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“Love Yourself”
Committed to
promoting a positive
body image at
Columbia College

Team Mental Health
Ryan Dyckes, Wileisha Stevens, Suzanne Blais, and
Elizabeth Sieber
Section: 003
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Table of
Contents
❖ Program Rationale
➢ Health Problem………………………………………………… 3
➢ Global………………………………………………………….. 4
➢ National………………………………………………………... 5
➢ State…………………………………………………………..... 6
➢ Local…………………………………………………...………. 7
➢ Program Purpose………………………………………………..8
❖ Needs Assessment
➢ Overview of the Health Problem………………………………. 9
➢ Populations Affected…………………………………………....9
➢ Planning/Steering Committee…………………………………...9
➢ Risk Factors…………………………………………………..10-11
❖ Mission statement, goals, and objectives………………………………12
❖ Program Implementation/Intervention…………………………………13
➢ Intervention Theory……………………………………………..14
➢ Intervention Strategy……………………………………………15
➢ Logic Model…………………………………………………….16
➢ Intervention Design……………………………………………..17
❖ Program resources……………………………………………………..18
➢ Gantt Chart…………………………………………………….19-20
❖ Program Marketing…………………………………………………….21
❖ Budget………………………………………………………………….22
❖ Evaluations……………………………………………………………..23
❖ Marketing Tools
➢ T-shirt Designs…………………………………………………24
➢ Flyer Designs…………………………………………………25-26
❖ References……………………………………………………………..27
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Program
Rationale
Health Problem
Body image is the way we perceive ourselves. According to
www.nationaleatingdisorders.org, one’s body image encompasses what they
believe about their appearance, how they feel about their body, and how they
control their body as they move (National Eating Disorders Association, n.d.).
Positive body image is being comfortable in your own body (National Eating
Disorders Association, n.d.). When a person has a positive body image, they
understand that the way they look does not define their self worth (Planned
Parenthood Federation of America Inc., 2016). Negative body image is perceiving
your body as something it is not (Planned Parenthood Federation of America Inc.,
2016). When you have a negative body image, you feel ashamed of your
appearance. Negative body image can cause you to have a poor outlook on life and
low self esteem, which could lead to suicidal thoughts. Negative body image can
also result in a wealth of eating disorders. With this disorder being a huge risk
factor for suicidal thoughts and eating disorders, our program will focus on
creating a positive body image.
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Scope of the Health
Problem

At the global level, cultural standards of what is considered the ideal body
varies across countries. In Spain and Nigeria for example, the ideal body is not like
America (Institute for the Psychology of Eating, 2014). They do not agree that
being skinny is the way to be beautiful. In Spain, they think the ideal body shape is
a pear shape or hourglass figure, while Nigeria has fattening rooms to gain extra
weight (Institute for the Psychology of Eating, 2014). A global body image survey
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was taken to reveal how men and women view their bodies in different countries.
Jacoby (2014) explains the results of the women respondents: The results showed
that American women tended to rate themselves as a 6.09 out of 10, while non-
American women rated their appearance as a 7.44 out of 10. She then explains,
men inside and outside the U.S. scored lower when rating their appearance than did
women. Jacoby provides pictures of one word self-descriptions given by the
respondents to describe how they feel about their body. Men and women in non-
American countries seemed to think of their body as perfect and attractive, while
men and women in America didn’t once use those words to describe their body.
They used words like average instead.

At the national level, the health problem of negative body image is a major
issue. Media plays a major role in influencing people to look a certain way. The
Journal of Management and Marketing Research online, performed the study,
“Body Image and ethnicity: A qualitative exploration”. This study was made to
determine the influence media had on men and women of different ethnicities. This
study reveals that caucasian women were the most likely to be dissatisfied with
their body from pressures of the media, followed by Hispanics, and African
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Americans were the least dissatisfied with their body (Haytko, Parker, Motley, &
Torres, 2014). White men were more likely to make a change in their diet to
achieve the desired body, while African American men were least likely. This study
revealed that both men and women suffer from negative body image. Age is also a
huge factor with negative body image. 91% of women recently surveyed on a
college campus had tried to control their weight through dieting (Eating Disorder
Hope, n.d.). Over 50% of teenage girls and 33% of teenage boys are using
restrictive measures to lose weight at any given time (Eating Disorder Hope, n.d.).
According to South Carolina Department of Mental Health, 95% of people with an
eating disorder are of ages 12-25 (DMH, 2006).

