of wording regarding everyone taking their fair share.

10. OLD BUSINESS –
A. Status of town sign permit process

This site is NOT wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including auxiliary aids or services) to
participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting notice, agenda packet or other writings that may be
distributed at the meeting, should contact Catherine Peery at least 3 working days before the meeting at 650-879-0150, fax 650-879-1847, cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org.
Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
MEETING NOTICE AND PROPOSED AGENDA
www.pescaderocouncil.org

11. Adjournment. Next meeting Tuesday, January 11, 2011, at Native Sons, and welcoming of new members,
election of Officers,

This site is NOT wheelchair accessible. Individuals who need special assistance or a disability-related modification or accommodation (including auxiliary aids or services) to
participate in this meeting; or who have a disability and wish to request an alternative format for the agendas, meeting notice, agenda packet or other writings that may be
distributed at the meeting, should contact Catherine Peery at least 3 working days before the meeting at 650-879-0150, fax 650-879-1847, cpeery@pescaderocouncil.org.
Notification in advance of the meeting will enable PMAC to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting and the materials related to it.
SPANISH TRANSLATION AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. Traducciòn en español esta disponible si es solicitado.
PESCADERO MUNICIPAL ADVISORY COUNCIL (PMAC)
Minutes
Tuesday, October 12, 2010 7:30 P.M.
Native Sons Hall, 112 Stage Road, Pescadero, CA 94060
www.pescaderocouncil.org

1. Call to order/Roll Call: Meeting called to order at 7:30pm by Chair, Catherine Peery
Present: Catherine Peery (CP), Don McDermott (DM), Geoff Allen (GA), Greg
Bonaparte (GB) and Rob Skinner (RS) Kate Haas (KH), Excused: David Lee (DL)
Absent: None.
2. Public Comments not on the agenda:
• Catherine began by dedicating the meeting in honor of Noel Diaz who passed
away the end of August. Jim Reynolds honored Noel as a prominent farmer, and
a lifelong and well-respected Pescadero resident.
• Daniel Roberts, reported on the radio station’s plan to put up webcams in town,
planning for 2. One at the firehouse where it floods, (Daniel offered that flooding
report would be updating on radio additionally.) Second camera intended to be
pointing at the town sign. Request was made to add the webcam issue to the
agenda for next month to provide opportunity for community input.
• RS – reported someone shot out the streetlight on Hwy 1 South of Pescadero
Creek rd, further commented on the quick response from the County.
• There will be an upcoming Brown Act meeting w/ County Council, covering
compliance issues. Carolyn Shade, RS, Jake Bowman, CP will be attending.
Invitation extended to anyone else in the community interested in attending.
3. Approval of Minutes of regular meeting from September 14, 2010:
GA GB KH D CP RS
M
Motion XX
Second XX
Ayes/Nays X X X X X X
Abstain
Carried XX
Failed
4. Financial Report:
• GP reported $1,123.61 in the copier account.
• GP reported $6,131.77 in the PMAC account.
5. Correspondence:
• CP reported a grant application for Native Son’s Hall has been submitted.
Unfortunately since the building is not a public one this may not satisfy the
County’s requirements and the Hall restoration project may instead be considered
a candidate for a County low interest loan. CP--request made for anyone willing
to send a letter of support (for the effort) to Rich Gordon or the County. CP
suggested emphasizing that this is the closest building Pescadero has to a public

1
one (aside from our schools)
• Letter of support for RCD (via email) received a vote of yes from all members
present
7. Reports from Current Committee Chairs and Community Liaisons:
• Housing Committee – CP reported on CDBG grant application for the Warheit
site. Puente is the fiscal sponsor, Pescadero Foundation is project Manager.
• School Board – DM reported the school’s financial situation. School still needs
to be very careful financially, there may yet need to make more cuts. There is a
request for school board volunteers
• Emergency Preparedness – No report, but discussion of a fire in Hidden Valley.
Nancy Frost and others of the (78 member) ham radio cooperative were called to
action but no evacuations were necessary, no damage, the fire was apparently
intentionally set.
• Communications Committee – No report.
• Puente – KH reported new playground improvements, flu shots to be available at
Second Harvest food day on Nov 22 in Pescadero and La Honda. Friday 17th of
Dec Puente is holding their la Posada. Sunday 17th, workday opportunity for
volunteers at Puente.
8. Land Use Committee Report:
• Wastewater Treatment – CP reported on a new grant application to revise the
feasibility study. Karen McBride of the Rural Community Assistance
Corporation submitted the grant application on our behalf.
9. New Business
• RS requested a vote to try the Community Church for our next meeting pointing
out the space is more comfortable and ADA accessible, the vote carried with CP
abstaining.
• Discussion of the town sign and if there had been a “no sign” option? Question of
who would maintain the sign
• Results of the voting on the location determined the site furthest to the East
• 3 permits will be needed, Public Works (an encroachment permit and it’s free,)
Building and Planning permit (free,) and a Coastal Permit, (cost was not known.)
In order to get the permits PMAC along with a nonprofit will have to apply
• 30 community members/organizations contributed to the sign
• Scheduling of the executive retreat for all PMAC members, moved to next
meeting.
10. Old Business:
• Scheduling of the executive retreat for all PMAC members, moved to next
meeting.
11. Next Meeting: November 9th (later postponed to December 14, 2010) at 7:30pm
12. Adjournment: Meeting adjourned at 9:30 p.m. by Chair, Catherine Peery
Submitted by Kate Haas (filling in for recording secretary, David Lee)

2
From: "Kellyx Nelson" <kellyx@sanmateorcd.org>
Date: October 28, 2010 4:19:19 PM PDT
To: "'greg bonaparte'" <gbonaparte@yahoo.com>, "'Catherine Peery'"
<catherine@ben-e-fit.com>, "'Kate Meyer Haas'"
<katebee@pacbell.net>, <mcdermott.don@gmail.com>, "'Geoff Allen'"
<geoff@foglinenursery.com>, "'Rob Skinner'"
<rob.skinner@gmail.com>, "'David Lee'" <dlee@whiteandlee.com>
Subject: $$$ good news and bad news

First the good news…

You may recall that I submitted a concept proposal in July 2009 with the Bay
Area Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (IRWMP) to develop a
watershed council in Pescadero and to develop some solutions to the
flooding problems. WHAT?!?! You don’t remember exactly what I’m talking
about?!? Can’t imagine… anyway, I have pasted it below for your reference.
Just this week, the concept proposal jumped yet another hurdle and looks
very likely to get funded for about $100,000. If funded, we could start the
projects in June 2011.

Now for the not-so-good news…

There’s no such thing as a free lunch. What looked like easy money now has
a bunch of complicated forms associated with it that I have to try to hammer
out before my looming maternity leave, when my plate was already full. The
bottom line is that I will do my best but it might be pretty darn imperfect.

Also, I want to manage expectations up-front about what can be
accomplished for flood control with this amount of money. Figure about $25K
for the watershed council. That leaves about $75K to address flooding. I
think this will enable us to do an extensive review of existing literature and
data, hire someone to work with us to nail down and define when where and
how flooding happens, convene stakeholders (including resource agencies
that permit projects), do some surveying and morphological work, and get to
a conceptual level of design solution. I’m not sure how far this will get us in
engineered designs or permits, but we will look for funding to take it to the
next level no matter where we end up.

So that’s the news. I wanted to keep you in the loop. I will send you the
forms when I have finished filling them out.

Two unrelated issues:
1. Is this the current distribution list for PMAC? I think the website is
outdated, as it still has Jackson, so I’m not sure.
2. Your website has an old RCD logo since our website is much more
outdated than yours. J Whoever manages your site can contact me and I will
send our new logo.

Best,
Kx

 
·.¸¸¸.·´¯'·.¸¸·´¯'·.¸¸.·´¯'·.¸¸·´¯'·.¸¸.·´¯'·.¸ ><((((º>
 
Kellyx Nelson

Executive Director
San Mateo County Resource Conservation District
625 Miramontes Street Suite 103
Half Moon Bay, CA 94019
phone: 650.712.7765
fax: 650.726.0494
www.sanmateorcd.org

Concept Proposal for IRWMP Funding in Pescadero Watershed
July 1, 2009

The San Mateo County Resource Conservation District (RCD)
requests funding to advance planning and collaboration in the
Pescadero watershed in San Mateo County to lay the foundation for
ecological restoration and flood control projects.

The RCD will partner extensively with community stakeholders,
including the Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council and the San
Mateo County Farm Bureau to coordinate efforts in the watershed that
will:
1. develop a solution or solutions to flooding problems in the town
of Pescadero; and
2. build and convene a watershed council to enhance the economic,
social, and ecological health of the watershed.
Solutions to Flooding
Residents of the town of Pescadero repeatedly identify flooding as a
priority resource management concern. There is extensive
documentation of the issue in various reports and meeting minutes.
The RCD will work with community and regulatory stakeholders to
develop project designs and plans that consider community needs as
well as resource protection constraints.

Watershed Council
There is extensive interest in the Pescadero watershed, including a
working group of public agencies focused on fish kills in the Pescadero
Marsh. Some citizen groups convene independently to focus on
watershed issues, including the Environmental Committee of the
Pescadero Municipal Advisory Council and local agricultural
producers convened by the Farm Bureau. Historically there was a
Coordinated Resource Management Planning process for the
Pescadero-Butano watershed.

However, there is no current watershed-wide non-regulatory group
established to bring together all of the interests in the watershed
dedicated to enhancing and protecting the watershed by promoting
individual, and community actions or undertaking collaborative
projects. The RCD will work with partners to create an organization of
community groups, government agencies, business, and academia that
work cooperatively to solve problems in the watershed that uses an
inclusive process to enhance the economic, social, and ecological
health of the watershed.
Co
onsid
deraationns foor
Rest
R torattion
n of tthe Pescadeero
Mar
M rsh
A Report Baseed upon the Proceedings
P of the Decembber 2008 Publlic Forum Resstoration of P
Pescadero
Maarsh: Identifyiing Problems and Explorinng Solutions

12/9/20010

Prrepared for th
he Pescadero
o Marsh Wo orking Groupp. Funding pprovided by tthe California Coastal
Consservancy and
d the U.S. Fiish and Wilddlife Servicee.
Acknowledgments

On December 9, 2008, the Pescadero Marsh Working Group convened a public forum
entitled: Restoration of Pescadero Marsh: Identifying Problems and Exploring Solutions.
The Pescadero Marsh Working Group wishes to thank the Native Sons of the Golden
West Pebble Beach Parlor #230 for providing the meeting facility and lunch for all of the
participants. The Working Group would also like to thank the scientists, community
members, agency staff, and others that gave their time to participate in the forum.

2
Considerations for Restoration of the Pescadero Marsh

Table of Contents
List of Tables .................................................................................................................. 4 
List of Figures ................................................................................................................. 4 
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 5 
Existing Conditions in Pescadero Marsh ........................................................................ 8 
Previous restoration program ...................................................................................... 8 
Current State of the Marsh .......................................................................................... 9 
Threatened and Endangered Species ........................................................................ 11 
Shift in Management Perspective ............................................................................. 14 
Restoration Goals for Pescadero Marsh........................................................................ 14 
Conceptual Model and Restoration Hypotheses ........................................................... 16 
Potential Restoration Actions ....................................................................................... 27 
References ..................................................................................................................... 30 
Appendix 1: Presentation Abstracts, December 2008 .................................................. 41 
Appendix 2: Comments and responses to draft ............................................................ 43 

3
List of Tables
Table 1 Summary of Pescadero Marsh Restoration Forum Proceedings ........................... 7 
Table 2: Summary of Hypotheses and Recommended Studies ........................................ 18 
Table 3 Pescadero-Butano Sediment Yield. Source: Reproduced from ESA (2004). ...... 40 

List of Figures
Figure 1 Pescadero Marsh Land Cover and Place Names.. .............................................. 32 
Figure 2 Water Quality Sampling Sites.. .......................................................................... 33 
Figure 3 Dissolved Oxygen in Pescadero Creek at Turtle Bend.. .................................... 34 
Figure 4 Pescadero Marsh Fish Kill 1995-2007.. ............................................................. 35 
Figure 5 Pescadero Marsh Conceptual Model.. ................................................................ 36 
Figure 6 Date of Sandbar Formation 1978-2009.. ............................................................ 37 
Figure 7 Monthly Mean Discharge in Wet, Dry, and Average Water Years Recorded at
Pescadero Creek ................................................................................................................ 38 
Figure 8 Location of Fish Kill.. ........................................................................................ 39 

4
Introduction

Pescadero Marsh (Marsh) is a 340-acre coastal wetland that surrounds the lower channels
of Pescadero and Butano creeks in San Mateo County, California (Figure 1). It includes a
bar-built seasonal freshwater lagoon as a key ecological feature. The Pescadero Marsh
Natural Preserve, a designated area within Pescadero State Beach, encompasses 235
acres. The Pescadero-Butano watershed drains an area of approximately 81 square miles
and has headwaters in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

During the past 150 years, residential, commercial, and agricultural development has
resulted in the loss of approximately 91% of California’s coastal wetlands (Larson 2001);
the Marsh is highly valued as one of the few coastal wetlands remaining. Of particular
importance is the Marsh’s estuary/seasonal lagoon. Coastal lagoons are regarded as some
of Earth’s most biologically productive ecosystems. The Marsh’s seasonal lagoon
provides critical breeding and nursery areas for numerous species of fish, including the
federally threatened steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Adjacent freshwater,
brackish, and saltwater marshes, riparian vegetation, and upland areas provide essential
habitat for a diverse assemblage of fish and wildlife, including multiple species of
concern.

As is the case with the majority of California’s remaining coastal wetlands, the Marsh has
been significantly altered due to land use changes in and around the Marsh and in the
upper watershed (Viollis 1979, Curry et al. 1985, ESA 2008). It is estimated that at least
half of the wetland area existing in the Marsh in 1900 was lost by 1960 (Viollis
1979).The Marsh’s hydrology and habitat quality continue to be impacted by a remnant
levee system, episodic sediment deposition linked to past logging in the upper watershed,
and upstream diversions from agricultural and residential development (ESA 2008). The
California Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) owns and manages the Marsh, and
in the past several decades has implemented projects directed at restoring the Marsh’s
hydrologic functions and biological productivity.

Restoration of the Marsh, however, is far from complete. Restoration work that was
implemented by DPR between 1993 and 1997 as part of the Pescadero Marsh Natural
Preserve Hydrological Enhancement Project (DPR 1992) resulted in unexpected changes
to the Marsh’s physical structure and ecological function, presenting a new set of
challenges to be addressed by future management (Swanson 2001, ESA 2008).
Developing a sound restoration strategy is complicated from both an ecological and a
regulatory standpoint. It requires not only an understanding of the complex physical and
biological processes driving change in a naturally dynamic coastal ecosystem, but
coordination among numerous resource agencies with overlapping jurisdictions and
potentially conflicting management mandates.

Public agencies and other stakeholders formed the Pescadero Marsh Working Group
(PMWG) with the mission to protect and enhance the ecological health of the Pescadero
Marsh ecosystem through collaborative, science-based planning and action. In December
2008 PMWG held a one-day Restoration Forum in the Town of Pescadero at which

5
researchers and professionals with long-term experience in Pescadero Marsh made
informative presentations about key biological populations, ecological processes, and
current and past condition and functioning of the Marsh. A moderated panel discussion
was held during which the group of workshop participants, composed of scientists,
resource managers, and community members, discussed perceived problems facing the
Marsh and generated a list of potential restoration goals and actions. The Forum
proceedings are briefly summarized in Table 1, and presentation abstracts are presented
in Appendix 1.

The purpose of this document is to synthesize the information presented by the speakers
at the Forum into a set of recommended goals and hypotheses to assess in order to
improve the working conceptual model of the Marsh. This document summarizes key
understandings, identifies critical uncertainties, and suggests studies to reduce these
uncertainties. It should be noted that Environmental Science Associates (ESA) conducted
extensive studies for DPR (ESA 2002; Jackson 2003; ESA 2004; ESA 2008) to assess
recent conditions in the Marsh, impacts of human activities, and potential restoration
options (Dr. Daniel Sicular of ESA summarized the findings and conclusions of these
studies at the Forum). In order to avoid duplication of effort the present document relies
heavily on the thorough characterization and informed recommendations contained in the
ESA publications and Dr. Sicular’s presentation.

