You are on page 1of 12

624 SUPREME COURT REPORTS ANNOTATED

Nestlé Philippines, Inc. vs. FY Sons, Incorporated
*
G.R. No. 150780. May 5, 2006.

NESTLÉ  PHILIPPINES,  INC.,  petitioner,  vs.  FY  SONS,
INCORPORATED, respondent.

Remedial  Law;  Appeals;  Docket  Fees;  A  court  acquires  jurisdiction
over the claim of damages upon payment of the correct docket fees.—A court
acquires jurisdiction over the claim of damages upon payment of the correct
docket  fees.  In  this  case,  it  is  not  disputed  that  respondent  paid  docket  fees
based  on  the  amounts  prayed  for  in  its  complaint.  Respondent  adduced
evidence  to  prove  its  losses.  It  was  proper  for  the  CA  and  the  RTC  to
consider  this  evidence  and  award  the  sum  of  P1,000,000.  Had  the  courts
below  awarded  a  sum  more  than  P1,000,000,  which  was  the  amount  prayed
for, an additional filing fee would have been assessed and imposed as a lien
on  the  judgment.  However,  the  courts  limited  their  award  to  the  amount
prayed for.

_______________

* SECOND DIVISION.

625

VOL. 489, MAY 5, 2006 625

Nestlé Philippines, Inc. vs. FY Sons, Incorporated

Same; Same; Findings  of  fact  of  the  trial  court  when  affirmed  by  the
Court of Appeals are binding upon the Supreme Court.—Both the RTC and
CA found that respondent had satisfactorily proven the factual bases for the
damages adjudged against the petitioner. This is a factual matter binding and
conclusive  upon  this  Court.  It  is  well­settled  that—.  .  .  findings  of  fact  of
the trial court, when affirmed by the Court of Appeals, are binding upon the
Supreme Court. This rule may be disregarded only when the findings of fact
of  the  Court  of  Appeals  are  contrary  to  the  findings  and  conclusions  of  the
trial  court,  or  are  not  supported  by  the  evidence  on  record.  But  there  is  no

 Inc. pp.  Respondent. The facts are stated in the opinion of the Court.000  to  secure respondent’s  credit  purchases  from  petitioner.  marketing. PETITION for review on certiorari of the decision and resolution of the Court of Appeals. 27­46.R. 3  Penned  by  Associate  Justice  Delilah  Vidallon­Magtolis  and  concurred  in  by Associate Justices Teodoro P. CV No.  A  deed  of  assignment  was  also  executed  by  respondent  in favor of petitioner on December 13.  2001  which  denied  petitioner’s  motion  for reconsideration. J. Pimentel. 57299 dated January 11.  selling and  distributing  food  items  to  restaurants  and  food  service  outlets. 1988. Petitioner  is  a  corporation  engaged  in  the  manufacture  and distribution  of  all  Nestlé  products  nationwide.  A  special  power  of . On  December  23. Villafuerte & Associates for petitioner. 90­3169. The antecedent facts follow. FY Sons.      Bustos. assigning the time deposit of  a  certain  Calixto  Laureano  in  the  amount  of  P500.  on  the other  hand. This Court will not assess all  over  again  the  evidence  adduced  by  the  parties  particularly  where  as  in this  case  the  findings  of  both  the  trial  court  and  the  Court  of  Appeals completely coincide. Incorporated November  14. CORONA.: This is a petition for review on certiorari under Rule 45 of the Rules 1 of Court assailing the decision  of the Court of Appeals (CA) in CA­ G. Regino and Josefina 626 626 SUPREME COURT REPORTS ANNOTATED Nestlé Philippines.ground to apply this exception to the instant case.  1998.  Regino  and  Josefina  Guevara­Salonga  of  the  11th Division of the Court of Appeals; Rollo. 2001 which in turn affirmed with  modification  the  decision  of  Branch  57  of  the  Regional  2 Trial Court (RTC) of Makati City in Civil Case No. vs. 3  as well as the CA’s resolution  dated _______________ 1  Penned  by  Associate  Justice  Delilah  Vidallon­Magtolis  and  concurred  in  by Associate  Justices  Teodoro  P.      Michael Elbinias for respondent.  is  a  corporation  engaged  in  trading.  petitioner  and  respondent  entered  into  a distributorship  agreement  (agreement)  whereby  petitioner  would supply  its  products  for  respondent  to  distribute  to  its  food  service outlets. 2 Penned by Judge Oscar B.

