POWERLINE

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catch kylie fever

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From the director Power picks Behind the scenes volunteers Interview: Karim Rashid New exhibition: Kylie: an exhibition New acquisitions: Relenza bird flu drug Members news Members calendar Members scene Christmas shopping guide Tokyo Recycle Project #15 Boulton & Watt steam engine New exhibition: Inspired! Design across time Observatory news Corporate partners Exhibitions at a glance

contents issue 80
DECEMBER 05 JANUARY FEBRUARY 06

TRusTEEs Dr Nicholas G Pappas, President Dr Anne summers AO, Deputy President Mr Mark Bouris Ms Trisha Dixon Mr Andrew Denton Ms susan Gray Ms Margaret seale Mr Anthony sukari Ms Judith Wheeldon sENIOR MANAGEMENT Dr Kevin Fewster AM, Director Jennifer sanders, Deputy Director, Collections and Outreach Mark Goggin, Associate Director, Operations and services Kevin sumption, Associate Director, Exhibitions, Projects and Planning Dominic Curtin, Associate Director, Finance and systems

LEADING DESIGN GROUPS COLLABORATE TO MAKE SYDNEY DESIGN 05 THE BEST YET.

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SD05 INTERNATIONAL KEYNOTE SPEAKER PAUL SIMMONS OF UK-BASED TExTILE DESIGN DUO TIMOROUS BEASTIES. SD05 OPENING CELEBRATIONS AT THE POWERHOUSE MUSEUM.

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from the director
As director of such a broadbased museum I am always on the look out for interesting material that might be added to our collection, or ideas that could become exhibitions or programs. One of the joys of my job is that I never know when the next object or idea is ‘just around the corner’. A wonderful example of this serendipity occurred recently while I was at Sydney Airport awaiting a flight to Melbourne. Being an ex-Melbourne boy, I was flying south to see the Sydney Swans try to break their 72-year premiership drought in the AFL Grand Final. I bumped into Dr Meredith Burgmann, President of the NSW Legislative Council, wearing her Sydney Swans scarf. Dr Burgmann has been a good friend of the Museum for many years. And she has been a passionate Swans supporter since they relocated from Melbourne over 20 years ago. During our conversation she told me how staff and Legislative Council members had surprised her on the last sitting day before the match by arranging for the President’s daily program to be printed in red with the Swans logo replacing the usual Legislative Council crest. The day’s proceedings had concluded with members of the Council joining in a spirited rendition of the club’s theme song. What a wonderful example of the place sport plays in Australian life, I thought. It’s the sort of informal celebration that normally gets lost in the mists of time. Not wanting this to happen, we agreed that if the Swans won, she should donate the unique program to the Powerhouse collection. As history now records, the Swans duly won what I can personally attest was a heart-stopping Grand Final, awarding the AFL Premiership to a NSW-based team for the first time. On the Friday after the win, I visited Meredith at Parliament House where she and the Clerk of Parliament, John Evans, presented me with a collection of items: the President’s personally annotated program for Thursday 22 September, a copy of the day’s Hansard, a DVD containing the adjournment debate, a photograph of the parliamentary choristers in full voice, a copy of the Legislative Council newsletter House Matters and a photo of me at the handover event on the floor of the chamber. Some of these items will be displayed soon in our Recent Acquisitions case. Like every object in our collection, they tell a story about the people, places, issues and events of our society and our times. Dr Kevin Fewster AM Director

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sD05 hits a new high
Record crowds of around 310,000 people participated in this year’s Sydney Design festival. Presented over 16 days was a program that included 50 events, talks, exhibitions and walks at 24 venues all over Sydney, from Paddington to Parramatta. The Powerhouse Museum led the way with great exhibitions, from a showcase of local industrial designers in Sydney designers unplugged, to the shape of things to come in Electrolux Global Design Lab, and a flourish from the past with Morris & Co. The Powerhouse also presented a knock-out lecture by UK textile designer Paul Simmons of Timorous Beasties; the first anniversary d factory; and the hypothetical ‘Would Sydney take a Guggenheim to it’s heart?’, which tackled issues of urban design and planning in Sydney’s growing west. The stand-out success for the Museum was the inaugural ‘Young blood: designers market’, where around 3000

Sydney Design drew record crowds in August making 2005 the most successful year to date.
people flocked to buy new design from local designers. The city was abuzz with SD05 banners, posters and programs. Almost every event on the program booked out early and all venues remarked on an increase in attendance. Once again, the collaboration of Sydney’s leading organisations contributed to the success of the festival, and ultimately helped bring us closer to establishing the eastern seaboard as an international destination for design innovation. To name just a few highlights, there were the beautiful algorithms of Daniel Brown and the pleated delights of Ruth McDermott’s Coralscapes at Object Gallery; the sheer brilliance of the team at workshopped 05 and exquisitely crafted vessels at Pyrmont Studios. The AAA and Sydney Architecture Walks were a hit and promise to be bigger and better for SD06. Robert swieca, sD05 Coordinator

MUSIC CURATOR MICHAEL LEA AND PHOTOGRAPHER MARINCO KOJDANOVSKI MAKING MUSEUM HISTORY WITH THE NEW H1 HASSELBLAD DIGITAL CAMERA.

PRESENTATION OF SYDNEY SWANS PRESIDENT’S ORDER OF BUSINESS TO DR KEVIN FEWSTER. FROM LEFT: DR MEREDITH BURGMANN, PRESIDENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, MS LYNN LOVELOCK, DEPUTY CLERK, LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, MR JOHN EVANS, CLERK OF THE PARLIAMENT AND DR KEVIN FEWSTER.

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the future is digital
In the 31 years since the Powerhouse Museum photography department was formed, the Museum’s vast collection has been documented on photographic film and housed in a photo library that now comprises over 500,000 images. On 30 June 2005, photographer Marinco Kojdanovski (pictured right) and music curator Michael Lea (pictured left) made Museum history when they shot the Hardcourt and Armstrong flutes for the collection using a new H1 Hasselblad camera and Imacon digital back. This notable step forward for the Powerhouse Museum means that high quality digital photography is now superseding film quality and has replaced film photography in the Museum. If you want to know more, see the events calendar (pp1213) for information about our special members-only digital photography behind-thescenes tour.

www.powerhousemuseum.com
FRONT COvER DETAIL OF VISOR BY DOLCE & GABBANA, KYLIEFEVER2002 TOUR, FROM KYLIE: AN ExHIBITION, A TOURING ExHIBITION FROM THE ARTS CENTRE, MELBOURNE. OPENS 26 DECEMBER 2005.

Where to find us

Powerhouse Museum, 500 Harris Street, Darling Harbour, Sydney Opening hours 10.00 am – 5.00 pm every day (except Christmas Day). School holiday opening hours 9.30 am – 5.00 pm
Contact details

Powerline is produced by the Print Media Department of the Powerhouse Museum

Postal address: PO Box K346, Haymarket NSW 1238 Telephone (02) 9217 0111 Infoline (02) 9217 0444, Education (02) 9217 0222
The Powerhouse Museum, part of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences also incorporating Sydney Observatory, is a NSW government cultural institution.