The desired outcome of this effort is to develop consensus and momentum around an
approach to move forward with restoration planning and action for the Marsh. However,
in comments received during the review period for the draft version of this report, a
number of fundamental disagreements became apparent regarding the approach to
restoration that should be taken. In particular, the issue of whether to focus on
establishing a system that can be maintained by natural processes or to establish a
managed system that maximizes productivity of species of concern emerged as a key
point of disagreement.

Similarly, multiple stakeholders have advocated for the restoration of the seasonal lagoon
to freshwater conditions, at least in years of average to above average rainfall, but
agreement has not been reached on the appropriate method of achieving this goal.
Significant debate exists regarding the extent to which the timing of sandbar formation
has changed and what point in time should be used as the restoration target. Neither has
agreement been reached in determining whether sufficient information exists to
manipulate the timing of sandbar closure as an interim experimental action while a
hydrologic model of the system is being developed.

We have attempted to point out areas in the following discussion where consensus will be
necessary before progress toward restoration can continue. To further characterize the
nature of the unresolved issues surrounding restoration efforts in the Marsh, a matrix of
comments received from reviewers and our responses are included in Appendix 2.

6
Introduction  Trish Chapman (California Coastal Conservancy) presented the
mission statement of the Pescadero Marsh Working Group
Presentations  Joanne Kerbavaz (California State Parks) provided a brief historical
overview of the development of management objectives for
Pescadero State Beach

 Tim Frahm (Native Sons), William Cook (Town of Pescadero
resident), and Jim Steele (former Department of Fish & Game
biologist) presented concerns about the functioning and
management of the Marsh from the perspective of local farmers,
fishermen, and residents

 Dr. Curt Storlazzi (U.S. Geological Survey) described the processes
that control sandbar formation and breaching

 Dr. Daniel Sicular (Environmental Science Associates) summarized
changes to the Marsh since the completion of the 1990s
Enhancement Project and discussed restoration implications

 Dr. Nicole Beck (2nd Nature) described the role of nutrient
availability and eutrophication as a mechanism for influencing
water quality in coastal lagoons

 Rebecca Sloan (TRA Environmental Sciences) described the factors
involved in the development of anoxic bottom waters in the
Pescadero Lagoon during sandbar formation and the fish kills upon
breaching

 Dr. Jerry Smith (San Jose State University) described the processes
driving seasonal and annual variation of the ecology in lagoons of
coastal California and discussed restoration implications for
Pescadero Marsh
Panel Discussion  Dr. Sean Hayes (National Marine Fisheries Service) summarized
recent findings on growth and migration patterns of estuary-lagoon
reared steelhead in the Scott Creek watershed

 Tom Taylor (ENTRIX) and Dr. Stuart Siegel (Wetlands and Water
Resources) discussed how lessons learned from previous restoration
attempts in the Marsh might aid in the development of a new
management approach

 Dr. Jeffrey Haltiner (Philip Williams & Associates) discussed the
need to quantify dominant processes in the Marsh in order to
develop a numerical hydrodynamic model for use in restoration
planning
Q&A  Audience members directed questions to speakers and panel
members

 Forum participants discussed potential restoration projects for the
Marsh
Table 1 Summary of Pescadero Marsh Restoration Forum Proceedings

7
Existing Conditions in Pescadero Marsh

The accumulated impact to the Marsh over the last several decades, combined with the
rare nature of such minimally developed coastal lagoon habitat, has resulted in significant
interest in restoring this ecosystem. Based upon the presentations at the Forum, this
section provides a synopsis of the major problems facing the Marsh that will be used to
identify potential goals for restoration. To place these goals in context, however, it is first
necessary to understand the changes made to the system in an earlier restoration program,
the current status of the Marsh (including key listed species), and the evolution of DPR’s
perspective for management of the Pescadero Marsh Natural Preserve.

Previous restoration program. In the 1990s a major effort was undertaken to restore the
Marsh through various physical manipulations of the landscape, and much of the
discussion at the Forum centered around the impacts of these projects and their
interactions with other stressors on the ecosystem. The Pescadero Marsh Natural
Preserve Hydrological Enhancement Project (Enhancement Project) included a variety of
physical changes to alter the hydrology of the Marsh undertaken by DPR between 1993
and 1997. This project was based upon the Pescadero Marsh Natural Preserve
Hydrological Enhancement Plan (PWA 1990).

North Pond (see Figure 1) was re-connected to the western portion of North Marsh and
the lagoon by removing the levee between North Pond and North Marsh and excavating a
channel from North Pond to Pescadero Creek through the Pescadero Creek right bank
levee; this component of the project was implemented to increase scouring of the lagoon,
improve water circulation in the pond, and provide valuable mud flat habitat for
shorebirds in the late fall and winter. A system of gated culverts was installed to allow for
management of flows to the North Pond/North Marsh complex. The management plan
called for closing these culverts immediately following sandbar closure to curb
freshwater inflows into North Pond and allow for rapid conversion of the lagoon from
salt to freshwater. A set of higher elevation culverts allowed for freshwater flows into
North Pond and North Marsh once the freshwater levels had risen in the rest of the
lagoon. Once the lagoon mouth reopened, the culverts to the North Pond/North Marsh
complex were to also be reopened. A low levee was constructed along North Marsh to
prevent all but the most extreme high tides from flowing into existing freshwater/slightly
brackish habitat for the California red-legged frog. Sag ponds were constructed to
provide additional habitat. The overall objective of these restoration actions was to
realize most of the potential tidal prism and to improve the habitat value of North Pond
without threatening the existing habitat value of North Marsh.

Breaks in the levees between Middle and East Butano marshes, Middle and North Butano
marshes, and North Butano Marsh and Butano Creek were widened and channels were
excavated to re-connect remnant slough channels; this component of the project was
implemented to restore fresh and tidal water circulation in the Butano marshes and
improve Butano Creek flood conveyance. The majority of the levees were left in place to
maintain basking habitat for the San Francisco garter snake.

8
The levee between Butano Creek and East Delta Marsh was removed, a tide gate at the
northeast end of the drainage ditch that divides the Delta marshes (Phipps tide gate) was
removed, and a channel was excavated to connect the ditch outside the levee to Butano
Creek, the purpose of which was to restore natural hydrology and improve Butano Creek
flood conveyance.

Current State of the Marsh. The Marsh is composed of seasonal fresh and brackish water
marshes, brackish ponds, an estuary/lagoon at the Pescadero-Butano creek confluence,
and riparian areas along the channels of Pescadero and Butano creeks. A brief overview
of current conditions in each area of the Marsh, as described at the Forum by Dr. Sicular,
Dr. Jerry Smith, Joanne Kerbavaz, and Rebecca Sloan, is provided below, with an
emphasis on observed changes to hydrology, water quality, and habitat type since
completion of the Enhancement Project. A more detailed discussion is available in ESA
(2008).

North Pond/North Marsh. The Enhancement Project recommended ongoing,
active management of the gated culvert system installed in the right bank levee of
Pescadero Creek that was intended to control tidal flows to North Pond. This
management program has not been implemented for many years and the gates are now
largely inoperable. Observations indicate that North Pond is not flushing sediment from
the lagoon as originally intended. “Operation and maintenance of the tide gates, and
keeping the low levee in good repair have proven to be impractical” (ESA 2008, p.41).

Monitoring by Dr. Smith (1997) and ESA (2002-2003) found that the low levee
constructed along North Marsh as part of the Enhancement Project was not built to the
design height of +5.5 feet, and as a result when the sandbar closes more water than
anticipated by the restoration design, and sometimes highly saline water, flows over the
levee into North Marsh. The unanticipated flows have also contributed to erosion of the
low levee. A breach in the levee was repaired in 1997, but another breach was discovered
in 2001 (ESA 2008). The reduced height of the low levee limits the amount of
freshwater that can be stored in North Marsh during the winter, and thus leads to the
marsh drying out earlier in the summer. Data from the past 30 years shows that salinity
levels in North Marsh have fluctuated significantly, based in part on season and location
within the marsh. Today, there is significant debate among observers as to the extent to
which general salinity levels have increased in North Marsh since the 1990s restoration.

Butano and Delta Marshes. The widened levee gaps and excavation of connecting
channels as part of the Enhancement Project increased tidal intrusion into North and
Middle Butano marshes and also improved conveyance of freshwater from Butano Creek
through the Butano marshes. The downstream (northwestern) portion of North Butano
Marsh has become more saline, while vegetation sampling in eastern-North, Middle and
East Butano marshes indicated a shift from moderately saline to mildly brackish or
freshwater conditions. The East Delta Marsh has been restored to brackish conditions.

Pescadero and Butano Creeks. A recovery of riparian forest along the channels of
both Pescadero and Butano creeks was observed in 2002-2003, representing an increase

9
in habitat diversity (ESA 2008). Cross-sections of Pescadero Creek measured in 2002
showed slight aggradation of the creek bed (Jackson 2003), but these were considered
within normal variation based on changes in sediment load from the watershed (ESA
2008). A slight lowering in the bed of Butano Creek was observed in the portion of the
channel downstream from Triple Junction, but the creek bed in the vicinity of Pescadero
Road Bridge was aggraded.1 ESA (2004) notes that

…Butano Creek, because of its low gradient, small drainage area, and the natural and built
constrictions in its lower channel, does not have the ability to transport all of its sediment load to
its mouth, and the material is instead deposited on the floodplains during floods, and in the stream
channel, at and below the Alder Patch, at other times. Pescadero Creek, by contrast, has the ability
to transport its sediment load all the way to the sea, enabling it to recover quickly from major
storms and to maintain a remarkably stable bed elevation over time… (p. 2-8).

At the Forum, Dr. Sicular noted that the Pescadero Road Bridge and the levees along
Butano Creek prevent Butano Creek from establishing a new channel and exacerbate the
flooding of the creek at Pescadero Road Bridge. Flooding at the bridge is a major concern
for residents of the Town of Pescadero and was an important topic of discussion at the
Forum. In January, 2010, Butano Creek jumped its channel downstream of the Pescadero
Road Bridge and is now flowing through the marshes as un-channeled flow (Sicular,
pers. comm.)

Estuary/Lagoon. The Marsh transitions seasonally from an open estuarine system
to a closed lagoon system. In winter and early spring the mouth of Pescadero Creek
maintains full connectivity to the ocean, the main estuarine embayment is open to full
tidal mixing, and some areas of the Marsh are subject to tidewater intrusion. In spring,
summer, or fall, a sandbar constructed by low energy waves forms at the mouth of
Pescadero Creek and remains in place until it is breached by winter storm flows (or by
artificial means, most often carried out illegally). After the sandbar forms, the Marsh is
separated from tidal influence and freshwater inflows inundate the marshes and raise the
water level in the lagoon. As noted previously, the tidal estuary/seasonal lagoon and
associated habitat is a key ecological feature of the Marsh.

At the Forum, Dr. Smith described the freshwater conversion process that takes place in
the lagoon after the sandbar forms. As freshwater from Pescadero and Butano creeks
flows over the top of seawater trapped behind the sandbar, the water column becomes
stratified as the denser salt water forms a layer at the bottom of the lagoon and tidally
influenced areas of the Marsh. The amount of freshwater needed to convert the lagoon
toward de-stratified conditions is determined by the amount of seawater trapped in the
lagoon at the time of bar closure and the lagoon volume. Sufficient freshwater inflows at
the time of closure create enough hydraulic pressure to quickly squeeze the saline layer
out through the sandbar. Dr. Smith noted that quick conversion to freshwater is likely to
occur only under the conditions of early bar formation and substantial inflow at the time

1
ESA (2008) notes that Swanson (2001) observed a sediment plug from 1,200 feet upstream of the
Pescadero Road Bridge to 2,000 feet below the bridge, and during the ESA surveys sediment accretion was
observed down to 3,200 feet below the bridge.

10
of bar formation (wet years). Under other conditions the conversion may be slower or
may not fully occur at all.

Observations made by Dr. Smith and others indicate that although sandbar formation in
the1980s typically occurred between the months of May and July, bar formation since
completion of the Enhancement Project and replacement of the Highway 1 Bridge in the
early 1990s has usually been delayed until September or October (see Figure 6). Dr.
Smith hypothesizes that this delay is associated with the formation of a reverse delta of
beach sand extending up the lagoon, rather than depositing at the mouth to form a
sandbar. Late sandbar formation has been linked to a strongly salinity stratified lagoon in
fall with severe hypoxia and anoxia. Limited impoundment of freshwater during the rainy
season combined with late sandbar formation can result in the drying of most of North
Marsh throughout the summer. It should be noted that the historic record of sandbar
closure and opening is incomplete and conflicting conclusions have been drawn from the
available data.

ESA (2008) conducted periodic water quality sampling in summer and fall of 2002 in
different areas of the Marsh at stations that were established by Dr. Smith after
completion of the Enhancement Project (Figure 2), and DPR and Rebecca Sloan
conducted additional monitoring at these sites prior to and during sandbar closure and
immediately following the sandbar breach between 2004 and 2007. These studies found
anoxic conditions in the lower water column following sandbar closure at sampling
locations throughout the Marsh, including: Pescadero Creek at Grassy Point and Turtle
Bend; the connecting channel between Pescadero Creek and the North Marsh culverts
and throughout the North Pond/North Marsh area; Butano Creek at the ditches leading to
the Foot Bridge and the former Phipps tide gate, and Butano Marsh near the Boat Launch
(see Figure 1). Many of the artificial channels were also associated with hydrogen sulfide
(H2S) formation (H2S is a product of anaerobic decomposition). Rebecca Sloan found
that hypoxic/anoxic bottom water conditions observed while the sandbar was in place
during the fall of 2004 and 2005 persisted until several days after the breaching of the
sandbar (Figure 3).

A fish kill coinciding with the breach of the sandbar has been observed in multiple years
since completion of the Enhancement Project and has included steelhead trout; the first
major fish kill was documented in 1995. Sandbar dynamics and the fish kill are discussed
in greater detail in later sections of this report.

Threatened and Endangered Species. Multiple species of concern use habitats provided
by the estuary/lagoon and marshes for foraging, breeding, rearing, and/or transition to
oceanic conditions. These include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), tidewater goby
(Eucyclogobius newberryi), California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii), San
Francisco garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis tetrataenia), and Western pond turtle
(Clemmys marmorata). A key goal of the Enhancement Project was to maintain habitat
for state and federally listed species, and state and federal mandates to protect and
enhance these endangered populations are a critical aspect of restoration. At the Forum,
Dr. Smith discussed the general requirements and known use of marsh and

11
estuary/lagoon habitats for each species, which is summarized below. It is important to
note that marsh and estuary/lagoon conditions vary among seasons and years, and
seasonal and year to year habitat requirements of different species are also different. All
parts of the estuary/lagoon and marshes do not have to suit the habitat requirements of all
species at all times, but instead have to provide certain conditions at particular times.

Steelhead Trout. The Pescadero-Butano watershed is known to support an annual
steelhead run. In years when the closed lagoon converts to freshwater conditions, it
provides important summer and fall rearing habitat for juvenile steelhead and can account
for the majority of smolt production in the watershed (Smith 1990, 2008). Rearing
juveniles require adequate dissolved oxygen and temperature, adequate depth to escape
from predators, and abundant food to cope with high water temperature (metabolic rate
increases as water temperature increases). Lagoon-reared steelhead can attain much
larger sizes than their stream-reared counterparts (Bond 2006). The estuary/lagoon also
provides a transition habitat in late winter and spring for smolts from the upper
watershed, with abundant food for spring growth and saltwater pockets for adjusting to
oceanic conditions. According to Dr. Smith, the open estuary is well-mixed by the tides
and maintains levels of dissolved oxygen sufficient to support steelhead trout. An open
estuary appears to provide better steelhead rearing habitat in drought years, when
the closed lagoon would be saline, stratified and warm because of limited
freshwater inflow. In years with adequate inflows for freshwater conversion, the
impounded freshwater lagoon provides much more steelhead rearing habitat than
the open estuary. However, in recent years the poor water quality observed in the
closed lagoon reflects a decrease in steelhead habitat quality and appears to be
associated with steelhead kills during the winter breach of the sandbar.

