POWERLINE

+ the magazine of the powerhouse museum spring 03

more than heroes and legends
_australian sporting achievement

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contents issue 71
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER 2003

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From the director Power picks New exhibitions – Australian Design Awards selection New exhibitions – Sport: more than heroes and legends Members news: Les Blakebrough Members calendar Members scene: our annual dinner Travelling exhibition: William Holford New acquisitions: Ken Done tapestry Rules of engagement: advice for parents New acquisitions: Sydney Opera House Splendid Isolation: Walkman and GameBoy Conservation of historic Wedgwood Fresh Fruits: student fashion Observe: historic Sydney Observatory Corporate partners New exhibitions at a glance

TRUSTEES Dr Nicholas G Pappas, President Dr Anne Summers AO, Deputy President Mr Mark Bouris Ms Trisha Dixon Ms Susan Gray Professor Ron Johnston Mrs Janet McDonald AO Mr Anthony Sukari Ms Kylie Winkworth SENIOR MANAGEMENT Dr Kevin Fewster AM, Director Jennifer Sanders, Deputy Director, Collections and Exhibitions Mark Goggin, Associate Director, Programs and Commercial Services Michael Landsbergen, Associate Director, Corporate Services Kevin Sumption, Associate Director, Knowledge and Information Management

www.phm.gov.au

from the director

As some of you may be aware, I recently co-authored a book, Gallipoli: the Turkish story. As a result I was invited to give a talk on Anzac Day at Sydney Observatory on how the seasons, celestial events and weather were critical to every phase of the Gallipoli campaign, from the fateful landing on 25 April to the final evacuation eight months later. My talk was just one of the many special programs and events offered at Sydney Observatory. It’s a great place to visit at any time — whether you want to star-gaze through telescopes, take a 3-D journey through space, or enjoy a picnic with the best views of our stunning harbour — but 2003 has some added highlights.

Some of the world’s top astronomers were in Sydney recently for the 25th General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union and the Australian Festival of Astronomy at Darling Harbour in July. Dr Nick Lomb, the Museum’s curator of astronomy, was involved in the organisation of both events. During the festival the Powerhouse and the Observatory hosted three exceptional public lectures. In late August and early September Mars is closer to Earth than it has been for the past 70 000 years. To celebrate this rare event the Observatory has an exhibition on Mars that covers early astronomical theories of life on the planet, recent explorations and our fascination with Martians. Launched earlier this year, our 3-D Space Theatre has proved an enormous success with

three programs so far, Elysium 7: express flight to Mars, A flight through the solar system and Observing Sydney in 3-D. The latter is narrated by actor John Howard and explores the Observatory’s role in the development of Sydney complete with magnificent 3-D views from the site. On 18 October, a Members Day at the Observatory will focus on heritage, history and archaeology. Find out more about this special event on page 22. And remember the Observatory organises a special program of events for children every school holidays. If you haven’t been before, I encourage you to take the kids this October. Dr Kevin Fewster AM Director

FRONT COVER: CATHY FREEMAN, EXULTANT AFTER HER GOLD MEDAL WIN AT THE SYDNEY 2000 OLYMPIC GAMES. HER RUNNING SUIT IS FEATURED IN THE EXHIBITION SPORT: MORE THAN HEROES AND LEGENDS. SEE STORIES ON PAGES 7-10. PHOTO COURTESY NEWSPIX.

Where to find us Powerhouse Museum, 500 Harris Street, Darling Harbour Sydney Opening hours 10.00 am – 5.00 pm every day (except Christmas Day). School holiday opening hours 9.30 am – 5.00 pm Contact details Postal address: PO Box K346, Haymarket NSW 1238 Website www.phm.gov.au, Telephone (02) 9217 0111, Infoline (02) 9217 0444, Education (02) 9217 0222
The Powerhouse Museum, part of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences also incorporating Sydney Observatory, is a NSW government cultural institution.

Powerline is produced by the Powerhouse Museum PO Box K346, Haymarket NSW 1238 Editor: Judith Matheson Editorial coordinator: Deborah Renaud Design: Triggerdesign Photography: Powerhouse Museum unless otherwise stated.
Every effort has been made to locate owners of copyright for the images in this publication. Any inquiries should be directed to the Rights and Permissions Officer, Powerhouse Museum. ISSN 1030-5750 © Trustees of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

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MEDAL COMMEMORATES PADDLE-STEAMER TRADE ON THE MURRAY-DARLING RIVER SYSTEM

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colonial medal revived
The reproduction medal marks the 150th anniversary of the beginning of commercial navigation of the MurrayDarling River system. From 1853 until World War I, Australia’s river systems were essential economic lifelines. Paddle steamers proliferated on the nation’s waterways and brought supplies to rural towns and returned to coastal cities with produce. The original River Murray Steam Navigation medal shares the distinction of being the first to be commissioned by an Australian colonial government (the other marked the cessation of convict transportation to Tasmania, also in 1853). Following the successful navigation of the Murray to Swan Hill and beyond, the South Australian Legislative Council ordered three gold medals to be

The Royal Australian Mint has reproduced an 1850s commemorative bronze medal from the Powerhouse collection.
produced. These are now lost but a small number of bronze examples were issued in 1856 (and in a later restrike of 1919), of which the Museum’s is the oldest surviving example. Using a laser scanner, the Royal Australian Mint has created a digital duplicate of the Museum’s medal, from which steel dies will be made to strike copies. The reproduction is an initiative of the Murray-Darling Basin Commission (MDBC), which manages the land and water resources of the MurrayDarling Basin and has had a strong association with the Museum over the past 10 years. This reproduction illustrates the significant role medals often play as reminders of past ambitions, events, and achievements. The medals will be for sale in the Museum shop from October. Paul Donnelly and Sandra McEwen

CERAMIC TILE WITH ISLAMIC ORNAMENT. PHOTO COURTESY OF GENERAL PALESTINIAN DELEGATION TO AUSTRALIA.

treasures of Palestine

ABOVE: PADDLE STEAMERS ON THE MURRAY RIVER. PRODUCTION LASER SCAN TAKEN BY THE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN MINT OF THE ORIGINAL RIVER MURRAY STEAM NAVIGATION MEDAL. THE MAIN (OBVERSE) DESIGN FEATURES THE PADDLE STEAMER ‘LADY AUGUSTA’ IN FRONT OF THE BARGE ‘EUREKA’ STACKED WITH WOOL BALES. PHOTO FROM THE POWERHOUSE MUSEUM’S TYRRELL COLLECTION.

people and their strong national identity, as reflected in this collection. It also provides an opportunity to reflect on the unresolved Palestine question, one of the most challenging and Treasures of Palestine presents a emotive dilemmas of the selection of traditional costumes, contemporary world. A range of embroidery, jewellery, ceramics, public programs is planned to sculptures, metalwork, and accompany the exhibition. mother-of-pearl inlay work, as These will include a Palestine well as contemporary paintings, 'cultural day' with costume posters, maps and photographs parade, music and food, and film drawn from the collection screenings. assembled by Mr Ali Kazak, Head of the General Palestinian The exhibition is supported by Delegation to Australia. the Community Relations Commission, NSW Ministry for The exhibition invites visitors to the Arts and Premiers engage with the Palestinian Department.

The great richness and depth of Palestine's cultural heritage will be on display in a new temporary exhibition opening at the Powerhouse in mid October.

powerpicks

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a lot of hot air
A number of hot-air engines from the Powerhouse Museum’s collection will be on display at the Sydney Antique Machinery Club’s annual Clarendon Classic Rally on 1314 September. Powerhouse conservator and club member Dave Rockell plans to fire up two of the engines, one made by UK company Robinson and one by US firm Rider-Ericsson. Both demonstrate the simplicity of the Stirling cycle on which these engines work. Used for pumping and running small machines, they were made from the 1880s to the 1920s and were supplanted by small electric motors. Another engine on display is fully sectioned to reveal its working parts. In addition, there are two household fans that ran, perhaps perversely, on hot air: a US Lake Breeze and a German Draeger. The rally will be held at Hawkesbury Showground, a short walk from Clarendon railway station, across the road from Richmond RAAF base.

JUDITH PUTS HOLOFERNES’ HEAD IN A SACK, DETAIL FROM A BIBLICAL TALE IN NEEDLE LACE, ENGLAND, MID 1600S.

laced with passion
If your image of lacemakers is nimble-fingered women with delicate ivory bobbins engaging in a gentle pastime, think again, says curator Lindie Ward, who is part of the new lace ‘openhouse’ initiative at the Powerhouse ‘A benign activity? Don’t be mistaken. Lace is a story of lust and violence,’ says Lindie. ‘We have one tiny lace rectangle from the mid 1600s in our collection which tells the ancient story of the wild and powerful Judith seducing Holofernes and then hacking
RIDER-ERICSSON HOT AIR ENGINE.