PO Box K346, Haymarket NSW 1238 Editor: Nicole Bearman Editorial coordinator: Deborah Renaud Design: Triggerdesign Photography: Powerhouse Museum unless otherwise stated.
Every effort has been made to locate owners of copyright for the images in this publication. Any inquiries should be directed to the Rights and Permissions Officer, Powerhouse Museum. ISSN 1030-5750 © Trustees of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

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005 powerhouse wizard
and ‘Is there an Australian gambling aesthetic? The gambling design industry’, by Dr Charles Pickett, curator of Australian history and society. Recordings play directly on your computer, so there’s no need to download the file onto an MP3 player or iPod first. If you have an idea for an audio recording you think would enhance the Museum website, such as an audio tour of some favourite objects, email the web services team on webservices@ phm.gov.au Recordings are now on the website at powerhousemuseum.com/ whatson/event_archive.asp

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005 life fellows

hear this
Since its recent inception in 2004, ‘podcasting’ has paved the way for an increase in audio material on the web. On the Museum’s website you can hear talks recorded during Sydney Design 05, including ‘Music industry aesthetics: sound versus image’ by Ruby Grennan and Tom Ellard; ‘Podcasting – the end of radio?’ by Vaughan Healey and Angus Kingston; ‘The art of logo design and visual identity’ by graphic designer Mark Gowing; plus there’s an audio tour of the exhibition Paradise, Purgatory and Hellhole: a history of Pyrmont and Ultimo by the curator, Anni Turnbull;

Life Fellow is the highest honorific title awarded by the Museum, and the annual Life Fellows Dinner celebrates the many individuals and organisations who have contributed to its development. Since 2002 the dinner has been sponsored by the Museum’s corporate partner Mincom Limited. At the 2005 dinner held in September four new Life Fellows were announced for their major contributions to the Museum. Mr Terence Measham AM, Director of the Museum from 1988 to 1999; Mr David Roche, a devoted collector of 18th and 19th century antiques and cultural heritage benefactor; Mr Alan Landis, a prominent and long established Sydney antique dealer, Powerhouse Honorary Associate, donor and advocate; and Mr Lionel Glendenning, chief architect of the Powerhouse Museum, which won the Sulman Award for architecture in 1988.

The second recipient of the Powerhouse Wizard award was also announced. The award, sponsored by Wizard Home Loans, was established in 2004 to recognise emerging leaders in Australian innovation and achievement. Three award finalists were showcased during the evening. Genevieve Lacey, acclaimed recorder virtuoso, who delighted the dinner guests with a performace of Nightingale by Van Eyck; Zoe MacDonell, a textile designer; and the 2005 Powerhouse Wizard, Khoa Do, a filmmaker, writer, director and actor whose 2004 film The finished people was widely acclaimed. Khoa Do received the award from Wizard Chairman and Museum Trustee, Mark Bouris and the inaugural Powerhouse Wizard James Bradfield Moody. Khoa Do then treated the audience to a preview of his new film Footy legends which will be released in 2006.

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coming soon: on the box
As Australia approaches 50 years of television broadcasting, the Museum is preparing a spectacular exhibition to commemorate. On the box: great moments in Australian television 1956–2006 examines our nation’s vast achievements in developing and presenting television programs. The exhibition will recall highlights that have become enshrined in the public memory, and look at the impact of television on the everyday lives of Australians since 1956. It will pay tribute to our favourite stars, explain changing technology, examine how programs are made, ask how audiences use TV, and explore the role of television in the community.
MAGGIE DENCE AS MAVIS BRAMSTON. IN THE MID-1960S THE MAVIS BRAMSTON SHOW’S IRREVERENT, REVUE-STYLE SKETCH COMEDY USED SOCIAL AND POLITICAL SATIRE TO BRING HUMOUR TO TOPICAL SUBJECTS. IMAGE PROVIDED COURTESY OF SEVEN NETWORK.

I remember when I was nine, and coming to the Powerhouse Museum for the first time. It was amazing. I remember racing around to touch all the screens, to stare at the scientific experiments, to marvel at the exhibits. I loved it. What I loved most about the Museum, however, was that it allowed me to immerse myself in another world, to connect to experiences and places that I’d never been to before. For those few hours I was a scientist, an inventor, an explorer. I was no longer a nine year old kid from Sydney’s west who wore his brother’s sticky-taped, hand-me-down shoes. It was great. That year was 1988, and during the year a photographer came to our primary school to take photos of school kids. He told us it was for an exhibition at the Powerhouse Museum. Immediately, I put my hand up, and he snapped a photo of me, with an enormous grin. For the next ten years it was my one claim to fame – that a photo of me was once exhibited in the Powerhouse. Well, here we are almost two decades later and it’s so wonderful to be back, and to receive this award.

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Among the costumes will be the wedding dress worn by Kylie Minogue on Neighbours, Ruth Cracknell’s Mother and Son outfit and a uniform from the classic soap Prisoner. From the Museum’s collection, studio television cameras donated by TCN9 and ATN7, and used at the birth of Australian TV broadcasting, will be displayed for the first time. Participate in aspects of TV production, in front of the camera and behind-thescenes, and view a large selection of classic Australian clips that show how TV has kept us entertained for five decades.

THIS SATELLITE IMAGE SHOWS THE LOCATIONS OF PERMANENT LIGHTS AROUND THE WORLD, MOST OF WHICH ARE GENERATED FROM BURNING FOSSIL FUELS.

I’ve spent the last few years working as a filmmaker, working with people from all different backgrounds, but especially with those most ‘at risk’ and marginalised. To me, film-making is an opportunity to immerse the audience in a world that they’ve never been to before, much like what the Museum did for me when I first came here as a child. To me, film-making is an opportunity to ultimately try and make a difference to people’s lives. We’re currently living in times of increasing cultural, social and economic gaps and barriers. Through film, I hope to bridge these gaps and break down these barriers. I believe that no matter what field we work in, and what background we’re from, we can all make a difference. I am truly honoured to receive this award. I want to thank the Powerhouse Museum and Wizard Home Loans, and I very much look forward to working with the Museum on a project next year. I can’t wait to have my photo in the Museum once again. Khoa Do, 005 Powerhouse Wizard, speaking at the Life Fellows Dinner.

2005 LIFE FELLOWS FROM LEFT: MR ALAN LANDIS, MR TERENCE MEASHAM AM & MR LIONEL GLENDENNING.

sustainability talks

Sunday afternoons have been heating up in the Museum at ‘Free radicals’, a new monthly series of sustainability talks designed to ignite fresh debate on issues that will affect our future. Aimed at anyone who enjoys an argument, is worried about the sustainability of their lifestyle, or who is new to the sustainability arena and loaded with questions, ‘Free Radicals’ takes on all the big issues in an intelligent and entertaining way. The debate about sustainability explores human, economic, social and biological forces, all coexisting and competing for limited resources, particularly in large metropolitan areas. Humans once held the view we live in a boundless world, where anything is possible, now it is apparent that when

populations compete for limited resources, something has to give; be it species, water supply, air quality or civilisation. So far in the series some of the country’s great thinkers, led by popular ABC science broadcaster Bernie Hobbs, have searched for the soul of this great city, and asked ‘is desalination worth its salt?’ In the coming months we look at climate change, power supply, sea levels, pandemic flu, radical activists, and riots, through a range of formats, from a hypothetical to a court case, debates and symposia. Talks are free with Museum entry. For details about what’s coming up next at ‘Free radicals’ visit powerhousemuseum.com/free radicals

On the box showcases over 600 objects, including original props and costumes, sets, technical equipment, awards, scripts and promotional items.

On the box: great moments in Australian television 1956–2006 opens 6 April 2006.

KHOA DO AT NINE YEARS OLD PHOTOGRAPHED FOR THE POWERHOUSE. KHOA DO, 2005 POWERHOUSE WIZARD WITH HIS NAME ON THE MUSEUM HONOUR BOARD.