Tidewater Goby. The tidewater goby spends all life stages in the closed lagoon
and/or backwater channels, use habitats of a wide range of salinity (freshwater to full-
strength seawater) and temperature (8 – 25°C), and can tolerate extremely low levels of
dissolved oxygen. They breed and thrive in summer in calm (non-“tidewater”)
conditions, provided by the closed lagoon or backwater areas, and need winter refuge
against storm flows and strong tidewater movement, as well as refuge from drought.
They are an annual species, requiring these suitable conditions each year to maintain
presence in the Marsh. As they do not establish populations more than 1 to 2 miles from
other sites they inhabit, if extirpated from the Marsh they are unlikely to re-colonize.
According to Dr. Smith, tidal summer conditions in the main embayment and drying of
North Marsh have probably reduced tidewater goby habitat by 80% and their
abundance significantly.

California Red-Legged Frog. The California red-legged frog (CRLF) breeds
between December and April, and metamorphosis occurs between early summer and fall.
Eggs require low salinity levels (less than 4 parts per thousand (ppt)), as do larvae (4-8
ppt, depending upon tadpole size). Adults can tolerate salinity levels of up to 10 ppt,
although studies conducted in the Marsh found that adults tended to vacate areas with
salinities of greater than 6.5 ppt (Jennings and Hayes 1990). Red-legged frogs are often
associated with water with a depth of greater than 0.7 m and thick emergent vegetation

12
for adequate cover. As they are relatively long lived, with a life expectancy of 5 to 10
years, breeding success is not needed every year for populations to persist in the Marsh.
Pescadero Marsh was identified as a core population area with one of the highest
identified populations of CRLF. Observations in 2002-2003 indicated that some areas of
both Delta marshes provide suitable habitat for the red-legged frog (ESA 2008).
According to Dr. Smith, drying of North Marsh (and probably parts of Butano Marsh) in
summer, and its high salinity, prevent its use by CRLF. These factors may have reduced
CRLF abundance in the North Marsh significantly; however, there has not been
surveying to verify current CRLF abundance in North Marsh or elsewhere in the
Pescadero Marsh system.

San Francisco Garter Snake. The San Francisco garter snake (SFGS) breeds from
June through September. They forage in aquatic habitat, where they use dense emergent
and bank-side vegetation for cover, and they overwinter in upland habitat. They have
been observed to use riparian areas and remnant levees in the Marsh as basking habitat,
although observations from 2002-2003 indicate that dense vegetation growth on remnant
levees in the Butano and Delta marshes has reduced their suitability as basking habitat
(ESA 2008). ESA (2008) recommends determining whether or not lack of basking habitat
in this area is a limiting factor to the SFGS population. Abundance of prey species does
appear to be an important limiting factor in the Marsh (Smith, 2008). San Francisco
garter snake adults feed primarily on red-legged frog adults, juveniles and larvae, and
therefore tend to occupy freshwater habitat. Juveniles feed primarily on the smaller
Pacific tree frogs (Hyla regilla). There is disagreement among observers as to whether
the low use of Pescadero Marsh by SFGS is a historic condition or has resulted from
changes in conditions caused by the 1990s restoration or other factors. According to Dr.
Smith, reduction of the CRLF population in the North Marsh and probably parts of
Butano Marsh has likely significantly reduced SFGS abundance in the Pescadero Marsh.
However, surveys in 1979 (Steele) and 1984 (McGinnis) found very low use of
Pescadero Marsh by SFGS, and neither survey founds snakes in North Marsh.

Western Pond Turtle. The western pond turtle is a freshwater species that can
tolerate moderate salinity. They nest in sunny, sparsely vegetated habitats such as
grasslands and non-irrigated agricultural fields above the flood plain and over-winter in
seasonal or perennial wetlands or in upland habitats. They require adequate basking sites,
emergent vegetation, and suitable escape cover, such as undercut banks, submerged
vegetation, logs, and mud. Smith and Reis (1997) note that western pond turtles were
“frequently observed” in various locations in the Marsh during surveys conducted in
1995 and 1996, including “in the upstream portion of Pescadero Creek, where salinities
were lower and where logs provided basking habitat and escape cover” as well as in the
channel to East Delta Marsh and the north ditch of North Marsh. The report notes,
“Potential upland nest sites appear plentiful and include open, south-facing levee banks
and the cattle pasture east of Pescadero Creek (Smith and Reis 1997, p.13). ESA (2008)
notes that western pond turtles were observed in Pescadero Creek in the vicinity of Turtle
Bend during surveys of the Marsh conducted in 2002.

13
Shift in Management Perspective. In addition to the changes in the Marsh caused
by the Enhancement Project, goals for restoration are influenced by the evolution
of DPR’s perspective on management. This evolution was summarized by Joanne
Kerbavaz of DPR at the Forum as a shift from managing individual features of the
Marsh to restoring ecosystem processes.

During the panel discussion at the Forum, panelists expressed agreement that reliance
upon natural processes and functions is a restoration approach that is preferred over the
use of active measures that require consistent human intervention and maintenance.
However, other forum participants including Dr. Jerry Smith and representatives of the
California Department of Fish and Game have advocated that active management will
likely be necessary to protect and enhance sensitive species habitat. In comments on the
draft version of this report, reviewers from the California Department of Fish and Game
stated that restoration goals should be consistent with DFG’s public trust responsibility to
maximize productivity of species of special concern, noting that if active management is
required to restore biological productivity, as is the case in many wildlife preserves, it
should take precedence over a reliance on natural processes.

Restoration Goals for Pescadero Marsh

Five key problems to be addressed by restoration actions emerged from the discussion at
the Forum. These are(1) fish kills associated with the sandbar breach, (2) degradation of
water quality (low dissolved oxygen) in the lagoon and other areas of the Marsh
following sandbar closure, (3) degradation of steelhead rearing habitat resulting from
fewer days of closed, freshwater lagoon, (4) loss of fresh and brackish water habitat, and
(5) sediment accretion in Butano Creek at the Pescadero Road Bridge (associated with
problematic flooding in adjacent agricultural fields and flooding and recurrent closure of
Pescadero Road – the main access point into the Town of Pescadero). Restoration goals
must address these problems by promoting feasible actions that apply our understanding
of the Marsh and are consistent with DPR management objectives.

Based upon the discussion at the Forum, it appears that there are four major restoration
goals for the Marsh:

1) Reduce the fish kills
2) Restore water quality and habitat conditions in the seasonal lagoon and establish
and sustain a mix of healthy wetland habitats
3) Restore early sandbar closure in wet years, to produce a converted
freshwater lagoon and to maintain summer flooding of North Marsh.
4) Base restoration to the maximum extent possible on restoring natural processes

The issue of sediment accretion at Butano Creek is outside the scope of a restoration
effort in the marsh. However, potential restoration actions should be evaluated such that
they do not exacerbate the already problematic flooding situation at Pescadero Road.
Challenges and uncertainties associated with each restoration goal are discussed below.

14
Reduce the fish kills. The die-offs associated with the sandbar breach have been
observed to affect multiple aquatic species, but the focus has been on the impacts to the
listed steelhead. A key challenge to achieving this goal is the expected difficulty in
quantifying the impact of restoration actions. An annual carcass survey is conducted
following the breach event and the number of steelhead carcasses counted varies
significantly from year to year (Figure 4).

It is unclear whether the variable survey results represent true variation in mortality or
simply the imprecision of carcass retrieval. Rebecca Sloan pointed out that any number of
mortalities might be unaccounted for each year, citing potential factors such as rapid
consumption of carcasses by scavenger species or washing of carcasses into the ocean
immediately after the sandbar breach. This variability could confound our ability to
detect a reduction in the fish kill unless the reduction was large and consistent among
years.

At the Forum Sean Hayes described a phenomenon observed in the Scott Creek
watershed, in which steelhead migrate in November from the lagoon to upstream
freshwater habitat instead of heading to the ocean. Similar behavior may occur in the
Pescadero system, which could isolate a significant fraction of the steelhead population
from the fish kill event; however, this migration has not been observed in Pescadero
Marsh. In addition, evaluating the relative extent of the fish kill is challenging because
the size of the steelhead population is unknown.

Restore water quality and habitat conditions in the seasonal lagoon and establish
and sustain a mix of healthy wetland habitats. Restoring ecological function to the closed
lagoon will require modifying the system such that in non-drought years, biological
productivity is supported by abundant fresh water habitat, relatively cool water
temperatures, and high dissolved oxygen levels. At present there appear to be several
factors that combine to reduce biological productivity (particularly of key species), but
causal relationships among these factors is not understood well enough to design
restoration projects with confidence. The remainder of this document addresses the
complexity of this issue.

Establishing and sustaining a mix of healthy wetland habitats will likely change the
relative proportions of fresh, brackish, and salt marsh habitat. It will be necessary to
determine how much loss of certain habitats, in particular tidal salt marsh, would be
acceptable to stakeholders in order to increase other types of habitats, such as brackish
and freshwater marsh. It will then be necessary to determine if this conversion would be
considered significant by regulatory agencies and whether mitigation would be required.2

2
Regulatory considerations apply to all restoration goals. At a minimum, projects in the marsh will require
permits from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (including consultation with NMFS and US Fish and
Wildlife Service), Department of Fish and Game, Coastal Commission, and the Regional Water Quality
Control Board. Proposed projects may also be subject to environmental review under NEPA and/or CEQA.
For each project, it will be necessary to determine (1) the potential impacts on listed species, coastal-
dependent and migratory birds, fish, and other Marsh-associated biota; and (2) the potential reductions in
federally protected sensitive habitat.

15
Base restoration to the maximum extent possible on restoring natural processes. If
physical characteristics of the Marsh were restored to a more natural configuration, a full
restoration of natural processes would still not be possible given the extent of
development in watershed. Anthropogenic factors in the upper watershed, such as road-
related sedimentation and modification of quantity and/or quality of freshwater inflows
(reduction in upstream water supply associated with diversions, agricultural runoff,
inflows from the proposed wastewater treatment plant, etc.), will influence the “restored”
Marsh to an unknown degree. Given the potential unpredictable nature of anthropogenic
influences over time, it may be difficult to determine how the system might be expected
to change in terms of habitat type distribution and availability. Further, future restoration
projects will be affected by climate change (current predictions for rise in sea level and
altered seasonal rainfall patterns will change Marsh hydrology). Resiliency to climate
change will be an important consideration in evaluating restoration scenarios.

Conceptual Model and Restoration Hypotheses

Understanding the ecology of this complex and dynamic ecosystem will enhance the
likelihood that restoration actions taken will contribute to achieving restoration goals in
the Marsh. The first step in this process is to use existing knowledge of the Marsh to
develop a basic conceptual model of how the ecosystem functions, including the primary
factors influencing conditions in the Marsh and the linkages between these factors. The
conceptual model can then be used to develop hypotheses regarding the causes of key
ecological problems, potential restoration actions, and potential impacts of restoration
actions on the ecosystem. Where significant uncertainties exist about the impacts of a
potential restoration action, targeted studies can be conducted to address these
uncertainties and the conceptual model can be refined. The refined model can then be
used to design projects and obtain permits. Post-project monitoring should be conducted
to track results; information obtained from monitoring will be used to modify the
conceptual model for future implementation of restoration projects and/or for
modification of existing projects.

Using existing knowledge about the Marsh and its watershed, the PMWG developed a
draft conceptual model of the ecosystem that was made available to participants at the
Forum (Figure 5). The model indicates how the important physical features and
ecological processes interact to influence habitat and species of concern. The model also
identifies those processes that can be influenced by management actions.

Using the conceptual model, it is possible to identify six key hypotheses regarding the
causes of the previously listed problems in the Marsh. Determining if these hypotheses
are true or false will provide essential guidance for the design and implementation of
restoration actions, and investigating these hypotheses will therefore be an important part
of restoration planning. Based upon the presentations and discussion at the Forum, the
supporting evidence, critical uncertainties, and potential studies to address uncertainties
are presented below for each hypothesis. The hypotheses are organized into three groups:

16
Understanding the Sources of Water Quality Impairment, Investigating Temporary
Actions to Prevent the Fish Kill, and Understanding the Impacts of Reconnecting Creeks
with the Floodplain (Table 3).

17
Hypothesis Suggested Study

1) The tidal prism has increased, Use a hydrologic model to determine if
leading to delayed closure of the reducing tidal prism would lead to earlier
sandbar. bar closure.

Estimate the time required to convert the
lagoon to freshwater based on known
data about lagoon volume, freshwater
Understanding Sources
inflows, and rate of seawater loss.
of Water Quality
2) Delayed sandbar formation and
Impairment
changes in marsh hydrologic Refine and complete the record of
connections decrease the likelihood sandbar formation and breaching pre-
that the lagoon will convert from and post- Enhancement Project.
saltwater to freshwater conditions,
exacerbating the development of Continue water quality sampling during
anoxic bottom waters. sandbar closure to determine extent of
eutrophic conditions and their correlation
with dissolved oxygen.

Identify and quantify water diversions in
the watershed.

Monitor changes in the section of Butano
3) The fish kill is a result of inflow of
Creek that now flows through the Butano
anoxic bottom waters from the
marshes, and determine whether action
channels of the Butano marshes at the
Investigating should be taken to configure a new
time of the sandbar breach.
Temporary Actions to channel.
Prevent the Fish Kill 4) Most steelhead move upstream
when water quality declines in the Undertake a major monitoring effort to
lagoon, and the fish kill represents a track the steelhead in the lagoon and
small component of the population. Pescadero and Butano Creeks.

5) Changes in marsh hydrologic Repair the low levee.
connections have reduced habitat for
fresh and brackish water species by Use a hydrologic model to predict
increasing tidal intrusion, reducing changes to the salinity regime of the
freshwater impoundment, and reducing marsh under various conditions of flow
flood conveyance. and levee configurations.
Understanding
Impacts of
Monitor changes in the section of Butano
Reconnecting Creeks
Creek that now flows through the Butano
with the Floodplain
marshes, and determine whether action
6) Man-made structures constrict the
should be taken to configure a new
lower channel of Butano Creek,
channel.
reducing sediment transport and flood
conveyance through Butano Creek and
Use modeling developed to address
marshes.
Hypothesis 5 to determine the effects of
reconnecting Butano Creek to its
floodplain.
Table 2: Summary of Hypotheses and Recommended Studies

18
Understanding Sources of Water Quality Impairment. Hypotheses 1 and 2 concern water
quality problems that have been observed during sandbar closure. Warm, oxygen-
depleted bottom waters in the Marsh result in low biological productivity (low
invertebrate abundance) and reduce the quality of rearing habitat for steelhead and other
aquatic organisms (Smith 1990). Identifying the main factors contributing to poor water
quality conditions is necessary to develop restoration actions to address this problem.

Hypothesis 1: The tidal prism has increased, leading to delayed closure of the
sandbar.

As noted previously, observations indicate that the sandbar forms in late fall since
completion of the Enhancement Project as opposed to late spring or early summer as
primarily seen in the 1980s, and delayed sandbar formation has been linked to poor water
quality conditions in the Marsh. At the Forum, Dr. Curt Storlazzi of the U.S. Geological
Survey explained the process of sandbar formation. Longshore currents, generated by
small waves approaching the shore at an angle, carry sand along the shore down from the
direction of wave approach. As the sand is transported, bar formation can occur at the
mouth of streams when stream discharge and tidal exchange are low. Beach sand along
the coast of California is typically transported from north to south due to waves
predominantly approaching the shoreline from the northwest; during an El Niño year,
however, waves approach from the west or southwest and southward transport of sand is
less common (Patsch and Griggs 2006; Storlazzi 2008).

The tidal prism, which is the volume of seawater moving in and out of the estuary on the
tides, is defined by the morphology of the estuary. A smaller tidal prism means lower
tidal current velocities that would promote bar formation for a given longshore transport
rate, while a larger tidal prism, for the same longshore transport rate, would inhibit bar
formation. The tidal prism is known to have increased following the 1990s restoration.