At the state level, there is limited data on negative body image. With that
being said, there is additional needs assessment and research needed. Negative
body image still continues to be of great concern in South Carolina. When you go
to any mall for example, pictures displayed of women in Victoria’s Secret are of
thin body shapes. In American eagle, the teenage boys and girls in the pictures are
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thin. This paints a picture in our minds of what is considered beautiful. Being
surrounded by ideal thin shapes, makes having a positive body image a hard thing
to do. In recent years, the trend of a thigh gap has made wave. A thigh gap is
having a gap inbetween your thighs when you are standing up. This is considered
to be a physically attractive trait in women in our society today. Thigh gaps aren’t
possible for some people to achieve because of the structure of our bones. Wanting
your body to be a certain way that it can’t, can lead to dangerous outcomes such as
suicidal thoughts or an eating disorder. As you can see, men and women of all
races and ranging from adolescent to young adult, seem to be targeted the most for
having the ideal body image of a thin shape. Painting this picture in their mind can
lead to them developing a negative body image.
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At the local level, Columbia S.C. is home to many colleges in South
Carolina. Mentioned above, 91% of women surveyed on a college campus tried to
control their weight by dieting (Eating Disorder Hope, n.d.). With the age of
college students usually ranging from 18-25, they are at the age to be at risk for
developing a negative body image. Out of the many colleges in Columbia S.C., we
chose to focus on Columbia College because they do not already have a program
targeting this issue. According to peterson’s.com, the gender distribution at
Columbia College is 78% female, 22% male and their ethnicity/race distributions
are; 55.86% Caucasian, 34.31% African American, and 3.14% Hispanics
(Peterson’s, 2016). With that being said, the target population we will be focusing
on will be White female college students aged 18-25 at Columbia College.

Programs Purpose
For our program, we will be emulating an existing curriculum from the
University of South Carolina’s Body Project to use at Columbia College. “Love
Yourself” will consists of a two part workshop that encourages the spread of
positive body image. In our program, we will also have a buddy system to offer
each participant continuous support with their health problem of a negative body
image. Each participant in our program will gain self-confidence, lifetime support,
and self-worth. They will learn to be comfortable in their own body and to love
themselves just the way they are. To get our program started, we, the program
planners, will go to Columbia college to pass out flyers. To encourage
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participation, we will pass out free T-shirts, provide free food, and give away free
journals to future participants. We will send out mass emails to future stakeholders,
funders, and therapists of our program explaining to them the importance of a
positive body image in today's society, and why they should invest in our program.
It is important that our planning committee is made up of not only people who
have negative body image, but speakers that have experienced negative body
image themselves and volunteers to serve as buddies. An administrator and
volunteers from within Columbia College will also be a part of our program. With
the help of our planning committee, we will succeed in making a program that is
well planned and one with never ending support for the participants. The priority
population will feel like this program is their own.

Needs
Assessment
Overview of the
Health Problem
Negative body image is a major issue in today’s society. When having a
negative body image you perceive your body as something it isn’t, and you are not
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comfortable in your own skin. A negative body image results in low self-esteem
which becomes a risk factor for suicidal thoughts or eating disorders.

Populations Affected
Women in college are especially affected by the health problem of negative
body image. Being surrounded by people your age can create a lot of pressure to
have the ideal body. Constantly comparing yourself to others can lead to being
disappointed in your body, and result in low self confidence and self-esteem.
Having low self esteem can lead to having suicidal thoughts. In today’s society,
and especially in college, there is a lot of pressure to maintain a certain weight so
you can be considered beautiful. To obtain input from our target population, we
will email white female college students between ages of 18-25 at Columbia
College a survey to complete. This survey will include a multitude of questions
revolving around their perceptions of their body.