000  for allegedly selling 50 cases of Krem­Top liquid coffee creamer to Lu Hing  Market.  Pampanga. Angeles. 48.  respondent. .  and  to  develop  market  areas  for  [petitioner’s] products. .  Krem­Top  liquid  coffee  creamer  was  sold  to Augustus Bakery and Grocery.  time  and  efforts  to  abide  by  such distributorship  agreement. 2006 627 Nestlé Philippines.  petitioner  fined  respondent  P20. At the end of 1989. Inc.  [petitioner]  made  representations  and  promises  of  rendering  support.  .  Respondent  paid  the  fine.  According to respondent: .  a  retail  outlet  in  Tarlac. Thus. [Respondent] thereby  invested  huge  sums  of  money.  1990.81.  Urdaneta.  Tarlac  and Olongapo. The  areas  covered  by  the  agreement  were  Baguio.  wrote petitioner to complain about the latter’s breaches of their _______________ Guevara­Salonga of the Former 11th Division of the Court of Appeals; Rollo. including  marketing  support. petitioner sent respondent a demand letter  and  notice  of  termination. On  October  19. p. .attorney  was  likewise  executed  by  Laureano  authorizing  the respondent to use the time deposit as collateral. an act again allegedly in violation of the agreement. 1990.  . to take effect on July 1. [respondent] was lured into executing a distributorship agreement with the [petitioner]. 627 VOL. vs.  assignment  of  representatives  by  way  of assistance  in  its  development  efforts. FY Sons.  Thereafter.  and  assurances  of  income  in  a marketing area not previously developed. on November 5.  In September  1990. 1990.  through  counsel. In turn.  the  [petitioner]  breached  the  distributorship  agreement by  committing  various  acts  of  bad  faith  such  as:  failing  to  provide promotional support; deliberately failing to promptly supply the [respondent] .  When  the  alleged  accounts were  not  settled. 1990. alleging bad faith.  Bulacan.  alleging  that  the  latter  had outstanding  accounts  of  P995.  petitioner  applied  the  P500. Respondent demanded the payment of damages.  Dagupan. Incorporated agreement and the various acts of bad faith committed by petitioner against respondent. 489.319.  La  Union. MAY 5. Petitioner imposed a P40.  1990. A supplemental agreement was executed on June 27. On  July  2.000 fine which respondent refused to pay. 1990.000  time  deposit  as partial payment. the agreement expired and the parties executed a renewal agreement on January 22. Respondent  filed  4 a  complaint  for  damages  against  petitioner.  This  was  purportedly proscribed  by  the  agreement.

