SWK 337: Diversity Issues in Social Work Practice

Instructor: Ebony N. Perez, MSW
Office: Spring Hill D-121
Email: ebony.perez@saintleo.edu
Phone: 352-684-4520
Office Hours: Wednesdays 1:30- 4:30 and by appointment
Senior Standing in Social Work

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This foundation course is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills for social work
practice with diverse populations, focusing on economically disadvantaged and oppressed
people, including ethnic minorities of color, women, people with disabilities, gay and lesbian
people, and poor people. Concepts to be covered include culture, ethnocentrism, race, ethnicity,
minority group, dominant group, prejudice, discrimination, institutional racism, labeling,
marginality, inequality, social class, social stratification, poverty, power, oppression, gender,
sexism, anti-Semitism, homophobia, and xenophobia. These concepts will be examined in
relation to the experiences of economically disadvantaged and oppressed people.

This course is built on a liberal arts foundation and based on the assumption that students
enrolled in this course already have fulfilled Basic Studies requirements, especially in the social
sciences, and philosophy. In addition, this course will examine the adaptive capabilities and
strengths of economically disadvantaged and oppressed people, and how such capabilities and
strengths can be used to do effective social work practice.

In this course, students will be expected to examine their own values, beliefs and behaviors and
explore how these may limit their ability to do effective social work practice with people of
diverse backgrounds, in particular with disadvantaged and oppressed people. Thus, students
should leave this course with a better understanding of themselves and the diverse groups they
will be working with in practice.
CSWE 2015 COMPETNECIES AND PRACTICE BEHAVIORS (PB)
relevant to the course.

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice.
PB 6: Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and
difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and
macro levels.
PB 8: Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal
biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this course, students will:
 Have knowledge of professional values that include value for autonomy, self-
determination, individual worth and dignity, and the Saint Leo University Core
values, as well as key principles of catholic social teaching as measured by class
presentations, panel discussions, individual and group projects.
 Social workers will be able to recognize and manage personal values in a way that
allows professional values to guide practice. (PB 8)
 Practice personal reflection and the Saint Leo core value of personal development by
completing a life review in terms of a multicultural assessment.
 Social workers will be able to recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and
values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create or enhance privilege and power.
(PB 6)
 Social workers will gain sufficient self-awareness to eliminate the influence of
personal biases and values in working with diverse groups. (PB 8)
 Social workers will recognize and communicate their understanding of the
importance of difference in shaping life experiences. (PB 6)
 Be able to discuss the impact of globalization in regard to social work and health
care issues worldwide have awareness of his or her own attitudes toward minority
and people of other ethnic groups as measured by photo and video reactions, panel
discussions, and community resource projects.
 Critically discuss the role of social and healthcare workers in regard to human
trafficking, sexual assault, terrorism and bioterrorism, crisis and hostage/negotiation,
crisis in schools, and crisis case handling as measured by exams and projects.
 Be creative in planning and preparing your class assignments. Consider each
assignment as a specific task that you visualize to implement in a future internship
and/or at your real job once you graduated from Saint Leo University.

III. REQUIRED TEXT AND READINGS:
Required Text:

Marsiglia, F. F., & Kulis, S. (2015). Diversity, oppression & change. Chicago, IL: Lyceum
Books, Inc.
IV. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY
The Academic Honor Code is published in it entirely in the Saint Leo University Catalog. The
first paragraph is:
As members of an academic community that places a high value on truth and the pursuit
of knowledge, Saint Leo University students are expected to be honest in every phase of
their academic life and to present as their own work only that which is genuinely theirs.
Unless otherwise specified by the professor, students must complete homework
assignments by themselves (or if on a team assignment, with only their team members). If
they receive outside assistance of any kind, they are expected to cite the source and
indicate the extent of the assistance. Each student has the responsibility to maintain the
highest standards of academic integrity and to refrain from cheating, plagiarism, or any
other form of academic dishonesty.

V. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT:
Appropriate academic accommodations and services are coordinated through the Office
of Disability Services, which is located in Kirk Hall Room 121. Students with
documented disabilities who may need academic accommodation(s) should email their
requests to adaoffice@saintleo.edu or call x8464.