Planning/Steering
Committee
● Program planners
● Volunteers
● Psychologists
● Speakers that have overcome a negative body image
● Beth Dinndorf, President of Columbia College
● Program facilitator
● Guidance counselor from Columbia College

Risk Factors Related
to a Negative Body
Image
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Behavioral Risk Environmental Risk Factors that
Factors Risk Factors cannot be changed
● Attitude ● Social media ● Pregnancy
● Perception of ones body ● College ● Gender
● Perceived susceptibility ● Lack of family support ● Age
● Seeking parents approval● Lack of friends
● Self consciousness ● Sexual abuse
● Being a perfectionist ● Magazines
● Depression ● Posters
● Perception of an ideal ● Celebrities
body type ● Abusive partner
● Living conditions

Factor Type Factor Explanation of
relationship with
behavior
Predisposing 1) Low self esteem When having low self
2) Perception of your own esteem, you will never
body feel like you are good
3) What you believe is the enough. Perceiving your
ideal body body as something it is
not, and believing that the
only ideal body type is
thin, is negative body
image.
Enabling 1) Living on a college In college you are
campus surrounded by people
2) Lack of family support your age, comparing your
3) Lack of friends body to others. Not
having your family or
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friends to support you
can enable you to
develop a negative body
image.
Reinforcing 1) Abusive partner Having an abusive
2) Social media partner who constantly
3) Magazines insults you about your
body will encourage the
continuation of a negative
body image. Social media
is bringing new image’s
into the magazines and
internet today. This will
continue to remind you
what the ideal body is.

Mission
Statement,
Goals, and
Objectives
Mission Statement
● To empower women at Columbia College to have a positive body image.

Goals
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● To promote a positive body image at Columbia College through a buddy support
system and educational weekly meetings.

Process Objectives
● Within the next 3 months, program planners will have hired 3 therapists that
specialize in treating people with mental illnesses to assist students on Columbia
College’s campus.
● By January 2016, program planners will have secured a venue on Columbia
College’s campus to hold the monthly motivational/informational meetings with
students, speakers, and therapists to address body image issues.

Impact/Learning
Objectives
● After completion of the program, 80% of program participants will be able to
define body image.
● Upon completion of the program, 60% of program participants will be able to
identify 2 things that they like about themselves.

Impact/Behavioral
Objectives
● Upon completion of the program, 75% of program participants will maintain
weekly contact with a support “buddy”.

Implementation
The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) concentrates on changing behaviors and
attitudes using mainly tertiary prevention, allowing the model to be a perfect fit for
the intervention. Attitudes and behaviors drive and control people’s actions and
thoughts. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior as a model for the intervention,
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those attitudes and behaviors can be changed, ultimately helping to change
negative body images among the target population.

According to Lowery et al. (2005) this study was conducted to evaluate the
relationships among health-related behaviors, self-esteem, and body image among
female and male freshman college students within classroom settings. The results
showed that male college students have a more positive outlook on their body
image than female college students mainly due to how Western society portrays the
ideal women figure as slender and fit throughout the media. The authors
concluded that a movement that promotes health-related behaviors may promote
higher self-esteem and overall a more positive body image, supporting the
implementation of an intervention to promote a positive body image among female
students at Columbia College.

Intervention Theory
Attitude Towards Behavior
Our target population may or may
not want to make a change in their
life to reduce their thoughts by
working on having a more positive
body image.
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Subjective Norms Behavioral Intention
Noticing how their peers in classes Behavior
May or may not want to
and around campus are enjoying May or may not want to
change how they feel
day to day life will influence our improve thoughts about
about themselves so
target population to want to oneself and work on
they will reduce suicidal
change their thoughts so they will having a more positive
thoughts until they no
have a more enjoyable life; body image.
longer have them.
working on social skills to interact
with peers which can have a better
impact on self-esteem and
improvement of body image.

Perceived Behavioral Control
Improvement of self-efficacy;
feeling like they have the power to
change how they feel about
themselves and having a more
positive body image which would
improve their outlook on life;
being able to have more efficient
health communication.