6 SO ORDERED.  petitioner  interposed  a  counterclaim  for P495. In  a  decision  dated  November  10.  the  latter terminated  the  agreement  on  the  allegation  that  [respondent]  did  not  pay  its accounts. vs. The amount of P100. Three­fourths costs against the defendant.000.000.81  representing  the  balance  of  respondent’s  overdue accounts.  the  Makati  City  RTC ruled in favor of the respondent: “WHEREFORE.  [Petitioner]  also  seized  [respondent’s]  time  deposit  collateral without  basis;  penalized  [respondent]  with  monetary  penalty  for  the concocted  charge;  5 and  unilaterally  suspended  the  supply  of  stocks  to [respondent].214. exemplary damages of P200. 90­3169.  with  interest  of  2%  per  month  from  the  date  of  default until fully paid.00  as  actual  damages  sustained  by  the plaintiff  by  reason  of  the  unwarranted  and  illegal  acts  of  the defendant in terminating the distributorship agreement; 2.000. The amount of P100.000 and costs of suit. moral damages of P100.000. Inc. is hereby ordered to pay the defendant the amount of  P53. [petitioner] would be able to obtain the market gains made by [respondent] at the latter’s own efforts and expenses.  In  its  answer. When [respondent] complained  to  [petitioner]  about  the  latter’s  acts  of  bad  faith.000.000. moral damages of P200.  attorney’s  fees  of P100.with  the  stocks  for  its  orders;  intentionally  diminishing  the  [respondent’s] sales  by  supporting  a  non­distributor;  and  concocting  falsified  charges  to cause the termination of the distributorship agreement without just cause.000 time deposit and costs of suit.000. By such termination.000.000. 5 Rollo. 628 628 SUPREME COURT REPORTS ANNOTATED Nestlé Philippines.” . premises considered.26  (sic)  which  amount  has  been  established  as  the  amount  the defendant is entitled from the plaintiff.00 as exemplary damages; 3. plus the return of the P500. judgment is hereby rendered in favor of  the  plaintiff  and  against  the  defendant  ordering  the  defendant  to  pay plaintiff the following: 1. pp. attorney’s fees of P120.00 as attorney’s fees; The plaintiff however.319. 28­29.000.  exemplary  damages  of  P100.000.  1997. Incorporated Respondent sought actual damages of P1. The  amount  of  P1.” _______________ 4 Civil Case No. FY Sons.

7 Consisting of the P1. Hence this petition raising the following grounds: (1) THE  [CA]  COMMITTED  A  GRAVE  ERROR  IN  LAW  WHEN  IT RULED THAT: “THE RATIOCINATIONS OF THE APPELLANT AS TO THE APPELLEE’S ALLEGED VIOLATION OF THE CONTRACT ARE THUS  WEAK  AND  UNCONVINCING”  AND  “THE  APPELLEE’S ALLEGED  NON­PAYMENT  AND  OUTSTANDING  BALANCE  OF P995. On January 11..000.000 time deposit.  JR.00. the CA  rendered  a  decision  affirming  the  RTC’s  decision  with modification: “WHEREFORE. Inc.26 payable by the appellee to the appellant is DELETED.500.Petitioner appealed the decision to the CA.000 awarded by the RTC plus the P500.214.  among  others. 27­28.  its  distributor;  that petitioner unjustifiably refused to deliver stocks to respondent; that the imposition of the P20. Incorporated amount of P53.00;  and (2) the _______________ 6 Rollo. 2006 629 Nestlé Philippines. FY Sons.81  WAS  NOT  SUFFICIENTLY  PROVEN”  DESPITE  THE FACT  THAT  FLORENTINO  YUE.000 fine was void for having no basis; that petitioner  failed  to  prove  respondent’s  alleged  outstanding obligation;  that  petitioner  terminated  the  agreement  without sufficient basis in law or equity and in bad faith; and that petitioner should be held liable for damages. 2001.000.  THE  MANAGER  OF  THE RESPONDENT  ADMITTED  IN  OPEN  COURT  IN  ANSWER  TO  THE QUESTION  OF  THEN  PRESIDING  JUDGE  PHINNY  C. vs. 8 SO ORDERED. pp.000.000. 489.000.  the  judgment  appealed  from  is  AFFIRMED  with  the following MODIFICATIONS: (1) the actual damages is INCREASED from 7 P1.00 to P1. (2) .  that  petitioner indeed  failed  to  provide  support  to  respondent. 629 VOL.” Both  the  CA  and  the  RTC  found.  ARAQUIL THAT  THE  DISTRIBUTORSHIP  AGREEMENT  WAS  TERMINATED BY  YOUR  PETITIONER  BECAUSE  OF  THE  UNPAID  BALANCE  OF THE RESPONDENT OF AROUND P900.319. MAY 5.