For those with a passion for the intricate beauty of lace, the Museum’s Lace Study Centre is now open every weekday.
his head off to save her nation. The lacemaker has highlighted the blood rushing from his neck with bright red silk thread!’ And this is not an isolated example. Needle lace panels and stumpwork embroidery from the period often depicted gruesome tales and powerful biblical stories. The Museum’s Lace Study Centre provides public access to about 300 of the most significant examples of handmade lace in the Powerhouse collection, dating from the late 1500s. The centre is now open to the public each weekday from 10.30am – 1.30pm, staffed by a team of specialist volunteers, who bring an extraordinary level of enthusiasm and expertise to the project. ‘Everyone with a passion for these intricate textiles is invited to use this unique resource. You can view different styles of lace from all over the world, conduct independent research, use the microscope for detailed study and find out more from the volunteers,’ says Lindie. Bookings essential for groups. Phone (02) 9217 0222.

PREMIER BOB CARR (CENTRE) WITH ROS AND JOHN MORIARTY AT THE OPENING OF BALARINJI: ANCIENT CULTURE, CONTEMPORARY DESIGN. PHOTO BY MARINCO KOJDANOVSKI

Balarinji on show

The Premier of NSW, Bob Carr, opened the new Powerhouse exhibition Balarinji: ancient culture, contemporary design on 3 July. He is pictured here with John Moriarty who, with wife Ros, created the trailblazing Balarinji design studio 20 years ago. The exhibition was sponsored by the Australian Graphic Design Association, which hosted a viewing of the exhibition for

their members and the Sydney design community later that evening. Balarinji designs have adorned everything from Qantas jets to silk kiminos. The exhibition covers the studio’s work from its earliest days to its emergence on the world stage.

Balarinji: ancient culture, contemporary design is on display within Bayagul until May 2004.

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walks through history
Hit the rock ’n’ roll heritage trail in Kings Cross with Spinning around curator Peter Cox, or visit the sites of Sydney’s trailblazing green bans with EcoLogic curator Anni Turnbull during History Week on 13-21 September. These are two of the tours by Powerhouse Museum curators for the annual celebration of history organised by the History Council of New South Wales. Bookings are essential. For more information and bookings phone Peter Cox on (02) 9217 0330 or Anni Turnbull on (02) 9217 0168.

THIS SIGN WAS MADE BY MAX TAPLIN FOR THE KELLY’S BUSH PROTESTS.

a partnership of design
Paul Priestman, of prominent UK design company Priestman Goode, was one of the visiting guest speakers at the 2003 Sydney Design Week program at the Powerhouse Museum. Priestman discussed several of his recent design commissions, including a new fleet of trains for Virgin that attempts to ‘recapture some of the romance of rail travel’. Since the inaugural program in 1997, Sydney Design Week has become a highlight of the design community’s annual calendar. Sydney Design Week 2003 saw a further evolution of the program with the ongoing support of The Sydney Morning Herald. As the media partner for Sydney Design Week, The Sydney Morning Herald provided valuable support which allowed the 2003 program to be promoted widely to the paper’s readership. In addition to this, the Sydney Design Week program was again enhanced by the involvement of longterm supporters The Royal Australian Institute of Architects (NSW Branch) and the Design Institute Australia (NSW Council). Joining the team in 2003 was the Australian Graphic Design Association, who also supported the Museum’s exhibition Balarinji: ancient culture, contemporary design, a featured exhibition in the Sydney Design Week program. Highlights of Sydney Design Week 2003 at the Museum included the exhibition Great expectations, accompanied by a series of public lectures by visiting British designers, made possible by the British Design Council. Sydney Design Week also saw the launch of The Sydney Morning Herald Young Designer of the Year Award and the Powerhouse Museum Selection from the Australian Design Awards 2003 (see page 7). The Museum is also pleased to announce a new corporate partnership with LogicaCMG, as sponsor of Great expectations. LogicaCMG is a global solutions company providing management and IT consultancy, systems integration and outsourcing services. Andrew Tindell, Chief Executive of LogicaCMG says, ‘There are many synergies between the exhibition, the Powerhouse and LogicaCMG, and we look forward to working with the Museum on this project.’

STUDENTS FROM SANTA SABINA COLLEGE PERFORM AT THE POWERHOUSE. PHOTO BY SOTHA BOURN.

choral moments

The travelling exhibition Creating a gothic paradise: Pugin at the Antipodes has inspired several delightful musical performances at the Powerhouse. ‘The great Victorian architect Pugin expressed his spirituality through the design of religious buildings and artefacts. This spirituality also has a choral tradition,’ says Education Officer Rita Orsini. The Sydney University Musical Society, accompanied by the energetic and powerful Samoan Youth Choir of the House of Praise Church, performed hymns and spiritual songs to an enthralled weekend audience in June. Four catholic school choirs, St Mary’s Cathedral College, Santa Sabina College (Strathfield), St Vincent’s College (Potts Point) and St Patrick’s College (Strathfield) have also enchanted visitors as part of the Pugin program.

Marianna Lopert from Santa Sabina College said after the performance: ‘It was very exciting to perform to the public and have our voices carried throughout the Museum. During these experiences the choir is forced to lift our level, and the atmosphere is really wonderful … we will all have gained from the experience.’ Certain exhibitions lend themselves to a musical enhancement. During Star Wars: The Magic of Myth, five Sydney schools (Carlingford, North Sydney Girls, Pittwater, Summer Hill and Roseville), made the theme from Star Wars resound from the Turbine Hall. Recitals are presented when suitable partnerships arise as part of the Museum Live! program. The next event is a classical guitar recital performed by St Laurence’s College (Queensland) on 24 September 2003.

PAUL PRIESTMAN, ONE OF THE VISITING GUEST SPEAKERS FOR SYDNEY DESIGN WEEK.

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THE 2003 POWERHOUSE SELECTION FROM THE AUSTRALIAN DESIGN AWARDS DEMONSTRATES PRODUCT DESIGN AT ITS BEST.
story_ROB RENEW, SENIOR CURATOR, ENGINEERING & DESIGN

Australian ingenuity
Several Australian design ‘icons’ are included in this year’s Powerhouse Museum Selection from the Australian Design Awards. They are the Sunbeam Mixmaster, the Albion cricket helmet and the Eveready Dolphin Lantern. While all three products have been on the market for many years, they have been comprehensively redesigned to enhance their performance and appearance. Sunbeam’s Mixmaster, for example, was first introduced onto the Australian market in 1948 and has been a stalwart in the nation’s kitchens ever since. The new Mixmaster Compact features a removable hand mixer with a separately powered stand to rotate the bowl. Meanwhile, Eveready’s Dolphin Mk 5 Lantern is a redesign of a product which has been a world leader for over 30 years. The redesign builds on the Dolphin’s reputation for reliability in extreme environments. The Powerhouse has been making its annual selection from the awards since 1992, allowing the Museum to update its collection of outstanding products from Australian designers and manufacturing companies. There are four main criteria for selection: excellence in design, innovation, sustainability, and advantage to Australian industry. All the chosen products have achieved high standards in such areas as safety, functionality, performance, ease of use, and appearance. Each product incorporates at least one important technical innovation. All have been designed with regard to improving durability and serviceability, reducing energy and materials use, and minimising harmful wastes. The products are likely to provide opportunities for Australian companies to establish or maintain leading positions in Australian and international markets. One of the greatest challenges for product designers today is to work with engineers and other technical staff in developing products based on the first application of a new technology. Products of this type, such as the Ultrasonic Cardiac Output Monitor, are well represented in this year’s Powerhouse Museum Selection. Perhaps this will give some hope to those who have been disappointed by the small number of Australian inventions adopted commercially overseas. These innovative products provide significant improvements in functionality and performance over competing products and give Australian companies opportunities in world markets. The number of innovative medical devices entered in the Australian Design Awards is increasing each year and in 2003 five medical products are included in the Powerhouse Museum Selection. Products such as the Betachek G5, a blood glucose testing device for monitoring diabetes, demonstrate outstanding achievement by Australian designers, engineers and medical researchers in developing and testing new technologies and then applying them to functional appliances. This product received the 2003 Australian Design Award of the year for its world-leading product innovation and design, the result of a successful collaboration between three companies with expertise in electronic and optical design, medical diagnostics, and product design. The Powerhouse Museum Selection is on display in the 2003 Australian Design Awards exhibition in the Succcess and innovation gallery on level 4.
Supported by the Australian Design Awards, a division of Standards Australia. TOP ROW FROM LEFT: GRADIFLOW BF400 LABORATORY INSTRUMENT; BETACHEK G5 DIABETES MONITOR; ALBION CRICKET HELMET; DEMAIN SERIES ANGLE GRINDER. BOTTOM ROW FROM LEFT: EVEREADY DOLPHIN MK5 LANTERN; ULTRASONIC CARDIAC OUTPUT MONITOR; MIXMASTER COMPACT; AUTOSET SPIRIT AIRFLOW GENERATOR AND HUMIDIFIER. PHOTOS COURTESY AUSTRALIAN DESIGN AWARDS.