It is important to note that the tidal prism in existence prior to the Enhancement Project
was itself an artifact of the extensive levee system that was already in place at that time.
It is likely that the historical tidal prism prior to anthropogenic changes to the marsh was
larger than the present tidal prism. Indeed, the Enhancement Plan noted as a constraint
the need to not allow full restoration of the historic tidal prism so that the lagoon mouth
would not stay open too far into the summer (PWA 1990).

Dr. Storlazzi explained that the tidal prism is just one of multiple factors influencing
sandbar formation. Formation of the sandbar also depends upon winds, which generate
the currents and waves that drive longshore sediment transport; waves, which generate
currents and re-suspend sediment and can be either constructive (small, long-period
waves) or destructive (large, short-period storm waves); precipitation and run-off, which
deliver sediment (constructive) and water (destructive) to the estuary; oceanic water
level, which determines the elevation of wave attack and drives water flow across the
estuary’s mouth; and sand abundance. During El Niño winters, which are characterized
by frequent, intense storms and higher-than-normal sea levels and wave heights, severe
beach erosion can occur, reducing the sand supply and delaying sandbar formation

19
(Storlazzi 2008). In some years, stream flows alone may be sufficient to delay sandbar
formation (ESA 2008). ESA (2008) estimated that stream flows of 11 ft3s-1 at the mouth
would be sufficient to keep the mouth scoured and prevent sandbar formation. Relatively
early closure during the late 1980s may have been influenced by low stream flows during
the drought (Sicular pers. comm).

To assess Hypothesis 1 a hydrologic model could be developed to evaluate the effects of
the tidal prism on pre-1990s and post-restoration conditions in the Marsh and used to
evaluate the probability that reducing the tidal prism would lead to earlier bar closure.

If the model suggests that reducing the tidal prism would lead to earlier bar closure, a
reversible reduction in the tidal prism could be designed, implemented, and the effect on
the sandbar monitored. It has been suggested such a reduction could be achieved by
temporarily blocking off the culverts to North Pond.3 Although early closure of the mouth
may be desirable for conversion to freshwater, it may not be possible to accomplish due
to the multiple factors influencing sand bar formation. ESA (2008) conclude that “it
seems unlikely that manipulation of the closure date is possible” due to the interaction of
processes involved in sandbar formation.

Hypothesis 2: Delayed sandbar formation and changes in marsh hydrologic
connections decrease the likelihood that the lagoon will convert from saltwater to
freshwater conditions, leading to the development of anoxic bottom waters.

The Enhancement Project increased tidal intrusion into some areas of the Marsh,
including North Marsh and North Pond via the channel through the Pescadero Creek right
bank levee and North and Middle Butano marshes via the reconnected slough channels
and ditches in the Butano marshes (ESA 2008). This has resulted in an increase in the
amount of seawater trapped in the Marsh following sandbar closure, which in turn
increases the quantity of freshwater needed to de-stratify the lagoon. As noted earlier,
observations indicate that since completion of the Enhancement Project, the sandbar
tends to form later in the year, with closure occurring more often in the late summer or
fall rather than in the spring or early summer (Figure 6).

Rebecca Sloan noted that spring sandbar formation does still occur. During her studies of
the Marsh, sandbar closure occurred in April of both 2004 and 2007. On both occasions,
the sandbar was breached shortly after formation and did not reform until the late fall. It
is not known if the breaching was natural or artificial.4

At the Forum Dr. Smith noted that late sandbar formation reduces both the rate at which
de-stratification occurs and the time available for complete freshwater conversion before

3
This action must be accompanied by monitoring of sensitive habitat and species in the vicinity of the
project and must be reversible so that negative ecological impacts, should they occur, can be minimized.
4
It is known that artificial breaching of the sandbar occurred prior to DPR’s acquisition of the Marsh, and
reports from local residents indicate artificial breaching still occurs in some years. The frequency of
artificial breaching is unknown and difficult to monitor.

20
the bar is breached by winter storms. Low stream flows typical of late summer (Figure 7)
are often insufficient to facilitate conversion. In addition to late sandbar formation,
conversion to freshwater conditions can be delayed or prevented due to drought
(insufficient freshwater inputs), seawater over-wash into the closed lagoon (re-stratifying
the lagoon), or natural or artificial breaching of the sandbar followed by sandbar re-
formation (reintroducing saltwater and re-stratifying the lagoon) (Smith 1990).

Dr. Smith explained that in the absence of sufficient freshwater inflows, deeper portions
of the lagoon and wind-protected areas of the Marsh can remain stratified for prolonged
periods due to lack of convective mixing. Oxygen consumption is greatest at the bottom
of the water column where organic matter accumulates and is decomposed. Stratification
also leads to warmer bottom waters. During daylight hours, solar radiation heats the
water column. Night-time air temperatures cool surface waters, but density stratification
prevents advection of heat from the bottom saline layer to the surface and heat remains
trapped within the saline layer. Hypoxic (< 2 mg O2 L-1) or anoxic (0 mg O2 L-1)
conditions eventually develop in the bottom waters due to biological consumption of
dissolved oxygen and decreased oxygen solubility associated with elevated water
temperature. Anoxic conditions can in turn produce abundant reduced iron and sulfur
compounds with high chemical oxygen demand. Mobilization of these compounds during
a breach event can rapidly deplete surface oxygen.

Studies conducted by Dr. Smith prior to implementation of the 1990s restoration
indicated some inter-annual variability in lagoon water quality conditions and ecology
(Smith 1990), based upon timing of sandbar formation and amount of inflows to the
lagoon, and he noted at the Forum that natural variability will result in the lagoon
environment not being optimal for all species in all years.

As discussed previously, studies conducted between 2001 and 2007 by ESA, DPR, and
Rebecca Sloan indicate that following sandbar closure, anoxic bottom waters form in
multiple locations throughout the Marsh and appear to persist until several days after the
sandbar breach. Rebecca Sloan concluded that anoxic conditions were driven by both
salinity stratification and eutrophication. Her studies of the Marsh between 2004 and
2007 indicated that during sandbar closure, salinity was the only independent variable
that was significantly correlated with oxygen availability, explaining 39% of the
variability in dissolved oxygen in the water column. She also found that Chlorophyll a,
Secchi disk depth, and surface nitrate and phosphate measurements taken in the Marsh
during sandbar closure suggested medium to high levels of eutrophication (Bricker et al.
1999), especially in certain locations. Dr. Smith suggests that salinity stratification, not
eutrophication, is the dominant feature of the water quality problem in the Marsh, citing
well-mixed systems such as the Pajaro and Salinas lagoons that, despite having highly
eutrophic conditions due to abundant agricultural return flows, maintain relatively high
dissolved oxygen levels.

In concluding remarks, Ms. Sloan stated that understanding the timing and nature of
sandbar formation and breach, including those artificially performed by the public,
should be the number one management priority in the marsh. She noted that current water

21
quality data do not characterize the marsh adequately because they are influenced by
artificial breaches. For instance, Ms. Sloan thought it likely that the sandbars that formed
in the spring of 2004 and 2007 were artificially breached. These breaches undoubtedly
altered water quality throughout the marsh for the remainder of the summer and fall, and
almost certainly impacted the entire lagoon ecosystem.

Diversions in the upper watershed also have a significant impact on the Marsh, as the
quantity of freshwater inflows is directly linked to habitat quality. Current estimates for
freshwater inflows into the Marsh are obtained from the USGS gauge at stream mile 5.3
on Pescadero Creek (see Figure 7), but Forum participants noted that numerous
diversions exist downstream of the gauge. Developing a better understanding of the
extent of upstream diversions and their impact on streamflow will therefore be critical in
restoration planning.

To determine if Hypothesis 2 is true or false, there are several questions that must be
addressed by separate studies.

Question 1: To what degree can natural variables (i.e. rainfall and seawater
intrusion) be expected to influence the rate of the freshwater conversion? To address this
question an analysis should be conducted to estimate the time required to convert the
lagoon to freshwater based on known data about lagoon volume, freshwater inflows, and
rate of seawater loss. The volume of seawater likely to be trapped in the Marsh by the
sandbar can be estimated with current information for bathymetry and tidal prism. The
most recent surveys of bathymetry or hypsometry in recent years were the cross section
surveys conducted by ESA in 2001-2002. New surveys will be necessary for accurate
modeling, as some areas of the Marsh appear to have changed substantially. Using
streamflow data from the USGS gauge on Pescadero Creek (and estimates of flows from
Butano Creek), the time needed for freshwater conversion for dry, average, and wet years
can be approximated.

This analysis would allow us to roughly model the conversion process, and to develop the
capacity to predict conditions or years in which the lagoon will be stratified or will
convert to freshwater. Monitoring to track the state of the lagoon can then be used to test
predictions and refine the conceptual model. If our predictions are accurate, we can be
more confident about using the conceptual model to design restoration actions.

Question 2: How frequently does spring sandbar formation occur and how quickly
is the sandbar typically breached? To answer this question we can refine and complete
the record of sandbar formation and breaching to the maximum extent possible. Tracking
sandbar formation and breaching will allow these events to be correlated to
environmental phenomena (i.e. storm events) or possible human intervention (i.e. illegal
artificial breaching). A method for monitoring/preventing illegal artificial sandbar
breaching, such as installing a web camera, will likely be needed). Understanding if the
sandbar is forming early in the year but being breached is important if this early season

22
breaching can be controlled by management actions, as this would theoretically enhance
the conversion of the marsh to freshwater conditions and prevent salinity stratification.

Question 3: How significant a factor is eutrophication in the formation of anoxic
bottom waters? This question can be addressed by continuing water quality sampling
during sandbar closure to determine the extent of eutrophic conditions and their
correlation with dissolved oxygen. If eutrophic conditions were correlated strongly with
dissolved oxygen concentrations regardless of salinity stratification, this would suggest
that nutrient inputs to the system might contribute to poor water quality regardless of the
conversion to freshwater. In such a case, it may be possible to identify controllable
sources of nutrient input to the lagoon.

Question 4:Do water diversions in the upper watershed significantly alter
freshwater inflows to the Marsh? To address this question water diversions in the
watershed must be identified and quantified. GIS-based modeling techniques are
available to evaluate the cumulative impacts of diversion on the natural hydrograph
during wet and dry seasons in dry, average, and wet water years (Merenlender et al.
2008). Depending upon the results of these investigations, it would be possible to work
with landowners in the watershed to adjust rates and timing of diversions during low-
flow periods to improve habitat quality in the Marsh.

Investigating Temporary Actions to Prevent the Fish Kill. Various stakeholders in the
Marsh have expressed great concern over the fish kill and seek an immediate solution for
preventing the die-off while longer term studies to identify the underlying causes are
conducted. Hypothesis 3 has been proposed by several stakeholders and was discussed at
the Forum.

Hypothesis 3: The fish kill is a result of inflow of anoxic bottom waters from
the channels of the Butano marshes at the time of the sandbar breach.

Following the fish kill in 2003, steelhead carcasses were analyzed at the University of
California, Davis Fisheries Pathology Lab to determine cause of mortality. The autopsies
revealed no evidence of pathogen-related mortality and the fish pathologist concluded the
cause was “likely environmental in nature” (Sicular pers. comm. as cited in Sloan 2006).

Rebecca Sloan conducted discrete and continuous water quality sampling in different
areas of the Marsh during sandbar closure and in the days immediately following the
breach annually from 2004 to 2007, measuring dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature,
hydrogen sulfide, nutrient concentrations, and sediment characteristics. Sampling ruled
out ammonia toxicity and sediment toxicity as likely causes of mortality, and Sloan
concluded that hypoxia was likely the main contributing factor.

As previously noted, sampling conducted by ESA, Rebecca Sloan, and DPR found poor
water quality conditions in multiple locations throughout the Marsh. In addition, H2S
formation was found to occur in the deep, relatively isolated areas of the artificial ditch

23
system in areas of fine-grained, organic-rich sediments, including the boat launch and the
Phipps Tide Gate (D-3 and G-1 in Figure 2).

It is hypothesized that the fish kill results from the rapid mixing of anoxic bottom waters
into areas being utilized by fish as the Marsh drains at the time of sandbar breach. Fish
mortality may be a result of suffocation or due to H2Sproduction promoted by anoxic
conditions that then poisons the fish.

Rebecca Sloan noted that tide gates at the Pescadero channel/Pescadero Creek junction
restrict post-breach mixing but that similar obstructions are not present between the
Butano channel and Butano Creek, facilitating mixing at the time of sandbar breach.
Sampling throughout the Marsh immediately following the breach indicated significantly
lower dissolved oxygen in Butano Channel during the first 24 hours after the breach than
in other areas of the Marsh. Carcass distribution following the sandbar breach has not
been uniform for all species involved in the die-off, but steelhead carcasses appear to be
concentrated between the Butano channel outlet and the confluence of Pescadero and
Butano creeks (Figure 8).

To investigate Hypothesis 3, a study to determine the role of artificial channel (ditch)
morphology in stratification/ H2S formation and post-sandbar breach flow dynamics
would be required. At the Forum it was suggested that a temporary weir could be
installed in the Butano channel upstream of the pedestrian bridge to delay the mixing of
poor quality water into Butano Creek at the time of the sandbar breach. If pre-breach
water sampling confirmed the presence of anoxic bottom waters and the presence of H2S,
then a reduced fish kill following breaching of the lagoon could implicate the oxygen-
poor waters from Butano channel as a cause. However, multiple confounding factors
could make it difficult to draw firm conclusions. As of 2010, this measure now appears to
be infeasible as Butano Creek recently changed course and flows un-channeled through
the Butano marshes. The artificial channel at the pedestrian bridge is now part of the
Butano Creek mainstem (Sicular pers. comm.). Instead, it will be important to document
and monitor the changes that are occurring, and to determine whether any action should
be taken to configure a new channel. Steelhead passage in and out of Butano Creek is
currently impeded due to the lack of channel. There may be insufficient hydraulic force
to configure a new channel through the Butano marshes due to the attenuation of flows
through the alder patch upstream of Pescadero Road Bridge. If such a channel were to
form, it could potentially reduce the fish kill by converting the ditches into stream
channels and eliminating the areas that are subject to H2S formation, and would also
enable steelhead passage up and down Butano Creek (Sicular pers. comm.).

Hypothesis 4. Most steelhead move upstream when water quality declines in the
lagoon, and the fish kill represents a small component of the population.

At the Forum Sean Hayes described how steelhead in the Scott Creek lagoon move
upstream at the end of the summer, spending another winter in freshwater. If this is
happening in Pescadero lagoon, a portion of the steelhead population might be avoiding
the impact of the anoxic waters.

24
To investigate Hypothesis 4 a major monitoring effort would be required to track the
steelhead in the lagoon and Pescadero and Butano creeks. This study would determine if
fish are moving upstream, what portion of the population they represent, and what
conditions are required for passage. It is important to note that the purpose of the
proposed study is not to diminish efforts to prevent the fish kill, but rather to improve
understanding of steelhead population dynamics in the system. Efforts to prevent the
annual fish kill should continue regardless of the extent of its impact on the watershed’s
steelhead population.

Understanding Impacts of Reconnecting Creeks with the Floodplain. It is known
that the lower reaches of Pescadero and Butano creeks have restricted access to or are cut
off from their floodplains by the levee system. Problems that have been associated with
these modifications are discussed under Hypotheses 5 and 6.

Hypothesis 5: Changes in Marsh hydrologic connections have reduced habitat for
fresh and brackish water species by increasing tidal intrusion and reducing flood
conveyance.

The levee on the right bank of Pescadero Creek prevents overbank flow of freshwater
into North Marsh during floods events (ESA 2008). As noted previously, the height of the
low levee along the western edge of North Marsh is lower than the design height of +5.5
feet and can be overtopped in extreme high tides and also impounds less freshwater in
North Marsh than intended in the 1990s restoration design. The combination of these
factors appears to have reduced freshwater habitat in the North Marsh. Sampling
conducted by ESA in 2002 indicated predominantly saline conditions in the North Marsh
prior to sandbar closure and brackish to saline conditions following sandbar closure. The
red-legged frog had been documented in the North Marsh prior to and in several years
following the Enhancement Project (Jennings and Hayes 1990, Smith and Reis 1997), but
ESA (2008) measured salinities during sampling in 2002 that indicated poor-quality
breeding and rearing habitat for this species.