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KARIM RASHID IS A NEW YORK-BASED DESIGNER WHO HAS DESIGNED IT ALL.
story_ANNE WATSON_CURATOR, ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN

designer of our time
From an award-winning rubbish bin to jewellery, mobile phones, furniture and futuristic concept environments, Canadian-born designer Karim Rashid lives and breathes design. In Australia to present the Bombay Sapphire Design Discovery Award, Rashid enthralled his audience when he presented a talk at the Powerhouse in October. On the eve of his first visit to Australia Powerline interviewed Rashid about his influences, work and interests. You grew up in the 1960s. Do you think this has had an impact on your love of plastics, colour and quirky shapes? Are there any 60s/70s designers who have been particularly influential? Yes, in fact I was born in 1960 and today as I write it is my birthday. I am 45 but feel 25. When I was young I imagined a world that was robotic. I was probably inspired by the ‘utopic’ visions of the time, of a world that would be seamless with technology. I went to Expo 1967 in Montreal almost every day with my father and brother, and the world I saw being shaped, by people like Buckminster Fuller, George Nelson, Marshall McCluhan, Isaac Asimov, Philip K Dick, and so many others, was a world that I was hoping I would grow up in. AND THAT WORLD IS HERE. I always loved plastic, since I was a child. I can remember the objects in my bedroom that played a significant and formative role in my life. I treasured an orange oversized clock radio by Howard Miller; a light grey plastic desk fan by Braun; a white plastic Claritone stereo; and a yellow Kartell mushroom lamp. Plastic was the material that I naively knew was the material of our contemporary world – even at the age of 10. Your brother Hani is a well known architect. Did you grow up in a creative environment? Yes we were born in a creative context. My father was so inspiring; he designed everything possible, from movie sets to furniture to clothes. He was an artist and set designer for film and television. I realised my life's mission at the age of five when I went sketching with my father, drawing churches in London. He taught me to see – he taught me perspective at that age – and he taught me that I could design anything and touch all aspects of our physical landscape. How do you explain the current global design ‘explosion’? Is it here to stay or is the current level of interest in design just a passing fashion? Today the largest growth potential is everywhere, in every context, due to the renaissance of design as a popular subject and not a marginal one. Every product needs to be thoughtfully designed, and this is happening now – every banal product is getting a ‘makeover’. I have been designing water bottles, shampoo bottles, soap dishes and garbage cans – objects that were previously not considered to be in need of design. Design must deal with the modus of our time, of human behaviour, of contemporary technologies, new materials, and smart design. Describe five of your designs you are most satisfied with and why? I am usually excited by new projects. I am presently working on a restaurant in Long Island that will open in October; a future house in Toronto for January 2006; a jewellery collection for Georg Jensen; some LCD televisions and hard drives for La Cie in France; a mobile phone; cleaning products; vacuum cleaners for Dirt Devil; and many furniture projects. I am also writing a book called Design your self: rethinking the way you live, love, work, and play for Harper Collins / Regan Books for January 2006 release. Sorry that is more than five! So much to do and so little time. You are incredibly busy – what do you do to relax? My country house – I try to go as often as I can. It is my hermetic divide. I never thought I would buy a house in the country because I have so many allergies to grass, trees, pollen, etc. And the city fumes; the urban stench works well with my system. It is hard for me to imagine doing nothing for a day but I am keen to witness the guilty pleasures of hedonism. Have you been to Australia before? Do you have any r+r plans while you are here? What do you want to see/do in sydney? I don’t believe in r+r. I believe in using the mind always, exercising it. I exercise the body six days a week, and the soul. With perfect balance and harmony you automatically have r+r always and a stress-free existence. I hope to learn and see and engage with everything I can. I have never been to Australia but I know that Australians have produced some of the best films in the world, and great music. The beauty of the country is omnipresent in the world and in our minds.

BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE POWERHOUSE MUSEUM A TEAM OF VOLUNTEERS GENEROUSLY DONATE THEIR TIME AND SKILL TO HELP GET MANY OF THE LITTLE JOBS DONE.
story_RORY MURPHY_ADMINISTRATION, OPERATIONS AND SERVICES DIVISION

the quiet achievers
Often working on tasks away from the public gaze, volunteers make a huge contribution to the success of a museum. In the Decorative Arts and Design curatorial department a group of special women have been contributing more than their fair share. In fact, between them, this group of five has contributed more than 64 years of volunteer service to the Museum. Every Thursday Dorothy McLean, Beryl Dwyer, Dorothy Green, Kathleen Mist and Beverly Prescott arrive at the Powerhouse to lend a hand. Walking by the curatorial offices you would hardly know they are there, but their work does not go unnoticed. ‘It’s great to know we can rely on them so much,’ says Lindie Ward, Assistant Curator, Decorative Arts and Design. At a sprightly 85 years of age Dorothy McLean is something of a phenomenon. She has been volunteering at the Powerhouse since 1985. Almost every Thursday for 20 years Dorothy has travelled from Maroubra, in Sydney’s east, to the Powerhouse to lend her particular talent. As an apprentice ladies tailor at David Jones in the 1930s Dorothy learnt how to sew. Seventy years later those skills still come in handy when she sits down to create yet another deluxe padded coathanger, each one helping to care for the Museum’s valuable costume and textile collection. Dorothy estimates that over the years she has created hundreds, if not thousands of the special coathangers that line the racks in the Museum’s collection store. Her all time favourite garment in the collection is a white dress, encrusted with Swarovski crystal, famously worn by Lady Sonia McMahon while dining with President Nixon at the White House in 1971. ‘It’s so important that the garments we have are treated carefully. Hanging in storage for such long periods could really deteriorate the items if it weren’t for Dorothy’s hangers,’ says Lindie Ward. Dorothy has no intentions of calling it a day any time soon. ‘I remember when I was 68 telling a friend that I was only going to stay until I was 80, and here I am at 85,’ she says with a laugh. The other women in the group seem similarly intent on continuing their support. Clearly enamoured with the time they spend at the Museum they all agree that they get out what they put in. Being around the curatorial staff lets us see all the hard work that goes into the exhibitions,’ says Beryl Dwyer.

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: KATHLEEN MIST (FRONT), BEVERLY PRESCOTT, DOROTHY GREEN, BERYL DWYER AND DOROTHY MCLEAN. PHOTO BY SUE STAFFORD.

KARIM RASHID RECLINING IN ONE OF HIS OWN CHAIRS. PHOTO BY ILAN RUBIN.

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SEE THE ExTRAORDINARY COLLECTION OF COSTUMES THAT HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO THE PERFORMANCE, STYLE AND CHANGING IMAGE OF POP DIVA KYLIE MINOGUE.
story_MARGOT ANDERSON, ASSISTANT CURATOR, THE ARTS CENTRE, MELBOURNE

kylie: an exhibition
Kylie Minogue has scaled the heights of international stardom to become one of Australia’s most famous exports. Since the late 1980s we have watched her remarkable transformation from the ‘girl next door’ to the ‘princess of pop’. Her story is now being told through Kylie: an exhibition, a travelling exhibition from the Arts Centre, Melbourne, opening at the Powerhouse on Boxing Day. The exhibition grew from Kylie’s gift of over 300 costumes to the Arts Centre in 2003 and explores the pivotal moments of a career spanning 20 years, through the themes of ‘Music and video’, ‘Tours’, ‘Special performances’, ‘Style’, and ‘Icon’. A sixth theme, ‘Image’, looks at Kylie through the lenses of well-known photographers from around the world. Kylie continues to evolve as a performer and this exhibition highlights her ability to reinvent herself through costume. Her journey from the small screen to the international stage can be clearly traced through the designers with whom she has collaborated. With outfits by world famous designers such as Stella McCartney, Dolce & Gabbana, and Alexander McQueen, Kylie gives us rare access to the glamorous tools of a living legend’s trade. Kylie won the hearts of audiences both in Australia and overseas in the 1980s as Charlene, the tomboy mechanic in Neighbours, and she held on to elements of this character in early videos like ‘I Should Be So Lucky’ (1989). The video for ‘Better the Devil You Know’ (1990) set Kylie on a new course and introduced us to the hot pants that have since become one of her signature looks. Kylie’s decision to join independent English recording label deConstruction in 1993 signalled a new direction both musically and stylistically. The costumes worn in videos from this period, such as ‘Did It Again’ (1997), exemplify Kylie’s flair for theatrics and add a bit of humour to the mix. Here we see four different ‘Kylies’, styled to reflect the labels given to her by the media; ‘Cute Kylie’, ‘Sexy Kylie’, ‘Indie Kylie’ and ‘Dance Kylie’ are exaggerated versions of costumes she appeared in throughout the 1990s. The costumes worn on tour give us an insight into the rigour of live performance. Kylie’s costumes are truly ‘working’ garments and by the end of a tour the wear and tear of multiple costume changes, microphone packs and make-up is evident. As well as showing the decorative techniques employed to enhance the impact of a performance, through trims such as sequins, crystals and fringing, the costumes also reveal more rugged measures, like industrial strength zips fitted to withstand the demands of highly physical choreography and rapid costume changes. The wardrobe for the KylieFever2002 tour was designed by Italian duo Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana (Dolce & Gabbana) and involved eight costume changes. They incorporated cutting-edge fashion statements, such as the combination of stiletto heels and bulky combat trousers, with references to the cult film A clockwork orange. Kylie launched the album Body Language with a special one-off performance at London’s Carling Apollo Theatre. With extravagant staging and a hand-picked audience the concert unveiled a brand new image for Kylie and featured costumes designed by leading international names Helmut Lang, Chanel and Balenciaga. The gold hot pants worn in the video for ‘Spinning Around’ form the centrepiece of the exhibition’s ‘Icon’ theme. Like so many of Kylie’s costumes they mark an important moment in her career and are instantly recognisable outside the dedicated circle of Kylie fans. Found in a flee market for 50p, the hot pants have gone on to become a legend in their own right as has the famous white, hooded jumpsuit worn in the video for ‘Can’t Get You Out Of My Head’. After drawing record crowds to the Arts Centre during its three-month-run in Melbourne, Kylie began touring the country in May 2005. The exhibition has been shown at the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra and the Queensland Performing Arts Centre.