VI. PROTECTION OF THE ACADEMIC ENVIRONMENT: Disruption of academic process is
the act or words of a student in a classroom or teaching environment which in the
reasonable estimation of a faculty member: (a) directs attention away from the academic
matters at hand, such as noisy distractions, persistent, disrespectful or abusive
interruptions of lecture, exam or academic discussions, or (b) presents
a danger to the health, safety or well-being of the faculty member or students. Education
is a cooperative endeavor – one that takes place within a context of basic interpersonal
respect. We must therefore make the classroom environment conducive to the purpose for
which we are here. Disruption, intentional and unintentional, is an obstacle to that aim.
We can all aid in creating the proper environment, in small ways
(such as turning off beepers and cell phones, and not chatting or sleeping in class), and in
more fundamental ways. So, when we speak in class, we can disagree without attacking
each other verbally, we wait to be recognized before speaking, and no one speaks in a
manner or of off-topic content that disrupts the class. Any violation of this policy may
result in disciplinary action. Please refer to the Student catalog for further details.

VII. SAINT LEO UNIVERSITY’S COMMITMENT TO ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE
Academic excellence is an achievement of balance and growth in mind, body, and spirit
that develops a more effective and creative culture for students, faculty, and staff. It
promotes integrity, honesty, personal responsibility, fairness, and collaboration at all
levels of the university. At the level of students, excellence means achieving mastery of
the specific intellectual content, critical thinking, and practical skills that develop
reflective, globally conscious, and informed citizens ready to meet the challenges of a
complex world.
Program Policies
1. Assignment Policy: Promptness in completing assigned tasks and readings is a
requirement of this course. Assignments turned in late will RESULT IN A LOWERED
GRADE.

2. All written assignments will be graded on the basis of content, clarity, punctuation,
grammar, sentence structure, proofreading, APA 6th style and overall quality of work.

3. Make-up Policy: THERE WILL BE NO MAKE-UP EXAMINATIONS PLEASE DO
NOT ASK

4. It is expected that social work students maintain a minimum cumulative grade point
average of 2.00, as well as 2.00 GPA in the social work major prior to entering the senior
field placement.

5. Grading
A final course grade will be based upon the following:
A 94% to 100%
A- 90% to 93%
B+ 87% to 89%
B 84% to 86%
B- 80% to 83%
C+ 77% to 79%
C 74% to 76%
C- 70% to 73%
D+ 67% to 69%
D 60% to 66%
F <60%

Course Policies
1. Attend all classes. Attendance is mandatory. No unexcused absences are allowed.
Class starts on time. Students are expected to inform the instructor before class if they
need to be excused from class. If students miss more than two (2) classes, for whatever
reason, their final grades may be adversely affected. Athletes missing classes must submit
the appropriate form and have their assignments submitted on-time.

2. Assignments are due on time. Promptness in completing assigned tasks and readings is a
requirement of this course. Assignments turned in late will RESULT IN A LOWERED
GRADE. There are no make-up assignments, tests, or quizzes. Missed assignments will
result in a zero. There is no extra credit.

3. Laptops and Electronics: Laptops are only permitted to be used in class, only when
allowed for certain assignments. Cell phone usage and text messaging are prohibited
during class time. Non-compliance will result in grade reduction/ point deductions and/or
student removal from class. If you are dismissed from class you must meet with the
instructor and/or your academic advisor during office hours in order to return.

4. Read the textbooks and the assigned readings. Only listening to lectures will not give
students a full understanding of course material. Lectures are designed primarily to
supplement, highlight or expand on aspects of the texts. They cannot substitute for the
textbooks or assigned readings. It is also expected that students will read assigned
material prior to class discussions of that material.

5. Class participation is a required component of this course. Students learn from each
other. The only way for students to assist each other in the learning process is to
participate themselves in the class.

6. All written assignments must be typed, double-spaced, using American Psychological
Association (APA 6th) format, and are due on the dates indicated. Grades will be based
on content, clarity, sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, neatness, proofreading and
overall quality of work.

VIII. ASSIGNMENTS
1. Film Analysis: - Film Analysis Paper:
A film will be shown (to be announced). Attendance is mandatory since this portion of the
class will be 25 points of your grade. Social workers learn how to recognize and manage
their personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide their practice in their
internship and in their professional work. The purpose of the film is to integrate your
knowledge of key concepts and practice behaviors we discussed in class and how it applies to
the main characters in the film. For example in the film the main characters face
discrimination and at times specific obstacles and challenges covered in class. Students are
expected to write about these themes using the material converted in class and integrating
the practice behaviors to understand how diversity characterizes and shapes the human
experience. Students will gain sufficient self-awareness through the characters in the film to
eliminate the influence of personal biases and values. After the film is shown the class will
break into small groups and discuss themes of the film. The paper must be between 5-7 pages
in length standard APA 6th format. And, include (2) Saint Leo University Core Values.