Given the strong evidence that important habitat for the red-legged frog has been lost in
the North Marsh, and that one cause of this loss is the deterioration of the low levee,
repairing the low levee, at least as an interim measure, was identified in the Forum as a
high priority action.

To develop potential restoration actions to improve habitat conditions in the long term,
Hypothesis 5 could be investigated by using a hydrologic model to predict changes to the
salinity regime of the Marsh under various conditions of flow and levee configurations.
Available information could be used to determine pre-disturbance configuration of the
Marsh, including location of natural levees (ESA 2008 provides a good description). The
model could be used to investigate changes to the Marsh that would result from
reconnecting Pescadero Creek to its floodplain, including channel meandering, sediment
transport, flood conveyance, and shoreline erosion. The changes projected by the model
could then be used to judge the impact to aquatic habitats and species of concern.

25
Hypothesis 5 (and others as well) also requires information about the long-term
population trends of sensitive species in the Marsh. The ultimate goal of any Marsh
restoration is to develop robust populations of the diverse array of endangered species
that are found in the ecosystem. In order to understand the status of these populations and
the impact of environmental variation and future management actions, these populations
must be monitored on a regular basis. Population monitoring would be required for
steelhead, tidewater goby, red-legged frog, and the San Francisco garter snake.

In follow up comments from the Forum, Joanne Kerbavaz noted that additional studies to
better characterize changes in habitat for fresh and brackish water species in the Marsh
may also be valuable given the possibility that as habitat in some areas has become less
suitable, habitat in other areas has expanded.

Hypothesis 6: Man-made structures constrict the lower channel of Butano Creek,
reducing sediment transport and flood conveyance through Butano Creek and
marshes.

Pescadero and Butano creeks are listed as impaired by sediment pursuant to §303(d) of
the Clean Water Act, and Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) requirements are being
developed for Pescadero and Butano creeks by the San Francisco Regional Water Quality
Control Board5. Sediment problems result in large part from massive disturbance from
logging in the 1950s and stream diversion (ESA 2004). The cause of sediment accretion
in Butano Creek is thought to be that the creek loses hydraulic force approximately 1,200
feet upstream from the Pescadero Road Bridge due to overflow on the east bank,
reducing sediment transport capacity and resulting in the accumulation of sediment in the
channel near the bridge over time (Swanson 2001 in ESA [2008]).

Sediment accumulation and the presence of artificial structures have also been associated
with the problematic flooding of Butano Creek at Pescadero Road. The levees along
Butano Creek prevent the overflow on the east bank from re-entering the stream channel,
and the Pescadero Road Bridge itself restricts conveyance of floodwaters downstream
through the Butano marshes (Swanson 2001 in ESA [2008]). Flooding at Pescadero Road
has significantly impacted residents of the Town of Pescadero.

Sediment transport in Butano Creek may be aided by actions in the Marsh, including
reconfiguring of the bridge and removal of levees, but at present appears to be a long-
term, systemic, and largely intractable problem (Sicular pers. comm.). ESA (2004) noted
that sedimentation from the upper watershed has decreased in the past three decades due
to better land use practices (Table 4). It is recommended in ESA (2008) that the creek
cross sections established in 1987 be resurveyed following major storm events to verify
the reductions in sediment yield and improve understanding of sediment dynamics over
time.

5
http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/sanfranciscobay/water_issues/programs/TMDLs/pescaderobutanocrkstmdl
.shtml

26
The migration of Butano Creek into the marshes, and the eventual establishment of a new
channel as the stream starts meandering through the relatively wide-open marshes, may
improve sediment transport. As noted in Hypothesis 3, it will be necessary to conduct
monitoring to determine whether Butano Creek will form a new channel through the
marshes or continue to diffuse through the tules.

The modeling project developed to address Hypothesis 5 could also be used to determine
the effects of reconnecting Butano Creek to its floodplain. Information obtained from
modeling can be used to design restoration projects that will improve habitat in the Marsh
and reduce flooding in the Town of Pescadero.

Potential Restoration Actions

A list of potential restoration actions was developed at the Forum. The studies suggested
in the previous section will help determine which of these restoration actions are good
candidates for implementation and will also be used to develop additional candidate
projects. The list of actions generated at the Forum and their potential benefits and
problems are included below. Some of these potential actions are also discussed in ESA
(2008). Actions 6-8 were suggested in follow up comments from the Forum.

1. Lower the right bank levee of Pescadero Creek at the upper end of the Marsh

Potential benefits: This action would be expected to re-establish natural hydrologic and
geomorphologic processes by connecting Pescadero Creek with its floodplain and
provide increased freshwater flow to North Marsh to support greater area of fresh or
brackish water marsh. It would minimize maintenance requirements and help create a
self-sustaining system.

Potential problems: Increasing flood conveyance from Pescadero Creek into North Marsh
may result in reduced sediment transport capacity for lower Pescadero Creek, leading to
aggradation of the stream bed (ESA 2008). This might also encourage the conversion of
rare salt marsh to brackish marsh at the fringes of North Marsh.

2. Raise (or at least repair) the low levee along the channel adjacent to North Marsh
that leads to North Pond.

Potential benefits: This action would be expected to reduce tidal flows to North Marsh
and thus reduce salinity, restoring brackish water habitat. In order to maximize
restoration of brackish and freshwater habitat, the salts that have accumulated due to past
tidal flows would have to be flushed out of the marsh through repeated filling and
draining of North Marsh with freshwater. Replacing the culverts at either end of the low
levee could facilitate this flushing. These culverts are presently inoperable.

3. Block the culverts that supply tidewater to North Pond and fill the channel between
the culverts and North Pond

27
Potential benefits: This action would be implemented to reduce tidal prism and
potentially promote earlier sandbar closure, and would promote faster conversion to
freshwater by reducing the initial volume of the lagoon to be filled by freshwater. This
action would be taken based upon the results of the studies conducted to investigate
Hypothesis 1.

Potential problems: This action would result in loss of tidal wetland habitat along the
channel to North Pond and in North Pond itself.

4. Partially or completely fill ditches in Butano Marsh and one in Delta Marsh

Potential benefits: To the extent that these ditches contribute to anoxia, this action would
be expected to reduce the amount of poor quality bottom water present at these locations.
This could improve water quality in the Marsh, and eliminate a reservoir of anoxic waters
that have been implicated in the fish kill. This may occur naturally due to the recent
migration of Butano Creek into the Butano marshes.

Potential problems: Some species use the ditches as habitat at other times of the year. In
addition, filling ditches would result in a minor loss of flood conveyance capacity of
Butano Marsh.

5. Remove some or all of the remaining levees between Butano Creek and Butano
Marsh

Potential benefits: This action would be expected to re-establish natural hydrologic and
geomorphologic processes by connecting Butano Creek with its floodplain and improve
flood conveyance through the Butano marshes. It may reduce the flooding at Pescadero
Road by spreading floodwaters and sediment out along the floodplain. It would be
expected to improve habitat quality in the marshes by increasing freshwater inputs and
improving circulation and create a diversity of habitat types including fresh, brackish, and
backwater habitat. This action was recommended prior to the January, 2010 change in
Butano Creek’s course. If Butano Creek establishes a new channel through the marshes,
it will in fact be reconnected with its historic floodplain.

6. Replace culverts and gates in Pescadero Creek right bank and reinstitute
management plan for culverts.

To simplify management, the culverts could be opened in fall/winter after the sandbar
breach occurs and closed on a set date in spring (April 15 or May1).

Potential benefits: A managed culvert system would allow seasonal tidal action in winter
and early spring for shorebirds. It would also facilitate a closed and more rapidly
converting lagoon in summer/fall. The closed lagoon would raise water levels and help to
maintain summer water levels in North Marsh, and improve conditions for tidewater
goby and red-legged.

28
Potential problems: A managed system is inconsistent with State Parks goals for the
Marsh, and Parks may not have the resources to successfully implement a managed
system.

7. Install a bladder dam at the Butano Channel

Potential benefits: Preventing inflows into the lagoon from the Butano Channel may lead
to improved water quality at the time of the sandbar breach and reduce the potential of a
fish-kill.

Potential problems: California Department of Fish and Game attempted to install the
structure in 2010. The project involved the use of multiple bladders that needed to be
stacked like a pyramid and the operation of water pumps. Leaks prevented the full
structure from being installed and the water pumps could not be continually operated due
to lack of funding, so the installation failed. Agencies are collaborating to develop an
alternative approach.

8. Manually form the sandbar

A bulldozer could be used to pile up sand and close the mouth of the creek earlier than
would occur through natural buildup of the beach barrier.

Potential benefits: Earlier sandbar formation may lead to improved water quality in the
closed lagoon.

Potential problems: It would likely be difficult to find a funding source for ongoing
manipulation of the lagoon mouth. All resource agencies would have to agree with this
approach in order to obtain permits to carry out the work.

29
References

Bond, Morgan H. (2006) Importance of Estuarine Rearing to Central California Steelhead
(Oncorhynchus mykiss) Growth and Marine Survival. Master’s Thesis, University of
California at Santa Cruz. Retrieved from
http://www.cemar.org/pdf/Bond%20Thesis%20Lagoon%20Rearing.pdf

Bricker, Suzanne B., C.G. Clement, D. E. Pirhalla, S.P. Orlando, and D.R.G. Farrow.
1999. National Estuarine Eutrophication Assessment. Effects of Nutrient Enrichment in
the Nation's Estuaries. Retrieved from http://ian.umces.edu/neea/pdfs/eutro_report.pdf

Curry, Robert, R. Houghton, T. Kidwell, and P. Tang. 1985. Sediment and Hydrologic
Analysis of Pescadero Marsh and its Watershed. Draft. University of California at Santa
Cruz. Prepared for California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA.

[DPR] California Department of Parks and Recreation. 1992. Pescadero Marsh Natural
Preserve Hydrologic Enhancement Project.

[ESA] Environmental Science Associates. 2002. Butano Creek Cross Sections Survey
Report. Report by Environmental Science Associates and Dennis Jackson. Prepared for
California Department of Parks and Recreation, San Francisco, CA.

[ESA] Environmental Science Associates. 2004. Pescadero-Butano Watershed
Assessment. Report by Environmental Science Associates, Pacific Watershed Associates,
O’Connor Environmental, Albion Environmental and D. Jackson. Prepared for Monterey
Bay National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, Monterey, CA. Retrieved from
http://montereybay.noaa.gov/resourcepro/reports/sedrep/pescadero.pdf

[ESA] Environmental Science Associates. 2008. Pescadero Marsh Restoration
Assessment and Recommendations for Ecosystem Management. Prepared for California
Department of Parks and Recreation, Half Moon Bay, CA.

Jackson, Dennis. 2003. Re-survey of the 1987 Pescadero Marsh Cross Sections on
Pescadero Creek. Prepared for Environmental Science Associates, San Francisco, CA.

Jennings, Mark R. and M.P. Hayes. 1990. Status of the California Red-Legged Frog
Ranaaurora draytonii in the Pescadero Marsh Natural Preserve. Prepared for California
Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA under contract No. 4-823-9018
with the California Academy of Sciences.

Larson, Eric J. 2001. Coastal wetlands-emergent marshes, p. 483–486. In W. S. Leet, C.
M. Dewees, R. Klingbeil, and E. J. Larson (eds.), California’s Living Marine Resources:
A Status Report. California and California Department of Fish and Game, Sacramento,
California.

30
Merenlender, A. M., Deitch, M.J., and S. Feirer. 2008. Decision support tool seeks to aid
stream-flow recovery and enhance water security. California Agriculture 62:148-155.

Pacific Watershed Associates. 2003. Sediment Assessment of Roads and Trails within the
Pescadero/Memorial/Sam McDonald County Park Complex, Pescadero Creek
Watershed, San Mateo County, California. Prepared for San Mateo County Parks and
Recreation Department and California Department of Fish and Game. Retrieved from
http://www.co.sanmateo.ca.us/vgn/images/portal/cit_609/23704068sedimentassessment_
body.pdf

[PWA] Philip Williams & Associates. 1990. Pescadero Marsh Natural Preserve
Hydrological Enhancement Plan. Prepared for California Department of Parks and
Recreation.

Sloan, Rebecca. 2006. Ecological Investigations of a Fish Kill in Pescadero Lagoon, CA.
Master’s Thesis. San Jose State University, San Jose, CA.

Sloan, Rebecca. 2008. Pescadero Lagoon Water Quality Dynamics, Fish Kills, and
Implications for Restoration Planning. PowerPoint presentation. Pescadero Marsh
Restoration Forum, December 9, 2008.

Smith, Jerry J. 1990. The Effects of Sandbar Formation and Inflows on Aquatic Habitat
and Fish Utilization in Pescadero, San Gregorio, Waddell and Pomponio Creek
Estuary/Lagoon systems, 1985-1989. San Jose State University. Interagency Agreement
84-04-324.

Smith, Jerry J. and D.K. Reis. 1997. Pescadero Marsh Natural Preserve Salinity,
Tidewater Goby and Red-Legged Frog Monitoring for 1995-1996. Prepared for
California Department of Parks and Recreation.

Smith Jerry J. 2008. Estuary/Lagoons as Habitat: Implications for the Pescadero
Creek Estuary Complex. PowerPoint presentation. Pescadero Marsh Restoration Forum,
December 9, 2008.

Storlazzi, Curt. 2008. The Dynamics of Bar-Built Estuaries. PowerPoint presentation.
Pescadero Marsh Restoration Forum, December 9, 2008.

Viollis, Frank S. 1979. The Evolution of Pescadero Marsh. Master’s Thesis. San
Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA.

[Swanson] Swanson Hydrology & Geomorphology. 2001. Hydrologic Issues regarding
Management of Pescadero Marsh in light of Enhancement Projects completed in 1993
and 1997. Prepared for California Department of Parks and Recreation.

31
Figure 1 Pescadero
P Marrsh Land Cov
ver and Place Names. Sourcce: Reproduceed from ESA ((2008).

32
Figure 2 Water
W Quality
y Sampling Sittes. Source: Reeproduced froom ESA (20088).

33
Figure 3 Dissolved
D Oxygen in Pescadero Creek at Turtle Bend. S ource: Reprooduced from S
Sloan
(2008).

34
Figure 4 Pescadero Marsh Fish Kill 1995-2007. Source: Sloan (2008); Kerbavaz (pers.comm.).

350
Number of Steelhead Carcasses

300

250

200

150

100

50

0
1995 2001 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Year

Note: This figure provides available data. Years not shown on the figure are ones in which State Parks did
not count dead fish. In years when dead fish were counted, the percent of dead fish counted could vary
significantly based on the timing of the daily tides.

35
Figure 5 Pescadero
P Marrsh Conceptua
al Model. Sou
urce: Developeed by Pescadero Marsh Woorking
Group in the
t Fall of 200
08.

36
Figure 6 Date of Sandbar Formation 1978-20096. Source: Modified from Sloan (2008) with data
from Viollis (1978); Smith (1990); Smith and Reis (1997); and Kerbavaz (pers. comm).

12
11
10
9
8
7
Month

6 First Closure
5
4 Second Closure
3
2 No Closure
1
0

Year

6
No data available for some years as indicated by gaps in graph.

37
Figure 7 Monthly Mean Discharge in Wet, Dry, and Average Water Years Recorded at Pescadero
Creek near Pescadero, USGS Gauging Station 11162500. Source: USGS7

1000

100
Discharge, cfs

10 1977 Driest Year
2002 Median Year
1
1983 Wettest Year

0.1

0.01
Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep

7
http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/monthly?referred_module=sw&amp;site_no=11162500&amp;por_111625
00_2=2208232,00060,2,1951-04,2008-10&amp;format=html_table&amp;date_format=YYYY-MM-
DD&amp;rdb_compression=file&amp;submitted_form=parameter_selection_list

38
Figure 8 Location of Fish Kill. Source: Reproduced from Sloan (2008).

39
Table 3 Pescadero-Butano Sediment Yield. Source:
Reproduced from ESA (2004).

40
Appendix 1: Presentation Abstracts, December 2008

Restoration of Pescadero Marsh:
Identifying Problems and Exploring Solutions

Presentation Abstracts

The following abstracts were prepared prior to the Forum and were made available to all
attendees.