SEE THE ExHIBITION AND GET THE FULL KYLIE ExPERIENCE WITH A SPECIAL PROGRAM THAT INCLUDES CHOREOGRAPHY, KARAOKE, TOURS AND TALKS ABOUT COSTUME DESIGN.

star struck summer holiday program
Powerhouse singstar Play space
4-28 January, 11.00 am – 3.00 pm
TM

Sing live on stage to some of your favourite pop tunes with SingStarTM by Sony PlayStation®2.
Free with Museum entry.

4-28 January, 11.00 am, 1.00 pm and 3.00 pm

Join Museum mascots Zoe and Cogs in the play space for lots of fun Kylie activities. For children under 8 years old.
Free with Museum entry.

Do the Locomotion
4-28 January, 3.30 pm, Kings Cinema

See and hear the Fotoplayer, a mechanical music-maker from the silent film era, accompany Kylie singing her first number one hit ‘Locomotion’.
Free with Museum entry.

Make your own music-video
10 January, 10.00 am – 3.30 pm

Kylie is famous for her captivating music-videos. Have a go at creating your own music-video in this one-day workshop. Recommended for children aged 11-16 years.
$100/$70 members.

From Charlene to showgirl
4 February, 1.00 pm

Join the exhibition curator from the Arts Centre, Melbourne for an exclusive insight into the Kylie Minogue costume collection.
Free with Museum entry.

d factory
23 February, 6.00 – 8.30 pm

From Velcro to duct tape, this special d factory reveals some of the tricks used for live stage performance and their impact on costume, prop and set design.
Free.

Kylie ultimate dance
18-19 March, 10.00 am – 4.00 pm

Express yourself on the dance floor for this celebration of Kylie performances and participate in sessions with Kylie choreographers and dancers. Suitable for all ages.
Free with Museum entry.

Kylie: an exhibition opens at the Powerhouse Museum on 26 December.

For program updates visit powerhousemuseum.com/kylie

PHOTO © DARENOTE LTD 2004

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: KYLIEFEVER2002 TOUR, ‘SILVANEMESIS’, BRA, MINI SKIRT AND CHOKER BY DOLCE & GABBANA, ARM BANDS BY JOHNNY ROCKET, BOOTS BY JIMMY CHOO. PHOTO BY KEN MCKAY; INTIMATE AND LIVE TOUR, 1998, DETAIL OF SHOWGIRL COSTUME BY MICHAEL WILKINSON FOR THE SYDNEY 2000 OLYMPIC GAMES, COLLECTION OF THE POWERHOUSE MUSEUM; ‘SPINNING AROUND’, FROM THE ALBUM LIGHT YEARS, 2000, DIRECTED BY DAWN SHADFORTH, HALTER NECK TOP WITH CHOKER BY ALExANDER MCQUEEN, SHORTS BY STELLA MCCARTNEY FOR CHLOé; ‘CAN’T GET YOU OUT OF MY HEAD’ FROM THE ALBUM FEVER, 2001, DIRECTED BY DAWN SHADFORTH, JUMPSUIT BY FEE DORAN FOR MRS JONES. PHOTO COPYRIGHT EMI RECORDS LTD, COURTESY PARLOPHONE RECORDS.

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MEMBERS ENJOY RARE, BEHIND THE SCENES ACCESS TO THE MUSEUM COLLECTION.

A DRUG CALLED RELENZA JOINS THE MUSEUM’S COLLECTION.
story_SANDRA McEWEN, CURATOR, BIOTECHNOLOGY

taking on bird flu
An Australian drug called Relenza (pictured above), which can be used to treat influenza, has recently joined the Museum’s collection of drugs that mark medical milestones. By way of comparison, the development of this type of drug is as significant to the treatment of viruses as Penicillin was in the battle against bacterial disease. It’s been 88 years since the Spanish Flu swept the world, killing more than 40 million people. Today another unusually virulent strain of flu is brewing among the wild bird populations of Asia. The flu virus spreads easily to domestic birds and it devastates poultry industries. Humans aren’t normally affected by bird flu, and vice versa, but every so often a virus mutates and jumps the species barrier. Just over 100 people in Asia have caught the new bird flu. More than half of them have died. So far the virus isn’t contagious among humans but, if it mutates enough to be easily transmitted from person to person, the pandemic will begin. Some experts fear the worst. High population densities, tourism and international air travel will ensure its rapid spread. It will take about six months to make a vaccine after the virus emerges in its final form. Antiviral drugs like Relenza will be the first line of defence against such a new virus. Relenza works by immobilising the virus, making it unable to leave infected cells. The scientists who designed Relenza identified one site that never changes on a flu virus, no matter how many times the virus mutates. They determined the shape of that site, then designed a molecule to target and bind to it. It effectively stops virus particles from spreading throughout your body, thus reducing the intensity of symptoms and the risk of secondary infection. In 1996 the scientists shared the Australia Prize for Science for their outstanding efforts. Their research was supported financially by CSIRO and by a small Melbourne-based company called Biota Holdings which had, in 1986, acquired the intellectual rights related to the discovery of the drug. In 1990 Biota Holdings reached an agreement with the giant UK-based pharmaceutical company Glaxo to develop, test and market the drug. Relenza was launched in 1999 after five years of clinical trials. Two months after Relenza was launched, another anti-viral drug was released worldwide. Its design is extremely similar to that of Relenza and was based on the original Australian research. It was developed by the Californian company, Gilead, together with the Swiss company, Hoffman-La Roche. That drug is marketed as Tamiflu and is administered as a tablet rather than as an aerosol like Relenza. A legal dispute between Biota Holdings and GlaxoSmithKline over the marketing of the drug followed. Until May 2005 Relenza had only 3 per cent of the anti-flu market but following a favourable report in The Lancet, countries have subsequently started stockpiling millions of doses of Relenza. With its story of brilliant research, corporate intrigue, and legal wrangling, Relenza has already earned its place in the Museum’s collection. If world health experts’ worst fears are realised, Relenza, together with Tamiflu, might save millions of lives. Disclosure: The author and her family own shares in Biota Holdings.


the inside story

TERRY MOONEY LEADS THE OCTOBER MEMBERS TOUR. PHOTO BY MARINCO KOJDANOVSKI.

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news and photos prizes to be won exclusive events family activities special offers

We are delighted to announce a new program of curatorled tours starting in 2006. The tours will be held on the first Thursday of the month and provide members with privileged access to the Museum’s stored collection. Each month a different curator will take participants into the object store to view some of the Museum’s most fascinating objects and hear their stories. Tours are of the basement store in Harris Street and are followed by morning tea and further discussion

with the curator. We regret Museum policy means that children under 12 cannot be admitted. However, children can see selected dolls from the collection when they are brought out for viewing in the Museum at our inaugural ‘mothers and daughters’ event. Another new initiative in 2006 is a series of curatorled walking tours. The first in the series, a walking tour of Pyrmont and Ultimo, with Anni Turnbull, curator of Australian History & Society, is on Thursday 9 February.

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Members e-newsletter
If you would like to receive the regular Members e-newsletter with updates on all members events please call (02) 9217 0600 or email members@ phm.gov.au with your membership number and e-newsletter in the subject line.