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sport, science and the theory of everything

WHEN SCIENCE CURATOR JESSE SHORE TOOK ON SPORT HE DISCOVERED THAT IT RELATES TO JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING.

Sure I like sport. I grew up in Brooklyn, New York, first playing catch with my dad, graduating to stoop ball, punchball and stick ball with the neighbourhood kids in the street, softball in any nearby field, touch football (USA style) in the street or nearby patch of concrete, and basketball on blacktop (although I was hopeless at it). Never wanted to be an athlete but liked to play. Sure I like science. I’ve wanted to be a scientist since I was 12 years old. I became one. But I found it more fun being a curator of science where I could tell the story of science rather than do it. I thought it might be real fun to combine science and sport and create an exhibition which communicates both. When the Powerhouse acquired more than 350 items from the Sydney Olympic Games, I went to view the new collection to see what might be relevant to my idea but I found only a few items in this potentially fantastic resource that even loosely related to the science or technology of sport. I moped for five minutes before the penny dropped — the science of sport could be too narrow and dry

a subject — I needed to broaden it out. That’s when I expanded (or exploded) the exhibition concept to include the science, technology, design, culture and fashion of sport. This makes it a true amalgam of the main subject areas of the Museum. The exhibition Sport: more than heroes and legends covers everything from the theories of Isaac Newton, who described in 1671 how spinning tennis balls curve in flight, and Benjamin Robins' New principles of gunnery published in 1742, to Einstein’s theory of relativity (and how it relates to global positioning system devices used in some sports) and the way sports clothing influences fashion off the field. Displays also cover changes in design and materials in such items as tennis racquets, bicycles and prosthetic legs for sprinting. Plus there are stories of the emotional involvement in sport of fans as well as players and sporting heroes both famous and unsung. The main surprise in developing this exhibition has been to find how many connections one can make between sport and nearly everything else.

MAIN PHOTO: ANDREW SYMONDS TAKES A CATCH OFF HIS OWN BOWLING AT THE GABBA, 2002. THE AERODYNAMICS OF BOWLING IS ONE OF THE TOPICS EXPLORED IN THE NEW SPORT EXHIBITION. PHOTO COURTESY NEWSPIX. INSET: CURATOR JESSE SHORE COMES TO GRIPS WITH SPORT’S DIVERSITY. PHOTO BY MARINCO KOJDANOVSKI.

sport: more than heroes and legends_opens 26 september

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OVER THE PAST 150 YEARS, AUSTRALIANS’ DETERMINATION TO IMPROVE OUR PERFORMANCE AND ENJOYMENT OF SPORT HAS LED TO A HOST OF INNOVATIONS. HERE IS A SELECTION.

australia’s sporting firsts

1. Australian Rules 1858 Developed in Melbourne in the 1850s as a winter sport for cricketers, Australian Rules is a remarkable innovation in organised leisure. Fans claim that it was the world's first football code to be played as a formally organised competition, that some Melbourne clubs are the oldest of any code in the world, and that the game (at least in the southern states of Australia) has the largest audience anywhere as a percentage of the population. 2. 18-footer skiff racing 1891 The first form of sailing to be developed as a spectator sport with large audiences, prizes and commercial sponsorship, skiff racing began on Sydney Harbour in the 1890s. Originally the races were for boats of all sizes, but soon the main competitors were specially designed 18-footers (about 6 m long). There were no limits set on sail area, crew numbers, or the design of hull and rigging but intense competition inspired improvements in the design and technology of the skiffs. 3. Australian crawl 1902 Until the 1890s competitive freestyle swimming was done with the head out of the water. Australian Richard Cavill adapted a stroke he observed Solomon Islanders using, which combined an up-anddown kick with an alternating overarm stroke. This new style was first used in competition in 1902 at the International Championships and set a new world record for the 100-yards race. The stroke became known as the Australian crawl.

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THEN PRIME MINISTER BOB HAWKE CELEBRATES AUSTRALIA II’S VICTORY IN THE AMERICA’S CUP IN SEPTEMBER 1983. PHOTO COURTESY NEWSPIX; AUSTRALIAN SURF LIFE SAVING CLUBS WERE THE FIRST IN THE WORLD. PHOTO BY HARVIE ALLISON, COURTESY WWW.HARVPIX.COM; DICK JOHNSON AND RACECAM AT BATHURST IN 1984. PHOTO FROM THE AUSTRALIA INNOVATES WEBSITE, COURTESY THE SEVEN NETWORK.

4. Surf lifesaving movement 1906 Australian surf lifesaving clubs were the first in the world. In 1903 a group of swimmers formed the Bronte Beach Surf Club and rigged up some rescue equipment. Soon after in 1906, Australian lifesavers developed the surf reel, which allowed lifesavers to reach swimmers in distress and be towed back to shore. Surf lifesaving by volunteers has saved many lives and is now an integral part of Australia’s beach culture. The rescue methods pioneered in Australia have been used throughout the world. 5. Speedo swimwear 1928 Speedo became an early pioneer in swimsuit design and has remained at the forefront of innovation ever since. The one-piece cotton ‘racing back’ costume for men which exposed their shoulders and back like a singlet was introduced in 1927. Considered daring, it was very ‘fast’ in the water. Other innovations followed. Research into hydrodynamics (movement through water) of garments, led to the use nylon, lycra and ‘paper’ (lycra/nylon) fabrics, the removal of modesty skirts from men’s and women’s costumes, and the raising of hiplines and necklines on women’s swimwear. Speedo has continued to innovate with the aqua-blade and Fastskin suits. 6. Synthetic radio broadcasts 1930s Cricket was immensely popular in the 1920s and 1930s and ‘synthetic’ radio broadcasts were devised by the ABC to enable matches played in the UK to be broadcast in Australia as they were played. News of games was transmitted over continents via land-

based telegraph lines and across oceans via underwater cables. Relying on the decoded messages, local commentators created a lively playby-play broadcast, complete with sound effects, to rapt listeners across the country. 7. Camera-Graph photo finish 1947 This Australian invention is similar to an American one of about the same time. The Camera-Graph was developed in Australia in 1946 by fashion photographer Athol Shmith and Bertran Pearl to photograph the finish of horse races. The Australian system used a neon tube and was set into the winning post. It captured pictures of the last second of a race with great accuracy. 8. World Series Cricket 1977 In 1977 cricket-loving media owner Kerry Packer set up a competition to broadcast on his TV network. Packer’s World Series Cricket competition was livelier and more colourful than previous one-day matches. He introduced day-night games and a white ball that was easier to see at night. Instead of wearing whites, the players wore coloured clothes to contrast with the ball (earning it the nickname ‘the pyjama game’). 9. Racecam 1979 Channel 7 introduced the system at the 1979 Bathurst 1000 car race to give TV viewers a driver’s eye view of the action. Racecam broadcast live images from racing cars, using a network of car-mounted cameras, miniaturised microwave radio transmitters, and relays in helicopters. A refined system is now used in a variety of different sports.

10. Australia II’s winged keel 1983 Australia was the first country in the world to beat America in the America’s Cup, wresting the trophy from the New York Yacht Club after 132 years of competition. In 1983 Australia II, backed by Perth businessman Alan Bond, and skippered by John Bertrand, defeated the US yacht Liberty in a series of seven races. The Australian yacht featured a revolutionary winged keel, designed by Ben Lexcen, which the Americans tried unsuccessfully to outlaw. The whole country was jubilant and the win prompted the then Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke to comment ‘…any boss who sacks anyone for not turning up today is a bum’. 11. Sportswool 2000 This double-sided fabric with merino wool on the inside and polyester on the outside was used by Australian athletes in the 1998 Commonwealth Games and the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. The fabric is ideal for sportswear because it releases moisture from the garment keeping athletes cool during exercise, but retains warmth before and after sporting activity. Sportswool was developed by CSIRO and The Woolmark Company and was first made commercially in 2000. See more Australian innovations on the Australia innovates website at www.phm.gov.au/australia_innovates Compiled by Angelique Hutchison and Judith Matheson.