. 46.00  AND  ORDERING  THE  REFUND  OF  THE AMOUNT  OF  P500.000. On  the  first  issue. THE  [CA]  COMMITTED  A  GRAVE  ERROR  IN  LAW  IN DISREGARDING  THE  TESTIMONY  OF  THE  WITNESS  FOR  THE PETITIONER.81  AND  THAT  THE EVIDENCE SUBMITTED BY THE RESPONDENT ON THE ALLEGED ACTUAL  DAMAGES  IT  SUSTAINED  AS  A  RESULT  OF  THE TERMINATION  OF  THE  DISTRIBUTORSHIP  AGREEMENT (EXHIBIT  “5”)  AND  COMPANION  EXHIBITS  WERE  MERELY SPECULATIVE AND DID NOT HAVE PROBATIVE VALUE.  petitioner  asserts  that  respondent’s  witness. Jr.  CRISTINA  RAYOS  WHO  PREPARED  THE STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT (EXHIBIT 11) ON THE GROUNDS THAT SHE WAS NOT INVOLVED IN THE DELIVERY AS SHE _______________ 8 Id.  RULE  130. .  OF  THE  REVISED RULES ON EVIDENCE. (4) THE  [CA]  COMMITTED  A  GRAVE  ERROR  IN  LAW 9 FOR  NOT AWARDING TO THE PETITIONER ITS COUNTERCLAIM. 630 630 SUPREME COURT REPORTS ANNOTATED Nestlé Philippines. Inc. (3) THE  [CA]  COMMITTED  A  GRAVE  ERROR  IN  LAW  IN AWARDING  TO  THE  RESPONDENT  ACTUAL  DAMAGES  IN  THE AMOUNT  OF  P1.000..  1191  OF  THE  CIVIL  CODE  AND PARAGRAPHS  5  AND  22  OF  THE  DISTRIBUTORSHIP  AGREEMENT BECAUSE OF THE FAILURE OF THE RESPONDENT TO SETTLE ITS ACCOUNT  IN  THE  AMOUNT  OF  P995.00  REPRESENTING  THE  TIME  DEPOSIT  OF THE  RESPONDENT  WHICH  WAS  ASSIGNED  AS  SECURITY  FOR THE  RESPONDENT’S  CREDIT  LINE  BECAUSE  THE  PETITIONER HAD  THE  RIGHT  TO  TERMINATE  THE  DISTRIBUTORSHIP AGREEMENT  UNDER  ART. Incorporated WAS  ONLY  IN  CHARGE  OF  THE  RECORDS  AND  DOCUMENTS  OF ALL  ACCOUNTS  RECEIVABLES  AS  PART  OF  HER  DUTIES  AS CREDIT  AND  COLLECTION  MANAGER  CONSIDERING  THAT  THE EVIDENCE  PRESENTED  WAS  AN  EXCEPTION  TO  THE  HEARSAY RULE  UNDER  SECTION  45  (SIC). a director and officer of respondent corporation.000. p. FY Sons. vs.319. Florentino Yue.