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from the members manager
This summer we’re very excited to introduce a new look Powerhouse events calendar. In response to your requests, we have expanded the members calendar to a Museum-wide events listing, so you can choose the events that take your fancy. Of course, we will continue to offer exclusive, membersonly events – marked for easy reference. The Powerhouse and Sydney Observatory are brimming with an array of tours, parties, workshops and talks for the whole family to attend this summer. As well as a new suite of curator-led, behind-the-scenes tours, we have also organised a very special members-only tour of the Museum’s digital photography department. This is a rare chance to see Museum photographers at work capturing images of the collection (see article on page 3) and to see what happens to these images in post production. So make sure you browse the events listing and book in for a fun-filled summer at the Powerhouse Museum. Finally, we would like to wish you and your families a very safe and happy holiday season and we hope to see you in the Members Lounge this summer. Leonie Crane, Members Manager

THE MEMBERS LOUNGE ON LEVEL 5 IS A GREAT PLACE TO RELAx AND ENJOY COMPLIMENTARY REFRESHMENTS WHILE THE KIDS PLAY.

members

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ExPAND YOUR CREATIVITY THIS SUMMER AT ONE OF OUR DIGITAL MEDIA COURSES IN THE SOUNDHOUSE VECTORLAB. (OPPOSITE PAGE) THE MUSEUM’S NEW MASCOTS, ZOE & COGS, BRING MUSEUM OBJECTS AND STORIES TO LIFE DURING THE SUMMER SCHOOL HOLIDAYS. KYLIE MINOGUE, ON A NIGHT LIKE THIS TOUR, 2000, TAILCOAT, TROUSERS AND WAISTCOAT BY PAMELA BLUNDELL, MINI TOP HAT BY STEPHEN JONES, LEATHER BROGUE WITH KITTEN HEEL BY MANOLO BLAHNIK. 1840s DOLL GIVEN TO ELIZA WILKINS BY HER GODMOTHER.

sunday 4 December
Free radicals – Desalination: is it worth its salt?

Thursday 8 December
First quarter moon viewing

* saturday 17 December
Members Christmas party

december

The debate Sydneysiders want to have! With a long history of soiling our water sources – from tank stream to Centennial Park – will this solution to a changing climate simply make for a drier future? Coles Theatre, 2.00 pm
Free monthle event, no bookings. For more information visit powerhousemuseum.com/freeradicals

View the moon through Sydney Observatory’s telescopes and find out about the lunar phases and lunar landings in our 3-D Space Theatre. 8.30 – 10.00 pm
Cost: usual night cost, no bookings

Celebrate the festive season with Powerhouse Members. At this year’s party we’ll introduce young members to our new Museum mascots at a sneak preview performance of their school holiday show. 10.30 am – 12.30 pm
Cost: adult $20, child $10, family $50.

Tuesday 6 December
Introduction to Photoshop and digital imaging

* Thursday 8 December & sunday 11 December
A free range Christmas with The song Company

Wednesday 14 December
Introduction to -D graphics

* saturday 17 December

Members Christmas shopping day

Boost your Photoshop skills and expand your creativity. This course introduces all the fundamental elements of working with digital images in Photoshop. SoundHouse VectorLab 10.00 am – 3.30 pm
Cost: $150 (20% discount for members), bookings essential 02 9217 0392.

An extravaganza of songs, carols and stories with The Song Company at a discounted price. Call 02 9251 1600 or visit songcompany.com.au 8 December 8.00 pm & 11 December 3.00 pm Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Macquarie Street
Powerhouse Members: adults $43/conc $39/under 30 $22/groups $35.

This intensive workshop takes you through the key elements for creating and working with 3-D, vectorbased graphics. SoundHouse VectorLab 10.00 am – 3.30 pm
Cost: $150 (20% discount for members), bookings essential 02 9217 0392.

The Powerhouse Shop is your perfect Christmas shopping destination. Show your membership card to receive 20% discount on most items and complimentary gift wrapping. 10.00 am – 5.00 pm
Cost: free

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january

1-9 January
spinning in space – a spectacular summer program

4-8 January
Powerhouse singstar™

* Tuesday 10 January

Music-video workshop for teenagers

* Friday 0 or saturday 1 January

sunday  January
Free radicals – Are we dying for a cold one?

Powerhouse digital photography – behind-the-scenes

Explore Space these summer holidays at Sydney Observatory. Dress up for a party day, take a 3-D Space Theatre adventure and particpate in night viewings.
Visit our website sydneyobservatory.com for the full holiday program.

Sing live on stage to some of your favourite pop tunes, including a selection of Kylie Minogue songs. The Powerhouse teams up with Sony Playstation® to bring you the ultimate performance experience. 11.00 am, 1.00 pm & 3.00 pm
Free with Museum entry, no bookings.

Mix up some loops into a cool music track, create a video clip and take it home on disk. For ages 11-16 years. SoundHouse VectorLab 10.00am – 3.30pm
Cost: Powerhouse members $70; non-members $100 (includes $30 annual student membership)

Take a tour of the Museum’s photography studio, and see our professional photographers at work. Suitable for ages 16+ 10.30 – 12.00 pm
Cost: members $10; guests $15.

When Sydney switches on its airconditioners more greenhouse gases are produced, raising global temperatures and draining our power infrastructure. Where is the line we dare not cross before personal choices give way to the need for regulation? Coles Theatre, 2.00 pm
Free monthle event, no bookings. For more information visit powerhousemuseum.com/freeradicals

4-8 January
star struck

* Thursday 1 January

Thursday 19 January
Dollies and friends

stop-motion animation workshop for teenagers

* Tuesday 4 January

After hours curator-led tour of Kylie: an exhibition

Join the Museum’s new mascots Zoe and Cogs in our new play space for a range of Kylie-related activities just for kids under 8 years old. 11.00 am – 3.00 pm, weekends and school holidays
Free with Museum entry.

Old-school animation in the digital age, learn all the steps and effects and make your own original short animated movie. For ages 11-16 years. SoundHouse VectorLab 10.00 pm – 3.30 pm
Cost: Powerhouse members $70; non-members $100 (includes $30 annual student membership)

Dr Kimberley Webber, senior curator, Australian history & society, shows a selection of the Museum’s doll and soft toy collection. 11.00 am – 12.30 pm
Cost: adult $15; child $10.

Museum curator Peter Cox hosts an exclusive afterhours, members-only tour of Kylie: an exhibition, without the crowds! 6.00 – 8.00 pm
Cost: $20

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february

* Tuesday  February
Medical curiosities tour

* Thursday 9 February

Thursday  February
d factory

Walking tour of Pyrmont and ultimo

Health and medicine curator Megan Hicks reveals mysterious surgical instruments, scary anatomical models and unmentionable ladies’ things in a basement tour of some of her favourite objects. Suitable for ages 12+. 11.00 am –12.30 pm
Cost: $15 adults.

Take a short walking tour of Pyrmont and Ultimo with curator Anni Turnbull and discover the fascinating history and stories associated with the area. 10.30am – 12.30pm
Cost: members $10, guests $15

Host Nell Schofield and special guests talk design. Chill out to the sound of DJs and join in the discussion as our panel explores the creative process and current issues in design. 6.00pm – 8.30pm
Free monthly event, no bookings. For more information visit powerhousemuseum.com/dfactory

* Friday  February

Tuesday 14 February
valentine’s Day on Observatory Hill

saturday 18 February
Intro to Photoshop and the digital darkroom

From Charlene to showgirl: behind the scenes of Kylie: an exhibition

* saturday 5 February

Digital darkroom for teenagers

An exclusive viewing of Kylie: an exhibition, followed by a conversation about the Kylie Minogue Costume Collection with the curator, Janine Barrand, from the Arts Centre, Melbourne. 6.00 – 8.00 pm
Cost: $25, members only.

A romantic evening of art and stars with the National Trust S H Ervin Gallery. View the exhibition Donald Friend and Margaret Olley followed by a night visit to Sydney Observatory. 6.30pm – 9.30pm
Cost: $60 per person, includes drinks, supper and parking/$50 Powerhouse & National Trust members. Bookings 02 9217 0485.