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a national necessity
OUR NEW EXHIBITION SPORT: MORE THAN HEROES AND LEGENDS EXPLORES AUSTRALIA’S PASSION FOR SPORT.
story _ ANNI TURNBULL, ASSISTANT CURATOR AUSTRALIAN HISTORY, ENGINEERING AND DESIGN
Australians are obsessed with sport. It is a major key to our identity. In 1871 English novelist Anthony Trollope visited Australia and duly observed ‘sport was clearly a national necessity.’ A century later social commentator Donald Horne noted in 1965 that ‘sport to many Australians is life and the rest shadow’. Why does sport matter so much to us? Why does it arouse such passion? On the one hand, we’ve got a great climate, plenty of wide-open spaces, a mostly healthy diet, and a tough ‘outdoors’ tradition. On the other, most of Australia’s population lives an increasingly sedentary life and enjoys its sport through cable television or in vast stadiums. Whether we are participants or spectators, there are many reasons why sport holds such an important place in Australian society. Sport produces many of our best known heroes and legends. Australians love their sporting heroes. We remember, idolise, eulogise, write songs and create legends about some, such as Sir Donald Bradman, Betty Cuthbert, Dawn Fraser, Ian Thorpe, Cathy Freeman, even Phar Lap while dismissing or forgetting others. Annette Kellerman, for example, was a major sporting star in the early 20th century but how many people know her name today? Not only a swimming champion, she was a distance swimmer, performer and film star whose career spanned 40 years. A new documentary about Kellerman has reignited interest in her extraordinary achievements. Sport is a barometer of the changing values of our society. In 1995, the Australian Football League (AFL) was the first sport in Australia to introduce a race abuse rule or code. It is now an offence for any player or official to insult or vilify another on the grounds of race, religion, ethnicity, colour, nationality or background. The rule vindicated the courageous stands taken by Indigenous players Nicky Winmar, Michael Long and others. Sport is an inspiration. Charismatic coach Brian Gorjian turned around the fortunes of the Sydney Kings basketball team. The Gorjian touch reversed a long losing streak in just one season. Gorjian, who also works the motivational speaker circuit, created a team of winners with a mix of ball skills, fitness, flair and competitive spirit. He claims the high he gets from coaching is better than being a player. ‘As a player, the high when you win is for you and maybe some for your team. But as a coach, it’s for the team, the fans, the board and yourself.’ Sport changes lives. Eight years ago David Liddiard, former professional rugby league player, used his fame on the field to begin the National Aboriginal Sporting Corporation Association (NASCA). The association takes Indigenous sports stars to Aboriginal communities around Australia to raise awareness, and promote a strong focus on health, education and participation in sport. NASCA also works with the Sydney Kings to encourage inner-city kids to regularly attend lessons at Alexandria Park Community School. The kids who do are rewarded with a weekly bus trip to a Kings game. The Kings also held a six-week basketball clinic for the school, run by Kings coach Brian Gorjian and players. Sport drives innovation in other fields. David Howell is a prosthetic limb-maker. Ten years ago David went to a meeting of para-athletes and saw them run. He was impressed with the times they recorded but not with the performance of their prosthetic limbs and offered to work with them. One of the first was Neil Fuller, who became a national and Olympic champion. ‘I’m never bored; each patient is a new challenge. These athletes are single-minded, they train six days a week and don’t want to miss. It’s like being a coach, you make the prosthesis for them, and they develop and run faster times. It’s a fairly evocative, emotional time when they break a world record. They become part of your family too.’ Sport offers a lifetime of spectator enjoyment. Orthopaedic surgeon Dr Warwick Bruce is an exrugby player and athlete. He’s a collector of memorabilia with a passion for the games and the people who play them. He admires excellence in any field but sport offers a more precise measure: ‘You can't always judge the best musician or surgeon but you can judge the best in sport. It’s how high they jump or how fast they run. The good thing in sport is you can measure it.’

ST KILDA FOOTBALLER NICKY WINMAR LIFTS HIS JUMPER TO SHOW HIS PRIDE AS AN INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN AFTER A RACIAL SLUR DURING A MATCH AGAINST COLLINGWOOD IN 1993. PHOTO COURTESY NEWSPIX.

sport: more than heroes and legends_opens 26 september

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MEMBERS CAN WIN AN INVITATION TO THE CELEBRITYPACKED LAUNCH OF SPORT BY RENEWING NOW!

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collection companions aquisition

‘DIAMOND SHIP-FORM’ AND ‘DIAMOND PLATTER’ BY LES BLAKEBROUGH, TASMANIA 2002. PHOTO BY MARINCO KOJDANOVSKI.

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news walk-throughs exclusive events family activities special offers

Funds donated by the Collection Companions of Powerhouse Members have enabled the Museum to acquire two significant new porcelain works by distinguished Tasmanian potter Les Blakebrough. Both are new forms for Blakebrough, and reflect his increasing interest in the dazzling white, translucent material he calls Southern Ice porcelain. The platter is the only one to survive from about six made, and the vessel is

based on a ship form he had noticed in Federico Fellini’s films. The diamond pattern on these objects is made by masking the clay with shellac, and then sponging it back. The surfaces have been compared with the subtle texture of damask. The Museum holds a number of works by Blakebrough from the 1960s to the 1980s. These fine new shapes reflect the developments in his career. They are on display in the Members Lounge.

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BOOK NOW! FOR NEW YEAR’S EVE

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from the members manager
The festive season will be upon us sooner than we think so I’d like to remind you all about our great Christmas and New Year’s Eve events. It pays to book early, especially for New Year’s Eve at the Observatory, which is a hugely popular night out for family and friends, especially overseas visitors. But back to what’s happening in spring. Our terrific new exhibition Sport: more than heroes and legends opens on 26 September. This exhibition strikes right at the heart of
DETAIL OF THE ETERNITY TAPESTRY, DESIGNED BY MARTIN SHARP AND WOVEN BY THE VICTORIAN TAPESTRY WORKSHOP, WHICH IS ON DISPLAY IN THE MEMBERS LOUNGE. ON LOAN FROM THE AUSTRALIAN GALLERIES.

what it is to be Australian. At the other end of the spectrum, we also have a special members viewing of Great expectations. For anyone with an interest in design, this is a chance to see how the creative process works. And don’t forget that Mars is closer to Earth than it has been for 70 000 years at the moment, so now is a great time to visit Sydney Observatory. See our calendar overleaf for more details of all these events. The annual Members dinner on 19 July was a fabulous night (the pictures tell the story, see page 14). One of the

highlights for me was the chance to meet some of you personally. Our new Members Lounge on level 5 wouldn’t be the special place it is without the Eternity tapestry, designed by Martin Sharp, greeting everyone. I’d like to gently remind you that we are seeking sponsorship to assist the Museum in purchasing the tapestry. If you can help, contact Senior Curator of Decorative Arts and Design Grace Cochrane on (02) 9217 0388. Jane Turner

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Christmas Party Join us in the Members Lounge on Sunday 7 December for music, festive fare and children’s entertainment, including a craft workshop to make Christmas presents. See next Powerline for more details or book now on (02) 9217 0600.

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september

Saturday 6 September
Kids craft: Fathers Day gift workshop Make a memorable one-off gift for dad in our Fathers Day craft workshop. At least one accompanying adult must be in attendance to supervise and assist their child.

Tuesday 9 September
NASA talk: Stardust and Genesis A rare opportunity to join NASA scientists to find out more about the Stardust and Genesis sample return missions, which are collecting particles from deep space for return to earth.

1.00 – 3.00 pm Cost: $8 per member child.

6.00 – 8.00 pm Cost: $5 members/$7 guests

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october

Thursday 9 October
Tea and textiles Curator Christina Sumner has just returned from Central Asia. She will be talking about recent acquisitions and more.

Thursday 9 October
Age of Aquarius legends night Enjoy a fun night at Sydney Observatory to learn about the legend of Aquarius. 3-D Space Theatre session, telescope viewing (weather permitting) and a pizza supper are included.

10.00 – 11.30 am Cost: $5 members/$10 guests.

6.15 – 10.00 pm Cost: $18 members/$55 member family. Bookings essential. Phone Sydney Observatory on (02) 9217 0485.

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november

Saturday 1 November
First Quarter moon viewing See the fascinating detail on the moon’s surface as well as other interesting celestial objects.

Friday 14 November
Legends of Pegasus pizza night Join in for a fun night at Sydney Observatory to learn about the legend of Pegasus. 3D theatre session, telescope viewing (weather permitting) and a pizza supper are included.

8.15 – 10.00 pm (weather permitting) Cost: $8 members/$6 child/$22 family/$12 guests. Bookings essential. Phone Sydney Observatory on (02) 9217 0485.

8.15 – 10.00 pm Cost: $18 members/$55 member family. Bookings essential. Phone Sydney Observatory on (02) 9217 0485

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New Year’s Eve This is one not to be missed. Sydney Observatory is a spectacular site in its own right, but it’s even better when fireworks over the harbour are part of the deal. See next Powerline for more details or book now on (02) 9217 0600.

members+

Saturday 20 September
Exhibition walk through: Balarinji Join Decorative Arts and Design Curator Anne-Marie Van de Ven to explore the creative process of Indigenous design studio Balarinji, from concept through to product development. See designs for everything from Qantas jets to silk kimonos.