2. Reflective Presentations

Students will be assigned to present on one of the seven “isms” (Racism, Sexism,
Classism, Heterosexism, Ableism, Ageism, and Religious Oppression) to explore the
cultural, institutional and personal dynamics of the “ism” and the ways American
society contends with the given “ism”. which address the unique history and position
of the diversity issue in the United States and the
The requirements include:
a. define key concepts using critical thinking
b. identify and analyze current policy regarding the dimension of
diversity (effectiveness or lack thereof, impact on diverse population,
etc.) think micro, mezzo, macro level.
c. to what extent did the culture’s structures and values oppress,
marginalize, alienate, create or enhance privilege and power?
d. identify pathways for resisting oppression and creating change
e. Include 2 Saint Leo University Core Values and 2 examples of
EPAs/PB,
f. presentation will be no more than 7 minutes.

Grades will be based on the degree to which the diversity issue is covered; concepts are
defined and overall quality of presentation. There will be no make up for missed
presentations as a result of not being prepared or being absent from class.

3. Research Paper. – PB 6; PB 8
As we develop into an increasingly diverse world we need to better understand the
unique history and position of diversity in the United States and learn the importance
of ethnic-sensitive practice. Students are required to apply both theoretical knowledge
and critical thinking skills in the research paper. As social workers it is essential to
understand the unique historical, social, legal, and political context of diversity within
the United States and the impact on contemporary issues. Students will choose a
diverse population, discuss the seven (7) “isms” of diversity and provide an analysis
based on the themes listed. Students will include a particular human behavior
theory/cultural competent practice model, practice behaviors, and their application, as
well as ethical considerations to the selected diverse group.

Through this paper students:
a. should learn the impact of diversity issues such as ethnicity and social class on
people’s lives
b. should learn how human behavior theories have strengths and weaknesses in
particular to those who are from a diverse population
c. should learn the consequences of oppression and social injustices at the micro,
mezzo and macro levels
d. should learn the importance of ethnic-sensitive practice

Research paper requirements include:
a. Select a diverse population of interest
b. Select a human behavior theory
c. Review the literature on selected human behavior theory and its application to the
selected diverse population. Research resources must include, 8 peer reviewed
professional journals and one website source and any book of your choice.
d. The selected diverse population should be of any other ethnic, cultural, and/or socio-
economic background of choice.
e. Provide an analysis of the historical, legal, social and political position of the diverse
population.
f. Discuss how the theory applies to the specific diverse population. Include strengths
and weaknesses of this theory regarding the chosen population.
g. Identify contemporary social justice and/or policy issues specific to the population.
h. Identify ethical considerations when working with this population and provide two
(2) examples of how you will engage in ethical decision making when working with
this population.
i. Identify and discuss pathways for resisting oppression.
j. Include (2) Saint Leo University Core Values, and (2) EPAS/PB.
k. The paper must be between 8-10 pages. Grades will be based on adherence to APA
format, content, completion of all requirements listed above, clarity, sentence
structure, spelling, punctuation, neatness, proofreading and overall quality of work.

4. Cross-Cultural Community Experience
Address the following questions in regard to the practice behaviors. How does diversity
shape your experience and your formation of identity? What did you gain in regard to
your own biases and values through your cross-cultural community experience? In order
for students to experience first-hand a diverse population different from their own ethnic
background, they will attend a cultural establishment or event such as a church service or
food establishment and present the experience in class. What dimensions of diversity did
you encounter in regard to age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender
identity and expression, and/or immigration status, political ideology, race, religion, sex,
and sexual orientation? Students can either present their work on a video OR in a brief (7
-10 min.) presentation with class discussion.

The requirements include:
a. obtaining approval from the instructor regarding the type of experience chosen
b. attend an event which must be no less than an hour
c. write a 2 - 3 page paper on the experience, applying the diversity concepts learned in
class and share the experience in class
d. Grades will be based on clarity of writing, application of diversity concepts,
punctuation, grammar, sentence structure and APA format.

Dates for these presentations will be discussed in class and sign-up sheet will be provided.