Ready to expand your creative possibilities? This course introduces the fundamental elements of working with images in the Photoshop environment. SoundHouse VectorLab 10.00am – 3.30pm
$150 (20% discount available for members), bookings essential 02 9217 0392

Learn to edit digital images in Photoshop and get tips on how to improve your photgraphy skills. No need to bring a camera. For ages 11-16 years. SoundHouse VectorLab 10.00am – 3.30pm
Cost: Powerhouse members $70; non-members $100 (includes $30 annual student membership)

summer 05/06
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members calendar
indicates members events

how to book for members events
Unless othewise stated, bookings and pre-payment are essential for all events. You can book online at www.powerhousemusuem.com/members or by phone on (02) 9217 0600 for events at the Powerhouse Museum. For bookings for Sydney Obervatory phone (02) 9217 0485. Three full working days (Monday – Friday) are required for a refund for Powerhouse events. Unfortunately we can’t refund or transfer bookings for SoundHouse VectorLab workshops.
All events are held at the Powerhouse Museum unless otherwise stated. All dates, times and venues are correct at time of publication.

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members scene

DIRECTOR OF THE KYOTO COSTUME INSTITUTE AKIKO FUKAI WITH LOCAL DESIGNER AKIRA ISOGAWA. DESIGNER JENNY KEE, WITH THE ExHIBITION CURATOR LOUISE MITCHELL, AKIKO FUKAI AND JUDITH WHEELDON, POWERHOUSE MUSEUM BOARD MEMBER.

Locomotive No 1 detailed model
Sure to be the most original and creative gift to give or receive this Christmas, this highly detailed model of the famous Locomotive No 1 will provide enjoyment in the making (detailed instructions provided) and much pleasure in admiring. Great results and no experience required! RRP $12.95

Powerhouse members were among the fashionista who flocked to the Museum for the opening of The cutting edge: fashion from Japan.
PHOTOS BY MARINCO KOJDANOVSKI.

Name a star
This unique gift from Sydney Observatory will last for more than a lifetime — the chance to name a star for a special person or special occasion. The Name-a-Star pack includes certificate, catalogue listing, star chart and passes to Sydney Observatory. Our members preChristmas price is $200. For inquiries phone (02) 9217 0485.

MARION VON ALDERSTEIN WITH JENNIFER SANDERS, DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM. POWERHOUSE PUBLICIST JO DUNLOP WITH MASAHIRO NAKAGAWA.

JANE DE TELIGA AND DAUGHTER EMMA. MIEKE LEPPENS (LEFT) WITH CARLA ZAMPATTI (RIGHT) AND DAUGHTER BIANCA.

Genevieve scarf Artychoke necklace
Bohemian style is a dominant theme in fashion collections this summer, combining elements of ethnic and vintage with a modern sensibility. Personalise and complete your look with gorgeous, one-off Genevieve scarves, and Artychoke jewellery. Each piece features carefully selected materials, pieced together to reflect the hand of the maker.
scarf RRP $220 necklace RRP $550

THE POWERHOUSE SHOP IS YOUR ONE-STOP CHRISTMAS SHOPPING DESTINATION. TRY THESE ITEMS FOR STARTERS.

NAKAGAWA SOCHI DESIGNERS (TOKYO RECYCLE PROJECT #15) MASAHIRO NAKAGAWA, ELLI TAKAHASHI, SHAWN AND LICA AZECHI WITH POWERHOUSE MUSEUM ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR MARK GOGGIN. MARY SHACKMAN AND FRIENDS.

christmas gift guide

solar LED spotlight
WIN THIS GOLLUM BANNER (RIGHT) FROM THE LORD OF THE RINGS MOTION PICTURE TRILOGY - THE ExHIBITION.

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members prizes
If your membership is valid at 30 April 2006 you will qualify to go into a draw to win one of the following fabulous prizes. Keep an eye out for your membership renewal in the mail, call the Members Office on 02 9217 0600 or renew online at powerhousemuseum. com/members Original promotional banner from The Lord of the Rings Motion Picture Trilogy – The Exhibition (pictured)
CONGRATULATIONS TO CYNA STRACHAN, WINNER OF THE MEMBERS PRIZE TO PARTICIPATE IN TOKYO RECYCLE PROJECT #15 (SEE STORY ON PAGES 16-17).

The Everlite combines a solar panel, NiMH batteries and a 50 lumen LED lamp in a neat package that’s great for camping. The batteries can be recharged about a thousand times without losing capacity and can store enough energy to keep the lamp running for up to 24 hours.
(12 hours) RRP $139.95 (24 hours) RRP $169.95

Inspired! notebook
A beautifully designed notebook to commemorate the Museum’s new permanent decorative arts and design gallery Inspired! Design across time. Feturing full colour reproductions of 26 objects from the exhibition, this notebook is an ideal stocking filler and a gorgeous gift in its own right. RRP $19.95

Motion Picture Trilogy – The Exhibition, to win this original banner and be the envy of collectors worldwide. To enter visit powerhousemuseum. com/members/competition
Hasbro Toys family fun packs valued at $500 each Each pack includes classic favourites like Play-Doh, Monopoly, My Little Pony and Star Wars collector packs. Simply ensure your membership is valid at 30 April 2006 and you will automatically go into the draw.

star struck showbag
Bag includes: tiara, feather ring, lip gloss, bracelet and Total Girl magazine. RRP $12.95 (feather boa sold separately)

Tell us in 25 words or less why you enjoyed your visit to The Lord of the Rings

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JAPANESE DESIGNERS BREATHE NEW LIFE INTO FASHION CAST-OFFS AND SENTIMENTAL FAVOURITES IN THEIR MUSEUM WORKSHOP.
story_HELEN WHITTY AND MAKI TAGUCHI, EDUCATION AND VISITOR SERVICES

story one: simon schwab and Claudia Brueheim
A designer at the Museum, Claudia was involved with the project from the beginning supervising Katherine Dicker (design intern) in the creation of the temporary workshop. Claudia and Simon decided to participate together, so the challenge was to make one garment that would fit them both.

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tokyo recycle project #15
‘I am sending you this garment that I have treasured these past years,’ says Mother to her son Hyoma, a tailor. Hyoma and his mother are characters in the Hyoma recycle story, written and illustrated by Masahiro Nakagawa, leader of the group of fashion recyclers known as Nakagawa Sochi. The Hyoma recycle story explains the philosophy underpinning this complex and exciting project, recently seen in its entirety at the Powerhouse Museum. From 24 September to 9 October 2005 the Nakagawa Sochi team – Masahiro Nakagawa, Rika Koiwa, Jun Koiwa and Eri Takahashi, supported by volunteer students from the Sydney Institute of TAFE’s fashion design school – created a unique design studio called Tokyo Recycle Project #15. The project aimed to break the fashion cycle by taking old clothes and textiles – along with the stories and sentiments attached to them by their owners – and transforming them into something new. Visitors could also take part in this unique creative experience by watching the team at work and chatting with them during special daily sessions. The project culminated in a spectacular fashion parade showcasing the outcome of two weeks of intense design work. The Museum was especially interested in the project because it brings to life the exhibition The cutting edge: fashion from Japan (on show until 29 January 2006) and also tackles an issue very close to the Museum’s heart and history – that of sustainable design. The project had already been a huge hit in New York, Hong Kong and Japan, before coming to the Powerhouse. Participants came from Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra to claim 50 places, available at three levels of transformation: Level 1: a minor transformation in the form of a screen-print or other topical application. Level 2: cutting, shaping, and reassembling, into something suitable for everyday wear. Level 3: a haute-couture garment. To begin the project, participants came to the Museum for a one-on-one consultation with Masahiro Nakagawa. The conversation, forms, letters and a Polaroid shot served as a reminder to the designer throughout the process. Here are some of the stories.