Friday 26 September
Sport: more than heroes and legends Special Members Viewing Find out why Australians are passionate about sport. This exhibition displays more than 100 items belonging to top Australian athletes including Ian Thorpe’s Speedo Fastskin swimsuit and Louise Sauvage’s wheelchair from the Sydney 2000 Olympics. 6.00 – 8.00 pm including pizza, wine and soft drinks.

how to book for members events
Due to limited places, bookings are essential for every event. Please ring the Members hotline on (02) 9217 0600 to make your booking before you send in payment. Please leave a message quoting your membership number, what event you are booking for and the number of members and guests. We will confirm your booking.

2.00 – 3.00 pm Cost: $5 members/$10 guests

Cost: $25 adults/$12 children/$65 family (2A+2C)

Saturday 11 October
Kids quiz: Sport See how much you can learn about sport in Australia. It’s also a chance to win a $50 gift voucher from the Powerhouse shop.

Saturday 18 October
Members Day at Sydney Observatory A special day of history and exploration including guided tours of the Signal Station, and a presentation of the results of an archaeological dig held on the site in February.

Payment for members events
We accept: credit card payments by phone, fax or mail; cheques; money orders; or cash at the level 4 entrance to the Museum. We pay for all events once bookings are confirmed, so if you are unable to attend your event, please let us know ASAP or we will charge you to cover costs. All events are held at the Powerhouse Museum unless otherwise stated. All dates, times and venues are correct at time of publication

1.00 – 3.00 pm Cost: $8 member child/$10 guest child

Cost: members free/$8 guests. Bookings essential. Phone Sydney Observatory on (02) 9217 0485.

Wednesday 19 November
Members viewing: Sport Discover the heroes and legends of Australian sport and get a hands-on experience of scientific phenomenon such as how your body works to play sport.

Saturday 22 November
Exhibition walk through: Balarinji Join Curator James Wilson-Miller for a tour of the Balarinji exhibition which showcases the work of one of the original trailblazers in Indigenous-based design in Australia. Includes a performance by the National Aboriginal Dance Conference.

Members e-newsletter
If you would like to receive the regular Members e-newsletter with updates on all new members events please call (02) 9217 0600 or e-mail members@phm.gov.au with you membership number and e-newsletter in the subject line.

6.00 – 8.00 pm including pizza, wine and soft drinks. Cost: $25 adults/$12 children/$65 family (2A+2C)

Cost: $5 members/$10 guests

special offers
Renew your Membership in the first three weeks of September and go into the draw for an invitation to the Museum’s exclusive celebrity-packed launch of Sport: more than heroes and legends. Renew your Membership in September, October or November and go into the draw for a family pass to our New Year’s Eve event at the Observatory.

ABOVE FROM LEFT: SPRING IS A GREAT TIME FOR AN EVENING VISIT TO SYDNEY OBSERVATORY. OUR NEW SPORT EXHIBITION EXPLORES AUSTRALIA’S PASSION FOR SPORT. PHOTO BY MARK EVANS, COURTESY NEWSPIX. LOUISE SAUVAGE WINS GOLD IN THE SYDNEY 2000 PARALYMPIC GAMES. HER WHEELCHAIR IS ON DISPLAY IN SPORT: MORE THAN HEROES AND LEGENDS. PHOTO BY BRETT FAULKNER, COURTESY NEWSPIX. HAVE FUN WITH OUR KIDS CRAFT WORKSHOPS. PHOTO BY SUE STAFFORD

Introduce a new Member to the Museum and go into the draw for a beautiful Royal Doulton collectors item valued at $475.

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members scene
SUZANNE AND JOHN ALLEN.

LEFT: STRING DUET TWO TO TANGO ENTERTAINED DINERS. BELOW: FRANCESCA VON BRAUNBATES AND MICHAEL BATES.

The annual Members Dinner on 19 July was an astronomical occasion.
PHOTOS BY GEOFF FRIEND

ABOVE: BARRIE BUTT

THE SCENE IS SET FOR A STARRY NIGHT. BELOW FROM LEFT: CATHY MILETTA, PENNY VLAHOS AND MARIA VALOS.

GUEST SPEAKER FOR THE EVENING, NOTED ASTRONOMER DR PAUL MURDIN FROM THE INSTITUTE OF ASTRONOMY, CAMBRIDGE, UK.

LEO FROM EUROPEAN CATERING ADDS THE FINISHING TOUCHES.

invitation from Royal Doulton
The Royal Doulton Company invites Powerhouse members to the 2003 tour of John Albitt, designer of Royal Crown Derby paperweights. Born in Ipswich and now living in Somerset, John has been associated with Royal Crown Derby since 1993. John’s work is held in a number of private collections and museums in New Zealand, Belfast and Cambridgeshire. At each in-store event John will share his knowledge and give an insight in to the inspirations behind his designs. His first paperweight for Royal Crown Derby was the Hummingbird, introduced in 1993. John works initially with pencil drawings, then moves to full colour illustrations. In the case of paperweights he then creates a clay model and prepares full artwork, fitting colours on to the modelled shape. As a special offer to Powerhouse Members attending the talks, make a purchase from the Royal Crown Derby collection to the value of $599 and receive a free copy of Royal Crown Derby paperweights book (RRP $69.95) along with a Goldcrest paperweight (RRP $139). Please present your Powerhouse Museum membership card at time of making purchase. John Albitt will be in-store at: Doulton & Company, Chatswood Chase Thursday 30 October, 6 – 8pm (02) 9411 7770 David Jones, Market Street Sydney Friday 31 October, 12 – 2pm (02) 9266 6328 David Jones, Wollongong Monday 3 November, 12 – 2pm (02) 4252 5678 For appearances in other states, please phone Royal Doulton Customer Service on 1800 252 034.
John Albitt’s itinerary is correct at time of printing, but may change. Please contact the store to confirm.

ROYAL CROWN DERBY ‘CROCODILE’ PAPERWEIGHT DESIGNED BY JOHN ALBITT (PICTURED RIGHT). PHOTOS COURTESY ROYAL DOULTON.

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artisan of influence
A TRAVELLING EXHIBITION FROM THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AUSTRALIAN POTTERY SHOWCASES THE WORK OF TALENTED POTTER WILLIAM HOLFORD.
William Holford (1840-1914) was a skilled modeller and mould maker who arrived in Australia in 1876 and enjoyed a successful career across three states. His work and influence is the subject of a small travelling exhibition of pottery made between 1887 and the 1930s. The 50 items in the exhibition range from bread crocks to water filters and have been selected from the collection of the National Museum of Australian Pottery, Wodonga, by its owner-director Geoff Ford. They track Holford’s career with examples of his work and works by other potters that were influenced by him. Trained in Staffordshire, William Holford worked for some years at the famous Minton Pottery, and arrived in Australia in 1876 after two years in New Zealand. He worked first at a number of potteries in Victoria, then briefly at the Lithgow Pottery in 1882-83, where he made distinctive moulds for a range of slip-cast domestic wares such as plates, basins, bread plates, pickle jars and jugs. He set up the Phoenix Pottery in Sydney, then established his own Standard Pottery in what is now Lane Cove, before leaving for Adelaide in 1887. After some time working at Trewenack’s Pottery in Magill and at Koster’s Pottery in Norwood, in 1890, with his son Thomas and two partners, he set up the first of a series of his own potteries including the London Pottery Works (1890; 1903-1906) and the Adelaide Pottery Co in Maylands (18911905), and the Federal Pottery Co (1906-1909). William Holford’s work is recognised by its competently made forms and characteristic decoration. One of these is the flower and fern pattern that became known as the ‘Premier’ design. Mould makers like Holford often took their moulds with them when they moved to new potteries. At other times the moulds remained in the pottery and influenced others. The exhibition also features documents, photographs, tools and catalogues.

William Holford’s art and design influence on Australian pottery is on display near the schools entrance on level 3.
Grace Cochrane, Senior Curator, Australian Decorative Arts and Design
An exhibition by the National Museum of Australian Pottery, Wodonga, Victoria. Supported by Northcote Pottery and Bendigo Pottery. WATERMONKEY (LEFT) AND JUG, MAJOLICA GLAZE WITH FERN-LEAF DECORATION. DESIGNED BY WILLIAM HOLFORD AND ATTRIBUTED TO LITHGOW POTTERY ABOUT 1882. CHEESE COVER AND PLATE, CANE WARE AND MAJOLICA GLAZED, DECORATED WITH COW HANDLE AND WILLIAM HOLFORD’S ‘PREMIER’ PATTERN, MADE BY ABRAHAM JAMES AT HIS POTTERY IN COORPAROO, QUEENSLAND ABOUT 1891. PHOTOS COURTESY GEOFF FORD.

POWERHOUSE MUSEUM SHOP
Open 7 days, 10.00 am – 5.00 pm

Books, CDs, writing accessories, art glass & ceramics, scarves & textiles, jewellery and watches, greeting cards, educational toys

For more information call (02) 9217 0331 Or email shops@phm.gov.au. Delivery available. Free gift wrapping. Gift selection service. Comfortable browsing atmosphere.

powerhouse members receive 10% off selected merchandise

Powerhouse members receive 10% off all Powerhouse Publishing titles in the Powerhouse Shop and mailorder.