Intervention Strategy
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Objective Theory and Intervention Possible
Type construct Strategy Activities

1. Learning TPB- attitudes Health Education ● Body image workshops
towards behavior ● Guest speakers (focusing
on suicidal thought
prevention)
● Positive body image
course

2. Learning TPB- perceived Health Brochures on creating a
behavioral control Communication positive body systems
● Simulations
● Emails
● Teleconference
● Website focusing on
positive body image
● Informational session

3. TPB- subjective Social support ● Create a social network
Environmental norm activities (other) ● Social gatherings
● Buddy system
● Support groups

Logic Model
Resources Activities Outcomes
Promotion  Hand out and Short Term Outcomes in
 Flyers hang up flyers terms of Morbidity and
 Cell phones and/or laptops  Post programs to Mortality Rates
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 Volunteers (15) social media  Participation in group
 Program Planners (4)  Send out a mass therapy
email
 Reserve Breed
Leadership Center
 Reserve Daniel
Hall
 Pre-Test
 Group Therapy
 Post-Test
 Bi-Weekly
Meetings
Administrative Meetings Long Term Outcomes in
 Breed Leadership Center terms of Morbidity and
at Columbia College Mortality Rates
 Pens  Increased positive
 Paper body image
 Tables  Decreased amount of
 Chairs suicidal thoughts
 The President of
Columbia College, Beth
Dinndorf
 Program Facilitator (1)
 Psychologists (2)
 Speakers (5)
 Participants (30)
 Volunteers (15)
 Program Planners (4)

Group Therapy
 Daniel Hall (Room for
Therapy)
 Pens
 Paper
 Sign-in sheet
 Tables Chairs
 Food
 T-Shirts
 The President of
Columbia College, Beth
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Dinndorf
 Program Facilitator (1)
 Psychologists (2)
 Speakers (5)
 Participants (30)
 Volunteers (15)
 Program Planners (4)

Intervention Design
Participants in this study include white female undergraduate college
students attending Columbia College who have been identified as having suicidal
thoughts due to a negative body image. Up to 30 participants can participate in
this program and each participant is required to pay $10 per semester. A healthy
body image workshop will be held on campus at Columbia College in Daniel Hall
for the participants’ convenience. There will be a buddy system where 15
volunteers will be each be paired with two participants to provide support and
guidance through the program.
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Program
Resources
What is needed?
Personnel
● The President from Columbia College, Beth Dinndorf, or a member from her staff
● Program Planners (4) - To manage and continuously monitor the program
○ Suzanne Blais: Organizing administrative meetings and group therapy sessions
○ Elizabeth Sieber: Continuous monitoring/evaluations
○ Leisha Stevens: Technology
○ Ryan Dyckes: Finance
● Program Facilitator (1) - To manage and train volunteers
● Psychologists (2) - To oversee the group therapy sessions and make sure
participants are responding positively to the program
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● Volunteers (15) - To pair each one with two participants, and pass out flyers and
assist with any other tasks
● Speakers (5) - People who have dealt/deal with mental health illness relating to
body image
● Participants (30)
Space
● Daniel Hall - To host and implement the program
● Breed Leadership Center at Columbia College - To hold meetings for
administrative personnel
Equipment
● Tables
● Chairs
Supplies
● Pens
● Paper
● Flyers
● Sign in sheet
● Food - Incentive
● T-Shirts - Incentive

Gantt Chart
Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May

Contact
Columbia
College
President

Hire a
program
facilitator

Hire 2
therapists

Reserve a
meeting
space

Purchase
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supplies

Recruit
Volunteers

Recruit
Participants

Pre-Test

Buddy
Pairing

Group
Therapy

Mid-
Semester
evaluations

Gantt Chart Checklist
November
➢ Contact Columbia College President Beth Dinndorf
➢ Hire a program facilitator
➢ Hire 2 therapists
December
➢ Hire a program facilitator
➢ Hire 2 therapists
➢ Reserve a meeting space
➢ Purchase supplies
January
➢ Recruit volunteers
➢ Recruit participants
February
➢ Recruit volunteers
➢ Recruit participants
➢ Pre-Test
➢ Buddy Pairing
➢ Group Therapy
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March
➢ Group Therapy
April
➢ Group-Therapy
➢ Mid-semester evaluations
May
➢ Group Therapy
➢ Post-Test