BEFORE: SIMON WAS WEARING THESE PANTS WHEN HE FIRST MET CLAUDIA. ON THE OTHER HAND CLAUDIA HAD HARDLY WORN THE DRESS BUT SHE LOVED ITS CUT AND CLOTH AND COULDN’T THROW IT AWAY. AFTER: FROM PANTS AND A DRESS COMES A HOODED SHIRT FOR BOTH CLAUDIA AND SIMON.

story two: Cyna strachan
Cyna, aged 13 years, was the winner of the Members special draw and one of the youngest participants. Cyna’s mother Beth read the Members bulletin and with Cyna’s love of unusual clothes and interest in Japanese culture in mind, signed her up.

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BEFORE: CYNA SELECTED THESE GARMENTS SHE HAD PURCHASED FROM AN OP SHOP. AFTER: CYNA’S NEW SKIRT WITH A BOLD UNION JACK MOTIF.

IMAGES CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: MASAHIRO FINE TUNES JENNY KEE’S DRESS. JENNY HAD A BOx FULL OF GARMENTS TRANSFORMED INTO A SPECTACULAR HAUTE COUTURE DRESS, WHICH HAS BEEN DONATED TO THE MUSEUM COLLECTION; JEANS AND A SHIRT ARE BECOME A STYLISH DRESS; MASAHIRO’S SKETCHES FOR JENNY KEE’S DRESS; THE TEAM USE A DRAPING PROCESS TO SHAPE CLOTHING DIRECTLY ONTO A MANNEQUIN. HERE JUN ADJUSTS AND PINS A GARMENT, READY FOR SEWING; JENNY KEE’S DRESS STARTS TO TAKE SHAPE; SEVERAL GARMENTS COMBINE TO MAKE A DRESS THAT CAN BE WORN IN DIFFERENT WAYS; MASAHIRO IN HIS PURPOSE-BUILT PRODUCTION WORKSHOP IN THE MUSEUM’S TURBINE HALL; JENNY KEE’S DRESS ON THE CATWALK; JUN MAKES FINAL ADJUSTMENTS TO A GARMENT. PHOTOS BY MARINCO KOJDANOVKSI.

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A REFRESHED BOULTON AND WATT STEAM ENGINE IS BACK IN ACTION. HOW DID THIS INDUSTRIAL MARVEL HELP TO SHAPE THE MODERN WORLD?

gathering steam
Imagine travelling back in time to 1785 to view Samuel Whitbread’s marvellous new steam engine, one of the first rotative engines in the world. While the form of the engine is familiar, you notice some essential differences. The most obvious is that the rocking beam and the tank are made of timber rather than cast iron. The tank holds James Watt’s most significant innovation, the ‘separate condenser’, to which steam is vented and then cooled on each stroke; it made his engines much more efficient than earlier ones by allowing the cylinder to be kept hot rather than alternately heated and cooled. The flyball governor, which controls engine speed by reducing steam flow, is missing. The sun and planet gears, which convert upand-down to rotative motion, and the parallel motion mechanism, which connects the piston rod to the beam, are both simpler in form. And the rim of the huge flywheel, which maintains momentum and smoothes the motion, is only about half as thick. The hidden difference lies in the steam supply to the cylinder and the valves that control it. The engine is singleacting: steam pushes the piston down on each stroke and momentum carries it up. (The change to doubleacting, with steam pushing in both directions, occurred in 1795 and increased the engine’s output from 10 to 15 horsepower.) The engine has put a team of horses out of work, but the huge horizontal wheel they were harnessed to is still in place, ready to take over if the engine breaks down. Via sets of gears and wooden shafts, the engine drives the rollers that crush malt, an Archimedes screw that lifts the crushed malt, a hoist that lifts bags of malt from the yard, a three-cylinder pump, and apparatus to stir the vat. In addition, a pump hanging from the beam lifts water from a well in the yard to a rooftop tank. Not bad for an engine of 10 horsepower, or 7.5 kilowatts, about the same power as a golf buggy! The engine’s piston, at work inside the cylinder, is not visible. One of similar type, probably made in 1839 and still in the engine in 1887 when it was retired from service in the brewery, will be placed on display shortly. But how did the engine come to be in Sydney? One of the founding trustees of the Museum, Professor Archibald Liversidge, was in London in 1887 and heard that the engine was being dismantled. He asked the brewery’s owners to donate it to the Museum. They agreed on condition that it be ‘erected, exhibited and kept in good order for the benefit of the public.’ When the engine arrived there was no place for it in the Museum. It was several years before an engine house was erected for it to share with Locomotive No 1. An electric motor was later attached to turn the engine over for interested visitors; however, few of them asked to see it. The planetarium, plastic woman and Strasburg Clock model were much bigger drawcards. So the decision to return the engine to steaming order was significant; Liversidge’s acquisition, and the Museum’s most valuable object, would finally be seen by a majority of visitors. Since 1988 visitors have come from all parts of the world to see it, the oldest rotative engine in existence. The engine recently had a thorough clean and is now back in action. Great new views of the engine have been created from the decorative arts and design gallery Inspired! Why is an old steam engine of interest in the information age? One reason is that, while the mechanical age might have passed, we still depend on mechanism. In the areas of agriculture, transport, manufacturing, and water and energy supply, mechanism keeps things chugging or zipping along, but most of it is hidden from view. The beauty of a steam engine is that much of the mechanism is visible and easily understood; and the basic principle of a piston working inside a cylinder is also at work in modern engines. The other reason why this old engine is still of interest is that it represents the great changes brought about by the advent of the rotative steam engine to turn existing machinery – and new machines such as those for spinning and weaving invented from the 1760s. Industry no longer relied on wind, water and animal power; workers left the land as engines helped work it more efficiently; towns became cities and cities expanded; and our present dependence on fossil fuels began. And Boulton and Watt’s preeminence in the field helped Britain maintain its economic might – and thus helped to shape the modern world. Debbie Rudder Curator, Engineering and Design

The Powerhouse Foundation Anniversary Appeal was launched on 1 september 005 with the aim to raise $50,000 by the end of the month. We are delighted to report that target was tripled and the Foundation raised over $155,000 during september. The Anniversary was celebrated at the Life Fellows Dinner on  september, where the Foundation was launched one year earlier. The Life Fellows Dinner was attended by key Museum stakeholders, including the Foundation Ambassadors [pictured]. The second President’s Circle luncheon also took place with guest speaker Justice Geoffrey Robertson QC, who delivered a fascinating speech covering topics ranging from the Ashes to child slavery and the trial of sudam Hussein, to the value of museums to humanity. The Hon Bob Carr was guest speaker for the November luncheon. On behalf of the Powerhouse Foundation I would like to thank all those who have given their support in the first year and look forward to welcoming new and renewed donors in the year ahead. Melissa smith, Foundation Executive 61  917 0564 or melissas@phm.gov.au Recent Donors
Ross McNair Anne Nelson Dr Gene & Mr Brian Sherman AM Trust Co of Australia Ltd Richard Flynn Ian & Joanne Ritchie Stephen & Johann Gray The Stockler Family Murray Doyle Anonymous Dr Marion Freedman-Lobel Marco & Angela Belgiorno-Zegna Dr Kevin Fewster AM & Ms Carol Scott Mr Brian Sherman AM & Dr Gene Sherman Drs David & Wendy Thoreau Christopher Vassall Jennifer Stuckey-Clarke Kevin Parker Judith Campbell Graham & Helen Wilson Angela Carter Stephen & Johann Gray Anonymous Dr John Gambrill Joy Marchant Miles Armstrong Lucy Bantermalis Margaret Stevenson Geraldine Bull Stephen McNamara Mr & Mrs David Calmyre Barbara Rogers Mary Ryland Simon Pagett Ian & Vicki Londish Alan Olsen Barry Casey Jack & Diana Ritch William L. Chapman Mrs Prudence Board John F. B. Egan

DETAIL OF THE BOULTON & WATT STEAM ENGINE. PHOTO BY JEAN-FRANCOIS LANZARONE.