Pescadero State Beach (Joanne Kerbavaz, California State Parks)
Ms. Kerbavaz will present a brief history of Pescadero State Beach, discussing property
acquisition and the development of management goals and objectives. She will orient the
audience to the general features of the Marsh, and describe State Park’s management
objectives.

Living With the Marsh (Tim Frahm, Native Sons of the Golden West)
Tim Frahm will discuss changes observed in the Pescadero Marsh over several decades
by steelhead fishermen who live near the Marsh and have fished in the lagoon their entire
lives. He will discuss the efforts of the Steelhead Committee formed by the Native Sons
of the Golden West to raise awareness and money for steelhead restoration efforts in the
Pescadero watershed.

The Dynamics of Bar-Built Estuaries (Curt Storlazzi, US Geological Survey)
Dr. Storlazzi will provide a general overview of bar-built estuaries, describing the
geologic and oceanographic processes that control bar formation and breaching, and how
these processes are in evidence in Pescadero Lagoon. He will review available
information about the timing of bar formation at Pescadero over the last few decades, the
potential impact of human activities on this process, and how climate change and rising
sea levels could influence bar formation in the future.

Recent Geomorphic History of Pescadero Marsh (Dan Sicular, ESA)
Dr. Sicular will review the geomorphic history of Pescadero Marsh, highlighting the
changes humans have made to historical conditions. He will describe restoration efforts
implemented in the 1990s, the impacts of these efforts, and suggest methods to restore
natural geomorphic processes in the system.

Nutrient Availability and Eutrophication in Coastal Lagoons (Nicole Beck, 2nd
Nature)
Dr. Beck will discuss the role of nutrient availability and eutrophication as a mechanism
for influencing water quality in coastal lagoons. She will describe the accumulation of
organic matter leading to high respiration rates that suppress dissolved oxygen in some
systems, and how these mechanisms should be considered when planning coastal lagoon
enhancement strategies.

41
Water Quality Dynamics of Pescadero Lagoon and Implications for Fish Mortality
(Rebecca Sloan, TRA Environmental)
Ms. Sloan will discuss the chronic bottom water anoxia in the Pescadero Lagoon during
sand barrier formation, fish kills upon breaching (with Oncorhynchus mykiss mortality),
and low-tide hypoxia in the days following tidal reconnection. She will use several years
of water quality data to evaluate the contributions of eutrophication and stratification to
poor water quality and illustrate how lagoon morphology exacerbates and/or controls
eutrophic and stratified conditions.

Estuary/lagoons as habitat: implications for the Pescadero Creek Estuary complex
(Jerry Smith, San Jose State University)
Dr. Smith will explain how lagoons can provide a variety of habitats for multiple species
of concern and that all habitats do not have to work for all species at all times. He will
describe how backwaters, deep scour pools and disconnected or seasonal wetlands can
provide important seasonal habitat for salmonids and other aquatic species, including
California red-legged frog, tidewater goby and the western pond turtle. He will explain
how late sandbar formation at the mouth of Pescadero Creek has resulted in a strongly
salinity stratified system in fall with severe hypoxia and anoxia problems in the lagoon
and how this has impacted lagoon productivity, and he will discuss restoration
implications.

42
Appendix 2
An Approach to Restoration of the Pescadero Marsh, 4/23/2010 Draft
Comments and Responses
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Tim Frahm intro 0 As you know, the Native Sons of the Golden West Pebble Beach Parlor #230 was one of the local funders of the Acknowledgement page added.
event upon which this document was based. It may be reasonable to acknowledge the contributions of both the
facility and for the lunch provided to the participants.
DFG Overall 0 We recommend that this Report specify goals and objectives for restoration. DFG recommends that specific Comment noted.
report restoration goals and objectives, as well as an approach be clearly defined. DFG's goal is to restore Pescadero
Marsh to a healthy, functioning state characterized by an extensive freshwater lagoon, marsh, and pond habitats
during the summer and fall so that they can support healthy populations of native species. We recognize that
there will be constraints to the amount of habitat that the site can sustain associated with hydrological and
geomorphic processes operating at the landscape/watershed scale, along with anthropogenic disruptions to
these processes. Additionally, we recognize that this system is dynamic and will constantly change over time. We
will develop biological goals appropriate to these processes and constraints and the dynamic nature of this
system. Watershed processes that support habitat conditions may not dictate 100% of what we do, but
understanding and taking into account these processes involved as well as the disruptions to those processes
that may limit what happens biologically is recognized as crucial to restoration at Pescadero Lagoon.

Joanne Kerbavaz intro 4 1 Characterization of Pescadero Marsh as containing a “bar built seasonal freshwater lagoon” understates the Pescadero marsh is correctly characterized as having
complexity of the system. As noted in 1985 by Bob Curry and his colleagues (Curry, et al., 1985. p 26): a "bar-built seasonal freshwater lagoon as a key
ecological feature." Other parts of the document
Every beach/lagoon system is different. Pescadero’s unique management problems derive in large measure address the complexity of the system, not limited to
from the unique dynamic interactions between its beach and lagoon. Human attempts to modify this system, the seasonal lagoon. The complexity of the system
together with hydrologic and geologic conditions, have created a very complex system. was a major reason the restoration workshop was
convened.
From the earliest records of the marsh (see, for example, the quotes in Viollis, 1979 pages 44-46), observers
have noted areas of fresh and salt water and a diversity of vegetation in response to this variation. The interplay
between fresh and salt water may at times results in a fresh water lagoon; however, it appears that, based on
sampling results, the enclosed lagoon has often been brackish, salty, or stratified with layers of different salinity.

Frank Viollis (1979, Figure 10) mapped salinity levels in August, 1978 around the time of the late August bar
closure. As Viollis wrote (page 144):

The observations made in August of 1978, indicate that subsurface pools of denser saline water exist within the
marsh complex (Figure 10). Continuation of these conditions could lead to stagnation of bottom waters resulting
in oxygen depletion – a situation unsuitable for aquatic life. Flushing action is also reduced, allowing for the
concentration of toxic wastes.

Comment continues...

Joanne Kerbavaz intro 4 1 comment continued... See above.
Dr. Jerry Smith’s 1990 report (page 12-13) showed that the salinity of the lagoon varied during the five years of
his work, with only one season of a quickly converted summer freshwater lagoon:

In 1985 the freshwater inflow quickly converted Pescadero Creek lagoon into a freshwater system for the
summer (Figure 3, Table 2). In 1986 streamflows were lower prior to sandbar formation (Table 1), resulting in
more saltwater in the lagoon at the time of bar formation and much slower conversion to a freshwater lagoon
(Figures 7A and 7B). Much of the lagoon had salt water lenses on the bottom for the entire summer. In 1984 the
sandbar was breached early in the summer at Pescadero and the meager inflows after breaching did not convert
the lagoon fully to freshwater (less than 2 PPT) until late October. In 1987 and 1988 low streamflows after
sandbar formation were insufficient to convert the lagoon to freshwater; most of the lagoon remained saline and
stratified for salinity all summer (Figures 11 and 13, Table 2).

Dr. Smith and others believe that a summer freshwater lagoon is the desired condition for Pescadero marsh;

Page 1
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Joanne Kerbavaz intro 4 1 Pescadero Marsh Natural Preserve contains 235 acres Corrected.
DFG intro 4 1, sent 2 The Report states that the Pescadero Marsh "includes a bar-built seasonal freshwater lagoon as a key ecological Goal 2 identified in the summary addresses restoring
feature." DFG is aware that prior to the 1990s, there was a seasonal freshwater lagoon (Smith 1990). However, a seasonal lagoon and mix of wetland habitat types.
after modifications were done to the Marsh in the 1990s, the seasonal lagoon became a salinity­stratified system Consensus has not been reached on what that mix of
and does not fully convert to freshwater, thereby substantially reducing habitat for sensitive species (Smith and habitat types should be.
Reis 1997). Therefore, DFG recommends the re­establishment of a productive seasonal freshwater lagoon with
the goal of increasing biological productivity for the above-listed sensitive species.

Joanne Kerbavaz intro 4 All discussions of the “natural” conditions of Pescadero Marsh should be prefaced with the understanding that, as Sentence added to paragraph 3 to address the loss of
calculated by Viollis (1979), the area of wetlands within Pescadero marsh had been reduced by one half between wetlands between 1900 and 1960.
1900 and 1960. Restoration work in the 1990s was predicated on the fact that tidal and fresh water circulation
and wetland area had been drastically reduced through human manipulation of the marsh.

Tim Frahm 1990s 7 3 I believe that the excavated channel was from the North Pond not North Marsh to the lagoon. Corrected.
restoration
Jerry Smith Prev 7 3 The original connection between North Marsh and the Pescadero Lagoon was through a partially closed 12” Comment noted. No change in text.
Restoration diameter culvert through the Pescadero Creek Levee.
Joanne Kerbavaz Existing 7 3 Paragraph 3 should be revised to include the following information: Text corrected to state that North Pond would be "re-"
conditions North Pond and North Marsh were previously connected. connected to North Marsh. Additional detail provided
As described by Williams, (1990 page 9): in comment is noted.
North Pond is now separated from North Marsh by a short levee, and there is only enough exchange of water
through a clogged culvert to keep water levels in the two areas nearly equal…Before construction of the levees,
North Pond was closely linked with North Marsh, and received fresh water from Pescadero Creek and the lagoon
by some means. Waves overtopping the north end of Pescadero Beach provided occasional salt water inflow to
North Pond (Viollis, 1979; Elliot, 1975).
Joanne Kerbavaz Existing 7 3 The purpose of the North Pond project included additional items. Text revised to make intent of 1990s restoration
conditions The purpose of the project element is more correctly described as follows (Williams, 1990 page 29): actions clearer.
North Pond provides the greatest potential for increasing the tidal scouring of Pescadero Lagoon, and the pond
suffers from poor circulation of water. Tidal fluctuation in the pond would provide valuable mud flat habitat for
shorebirds in the late fall and winter. This approach allows realization of most of the potential tidal prism, and
improvement of the habitat value of North Pond, without threatening the existing habitat value of North Marsh

Joanne Kerbavaz Existing 7 3 The low levee was designed to prevent most tidal flow, but not to prevent all overtopping Text revised to clarify that levee would block all but
conditions (Williams, 1990 page 30) described the levee as follows: the most extreme high tides.
If the levee is constructed to an elevation of +5.5 feet, it will not be overtopped by tidal flow in the channel except
perhaps in extreme conditions. On the other hand, it will routinely be overtopped in the summer, after the mouth
of the lagoon has closed and the water level in the lagoon rises about 5.5 ft.
Joanne Kerbavaz Existing 7 3 The June 22, 2010 letter from the Department of Fish and Game (DFG) included some discussion of the Comment noted. Text revised to more clearly explain
conditions operation of these gates. As stated in your text, the gated culverts were designed to be closed following sandbar intended management of culverts in response to
closure, and opened following bar opening. Williams (1990 page 30) described the intended operation as other comments.
follows:
The large “North Pond” culverts would be opened after the mouth of the lagoon opens in the fall, allowing
substantial tidal circulation in North Pond…
When the mouth closes, the gates on the North Pond culverts would be closed, so that the brackish to fresh
water conversion in the lagoon would not be delayed by the need to dilute the large volume of brackish water in
North Marsh.
Jerry Smith Prev 7 4 Prior to the modifications in levees undertaken between 1993 and 1997, an opening in the left bank levee of Comment noted. No change in text.
Restoration Butano Creek immediately downstream of the Pescadero Road Bridge was constructed in 1986 by DPR (Tom
Taylor). This was intended to send a portion of flood flows through the Butano Marshes and reduce flood flow
back up downstream of the bridge.

Page 2
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Tim Frahm 1990s 7 4 It may be useful to note the percentage of the levy which was removed (or remains). (i.e. was a majority of the Changed to "the majority of the levees." The concept
restoration levy removed? Or was it small, short segments). The way it reads, “portions of the levies were left in place” – I of this restoration action as stated in the
suspect that a majority, not a “portion” were left. Enhancement Plan (PWA 1990) is to "Restore natural
circulation of water through the Butano marshes by
removing parts of the levees, while leaving most of
the levees for pedestrian access and basking by
garter snakes" (p.49).
DFG Prev 7 3, sent 2 The Report states, " ... a system of culverts was installed to curb freshwater inflows into North Pond immediately Text revised to make intent of 1990s restoration
Restoration following sandbar closure to allow for rapid conversion of the lagoon from salt to freshwater." In DFG's literature actions clearer.
review, the purpose of operating these tidegates was to reduce the time and the quantity of freshwater inflow
required to completely destratify the water column and convert it to freshwater, keeping habitat for sensitive
species intact and productive (Smith 1997, Williams 1990). The intended management of these culverts was to
close them by late spring/early summer then to open them in the late fall (Williams 1990).

Tim Frahm Current state 8 1 “observations indicate that North Pond is not flushing sediment as originally intended”. My reading of the 1992 Text changed.
of the marsh Enhancement Plan indicates to me that the intention was not to flush North Pond, but rather to “flush” the lagoon.

Tim Frahm Current state 8 1 In either case, it would be appropriate to additionally note that the gates were not operated as directed in the plan Text added.
of the marsh (closing when the bar closes and opening after the bar breaches), so the intended results of the project may
have been diluted by not following the projects management activities.
Jerry Smith Current state 8 2 The gated culvert system was not installed at North Pond, but in the right bank levee of Pescadero Creek to allow Location of culvert clarified. Text revised to make
of the marsh seasonal (winter/spring) movement of tidal flow to North pond but not for sediment flushing of North Pond). The clear that management scheme has not been
gates were to be closed at the time of sandbar formation in early summer to reduce the time and freshwater implemented for several years.
inflow required to convert the lagoon towards freshwater. They were rarely operated and never maintained. If
operable and closed in late spring and opened after bar breaching in winter, tidal winter conditions and regular Added potential action to replace culverts and revert
early summer sandbar closure were expected to occur. If the culverts were replaced and opened in winter and to management plan.
closed in spring (on an assigned date, requiring 2 hours of “management” a year) those same goals could
probably be achieved.
Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 8 2 The statement that “observations indicate that North Pond is not flushing sediment as originally intended” is not Text revised to clarify that flushing of the lagoon,
of the marsh clear. State Parks staff have observed channeling in North Pond and deepening of the main channel to North rather than North Pond, has not been observed.
Pond; these observations could be checked with surveys of the 1987 cross sections in North Pond. As stated
above, one intent for the connection was to increase tidal prism to expand overall movement of sediment in the
lagoon.
Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 8 3 The discussion of the low levee confounds two conditions, the ability of the low levee to be topped by tides, and Text revised to more accurately summarize findings
of the marsh the ability of the low levee to be topped by the rising lagoon. The reference to Dr. Smith (1997) and ESA (2002- in source documents. References to tidal overtopping
2003) finding “that the low levee…was not built sufficiently high to prevent tidal intrusion” is not correct. Smith removed.
and Reis (1997 page 4) reported that the levee was overtopped by the rising lagoon, not by tides:

…the sandbar re-formed in December [1993], backing up saline water throughout the marsh complex. This
apparently included flooding over the new low levee and through the small culvert into North Marsh…In spring of
1994 the sandbar had closed by mid-May and lagoon levels were high enough to again back water over the low
levee into North Marsh.

As stated above (from Williams, 1990 p. 29-30) the levee was designed to prevent overtopping for most, but not
all, tides. Dan Sicular (ESA, 2008 page 29) found no sign of the levee being overtopped at its lowest point by
one of the highest tides of the year, and he concluded:

In any event, it appears that only the highest of the high tides would overtop the low levee breach, and then
probably only for a short time.