Program
Marketing
Promotional Tools
 Flyers posted and personally handing
out flyers around the Columbia
campus
 Social Media (postings on Facebook,
Twitter, and Instagram)
 Mass emails sent out to all students
 Tabling on campus handing out
flyers and talking one on one with
students about the program
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Incentives
 Free food
 Extra one-on-one
meeting with one of
the therapists for a
discounted rate
 Free journal
 Free T-shirt

Budget
PERSONNEL COST

The President of Columbia College: In-Kind
Beth Dinndorf

Program Facilitator $1000 per semester

Psychologists (3) $30,000 ($10,000 each per
semester)

Volunteers (15) $150 ($10 per participant per
semester)

Program Planners $2000 ($500 each)

Participants $300 ($10 per participant per
semester)

Speakers $200 ($40 each)

OFFICE SPACE/RENT
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Breed Leadership Center In-Kind

Daniel Hall In-Kind

EQUIPMENT

Tables In-Kind

Chairs In-Kind

SUPPLIES

Pens $15 for the semester

Paper $700 for the semester

Food $1,000 for the semester

T-shirts $1,500 for the semester

Grant Given: “Go for your Life” Amount: $15,000
Positive Image Grant

Participation fee $415

Total Budget Needed: $36, 865 Asking For: $21,450

Evaluations
● Qualitative evaluation techniques will be used in order to evaluate the
effectiveness of our program.
● Pre and post tests will be administered to the participants to show how their body
image and self esteem has changed over the course of the semester.
● Mid semester evaluations will be administered to participants, volunteers, and
therapists in order to evaluate the quality of the program and identify possible areas
of improvement.

Process Evaluations
● The three therapists’ contracts will be kept in order to show that they were hired
to work with the students involved in “Love Yourself”.
● A confirmation email giving “Love Yourself” permission to use one of Columbia
College’s buildings will show that a venue has been secured for meetings.
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● Receipts will show all costs for materials purchased.

Impact Evaluations
● A pre-test will be used to evaluate the body image of participants, qualities that
they like about themselves, and their support system before the program.
● A post-test with show changes in the participants’ body image, sense of self worth,
and system at the end of the program.
● Attendance sheets will be used to track participant attendance to meetings.
● Volunteers and participants will log their weekly meetings, what they talked
about, and what they did.
● Part of the Mid semester evaluation will examine the participants attitudes and
feelings towards various aspects of the program.

Marketing Tools
T-shirt Design
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Flyer Option #1
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Flyer Option #2
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References
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Eating Disorder Hope. (n.d.). Weight & Body Image Disorders: Causes,
Symptoms, & Signs. Retrieved from
www.eatingdisorderhope.com/information/body-Image#What-is-Negative-or-
Distorted-Body-Image.

Haytko, D.L., Parker, R.S., Motley, C.M., & Torres, I.M. (2014). Body
image and ethnicity: A qualitative exploration. Journal of Management and
Marketing Research, 17, 9-12.

Institute for the Psychology of Eating. (2014). Body Image Around the
Globe. Retrieved from www.psychologyofeating.com/body-image-around-globe/

Jacoby, Sarah (2014). Here’s How People Around The World Feel About
Their Bodies. Global Body Image Survey Women, Men. Retrieved from
www.refinery29.com/global-body-image

Lowery, S., Kurpius, S., Befort, C., Blanks, E., Sollenberger, S., Nicpon, M.,
Huser, L. (2005). Body image, self-esteem, and health-related behaviors among
male and female first year college students. Journal of College Student
Development, 46(6), 612-623. doi:https://doi.org/10.1353/csd.2005.0062

Peterson’s. (2016). Columbia College. Retrieved from
www.petersons.com/college-search/columbia-college-000_10002184.aspx

Planned Parenthood Federation of America Inc. (2016). Body Image at a
Glance. Retrieved from www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/body-image.

National Eating Disorders. (n.d.). What is Body Image. Retrieved from
www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/what-body-image.

South Carolina Department of Mental Health. (2006). Eating Disorder
Statistics. Retrieved from www.state.sc.us/dmh/anorexia/statistics.htm