 pp.000.  and  when. 2006 631 Nestlé Philippines. Incorporated Respondent counters that this statement was merely in answer to the question  of  the  presiding  judge  on  what  ground  petitioner supposedly  terminated  the  agreement. Yue’s statement cannot be considered a judicial admission that respondent had  an  unpaid  obligation  of  P900.81 was not sufficiently proven. FY Sons.  that  the  testimony  of  Rayos  constituted  incompetent evidence: x  x  x  the  appellee’s  alleged  non­payment  and  outstanding  balance  of P995. among others.  Moreover. Her  explanation  was  that  there  were  DO’s  or  Delivery  Orders  covering  the transactions. 14. saying.” Petitioner’s  argument  is  palpably  without  merit  and  deserves scant consideration. MAY 5.000. On  the  second  issue. vs. 631 VOL. 10 Id. _______________ . 489.319.  who  prepared  the  statement  of  account  on  the  basis  of  the invoices  and  delivery  orders  12 corresponding  to  the  alleged  overdue accounts of respondent.  The  witness  for  the appellant  who  prepared  the  Statement.  and  it  does  not  show  receipt  thereof  by  the appellee.  The CA ruled that petitioner was not able to prove that respondent indeed had unpaid accounts. Yue’s statement in isolation from the rest of his testimony and took it out of context.  Cristina  Rayos. 11­13. It quoted Mr.  petitioner  argues  that  the  CA  should  not have  disregarded  the  testimony  of  petitioner’s  witness. Obviously. p.  in  fact  admitted  that the  Invoices  corresponding  to  the  alleged  overdue  accounts  are  not  signed. this witness  later  testified  that  “(petitioner)  wrote  us  back  saying  that they (had) terminated my contract and that I owe(d) them something 11 like P900.  The  witness  was  not  being asked. x x x      x x x      x x x Anyway.000  and  that  the  agreement  had been terminated for this reason.admitted in open court that the respondent had an unpaid obligation 10 to petitioner in the amount of “around P900. In fact.” _______________ 9 Rollo.  Cristina Rayos.  if  such  indeed  was  received.  the  appellant’s  Statement  of  Account  showing  such  alleged unpaid  balance  is  undated. Inc. nor was he addressing..  there  are  no supporting  documents  to  sustain  such  unpaid  accounts. the truth of such ground.

  She  was  not  even  the  credit and collection manager during the period _______________ 13 Rollo. MAY 5.” Petitioner contends that the testimony of Rayos was an exception to 14 the hearsay rule under Section 43. p. she could not have identified the same. 16.  or  whether  they were  actually  received  by  respondent. 11 Id. 39. 489. FY Sons. however.  by  a  person  deceased.  i. Incorporated However.”  “15­A”  and  “16­A”  as  the persons who received the goods for the appellant. 15 That is.  whether  such  deliveries  were  in fact  made  in  the  amounts  and  on  the  dates  stated.  she  did  not  identify  the  signatures  appearing  on  the  Delivery Orders  marked  as  Exhibits  “13­A. p. for she was not involved in the delivery. pp.  or  unable  to  testify. p. 16.. Rayos testified on a statement  of  account  she  prepared  on  the  basis  of  invoices  and delivery orders which she. who  was  in  a  position  to  know  the  facts  therein  stated. as she is only  in  charge  of  the  records  and  documents  on  all 13accounts  receivables  as part of her duties as Credit and Collection Manager. 12 Rollo. She thus knew nothing of the truth or falsity of the facts stated in the invoices  and  delivery  orders.. 15. knew nothing about. at the time she testified; Rollo. she was not involved in the delivery of goods and was merely in charge of the records and documents of all accounts 15 receivable  as  part  of  her  duties  as  credit  and  collection  manager.  if  such  person  made  the  entries  in  his  professional capacity or in the performance of duty and in the ordinary or regular course of business or duty. 2006 633 . 14 Id. 632 632 SUPREME COURT REPORTS ANNOTATED Nestlé Philippines. The  provision  does  not  apply  to  this  case  because  it  does  not involve entries made in the course of business. admittedly. 633 VOL. Inc.”  “14­A. She had no personal knowledge  of  the  facts  on  which  the  accounts  were  based since. In any case. 79­80.—Entries made at.  may  be  received  as prima  facie  evidence. vs. or near the time of the transactions  to  which  they  refer. p.e. Petitioner’s contention has no merit.. Rule 130 of the Rules of Court: Entries in the course of business.