Evaluation for course grades will be computed according to the following:

Assignments Point Total
Film Analysis Paper 100
Reflective Presentation 100
Research Paper 100
Cross-Cultural Community Experience 100
Final Exam 100
Class Attendance and Participation 100
Total Points 600

IX. COURSE SCHEDULE:
Course Outline

Week/ Topic: Readings/Assignments
Module

Week 1: Syllabus Review Conceptual Frameworks
8/24 Building Cultural Competence – identity and Chapter 1 in Marsiglia/Kulis
boundaries – ethnicity – privilege and empathy

A Culturally Grounded Paradigm: Oppression, Chapters 2 & 3 in Marsiglia/Kulis
Week 2: Stereotypes, Prejudice and Discrimination Sign up for Cross Cultural Presentations
8/31

Chapter 4 in Marsiglia/Kulis
Week 3: Evolutionary and Structural Functionalist
9/7 Theories

Week 4: Theoretical Perspectives on Diversity Chapters 5 in Marsiglia/Kulis
9/14 Culturally Grounded Social Work Reflective Presentation Due 9/21

Chapters 6 & 7 in Marsiglia/Kulis
Week 5: Intersecting Social and Cultural Determinants Prepare RP-Outline 1 – 2 pages including
9/21 of Health and Well-Being a reference list of 8 professional journal
articles due 9/28

Week 6: IN Class Film – you must be present Chapter 8 in Marsiglia/Kulis
9/28 After the film is shown, the class will meet in
small groups to discuss the film, key concepts RP Outline Due
and issues related to in class readings – and
EPAS. Drafting your Analysis Paper – provide
examples
Film Analysis Paper due Oct 12th
Week 7: CSI Conference: NO CLASS- Out of class Cross Cultural Experience/ Complete
10/5 activity: Work on your cross cultural Culture Activity
presentations and Film Analysis

Week 8:
10/12 NO CLASS- All College Day Film Analysis Paper DUE in Dropbox
by 7pm

Week 9: The Formation and Legacies of Racial and Chapter 8 in Marsiglia/Kulis
10/19 Ethnic Minorities Cross-Cultural Presentations

REMINDER: Work on your research paper

Week 10: Cultural Competence with Gender Cultural Competent Practice with
10/26 Transgendered persons

Cultural Competence with Sexual Orientation Chapters 9 &10 in Marsiglia/Kulis
Continue Cross-Cultural Presentations

Week 11: Cultural Norms and Social Work Practice Chapter 11 in Marsiglia/Kulis
11/2

Week 12: Culturally Grounded Methods of Social Work Chapter 12 in Marsiglia/Kulis
11/9 Practice with Individuals, Groups,
Communities and Agencies

Reminder: Research Paper Due next week

Week 13 Culturally Grounded Community-Based Chapter 13 and 14 in Marsiglia/Kulis
11/16 Helping Research paper due

Enjoy  Try adding a different ethnic
Week 14: Thanksgiving Holiday food to dinner.
11/23

Week 15: Course Wrap up and final exam review Research Paper Summary Presentation
11/30
Final
Exam : Final Exam FINAL EXAM 12/7
12/7

Scoring Rubric for Film Analysis Paper
Rating is based on a Likert Scale where:
5 = Exceptional corresponds to an A (90-100). Performance is outstanding; significantly above
the usual expectations.
4 = Proficient corresponds to a grade of B- to B+ (80-89). Standards are above the level of
expectation.
3 = Average corresponds to a C- to C+ (70-79). Standards are acceptable but improvements are
needed to meet expectations well.
2 =Marginal corresponds to an D (69 to 60%). Performance is weak and improvements are
needs to meet the expectations and standards. The standards are not sufficiently
demonstrated at this time.
1 = Failure Course Expectations and standards are not meet.

Ratings
Criteria 1 2 3 4 5
Describe social work ethical principles that guide professional
practice when discussing the film with your colleagues in class.
 PB 8: What are your personal values that guide your
professional values? What kind of ethical decisions will you
make after having viewed the film (name 3 decisions)?
Describe the Pros and Cons of your decision in your paper.
 Paper written in APA 6th format
Describe multiple factors such as age, class, color, culture, disability,
ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status,
political ideology, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation that
influenced your decision making after having watched the film.
 How did oppression, marginalization, and/or alienation
affect the well-being of the people viewed in the film?

 What kind of self-awareness did you gain through viewing
the film? What are your suggestions of dealing with
personal biases and values when working with diverse
groups?
 How will you communicate your understanding of
discrimination and/or obstacles, challenges when working
with people of other ethnic groups and cultural beliefs?