BOOKS FROM POWERHOUSE PUBLISHING

woven impressions
ARTIST AND DESIGNER KEN DONE HAS RECENTLY ADDED A MAJOR NEW WORK TO HIS DESIGN ARCHIVE AT THE POWERHOUSE MUSEUM.
Ken Done has donated his prized tapestry Twentyeight views of the Opera House and the related small painting Twenty-five views of the Opera House 15 to the Powerhouse Museum under the Commonwealth Government’s Cultural Gifts Program. The magnificent tapestry was woven by the Victorian Tapestry Workshop in Melbourne and is based on Done’s series of 25 small canvas paintings (each measuring 25 x 20 cm) of the Sydney Opera House. These paintings, exhibited in Paris during 1996, depict light and colour on the surface of the Opera House and its surrounding waters. Reminiscent of French impressionist painting, they provided an interesting challenge for the Victorian Tapestry Workshop, which is renowned for fostering collaborations between contemporary artists and the workshop weavers. For Twenty-eight views of the Opera House, the weavers worked closely with Done in choosing the initial design and colours. Using three visual reference sources — 35 mm slides of all the paintings, a selection of the original artworks, and the overall design to which Done had added oil pastel borders (all kept close to the loom for reference) — they commenced the tapestry in 1998, completing it 40 weeks later in 1999. Hand-woven and measuring 286 x 398 cm, the tapestry weighs approximately 34 kg. It is woven from fine Australian wool dyed in the workshop’s own dye house. The tapestry becomes part of the Ken Done design archive, acquired by the Museum in 2001, which includes designs associated with events of national significance such as the Australian Pavilion in World Expo '88 and the programs for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. Ken Done, a Museum Life Fellow, has earned a special place in the history and development of Australian art through his distinctive graphics and, at times controversial, mass-production of images. Made a member of the Order of Australia for services to art, design and tourism in 1992, Done’s contribution to the development of Australian identity during the latter part of the 20th century is indisputable, particularly his portrayal of Australia as a colourful, sophisticated, relaxing and fun place to visit. Done’s Twenty-eight views of the Opera House tapestry is on display on level 2 of the Powerhouse Museum (Musical instruments… made and played exhibition foyer). Anne-Marie Van De Ven, Curator Decorative Arts and Design

Now available!

WHAT’S IN STORE? A HISTORY OF RETAILING IN AUSTRALIA
Kimberley Webber and Ian Hoskins An engaging historical journey that brings to life Australia’s colourful retail heritage. Discover shopkeepers’ stories plus retail technology and fashion. 128 pages with over 200 illustrations. RRP $34.95

TWENTY-EIGHT VIEWS OF THE OPERA HOUSE TAPESTRY DESIGNED BY KEN DONE, WOVEN BY THE VICTORIAN TAPESTRY WORKSHOP, SYDNEY/MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, 1998-1999 WITH GRAND PIANO, STUART & SONS, NEWCASTLE, 1999. PHOTO BY JEAN-FRANCOIS LANZARONE.

Reprint by popular demand!

RAPT IN COLOUR
Claire Roberts and Huh Dong-hwa (eds) Discover the beauty, wondrous colour and fascinating patterns of Korean wrapping cloths and costume from the Choson dynasty. 108 pages with 68 beautiful illustrations RRP $32.95 And coming soon... 2004 Sydney Observatory sky guide, the ever popular annual. Available Dec 03. EcoLogic: creating a sustainable future, an essential resource book. Available Nov 03. Powerhouse books are available from the Powerhouse Shop, good bookstores and by mailorder. For more information contact Powerhouse Publishing on (02) 9217 0129 or email phpub@phm.gov.au www.phm.gov.au/publish

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HOW DO YOU KEEP UP WITH CURIOUS (AND NOT SO CURIOUS) CHILDREN IN THE MUSEUM? SOME TIPS FOR THE ADULTS.
story_HELEN WHITTY, EDUCATION SERVICES COORDINATOR, photo_GREG ANDERSON

rules of engagement
The whole family can enjoy a day at the Museum. You can have fun and learn something about yourself, each other and the society around you. Here we outline six steps for a satisfying day out. 1. Plan it To make the most of your visit, make sure you plan it well. You can visit the exhibitions or you can join in public programs that include demonstrations, tours and performances. To find out what’s new, check out our regular publications, such as the new Exhibitions + events booklet, or go to our website. The monthly What’s on lists the times and dates of all exhibitions and public programs. Phone (02) 9217 0202 to be placed on the mailing list or pick one up on arrival. Call (02) 9217 0222 to find out the plans for each holiday program or book into special activities. When you arrive for your visit, pick up a copy of the Guide, which has a map showing the location of exhibitions, plus details of services and facilities, including where to find food, toilets and shops. You can make enquiries about daily events at admissions or the information desk on level 4. 2. Explain it Give your children some idea of where they are going and what they will see. Explain that the Powerhouse Museum is housed in the shell of an old power station and is filled with many precious things called objects. The objects come from the Museum’s vast collection. The Museum’s job is to preserve and protect this collection. That’s why some objects are in cases and you can’t touch them. There are also films and videos to see and interactives to play with. 3. Stage it Stage your visit so that the exhibitions you visit are in decreasing order of complexity. The children’s concentration levels will be the highest in the first exhibition you visit. At this early stage, they will be more likely to help you read the labels and look at the objects. The Bayagul, Cyberworlds and EcoLogic exhibitions have special label trails for children. Later on, exhibitions with large objects, interactives and public programs with hands-on activities will extend their concentration. Check the Guide for the locations of the popular interactive KIDS units. A new series of childrens trails, catering for 5-12 year olds is also being developed. The first of these, Dressing up, was launched in August. Using the trail, children follow a series of clues around the ‘... never done’ and What’s in store? exhibitions to find selected objects. Whichever path you take, allow for rest stops and free time. Encourage children to scan exhibitions in their own time and then focus on an area of interest. 4. Go with it In any one visit you will be caregiver, minder, follower, leader, interpreter, font of all knowledge and an active listener. The children will want to make their own connections but it is also an opportunity to share some family stories. The interactives are sure to be a winner with the kids but the objects will ‘speak’ with a little help. Questions are a useful way to keep them interested and talking. Some questions for very young children might be: What are all the things you can see in this showcase? How many wheels on the train? How many colours in that costume? How can you tell this is very old? What does it sound like? Do we have something like that at home? Does grandma? 5. Express it Debrief on what you have seen. What did you all like the best? What is your favourite thing in the Museum? You could choose a postcard from the shop and send to grandparents or best friends. Buy a souvenir of your visit. Talk about it in the car or on the train on the way home. 6. Plan to come back There is always much more to do and see at the Powerhouse Museum.

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A RECENT ACQUISITION SHEDS LIGHT ON HOW THE SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE WAS BUILT.
story_DES BARRETT, CURATOR photos_MARINCO KOJDANOVSKI

how did Utzon’s design stand up?
A fascinating collection of architectural and engineering drawings and some engineering models of the Sydney Opera House were recently donated to the Museum by Ove Arup and Partners, who were the principal engineering consultants on the technically complex and socially controversial project. The new acquisitions will feature in an exhibition to mark the 50th anniversary of the design competition for the Sydney Opera House, which is planned for 2005. Just over a year after the design competition opened in December 1955, NSW Premier John Joseph Cahill announced that Jørn Utzon, a relatively unknown architect living and working in Hellebaek, north of Copenhagen, had won first prize with Scheme 218. Utzon’s collaboration with Ove Arup began soon after he won the competition. The architect’s original design required considerable intervention from the structural engineer. Arup recognised Utzon’s design talents, but there were structural implications for what he had proposed. One of Arup’s biggest challenges
MAIN PHOTO: A TIMBER WIND-TEST MODEL. INSET: MODEL DEMONSTRATING THE SPHERICAL DERIVATION OF THE GEOMETRY FOR THE ROOF SHELLS.

was that while the ‘shells’ of the Opera House roof had obvious aesthetic appeal, the shapes devised by Utzon were free form without geometric definition and their structural viability was unproven. The intense collaboration between architect and engineer continued throughout the first two stages (1959-1966) of the three-stage project. In 1966 Utzon, who had gained world recognition for his Opera House design, resigned from the project. He left Sydney and never returned. Among other things, Ove Arup and Partners has donated a timber wind-test model, which was used in experiments to gather data about the wind-pressure distribution over the shells, and a spherical model which was important to ‘work out’ the geometry of the roof. There are also several portfolios of drawings that Utzon presented to Premier Cahill in 1958. He prefaced one set of drawings with ‘I am happy with this book … I am able to give a project which realises in a practical form the vision of the competition’.