Consequently. The  foregoing  shows  that  Rayos  was  incompetent  to  testify  on whether  or  not  the  invoices  and  delivery  orders  turned  over  to  her correctly reflected the  details  of  the  deliveries  made.  respondent’s  position was  that  petitioner  concocted  falsified  charges  18 of  non­payment  to justify  the  termination  of  their  agreement. p. vs. p. pp.  the  CA correctly disregarded her testimony. On  the  third  issue. petitioner  could  have  easily  fabricated  them.  Having  generated  these  documents. the CA declared that petitioner was not able to  prove  that  respondent  had  unpaid  accounts.  petitioner  questions  the  award  of  actual damages  in  the  amount  of  P1. Nestlé Philippines.  This argument cannot be  taken  seriously. p. 78.   In  no  way  could respondent be deemed to have admitted those deliveries. 19 Id. 18 Rollo.  Thus. the CA awarded actual damages to respondent in the amount of P1. Inc. Petitioner  next  argues  that  respondent  did  not  deny  during  the trial  that  it  received  the  goods  covered  by 17 the  invoices  and  was therefore deemed to have admitted the same. vs. for petitioner’s breach of _______________ 16 Id. 16.  Petitioner’s  failure  to present  any  competent  witness  to  identify  the  signatures  and  other information in those invoices and delivery orders cast doubt on their veracity. Petitioner. Incorporated 16 the  agreement  was  in  effect.000  time  deposit. 28.  thus  debunking  the claim  of  a  valid  termination.000. 11­18. Incorporated the agreement.. Inc.000. 634 634 SUPREME COURT REPORTS ANNOTATED Nestlé Philippines.   This  can  only  mean  that  she  merely obtained  these  documents  from  another  without  any  personal knowledge of their contents. FY Sons. Furthermore.000  and  the  refund  of  the P500.000.  contending  that  it  validly  terminated  the agreement  because  of  respondent’s  failure  to  pay  its  overdue accounts.  From  the  very  beginning.  The  CA  also  held  petitioner  guilty  of19 various  acts  which  violated  the  provisions  of  the  agreement. As discussed above. 17 Rollo.. FY Sons.  the  invoices  and  delivery  orders  presented  by petitioner  were  self­serving. other than claiming that it validly .

 Inc. there was legal basis for the grant of actual damages. _______________ 20 Rollo.  285;  Manchester  Development Corporation v. This rule may be disregarded only  when  the  findings  of  fact  of  the  Court  of  Appeals  are  contrary  to  the findings  and  conclusions  of  the  trial  court.015. Court of Appeals. are binding upon the Supreme Court.  1137. citing Ayala Corporation v.   In  this  case. pp.  29 September 1989. 635 VOL.  85879. 2006 635 Nestlé Philippines.  or  are  not  supported  by  the evidence  on  record. No.  Inc. Indeed. 568­569.000. 533­536 (1999).246.  Nos.  30  January  1990. 178 SCRA 221.  42  (1999). Court of Appeals.  Ltd.  378  Phil. MAY 5.  v.60 should  not  have  been  considered  because  respondent’s  complaint only prayed for an award of P1.  findings  of  fact  of  the  trial  court. 79937­38. L­75919.000. 7 May 1987. G.R.  (SIOL)  v. 444; Sun  Insurance  Office. Respondent adduced evidence to prove its  losses. FY Sons.  181  SCRA  687;  Ng  Soon  v.  Nos. 180 SCRA 433.  RTC  of  Tagum.  20  December 1989.  No. vs. It further contends that the court acquires jurisdiction over the claim only upon payment of the 20 prescribed docket fee.  It  was  proper  for  the  CA  and  the  RTC  to  consider  this evidence  and  award  the  sum  of  P1.000. did not challenge the findings of the CA that it committed various violations of the agreement.000. No. G.  170  SCRA  274.  Alday.  . 363 Phil. Madayag.R.000.  But  there  is  no  ground  to  apply  this  exception  to  the .  . Incorporated Both  the  RTC  and  CA  found  that  respondent  had  satisfactorily proven  the  factual  bases  for  the  damages  adjudged  against  the petitioner. 21 Ballatan v.  a  court  acquires  jurisdiction  over  21 the  claim  of  damages upon  payment  of  the  correct  docket  fees. Petitioner  asserts  that  the  documentary  evidence  presented  by respondent to prove actual damages in the amount of P4.  Court  of  Appeals. Hence.  However.  Had  the  courts  below awarded a sum more than P1.  It is well­settled that— “. citing Tacay  v.  13  February  1989.000. 16­17.R.  416­417;  304  SCRA  34.  G. This is a factual matter binding and conclusive upon this 23 Court. 408. G.terminated the agreement. the courts limited their award to the amount prayed for. which was the amount prayed for. 149 SCRA 562. 22 Benguet  Electric  Cooperative. an additional filing fee would have been assessed and imposed 22 as a lien on the judgment.  Asuncion.  Davao  del  Norte. 88421.  88075­77.  1150­ 1151; 321 SCRA 524.  it  is  not disputed  that  respondent  paid  docket  fees  based  on  the  amounts prayed for in its complaint.  when  affirmed  by  the  Court  of Appeals.R. 489.