Total
Scoring Rubric for Reflective Presentation

Rating is based on a Likert Scale where:

5 = Exceptional corresponds to an A (90-100). Performance is outstanding; significantly above
the usual expectations.
4 = Proficient corresponds to a grade of B- to B+ (80-89). Standards are above the level of
expectation.
3 = Average corresponds to a C- to C+ (70-79). Standards are acceptable but improvements are
needed to meet expectations well.
2 =Marginal corresponds to an D (69 to 60%). Performance is weak and improvements are
needs to meet the expectations and standards. The standards are not sufficiently
demonstrated at this time.
1 = Failure Course Expectations and standards are not meet.

Ratings
Criteria 1 2 3 4 5

Engage diversity and difference in practice by:
a. define the concepts
b. summarize the readings from the chapter in your
own words (not a copy from the book) – what did
you learn from your readings?
c. Presentations will be no more than 5 minutes
d. Ask questions of the class to facilitate discussion
related to your readings (textbooks) and to the
Practice Behaviors.
(PB 6) Recognize the extent to which a
culture’s structures and values may
oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create
or enhance privilege and power.
(PB 8) Gain sufficient self-awareness to
eliminate the influence of personal
biases and values in working with
diverse groups.
(PB 8) Recognize and communicate the
understanding of the importance of
difference in shaping life experiences.

Total
Scoring Rubric for Research Paper
Rating:
5 = Exceptional corresponds to an A (90-100). Performance is outstanding; significantly above
the usual expectations.
4 = Proficient corresponds to a grade of B- to B+ (80-89). Standards are above the level of
expectation.
3 = Average corresponds to a C- to C+ (70-79). Standards are acceptable but improvements are
needed to meet expectations well.
2 =Marginal corresponds to an D (69 to 60%). Performance is weak and improvements are
needs to meet the expectations and standards. The standards are not sufficiently
demonstrated at this time.
1 = Failure Course Expectations and standards are not meet.

Ratings
Criteria 1 2 3 4 5
The paper or project is scholarly in nature and is complete
10
Two Saint Leo University Core Values are included 10

Diversity issues are identified and logically addressed 10

Paper or Project includes an extensive analysis of the issues 10
including social justice

PB 8: Practitioner demonstrates application of self- 20
awareness and self-regulation in order to manage the
influence of personal biases and values in working with
diverse clients and constituencies.
PB 6: Practitioner recognized and communicated his/her 20
understanding of the importance of diversity and difference
in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo,
and macro levels.

Writing and grammar skills are appropriate: correct 10
spelling, grammar, sentence structure are evident.

Resources are completed and appropriately cited and 10
references using APA Style

Total

Scoring Rubric for Cross-Cultural Community Experience (CCCE)
Rating:
5 = Exceptional corresponds to an A (90-100). Performance is outstanding; significantly above
the usual expectations.
4 = Proficient corresponds to a grade of B- to B+ (80-89). Standards are above the level of
expectation.
3 = Average corresponds to a C- to C+ (70-79). Standards are acceptable but improvements are
needed to meet expectations well.
2 =Marginal corresponds to an D (69 to 60%). Performance is weak and improvements are
needs to meet the expectations and standards. The standards are not sufficiently
demonstrated at this time.
1 = Failure Course Expectations and standards are not meet.

Ratings
Criteria 1 2 3 4 5
The CCCE - paper or project is scholarly in nature and is
complete – include Saint Leo University Core Values
Resources are completed and appropriately cited and
references using APA Style
Diversity issues are identified and logically addressed in the
CCCE - Personal and professional values are recognized and
managed in practice

Practitioner recognize the extent to which a culture’s
structures and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or
create or enhance privilege and power through experience
within the community.

Provide examples within the assignment how self-awareness
was gained and eliminated. Describe personal biases and
values in working with diverse groups or participating in
events.

Recognize and communicate your understanding of the
importance of differences in shaping life experiences.