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splendid isolation
THE REVOLUTION IN MOBILE AND WEARABLE ELECTRONIC DEVICES OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS HAS INFLUENCED EVERYTHING FROM FASHION AND MUSIC TO SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR.
Two of the most significant products to emerge over that time were the Sony Walkman in the late 1970s and Nintendo GameBoy a decade later. Both used advances in transistor and microprocessor technologies, and applied them to personal consumer products. The Museum’s collection contained neither of these items but a request to all Powerhouse staff earlier this year promptly produced suitable examples of each. They are valuable additions to our collection, which represents the changing uses, design and impact of new technologies over the latter part of the 20th century. When the Sony Walkman (model # TPS-L2) was released in 1979, it was the first (truly) portable and wearable personal cassette player. Sony reconfigured existing technology into a compact package that was attractive, portable, simple to operate and delivered high quality sound. It was an immediate commercial success internationally and within months several other manufacturers issued imitations of the design. The original model had no speaker, so the listener had to don the headphones supplied. So revolutionary was this product that the design team at Sony had reservations about the isolation a user of the Walkman might experience. They countered this with two features. The first was a button on the top which, when depressed, mutes the audio program, engages a small microphone and plays the sound of the immediate environment into the headphones. The second feature was provision for two sets of headphones. Both features were deleted from subsequent models when it became clear that a major part of the appeal of the Walkman was the isolation and individually programmed listening pleasure it provided. Once music had gone ‘private’ in public, the floodgates opened. The years since the Walkman’s first appearance have seen continuous change and adaptation in a variety of products and mechanisms. The Walkman’s impact has gone far beyond product design into fashion, music and social trends. GameBoy was the first portable, hand-held game system with interchangeable games and it remains the most popular game console in history. Since its inception in 1989, through to 1996 when Nintendo began production of the GameBoy pocket model, it has sold in excess of 500 million units. Gunpei Yokoi, who designed GameBoy, had been employed in Nintendo's games department since the 1970s. In 1981 Yokoi teamed up with Shigeru Miyamoto (who later produced Super Mario Brothers) to develop Donkey Kong. GameBoy’s initial success was in part due to the decision to bundle the Tetris game with all purchases. Tetris, a real-time, puzzle-based game, was developed by Russian Alexey Pajitnov in 1984. Like the Sony Walkman, GameBoy is a personalised accessory. The use of such portable, electronic devices in public spaces tends to isolate the user from their surroundings. Studies show that this ‘nonsocial behaviour’ in public is abhorred by many and yet there is an increasing tolerance of the use of such items as mobile phones and digital assistants. The relatively short history of the electronic game industry has produced great successes and failures. Constant adaptation and innovation in interface design and delivery media have kept the games in demand. Meanwhile they have had a huge impact on other media including film (computer-generated graphics) and music; plus fashion and language. Campbell Bickerstaff, Assistant Curator Information and Communication Technology

TOP INSET: THE FIRST SONY WALKMAN MODEL RELEASED IN 1979. BOTTOM INSET: CAMPBELL BICKERSTAFF ENGAGES IN SOME ‘NONSOCIAL BEHAVIOUR’ WITH THE GAMEBOY CONSOLE. PHOTOS BY JEAN-FRANCOIS LANZARONE. BELOW: GAMEBOY SCREEN GRAPHIC COURTESY OF NINTENDO AUSTRALIA PTY LTD.

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POWERHOUSE MUSEUM CONSERVATORS HAVE COMPLETED RESTORATION OF TWO SIGNIFICANT WEDGWOOD PIECES.
story_GOSIA DUDEK, CONSERVATOR photos_NITSA YIOUPROS

to the rescue!
The two imposing black-and-white jasper vessels that have been restored were made at the Wedgwood factory in England in the late 1870s. The ‘War and peace’ ewer and the ‘Apotheosis of Virgil’ vase were centrepieces at Sydney’s International Exhibition in 1879. They were subsequently acquired by the Art Gallery of NSW. After periodic displays and many years in storage, the condition of the vases significantly deteriorated. The restoration process was complex and timeconsuming. Both objects had suffered extensive staining. The cover of the ‘Virgil’ vase was broken into many pieces and a large section of the cover was missing. The ewer’s handle was broken into several pieces and its base had considerable breaks and losses. Conservators used a combination of techniques to clean the vases. These ranged from brush vacuuming and swabbing with cleaning solutions to repeated applications of poultices and ultrasonic baths. Broken parts were then carefully reassembled and glued, making sure that the many broken pieces were realigned perfectly. Missing areas were filled with specially developed epoxy putty mixed to match the colour and texture of the original surfaces. Reconstruction of the missing section of the ‘Virgil’ cover was a complicated procedure. This involved taking silicone moulds and casting the replacement pieces in epoxy putty. The restoration work was generously sponsored by Waterford Wedgwood Australia. The vases are on long-term loan from the Art Gallery of NSW and will form part of the display in the Museum’s new Decorative Arts and Design Gallery scheduled to open in late 2004.

ABOVE: COVER OF THE ‘APOTHEOSIS OF VIRGIL’, STONEWARE VASE BEFORE AND AFTER RESTORATION. RIGHT: AFTER RESTORATION. ‘APOTHEOSIS OF VIRGIL’, STONEWARE VASE (BLACK JASPER DIP WITH WHITE JASPER RELIEF DECORATIONS), DESIGN OF RELIEF ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN FLAXMAN (1755-1826). MADE BY WEDGWOOD IN ENGLAND ABOUT 1878. HEIGHT: 66 CM. FROM THE ART GALLERY OF NEW SOUTH WALES COLLECTION.

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fresh fruits
In the Museum’s recent competition Fresh Fruits, fashion students were invited to create a new and exciting fashion ensemble inspired by the exhibition FRUiTS: Tokyo street style – photographs of Shoichi Aoki. The brief was to create an outfit based on a recent personal obsession, using a variety of textiles and costumes along with funky, fashionable and avantgarde styles, materials and construction methods, and photograph it in a streetscape. The best entry won $1000, and their work is on display at the Powerhouse Museum. All entrants were invited to wear their ensemble to the Museum for the announcement of the winner and to participate in a promotion on the Sydney Monorail (pictured above). The result was a visual feast and a true celebration of the FRUiTS ethos. The winning entry (main photo), by Donna Sgro, aged 27 and Nilou Zibaee, aged 18, is called ‘Ping-pong ensemble’. The skirt, made with handmade resin shapes, is teamed with vintage marching girl jacket and belts, feather pillbox hat and key-ring toys. The FRUiTS exhibition is on display on level 5 until 26 January 2004.

MAIN PHOTO COURTESY DONNA SGRO, INSET PHOTOS BY MARINCO KOJDANOVSKI.

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EXPLORE THE HISTORY OF OBSERVATORY HILL WITH TOURS OF THE SANDSTONE SIGNAL STATION

VIEW OF SYDNEY OBSERVATORY FROM 1871 SHOWING THE SIGNAL STATION AND SIGNAL MASTS IN THE FOREGROUND BUILT ON THE REMAINING WALLS OF FORT PHILLIP. PHOTO BY NSW GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, POWERHOUSE MUSEUM COLLECTION.

uncovering Observatory Hill’s history
An archaeological dig on the site of Sydney Observatory has revealed evidence of its former use as a windmill and a fort and has confirmed Observatory Hill as one of the most historically interesting parts of Sydney. Observatory Manager Toner Stevenson says, ‘Astronomy is the big picture for the Observatory but the site has far wider significance. We are developing new programs that are designed to broaden public interest in the history of Observatory Hill, which reflects how Sydney has developed and changed over the years.’ The dig uncovered many hidden treasures and gave further insight into the layers of occupation. Archaeologists from the NSW Department of Commerce (Design and Heritage section) uncovered artefacts from the preEuropean environment, as well

An archaeological dig has confirmed Observatory Hill as one of the most historically interesting parts of Sydney.
as clay smoking pipes cast with naval emblems and government-stamped bottles and utensils. It also revealed evidence of the clearing of the hill for construction of the new colony’s first windmill prior to 1804, the construction of Fort Phillip from 1804-6, which appears to have taken advantage of the steep natural slope of the hill, and the use of the hill by the military. Fort Phillip was never completed but a section of its walls was used as the platform for the Signal Station, built in 1847. Now the oldest building on the site, the station is another treasure soon to be unveiled for the public. ‘One of the main tasks is the conceptual development of this site and the planning of further investigation in and around the fort walls on which it stands. A team of curators, historians, conservators and archaeologists will start work on this in the next few months,’ says Toner.

members day at Sydney Observatory
Powerhouse Members have a special opportunity to explore the history of Observatory Hill on Saturday 18 October. There will be guided tours of the sandstone Signal Station throughout the day. Built on the remains of the rampart of Fort Phillip, the cottage was used to communicate information about ship movements on Sydney Harbour until the 1920s. This building has been stabilised, but with otherwise minimal interference, its interior finishes and structure show the layers of its occupation and use. At 1.00 pm and 2.00 pm join archaeologist Caitlin Allen for a presentation of what was revealed by the archaeological dig in February. See evidence relating to all phases of occupation on Observatory Hill and learn how and what makes an archaeological dig exciting. The film Observing Sydney in 3-D, narrated by actor, John Howard, will be shown throughout the day. For costs, bookings and other details phone (02) 9217 0485 or see the Members calendar on page 12.