 G. Incorporated respondent.   Considering  that  the  amount adjudged is not excessive. 2001 in CA­G.  Chiok. citing Guerrero v. G. 636 636 SUPREME COURT REPORTS ANNOTATED Nestlé Philippines. 25 Tocao v. 18 November 2003.  given  that  petitioner  was  not  able  to  prove  that respondent  had  unpaid  accounts  in  the  amount  of  P995. No.      Puno (Chairperson). vs. Costs against petitioner.  445. 24 Bank of the Philippine Islands v.R. 127405. J. WHEREFORE. 124 Phil.R.  Azcuna  and Garcia. 349 Phil. Moreover.  cannot  claim moral and exemplary damages and attorney’s fees from respondent.R. Inc. G.81 with interest. 772. FY Sons.  the seizure of the P500.  No.  152122. Leobrera.319. .  it  is  not  entitled  to  the  supposed  unpaid balance of P495. 26 November 2002. 57299 are hereby AFFIRMED.  being  at  fault  and  in  bad  faith. This Court will not assess all over again the evidence adduced by the parties particularly where as in this case the findings of both the trial 24 court and the Court of Appeals completely coincide. No. 171 (1966). the refund of this amount with interest is also called for. the petition is hereby DENIED for lack of merit.  30  July  2003. 605; 285 SCRA 670 (1998); Batingal v. No. 4 October 2000. 149375. It failed to prove the alleged outstanding accounts of _______________ 23 China  Airlines  v. Finally.  407  SCRA  432. 342 SCRA 20. 1 February 2001. On Leave. Petitioner. petitioner’s counterclaims are necessarily without merit. 351 SCRA 60.  the  determination  of  the  amount  of  damages commensurate  with  the  factual  findings  25 upon  which  it  is  based  is primarily  the  task  of  the  trial  court.R. citing Mercado v. we affirm its correctness.  Chairperson). 21­22. citing Air France v. Court of Appeals. Court of Appeals. 137147. Carrascoso.           Sandoval­Gutierrez  (Actg. concur.. We therefore affirm them.R..instant case. SO ORDERED. 416 SCRA 15.  Accordingly.  2001  and resolution dated November 14.81. we find no error in the assailed decision and resolution of the CA. In fine. 742; 18 SCRA 155. The  decision  of  the  Court  of  Appeals  dated  January  11. People.000 time deposit was improper. Court of Appeals. 38. As a result.319.  and  there  being  no proof  that  respondent  was  guilty  of  any  wrongdoing. JJ.” Likewise. CV No. G. 392 SCRA 687.

 419 SCRA 101 [2004]) ——o0o—— 637 © Copyright 2017 Central Book Supply. Inc. Note. Petition denied. . judgment and resolution affirmed. (Bon vs. People.—Factual  findings  of  the  Court  of  Appeals  are  conclusive on the parties and carry even more weight when such findings affirm those of the trial court. All rights reserved.