Total

LIBRARY RESOURCES
Cannon Memorial Library

On-site Resources
Distance Learning Librarian
In addition to the general reference staff, Sandy Hawes provides reference support for all online
students and faculty from her offices in the Cannon Memorial Library at Saint Leo’s university
campus. She is available during office hours to answer questions concerning research strategies,
database searching, locating specific materials, and interlibrary loan (ILL). Contact her to
arrange online research instruction for your class.
Sandra Lee (Sandy) Hawes
Cannon Memorial Library—MC2128 352-588-8262 (voice mail)
33701 State Road 52 352-588-8259 (fax)
Saint Leo, FL 33574-6665 sandy.hawes@saintleo.edu

Cannon Memorial Library
The library provides an 800 number and an email address for general reference services: 1-800-
359-5945 or reference.desk@saintleo.edu. Reference Hours
352-588-8477 (Reference Desk) Monday—Thursday 8am-10pm
352-588-8476 (Circulation Desk) Friday 8am-6pm
352-588-8258 (Main) Saturday 10am-6pm
352-588-8259 (Fax) Sunday 10am-6pm

Library Instruction
To arrange library/research instruction for your classes, please contact:
Elana Karshmer elana.karshmer@saintleo.edu University Campus
Viki Stoupenos viki.stoupenos@saintleo.edu FL, GA, SC Centers
Steve Weaver steven.weaver@saintleo.edu MS, TX, VA Centers
Sandy Hawes sandy.hawes@saintleo.edu COL and DL

Online Catalog, “LeoCat” (All books & media)
Click on University Campus Library Resources on the Cannon Memorial Library website (
http://www.saintleo.edu/SaintLeo/Templates/Inner.aspx?pid=7662&mode=remove ) and choose
LeoCat. Simple search choices are: title, author, keyword, subject, or journal title. Use
advanced searching to set limits or expand your search choices. To borrow books from Cannon
Memorial and have them shipped to you, use the Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery
link, complete the online request form, and submit it. When you are done with the books, return
them by United States mail.

Saint Leo Library Online Resources
http://www.saintleo.edu/SaintLeo/Templates/Inner.aspx?pid=7662&mode=remove
Saint Leo provides its own array of online databases and resources supporting online courses as
well as Continuing Education classes. The following databases are available to Saint Leo
students and faculty. Use the Online Library Resources link on the Library webpage and select
Databases. You’ll be taken to the ID Validation screen (if you’re not already in the portal) where
you enter your email address and email password to gain access. Once you’re logged in you can
go back and reselect any of our databases without ever having to log in again.
Access Science (Science database, includes McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of
Science and Technology)
EBSCO (Comprehensive all-subject database, includes Business Source
Premier, ERIC, PsycINFO, ATLA)
*LexisNexis (Comprehensive all-subject resource, includes newspapers)
Literature Resource Center (Comprehensive source for literary topics, includes Twayne
Authors)
Newsbank (625 U.S. newspapers)
ProQuest (Comprehensive all-subject database, includes ABI/Inform Global)
PsycINFO (APA abstracts and indexing for psychology subjects (in EBSCO))
Westlaw (Comprehensive legal resource)
Wilson (Includes Education, Science, Humanities, & Business indexes)

*LexisNexis: This all-subject database can only be accessed on the main Florida campus, but a
reference librarian at Cannon Library will be glad to assist you. Call the toll-free number for the
Reference Desk on the university campus, 800-359-5945, or send your research request or
question by email using one of the Ask a Librarian links on the Cannon Memorial Library
webpage.

Local Area Library Resources
Almost all public library systems offer free borrowing privileges to local community members,
as well as free access to their online databases, including access from your home. The key is
obtaining a library card. Check with your local library to find out how to get a borrower’s card.
For a list of libraries in your area, please click on the Centers, Center for Online Learning,
Distance Learning Services link on the library webpage and choose Libraries Near Your
Center. Additionally, through reciprocal agreements, Saint Leo students have borrowing
privileges at several other Florida university libraries. Be sure to bring a current Saint Leo
student ID card and proof of current enrollment with you, if you want to use one of these
libraries.

Library Card Reimbursement
Saint Leo will reimburse off-campus Distance Learning student for one library card at a local
area university. Students need to save the original receipt and submit a Library Card
Reimbursement form to the Center where enrolled for approval. To download the form, click on
the Centers, Center for Online Learning, Distance Learning Services link on the library
webpage and choose Libraries Near Your Center.

Library Tutorial
All new off-campus School of Continuing Education students are required to pass the library
tutorial exam. Students should review the instructional materials and practice quizzes by
clicking on any of the Library Tutorial links on the library website. The same material is found
on the School of Continuing Education’s Orientation CD. After reviewing all the material, click
on the Final Exam link, which will take you to the tutorial test in eLION at
http://elion.saintleo.edu
Bibliography

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