Page 3
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 8 3 The conclusion that as a result of the levee breach, “habitat in North Marsh has transitioned from Conclusion deleted and replaced with statement
of the marsh freshwater/slightly brackish to brackish/saline” is not correct. North Marsh is not uniform. It contains a variety of about disagreement among observers regarding
habitats, including ponds, mudflats, and both natural and artificial channels. The overall appearance of North salinity trends in North Marsh.
Marsh is as a salt marsh, with almost exclusive cover by salt marsh species in the main portion o f the marsh.
This appearance has been consistent from the earliest available surveys. North Marsh was included within the
area mapped as salt marsh in 1854 (Curry, et al., 1985 page 14):

The first accurate and detailed map of the marsh-lagoon system was published by the U.S. Coast Survey in
1854…The maps clearly show open water and seasonally flooded wetlands. The boundaries shown as wetlands
in the 1850’s through 1890’s comprise those boundaries of areas subject to frequent seasonal flooding today.
These are the areas subject to regular salt-water flooding on a seasonal or every-other-year basis. They
generally lie at elevations today of 4-6 feet above mean sea level to mean sea level…

The horizontal hachuring that indicates marsh-lands was depicted based upon “marsh vegetation”… At
Pescadero, the dominant “mash” vegetation is found in areas subject to salt-water flooding at frequent enough
intervals to limit vegetation to salt-tolerant species. Thus, it is no surprise to find today that salt-affected soils are
almost exactly delimited by the boundaries of the marsh-pattern on the 1854 map.

Water sampling records confirm that North Marsh has at least periodically held saline water. This is reflected in
vegetation as well as in saline soils. Jennings and Hayes (1990) compiled data for a number of stations in North
Pond and North Marsh in their Table 2. These data from Viollis (1979), Smith (1987) and the Jennings and
Hayes study show that North Marsh surface water salinities varied between years, seasons, and sampling
locations. Surface salinity levels for the channels around North Marsh ranged from 10.4 to 20.5 ppt in August
1989. Viollis measured surface salinity levels for stations in the central portion of North Marsh at 19.0 to 20.0 ppt
in August 1978.
Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 8 3 comment continues.... See above.
of the marsh
In 1989, Jennings and Hayes (1990, page 17) described salinities in California red-legged frog breeding areas:

Most of the egg masses we encountered in North Marsh were found in water between 4.2 0/00 and 4.7 0/00
(Table 4). Based on the data by Smith (1987), these values appear to be slightly higher (ca. 0.8 0/00) than
normal for the period of February to April, although higher salinity levels do appear from time to time throughout
the year (Tables 2 and 3). In general, salinities increase in North Marsh as the water evaporates in late spring
and summer, then decrease after the dilution of rainwater and stream runoff in the fall and winter.

Some areas within North Marsh have frequently contained fresher water, especially the artificial channels found
on the edges of North Marsh (see Jennings and Hayes, 1990 Figure 2). These fresh water areas have been the
location for most observations of California red-legged frogs in North Marsh, and are the locations within North
Marsh where California red-legged frogs are still observed.

Despite the presence of fresh water areas, North Marsh has been previously seen to become too saline to
support breeding of California red-legged frogs. In 1989, Jennings and Hayes (1990, page 17) found that:

Salinity data indicate that salinity can be an important factor on embryonic mortality for California red-legged
frogs at Pescadero Marsh. Our field observations revealed that most of the embryos observed in naturally laid
egg masses in North Marsh appeared dead in the late cleavage to neural tube state (Gosner States 9-16) (Table
4). Since salinities of 4.2 0/00 to 5.2 0/00 were measured next to these egg masses at the time of our field

Page 4
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 8 3 comment continued... See above.
of the marsh
Jennings and Hayes (1990 page 10) noted the variability in habitat quality in North Marsh, and explained some of
the variation in salinity measurements by differences in fresh water input:

Interpretation of California red-legged frog use of North Marsh during 1989 must be viewed in the context of
three unusually dry winters that preceded the study year. We anticipate that frog use of North Marsh will vary if
the water regime differs substantially; it needs emphasis that 1989 use patterns may not translate to all years.
For example, the wetter-than-average winter of 1985-1986 resulted in fresh water from Pescadero Creek
inundating North Marsh because the levee between Pescadero Creek and North March (sic) was overtopped in
mid-February (T. Taylor, pers. comm.). Fresh water filled North Marsh and two months were needed for the
water to drain enough so that most emergent marsh vegetation was re-exposed. Thus, the habitat that was
extensively used for oviposition during the 1989 season would not have been available to frogs between mid-
February to roughly mid-April 1986, or most of the reproductive season in that year. Further, even if frogs
Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 8 4 The conclusion that “North Butano Marsh has become more saline” is not correct. Using vegetation as an Text revised to clarify difference in trend.
of the marsh indicator of salinity, the two plant transects in North Butano Marsh sampled by ESA in 2002 showed different
trends. As displayed on Figure 5 of the Vegetation Transect Analysis (Appendix A, ESA, 2008) Transect T3
showing a reduction in cover for saltmarsh species and an increase in brackish and freshwater species.
Transect T4, which is further downstream and appears to be adjacent to a marsh channel, showed an increase in
saltmarsh species and a reduction in brackish and freshwater species.
Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 8 4 The June 22, 2010 letter from DFG disputes the statement on page 8 that “The East Delta Marsh has been Comment noted.
of the marsh restored to brackish conditions.” According to the Vegetation Transect Analysis (Appendix A, page 7, ESA,
2008):
The general trend in East Delta Marsh between 1985 and 1990 was of increased representation of salt marsh
species and a decrease of freshwater species. Between 1990 and 2002 the trend was somewhat reversed….

The 2002 monitoring revealed a more complex species structure as the cover of salt marsh species dropped
precipitously and a suite of brackish and freshwater species came in. The most dramatic species cover changes
between 1990 and 2001 were a great reduction in marsh gumplant cover…and the strong appearance of Pacific
potentilla....Both cattail species (generally freshwater species) appeared for the first time in these transects in
2002, with 26% cover in Transect T10.

The DFG letter reports that this area became “brackish” after the 1990s, and cites Smith and Reis, 1997.
Salinity monitoring for the stations in East Delta Marsh (G1 and G2) is shown in Table 2 (page 19) of Smith and
Reis, 1997. Salinities were under 4 ppt for 15 of the 22 samples, and under 7.5 ppt for 19 of the 22 samples. I
was not able to find a reference within this study to previous monitoring in this area or a comparison to previous
results indicating an increase in salinity. The 1997 study includes maps (Figures 3 and 4) indicating areas within
East Delta Marsh where the researchers found California red-legged frog larvae and young of the year.

Jennings and Hayes (1990 page 11) describe East Delta Marsh, based upon their field work in 1989 as follows:
DFG Current state 8 4, last Page 8, Paragraph 4, last Sentence. The Report states, "The East Delta Marsh has been restored to brackish Comment noted. "Brackish marsh" defines a habitat
of the marsh sentence conditions." In review of the literature, DFG is aware that prior to the work done in the 1990s, this location was type which is reflected by the vegetation. Vegetation
likely important habitat for California red-legged frog. After the 1990s this location has become "brackish" with transects support the conclusion that East Delta
salinity concentrations too high 1 for CRLF reproduction (Smith and Reis 1997). We recommend that a Marsh has been restored to a brackish marsh.
species­approach be taken when describing whether locations in the marsh have been restored and that the Species use of habitat types is a different issue.
East Delta Marsh habitat has changed for the worse, rather than for the better.
Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 9 2 I recommend removing the reference to the seasonal timing of bar closure and opening. As shown in Figure 6, Text not changed. Text is consistent with variation in
of the marsh known dates have varied over the years. bar closure dates shown in figure 6.

Page 5
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Tim Frahm Current state 9 3 This description of the fresh water conversion correctly notes the two drivers of the conversion (amount of Text added to description of the 1990s enhancement
of the marsh trapped salt water and the “volume of the lagoon”), but it could then mention that the issue of lagoon volume was to address the intended management of the culverts.
raised in the 1992 PESCADERO MARSH NATURAL PRESERVE HYDROLOGIC ENHANCEMENT PROJECT. Text not changed in the existing conditions section.
The solution to the “volume” portion of the fresh water conversion equation was addressed with this management
solution;
“When the mouth closes, the gates on the North Pond culverts will be closed, so that the brackish to fresh water
conversion in the lagoon will not be delayed by the need to dilute the large
volume of brackish water in North Marsh.”
It seems to us fishermen, that since the gates are always open, the volume of the inundation area exceeds the
ability of the freshwater inputs to “quickly squeeze the saline layer out” as worded by your document. For
example, the area of the lagoon if isolated from the North Pond/North Marsh by closing the gates is
approximately 15 acres. If you add in the area of water impoundment in the North Pond/North Marsh with the
gates open (current condition) the area is over 55 acres. If you have inflow of 5 cfs in the late season
(conservative), you generate 10 ac ft per day of impounded water. That results in 8” inches of “stacked” water
Jerry Smith Current state 9 3 The amount of water required to convert the lagoon depends upon inflows and how salty the lagoon is. Because Text added to indicate quick conversion is likely only
of the marsh of substantial diversion in the watershed at the time of sandbar formation conversion may not occur in dry years. under certain conditions. Managing gates on a fixed
Only with wet years, early bar formation and substantial inflow at the time of bar formation would hydraulic schedule is discussed under "Potential Restoration
pressive “quickly squeeze” the saline layer out; under other conditions the conversion would be slower or might Actions."
not fully occur at all. The closure of the culverts to North Marsh and Pond was supposed to occur to speed that
conversion. The plan was to closed the gates when the bar formed. Based upon what happened (lack of closure)
and the potential role of the open gates in altering tidal flow and delaying sandbar closure, a better strategy is to
just close (functional) gates on April15 or May 1.

Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 9 3 Please clarify that this entire paragraph is attributed to Dr. Smith. Comment noted. There is no documented debate
of the marsh regarding the processes described in this paragraph.

Joanne Kerbavaz Current state 9 4 Please clarify that this entire paragraph reflects the opinions of Dr. Smith, and that there are data that may not Text revised to more directly attribute some of the
of the marsh agree with this description. A complete analysis of these statements is a more ambitious project that I can statements to Dr. Smith. Text also added stating
present here. As an example, please refer to your Figure 6 (page 36). The records for the period before the different conclusions have been drawn from the
changes in the highway bridge and the beginning of the 1990s restoration projects show a variation in bar available record of bar closure.
closure timing, with many recorded closures after June.

The variation in bar closure timing was known in the 1980s, as shown by Jennings and Hayes (1990, page 13):
…the timing of lagoon closure by the sand bar at its mouth may vary over as much as a six-month interval
between years.

Robert Orr (1942, page 287) describes the marsh as based on his observations in the 1930s:
During the summer the marsh is quite dry, except as it is influenced by tide water entering the creek and sloughs.
The pickle-weed and marsh grass areas offer, during this time and until late fall, safety to Savannah sparrows
and other largely ground-dwelling forms. By the end of August the tules and cat-tails show marked signs of dying
down and by the first part of November the stalks are completely dead, although standing and still functioning as
suitable bird cover. Early rains in late October and November usually result in flooding the marsh which at this
season greatly increases its attractiveness to certain late migrants…This flooded or partly-flooded condition
occurs frequently during the early winter until heavy rains or human efforts open the bar across the mouth of the
creek.

In addition, statements included in Elliott (1975 pages 28-29) and Viollis (1979, page 26) reflect the view that the
lagoon had previously been open for most of the year, and that longer term closures were “recent.” This
DFG T&E species 10 3 Page 10, Paragraph 3. We recommend that the western pond turtle be added to the sensitive species list. Added list. Paragraph discussing western pond turtle
added to section below.

Page 6
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Joanne Kerbavaz T&E: 10 3 This paragraph contains statements and assumptions that should be revised to more clearly indicate that they Text was revised based on other comments and now
steelhead are the opinions of the researchers involved. For example, the conclusion that: “In years when the closed addresses to some extent the question of what
trout lagoon converts to freshwater conditions, it provides important summer and fall rearing habitat for juvenile happens in other years. No further edits made.
steelhead and can account for the majority of smolt production in the watershed” cites the work of Dr. Smith from
1990, as also presented in the forum. Given that the lagoon only periodically meets those conditions, and that it
may not have operated in that manner prior to the restriction of tidal flow, it would be important to determine what
occurs in other years.
Joanne Kerbavaz T&E: 10 3 Please clarify that the final sentence in this paragraph is also attributed to Dr. Smith. Comment noted. There is no documented debate
steelhead regarding the existence of the steelhead run and
trout therefore no need to attribute the sentence.
Jerry Smith T&E 10 4 Should read, “the open estuary is well-mixed by the tides …” changed wind to "tides"
steelhead The remainder of the paragraph should read: An open estuary appears to provide better steelhead rearing Changed remainder of paragraph, similar to comment
habitat in drought years, when the closed lagoon would be saline, stratified and warm because of limited but with slightly different wording.
freshwater inflow. However, the amount of steelhead habitat available is much less than in a large impounded
freshwater lagoon, that would occur with early sandbar formation and adequate inflows for freshwater conversion.
(The open system in 2007 and 2008 produced about 1500 and 750 steelhead; the closed and converted systems
in 1985 and 1986 produced about 10,000-25,000steelhead; the closed and saline/stratified lagoons in the
drought years of 1987-1989probably produced only low hundreds of steelhead). In addition, the late sandbar
closure in recent years (discussed later) appears to be associated with steelhead kills during the winter breach of
the sandbar.
Jerry Smith T&E gobies 11 1 Should read: “…probably reduced tidewater goby habitat by 80% and their abundance substantially. Text changed.
DFG T&E - gobies 11 1 Page 11, Paragraph 1. We recommend that the following information be added: In regard to tidewater goby Tidewater gobies have not been extirpated from
populations located in the San Francisco through Monterey County area, the Pescadero Marsh habitat was Pescadero Marsh, so it is unclear why a unique
believed to have been the most productive. Also, genetic studies indicate the Pescadero Marsh population to be genetic signature would have been lost.
unique; therefore, we believe that impacts to this population resulted in losing this unique genetic signature
(personal communication with Dr. Jerry Smith). Comment noted but not added. Need citation to
written material by Dr. Swenson (i.e., so comments
We are also aware that Dr. Ramona Swenson determined that gobies collected in North Marsh (of Pescadero and context can be understood by others).
Marsh) grew larger than those she had sampled in other lagoon systems (personal communication with Dr.
Swenson). Fishery biologists recognize the positive correlation that exists between fish size and fish fecundity,
and DFG staff are concerned that restoration actions have caused this particular location, as well as others in
Pescadero Marsh, to dry up early, thereby substantially impacting the quantity and quality of habitat.

DFG T&E - CRLF 11 2 Page 11, Paragraph 2. We recommend that the following information be added. At the time that California red- In reviewing the Recovery Plan, the assertion
legged frogs were listed under the Federal Endangered Species Act (FESA) in 1996, the Pescadero Marsh regarding Pescadero's CRLF population was not
population was believed to have been the largest of the entire population of this species [U.S. Fish and Wildlife found.
Service. 2002: Recovery Plan for the California Red-legged Frog (Rana aurora draytoniJ)]. The data used for this
assessment was collected prior to DPR's 1990s restoration project. Unfortunately, Smith and Reis (1997) Text was added to reflect importance of Pescadero
described a substantial habitat and population decline for this species after the restoration project had been CRLF population as identified in the recovery plan.
implemented.
Joanne Kerbavaz T&E: CRLF 11 2 For those not familiar with the marsh, this paragraph may be viewed as conclusive evidence that California red- Comment noted. Text does not say or imply that
legged frogs have been eliminated from portions of the marsh. There have been no systematic surveys CRLF have been eliminated from portions of the
(including nocturnal surveys) recently along the lines of the work of Jennings and Hayes (1990) in 1989. It should marsh.
be noted that State Parks staff and others have continued to observe California red-legged frogs in many areas
of Pescadero Marsh, including North Marsh and Butano Marsh. Some areas within that marsh have shown
trends for increasing fresh water -- and presumably the potential for increased habitat for California red-legged
frogs. It is possible that California red-legged frogs, which are noted for the ability to travel long distances
(McGinnis, 2002 page 3) have shifted from areas with more saline water to areas that now contain fresher water.