A SELECTION OF ARTEFACTS UNCOVERED BY THE DIG AT SYDNEY OBSERVATORY, AND THE DIG IN PROGRESS (ABOVE). PHOTOS BY SOTHA BOURN. A SELECTION OF THE ARTEFACTS UNCOVERED BY A SELECTION OF THE ARTEFACTS UNCOVERED BY

observe

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powerline winter 03

THE POWERHOUSE MUSEUM GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES THE SUPPORT OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS

+principal partners

DICK SMITH
DICK SMITH AUSTRALIAN EXPLORER BELL 206B JETRANGER III HELICOPTER INTEL YOUNG SCIENTIST 2002, SOUNDHOUSE™ AND ONLINE PROJECTS COLES THEATRE, TARGET THEATRE, GRACE BROS COURTYARD, K MART STUDIOS

+senior partners

SPORT: MORE THAN HEROES & LEGENDS

ECOLOGIC: CREATING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

STEAM LOCOMOTIVE 3830 STEAM LOCOMOTIVE 3265

GREAT EXPECTATIONS: NEW BRITISH DESIGN STORIES

+partners

AUSTRALIAN POSTERS SPORT: MORE THAN HEROES & LEGENDS

LEGO AUSTRALIA METRO MONORAIL

NHK TECHNICAL SERVICES, INC. CYBERWORLDS: COMPUTERS AND CONNECTIONS NIKON

SOUNDHOUSE™ MUSIC ALLIANCE SOUNDHOUSE™ MUSIC AND MULTI MEDIA LABORATORY THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD SYDNEY DESIGN WEEK YAMAHA MUSIC AUSTRALIA YAMAHA DISKLAVIER GRAND PIANO

GRAND MARNIER GRAND MARNIER / POWERHOUSE MUSEUM FASHION OF THE YEAR ENGINEERS AUSTRALIA SYDNEY DIVISION ENGINEERING EXCELLENCE 2002

SPORT: MORE THAN HEROES & LEGENDS MINCOM LIMITED LIFE FELLOWS DINNER 2003 NOVOTEL SYDNEY ON DARLING HARBOUR OFFICIAL SYDNEY HOTEL SYDNEY OBSERVATORY

+supporters
ARAB BANK AUSTRALIA WATTAN PROJECT AUSTRALIAN GRAPHIC DESIGN ASSOCIATION BALARINJI: ANCIENT CULTURE, CONTEMPORARY DESIGN BOEING AUSTRALIA LIMITED SPACE: BEYOND THIS WORLD DELTA ELECTRICITY ELECTRICITY DISCOVERY CHALLENGE GREAT WHITE NOISE ‘SOUNDING THE MUSEUM’ PROGRAM FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED

+founding corporate members
INTEL AUSTRALIA LOGICA CMG NSW DEPARTMENT OF LANDS TRANSGRID

+landmark corporate members
ARAB BANK AUSTRALIA CAPITAL TECHNIC GROUP CONNELL WAGNER DUNLOP FLOORING AUSTRALIA MINCOM LIMITED ROYAL DOULTON AUSTRALIA SWAROVSKI INTERNATIONAL (AUST) SYDNEY INSTITUTE TASCO THE RACI INC, NSW BRANCH WEIR WARMAN LTD WORMALD

new exhibitions at a glance
SEPTEMBER_OCTOBER_NOVEMBER 2003
Sport: more than heroes and legends
LEVEL 4, FROM 26 SEPTEMBER 2003

What is it that drives Australians to be faster, fitter and more competitive? What makes a sporting hero? What compels us to support our heroes rain, hail or shine? Discover the triumphs, the fashion, the science and the passion of sport. This interactive exhibition brings together material from 60 different sports. Special admission prices apply. Great expectations: new British design stories
LEVEL 3, UNTIL 1 FEBRUARY 2004

Golden Threads: the Chinese in regional New South Wales 1850–1950 and My Chinatown
LEVEL 3, UNTIL 12 OCTOBER 2003

The Museum’s new Australian Communities Gallery features two exhibitions that celebrate the significant and diverse contributions made by Chinese-Australians to our history and heritage. Closing soon — don’t miss out. Intel Young Scientist 2003
LEVEL 3, FROM 25 OCTOBER 2003

Featuring more than 100 British design projects, Great expectations highlights the creative process of turning ideas into products across a range of fields. Treasures of Palestine
LEVEL 3, FROM 17 OCTOBER 2003

An inspirational exhibition of models, photographs and multi-media presentations created by the top NSW science students for the Intel Young Scientist Awards. Australian Design Awards
LEVEL 4, SUCCESS AND INNOVATION GALLERY, UNTIL JUNE 2004

The great richness and depth of Palestine's cultural heritage is displayed through a selection of traditional costumes, embroidery, jewellery and artworks plus contemporary paintings, posters and photographs. Childhood memories of migration: images, imagining & impressions
LEVEL 3, FROM MID NOVEMBER 2003

Improved versions of the Sunbeam Mixmaster, Eveready Dolphin torch and Test Series cricket helmet are among the 14 products in the Powerhouse Museum Selection from the Australian Design Awards 2003. Fruits: Tokyo street style — photographs by Shoichi Aoki
LEVEL 5, UNTIL 26 JANUARY 2004

This exhibition explores the stories of child migration from the official and individual perspectives through toys, drawings, interactives and memorabilia. Balarinji: ancient culture, contemporary design
LEVEL 2, UNTIL 30 MAY 2004, WITHIN BAYAGUL

Pink hair, kimono and platform shoes — discover fantastic fashion from the streets of Tokyo. Shoichi Aoki's extraordinary photographs chronicle a 'fashion revolution in Tokyo's suburbs' from the mid 1990s to now. Engineering Excellence
LEVEL 4, SUCCESS AND INNOVATION, UNTIL 23 NOVEMBER 2003

The original trail-blazers in Indigenous design, Balarinji celebrates twenty years of award-winning work — all with their signature blend of traditional motifs and contemporary graphics. William Holford’s art and design influence on Australian pottery
LEVEL 3, UNTIL 10 NOVEMBER 2003

Outstanding engineering projects from the Institute of Engineers (Sydney division) awards program. Schools Spectacular
LEVEL 2, FROM 21 NOVEMBER 2003

Fifty Australian pottery items from the National Museum of Australian Pottery, Wodonga showcase the work and design influence of William Holford (1841–1912).

Celebrating 20 years of the Schools Spectacular with the costumes, glitz and glamour of the variety entertainment show in which thousands of students perform each year.

FROM LEFT: LACE TABLECLOTH, AUSTRALIA, ABOUT 1925; ANDREW SYMONDS AT THE GABBA 2002, PHOTO COURTESY NEWSPIX; EARLY SKIFF RACING ON SYDNEY HARBOUR, PHOTO FROM THE TYRRELL COLLECTION, POWERHOUSE MUSEUM.

exhibitions at Sydney Observatory
Mars: the closest encounter
UNTIL JUNE 2004

travelling exhibitions
Intel Young Scientist 2002 Newcastle Regional Museum
UNTIL 21 SEPTEMBER 2003

Mars is closer to Earth this year than it has been in recorded history. View Mars through the Observatory’s telescopes and learn about the most recent explorations of the red planet as well as early astronomical theories of life forms.

Spinning around: 50 years of Festival Records Melbourne Museum
UNTIL 23 NOVEMBER 2003

+

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INDIVIDUAL
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1 year $60 $30

2 years $108 $54

3 years $153 $77

*Concession applies to full-time students, seniors, pensioners, unemployed. Country members must live more than 150 km from Sydney GPO.

HOUSEHOLD**
Standard Country/concession

1 year $85 $50

2 years $153 $90

3 years $217 $127

** A household is up to two adults and all students under 18 years at the same address. Country households must be more than 150 km from Sydney GPO. Concession applies to full-time students, seniors, pensioners, unemployed and all adults in the household must be eligible for concession.

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MEMBER DETAILS
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Return this form to: Powerhouse Members, PO Box K346, Haymarket NSW 1238

from the collection
This neckpiece was made in 1988 by Australian jeweller Margaret Kirkwood, using stirling silver and mokume gane, which is a ‘married’ metal. In this process different metals are beaten together to simulate wood grain. It is one of a selection of 22 contemporary neckpieces from the Museum’s collection that are now on display on level 4, representing local and international jewellery from the late 1970s to the present. Once a symbol of prestige and fashion, the neckpiece is now also a form of creative, political and personal expression. The materials used in these neckpieces show the bold and sometimes radical directions in contemporary jewellery design.

ISSN 1030-5750
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www.phm.gov.au