Joanne Kerbavaz T&E: CRLF 11 2 There are additional assumptions within this paragraph that should require additional review before they are Text revised to clarify the uncertainty.
accepted, or they should be presented as opinions for which there may be contrary data. For example, the
“drying of North Marsh (and probably parts of Butano Marsh) in summer” is presented as a new phenomenon.
As discussed above, Robert Orr (1942) described the marsh as “quite dry” in the summer, except for tidal areas.

Page 7
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Joanne Kerbavaz T&E SFGS 11 3 As above, there is an assumption that salinity changes in North Marsh have “likely significantly reduced San Text revised to eliminate specification of salinity as
Francisco garter snake (SFGS) abundance in the Marsh.” However, previous studies of SFGS distribution and the limiting factor for SFGS in marsh. Text added to
abundance did not identify North Marsh as an important site for SFGS. highlight the lack of disagreement among observers
as to whether low use is historic condition or changed
In a memorandum dated October 10, 1979, James Steele (at the time a fishery biologist for the Department of condition.
Fish and Game) reported on a survey on August 22-24, 1979 to determine the distribution of SFGS within the
marsh. Steele found three SFGS within Butano marsh; he did not find any within North Marsh. Steele measured
salinity levels at 12 to 13.5 ppt in the channel along the north side of North Marsh.

Sam McGinnis (1984, page 20) captured SFGS in the Trout Ponds (called the Water Lane Pond), an area where
SFGS are observed today. McGinnis (1984, page 21) concluded based on survey work completed 5/12/84 to
7/31/84:

No San Francisco garter snakes were observed or captured in Pescadero Marsh proper. Water levels varied by
several feet and shoreline traplines were often submerged. During high water periods, water was moderately
brackish.

In a 2002 report prepared for Catrans, McGinnis (2002, page 1) wrote that seven populations of SFGS are
documented in the Pescadero region.

These all occur at small ranch pond sites and in the eastern reaches of Pescadero Marsh.

McGinnis distinguished between the upland freshwater areas that are more likely to support SFGS and areas to
the west that would have the potential for salt water intrusion.

The absence of observations of SFGS does not preclude the presence of the species.

As was noted by Steele (1979, page 2) in his memorandum:
Joanne Kerbavaz T&E SFGS 11 3 Any conclusions regarding the abundance and distribution of SFGS should be supported by surveys, and by Comment noted.
comparison with earlier studies of abundance and distribution. As above, it should also be recognized that SFGS
shift locations to take advantage of changes in habitat suitability.
Joanne Kerbavaz Shift in mgmt 11 4 The “management goals and objectives” shown in the table on page 12 were recommended by ESA in their 2008 Text referring to recommended management
perspective report. The caption to Table 2 should be amended to read: Table 2. Recommended Management Objectives objectives was deleted. Only adopted DPR policies
for Pescadero Marsh (ESA 2008) are relevant.

These goals and objectives have not been adopted by California State Parks. Many of these goals do reflect
California State Parks management directives, as presented by in the forum.
Jerry Smith T&E SFGS 11 3, last Should read: “…in the North Marsh and parts of Butano Marshes and Delta Marsh due to high salinity and drying "and probably parts of Butano Marsh" added to
sentence of North Marsh has likely substantially…” sentence. Delta marsh not mentioned because it is
not mentioned in paragraph on CRLF. Causes of
CRLF population declines removed from SFGS
paragraph. They are stated in CRLF paragraph more
clearly and without creating redundancy.
DFG Mgmt 12 1 The Report states that DPR has shifted" ... from managing individual features of the Marsh to restoring Text added describing DFGs public trust
perspective ecosystem processes." We agree with taking an ecosystem approach, but we recommend that DFG's public trust responsibility.
responsibility be included in this section of text, along with our goal at the Marsh of restoring biological
productivity of sensitive target species while taking an ecosystem approach. We need to tie the restoration back
into measurable recovery goals.

Page 8
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Jerry Smith Shift in mgmt 12 5 Page 12.Paragraph 5 (below the table). Last 2 sentences. The following comments also apply to the 1st 2 Text changed on page 12 to capture viewpoint of Dr.
perspective paragraphs on page 13. Smith and DFG.

I disagree with these statements. I do not believe there was widespread agreement with the statements as Text not changed on page 13. Not sure which text
written. Many of the Forum speakers and panel members would disagree; I certainly do. Although, in an ideal comment applies to.
situation, reliance on natural processes is preferred over use of active measures, the present Pescadero
conditions are not an ideal situation. Stream flow in late spring and summer has been greatly reduced in the
watershed, affecting the amount of water that can convert the lagoon to fresh conditions after sandbar closure.
The natural condition of almost all estuaries along the central coast is for the sandbar to form a closed lagoon by
early to mid summer (in the absence of artificial breaching).The present conditions, including the late sandbar
closure, saline, stratified conditions in fall/winter at the time of sandbar breaching, and drying of north marsh in
summer have severely impacted the abundance of tidewater goby, red-legged frog, probably the San Francisco
garter snake, and the potential abundance of steelhead in average to wet years.

Fish kills are occurring during the winter breach of the sandbar. The present condition is unsuitable and probably
constitutes “take” under the Federal endangered Species Act.

Use of natural processes to restore the impacted populations is preferred, where it achieves the goal of
protecting and restoring the previously large populations of sensitive species. Otherwise, minimal active
measures are preferred, if they will achieve the goals of restoring impacted populations (such as repairing the low
Tim Frahm Mgmt 12 1st after I don’t remember that there was a “fairly widespread agreement that reliance on natural processes is a Section changed to limit agreement to the panelists.
perspective table restoration approach that is preferred over the use of active measures ...” Sorry, I just don’t remember that. This theme was strong in the panel discussion.
Perhaps that showed up in the evaluations, but I don’t remember being asked that question on the evaluations. I Last sentence deleted.
do remember that there were many questions from the participants about “projects” and some discussion from
the audience on how you could characterize projects to move the permits quicker (i.e. characterizing the
replacement of the culverts as “maintenance”). I would suggest that the last sentence of that paragraph be
removed. I think it is imposing Parks bias and does not reflect the discussions at the forum and would create
perceived road-blocks to projects.
Jerry Smith Restoration 12 last I would certainly add a 5th key problem that emerged at the Forum. The change in timing of sandbar closure Text changed to include a 5th problem, stated
goals since the bridge replacement and restoration actions appears to be a major factor in the first 3 listed problems differently than suggested -- degradation of steelhead
(fish kills, degradation of water quality, and loss of fresh and brackish water habitat).Similarly, I would add a 4th rearing habitat as a result of fewer days of closed,
potential restoration goal: Restore early sandbar closure in wet years, to produce a converted freshwater lagoon freshwater lagoon.
and to maintain summer flooding of North Marsh. Those conditions are best for tidewater goby, red-legged frog 4th restoration goal added.
(and probably SF garter snake), and steelhead.
DFG Mgmt 12 The Report cites Williams (1990) which states, "[ilt appears impossible to restore Pescadero Marsh to a self- Text changed to reflect both viewpoints.
perspective managing system, as a natural system ought to be. Rather, past and continuing human influences on the marsh
require continued human intervention to realize specific and sometimes conflicting management goals." The
Report then states that based on presentations and discussion at the Forum, there appears to be a fairly
widespread agreement upon the natural processes and functions in a restoration approach that is preferred over
the use of human measures .... " We disagree that there was "fairly widespread agreement" on this issue, and
due to our public trust responsibility, we recommend taking an incremental ecosystem approach to restoring
biological productivity of sensitive target species. If active management is required to restore biological
productivity, as is the case in most wildlife preserves. we recommend active management over passive
management. We acknowledge that the system may have been so altered substantially by humans in the past
that active management may be the only practical tool for achieving a seasonal freshwater lagoon.
DFG Restoration 13 1 The Report describes the need for restoration goals to be consistent with DPR management objectives; Text not changed. DPR is the landowner and thus
goals however, the Report does not include the need for restoration to be consistent with DFG's public trust their objectives must be considered.Authors were
responsibilities. We recommend that restoration goals be consistent with DFG's public trust responsibilities and unable to find any information about how DFG's
that the following text be added to this goal. In restoration goal Number 2 we would like to see the following text public trust responsibilities could force a landowner to
added to the end of goal: " ... that maximize the productivity of species of special concern." We need to tie the take restoration actions to maximize the productivity
restoration back into measurable recovery goals. In addition, we like to see goal Number 3 read "[b]ase of species of concern. If citation can be provided, text
restoration to the maximum extent possible on restoring natural processes, but active measures will be should be changed. Otherwise, this goal would need
considered if studies indicate that they are required for the protection of sensitive habitats and species." to be added through consensus on it, which did not
appear to be reached at the time of the forum.

Page 9
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Joanne Kerbavaz Goal: 13 3 The statement on page 13 that “…the number of steelhead carcasses counted varies dramatically from year to "dramatically" replaced with "significantly". The
Reduce fish year” may be misleading, especially considering more recent data. It would be more accurate to say that the variation seen is in the range of 1-2 orders of
kills number of carcasses counted for each observed event has varied, but has remained within the range of less magnitude, which is significant.
than 10 at a minimum to approximately 300 at a maximum. For the years with actual carcass counts, the
numbers of steelhead have ranged between 170 (2006) and 4 (2009). The count has been fewer than 10
steelhead for the past three years.
Joanne Kerbavaz Goal: 13 4 Although carcass counts probably do not capture all mortalities, the imprecision should not be overstated, Comment noted. Text already acknowledges
Reduce fish especially for the years with low numbers. From personal observation, searches over the past few years have uncertainty on this topic.
kills not shown “rapid consumption of carcasses by scavenger species.” Specific carcasses have been marked and
relocated from one to several days later. During repeated surveys, evidence of scavenging (e.g., tracks, damage
to carcasses, fish debris) has been minimal.
Joanne Kerbavaz Goal: 13 4 I do not know the source of the statement in the DFG letter (page 4) that steelhead die instantaneously at the Comment noted.
Reduce fish breach. State Parks staff have monitored the sandbar breaching events, and have only found evidence of
kills mortality after the low tide and receding lagoon leave carcasses on the banks.
DFG Restoration 13 last Although DFG supports the sentiments of the last paragraph of this page which is titled "[r]estoring water quality Comment noted. Consensus on DFG's belief has not
goals and habitat conditions in the seasonal lagoon ... ," DFG disagrees with the statement " ... but causal relationships been reached. If it had, a restoration project would
among these factors is not understood." Specifically, DFG believes that adequate information is known about already have been designed "with confidence."
species' biological needs to move forward on restoration actions. However, DFG believes that important Remainder of DFG comment supports text of
information can be learned by implementing experimental "treatments" in an incremental manner (see paragraph.
attachments) to better understand how to reduce the re-suspension of sediment (and thus improve water quality)
as well as how the hydrology affects the timing of sandbar closure. Additionally, hydrological analysis could be
done to explore sandbar closure dynamics and reduce residential/road flooding risk.

Jerry Smith Goal: reduce 13 next to last The situation that Sean Hayes describes is of upstream movement of steelhead in fall, associated with wave and Comment noted. Text not changed because text is
fish kills and kelp over wash and deteriorating dissolved oxygen in the lagoon. The first substantial rains are usually needed to only posing a hypothesis. Comment argues against
Hyp 4 even allow fish to move upstream above the lagoons, and the upstream movement may also occur in winter implication of hypothesis -- i.e., observed fish kill may
without water quality declines. It is probably not a significant factor in mitigated the kills associated with bar not represent a significant portion of steelhead
breaching at Pescadero. Preventing the kills is the more important issue. In 2007 the number of steelhead population, and therefore may not require significant
population in the lagoon was estimated as about 1500.In 2008 it was about 750. action to address. Hypothesis is valid. Policy that
evolves from testing hypothesis is open for debate.

No citation provided for 2007 and 2008 population
estimates, so data not added.

Tim Frahm Restoration 13 The Town of Pescadero is not being flooded from overtopping at the Butano Creek / Pescadero Rd crossing. Text changed to clarify.
goals (The “Town” is periodically flooded during huge storms which overtop Pescadero Creek near the town. – don’t
mix up the issues of Pescadero Creek with the Butano Creek) There are serious flooding concerns from the
Butano Creek and it should be characterized as severe road flooding which causes road closures and threatens
life and property of those who attempt to cross the flooded roadways. Additionally, the Town of Pescadero
becomes more isolated due to the recurring road closures and residents proximate to the Butano Creek /
Pescadero Rd crossing are severely impacted.
Tim Frahm Restoration 13 on the bottom of page 12, there is a statement of the 4 problems, but on page 13, there are only 3 goals. I think Text added to clarify that the flooding problem in the
goals this needs some re-working. For example, none of the goals addresses the problem of sediment accretion in creek is beyond the scope of a marsh restoration
Butano Creek, even though this is one of the 4 identified problems. In fact, the 1992 Enhancement Plan speaks effort, but that actions in the marsh should not
to the issue of this same problem and offers solutions. exacerbate the problem.
Tim Frahm fish kills 13 please note that Figure 4 is an incomplete table. Parks didn’t “count fish” every year and even in those years Note added to Figure 4
that Parks counted fish, there are some years that the timing of the daily tides thwarts our efforts to find stranded
fish (which we count – most dead steelhead sink so we can’t account for them).
Tim Frahm fish kills 13 I’m surprised that you would ever make comments like “evaluating the importance of the fish kill”. I would Wording changed. Text added under hypothesis 3
suggest that you never use the words “importance” or “significance” in association with the fish kill (this occurs in noting importance of addressing the Fishkill, no
several places in the document). It may be appropriate to assess the “extent” of the kill (keep counting), or the matter the size.
“percentage” of the population, but any killed or dead steelhead is “significant” and “important”. These terms
have a regulatory connotation and even folks like me know that. And why should you even care if it’s a “small
component” as it is characterized in other sections of the report. Big, small or even very, very small, this fish kill
is preventable and should be addressed.

Page 10
Commenter Section Original Original Comment Response
Page Paragraph
Tim Frahm fish kills 13 In that same paragraph, which was commenting on Sean Haye’s research, I would also like you to know that not Paragraph already addresses this. Minor wording
only is there no research in Pescadero regarding the behavior of juvenile “up-migration”, but there is no change of "documented" to "observed."
observation of this migration noted by the fishermen. I can elaborate on this if you are interested.
DFG Restoration 13 The Report describes the annual fish kill problem and states that there is a "key challenge" in the difficulty of Comment noted. Report accurately summarizes what
goals quantifying the number of individuals and proportion of the steelhead population that are killed during the annual was presented at the forum. No proposal or
breach. The Report further states that Forum Member/NOAA Fisheries researcher Dr. Sean Hayes observed that recommendation to count steelhead population is
steelhead moved upstream after a breaching event at Scott Creek. DFG believes when it comes to implementing made in this section.
restoration actions at Pescadero Marsh, quantifying the proportion of the steelhead population that is killed every
year is a "non-issue" and that delaying the implementation of important restoration actions so that an
assessment of the number of fished killed annually can occur will delay restoration progress. DFG believes that
any fish dying due to water quality problems which are within our control is unacceptable. Furthermore. although
Dr. Hayes' research is interesting, we do not believe that the fish moving upstream in Scott Creek after the
breach affects our goal to restore a freshwater lagoon for the following reasons: 1) At Pescadero Marsh,
steelhead are observed to die instantaneously (in seconds). with insufficient time to safely swim upstream, out of
Joanne Kerbavaz Goal: habitat 13 As discussed above, this section relies on assumptions about “ecological function” and “biological productivity” It is unclear what assumptions the commenter is
mix that should still be treated as uncertainties that could be tested. referring to. The main point of this section is to define
hypotheses that can be tested to further
understanding of the marsh's ecological functions.
Jerry Smith Goal: restore 14 1 Tidal marsh is a valuable habitat and can still be maintained with an open sandbar in winter and early spring and Text changed to reduce emphasis on tidal salt marsh
habitat and a closed sandbar and freshwater lagoon in summer and fall. The conditions of salt grass and pickleweed were and focus more on the concept that habitat
WQ maintained in the 1980’s despite freshwater lagoons in the summer of many of the years. In addition, the those conversion will require approval by regulatory
conditions produced the habitat conditions that supported large populations of federally listed species (see agencies a