CELEBRATING THE SUCCESS OF THE FOUNDATION APPEAL AT THE LIFE FELLOWS DINNER, FROM LEFT: JACK RITCH, FOUNDATION AMBASSADOR; MELISSA SMITH, FOUNDATION ExECUTIVE; CHRISTINA SUMNER, CURATOR, INTERNATIONAL DECORATIVE ARTS & DESIGN; DIANA RITCH, IAN RITCHIE, AND JOANNE RITCHIE, FOUNDATION AMBASSADOR. PHOTO MARINCO KOJDANOVSKI. 

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HOT SUMMER OFFER FROM POWERHOUSE PUBLISHING

The cutting edge: fashion from Japan MEMBERS PRICE $31.45

THESE BEHIND-THE-SCENES PHOTOS SHOW A GLIMPSE OF THE BIGGEST ExHIBITION INSTALLATION SINCE THE POWERHOUSE OPENED IN 1988.

On the move: a history of transport in Australia MEMBERS PRICE $32.95

Inspired! brought to you by...
The Museum’s new permanent decorative arts and design gallery Inspired! Design across time opened on 6 October 2005 and occupies pride of place leading from the Grand Foyer of the Museum. As well as showcasing around 800 objects from the Museum’s world-class decorative arts and design collection, the gallery also integrates a new vista for the treasured Boulton & Watt steam engine and Strasburg Clock model. Following many years of planning and development, the construction of showcases and grand architectural structures commenced in June 2005. Staff from all museum departments were drawn together, including curators, designers, editors and print production, marketing and media, conservators, registrars, audio-visual and interactive production and the workshop, as well as numerous outside contractors. The 800 objects on display were brought in three weeks prior to opening. The need to sequence the installation of these objects was vital, and making sure the right people were available at the right time was one of the biggest challenges. The most satisfying moment in a project of this scale is being ready for opening night. A museum’s strength is in the combined knowledge and experience of its staff. On this project everyone truly delivered and the most satisfying outcome for all has been the overwhelmingly positive response to the exhibition. True to its title, the exhibition will continue to inspire! Ross Clendinning, Exhibition Coordinator

Greek treasures: from the Benaki Museums in Athens MEMBERS PRICE $35.95

Yesterday’s tomorrows: the Powerhouse Museum and its precursors 1880-005 MEMBERS PRICE $44.95 1000 years of the Olympic Games $26.95 / members $14.83 Australian gold & silver 1851-1900 $24.70 / members $12.35 Bayagul: contemporary indigenous communication $17.95 / members $8.98 Cars and culture: our driving passions $26.95 / members $14.83 Contemporary silver: made in Italy $35.95 / membesr $17.98 Pathways through paradise: oriental rugs from Australian collections $22.45 / members $11.23 visions of a republic: the work of Lucien Henry $40.50 / members $20.25 Women with wings $22.45 / members $11.23

See the mailorder insert in this issue.
OPPOSITE PAGE CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: EINAR DOCKER AND JULIUS MEDGYESSY FROM THE MUSEUM’S REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT POSITION THE MORAINE SOFA BY ZAHA HADID (SEE BACK COVER); ASSISTANT REGISTRAR SARAH POINTON PLACES A GLASS BOWL, ‘VIOLET MACCHIA’, BY DALE CHIHULY, USA; CONSERVATOR KEITH POTTER AND THE STRASBURG CLOCK MODEL; CURATOR EVA CZERNIS-RYL ENSURES A GROUP OF 1950S ITALIAN GLASS IS IN THE RIGHT POSITION; CONSERVATOR KEITH POTTER AND GRAHAM COUGHLAN FROM WORKSHOP MOVING THE ROWE STREET GRAPHIC PANEL; CONSERVATOR KATE CHIDLOW DRESSES A MANNEQUIN. THIS PAGE: CONSERVATOR TIM MORRIS AND JULIUS MEDGYESSY INSTALL THE ‘LOCKHEED LOUNGE’ BY AUSTRALIAN DESIGNER MARK NEWSON. PHOTOS BY JEAN-FRANCOIS LANZERONE.

Powerhouse books are available from the Powerhouse Shop, bookstores and mailorder. For more information or to order contact Powerhouse Publishing on (02) 9217 0129 or email phpub@phm.gov.au www. powerhousemuseum.com/ publications

Remember, members receive 10% discount on all titles from the Powerhouse Shop and mailorder

Buy one of these fabulous recent titles and get up to three books from the list below for half price and no extra postage!

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powerline spring 05

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powerline spring 05

observe

MARVEL AT GALAxIES AND IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES OF LIFE BEYOND EARTH.

THE POWERHOUSE MUSEUM GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES THE SUPPORT OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS

+principal partners

DICK sMITH
SPORT: MORE THAN HEROES & LEGENDS GREEK TREASURES: FROM THE BENAKI MUSEUM IN ATHENS COLES THEATRE, TARGET THEATRE, GRACE BROS COURTYARD, K MART STUDIOS

DICK SMITH AUSTRALIAN ExPLORER BELL 206B JETRANGER III HELICOPTER

+senior partners

7
starry spirals
Spread across the vast emptiness of space are big families of stars we call galaxies. Some galaxies look like fuzzy balls, others have a beautiful spiral shape like the shell of a snail. Astronomers estimate the number of galaxies visible through a large telescope is about 100,000 million galaxies, each containing about 200,000 million stars, plus vast clouds of gas and dust that are the building blocks of new stars. All the stars, dust and gas move around the centre of a galaxy, like planets moving around the sun. In 1924 astronomers demonstrated we live in a galaxy called the Milky Way. In the 1950s, using radio waves emitted by hydrogen gas, astronomers mapped the location of all the hydrogen gas in our galaxy and discovered we live in a spiral galaxy. At night you can see our galaxy as a glowing band of light among the stars.

SPIRAL GALAxY. IMAGE COUTESY NASA/HST. RIGHT: STONEHENGE. PHOTO BY NICK LOMB.

Our new 3-D show ‘Spinning in Space’ explores spiral galaxies.
The expanse of our galaxy is about one million, million, million kilometres. Astronomers measure distance in light years – the distance light travels in one year. Our galaxy is about 100,000 light years wide. The sun and nine planets that make up our solar system travel through space at a speed of 240km every second. This means the sun travels one light year every 1400 years, taking about 250 million years to orbit once around the centre of the galaxy. A famous astronomer once said, ‘If you count every single grain of sand on every beach on Earth, there are still more stars in the night sky spread through all the galaxies across the universe.’ The possibilities for life beyond the Earth are truly mind boggling. From 1 January 2006 see our new 3-D show ‘Spinning in space’ with astronaut Tom aboard the International Space Station. Martin Anderson, Astronomy Educator
THE MOON’S SURFACE. PHOTO BY NICK LOMB.

ECOLOGIC: CREATING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

POWERHOUSE MUSEUM @ CASTLE HILL GREEK TREASURES: FROM THE BENAKI MUSEUM IN ATHENS KYLIE: AN ExHIBITION MUSEUM MASCOTS: ZOE AND COGS

POWERHOUSE WIZARD

+partners

+supporters
MINCOM LIMITED LIFE FELLOWS DINNER 2005 POLOxYGEN INSPIRED! DESIGN ACROSS TIME NOvA 96.9 KYLIE: AN ExHIBITION RAILCORP LOCOMOTIVE NO 1 sBs RADIO THE CUTTING EDGE: FASHION FROM JAPAN sOuNDHOusE™ MusIC ALLIANCE SOUNDHOUSE™ MUSIC & MULTIMEDIA LABORATORY ARAB BANK AusTRALIA THE CURIOUS ECONOMIST: WILLIAM STANLEY JEVONS IN SYDNEY SYDNEY DESIGNERS UNPLUGGED: PEOPLE, PROCESS, PRODUCT NOvOTEL sYDNEY ON DARLING HARBOuR OFFICIAL SYDNEY HOTEL ELECTROLux ELECTROLUx GLOBAL DESIGN LABORATORY NsW TREAsuRY THE CURIOUS ECONOMIST: WILLIAM STANLEY JEVONS IN SYDNEY REsERvE BANK OF AusTRALIA THE CURIOUS ECONOMIST: WILLIAM STANLEY JEVONS IN SYDNEY


the moon at a standstill
2006 is a year of major lunar standstill. This does not mean the moon will suddenly stop moving; rather it means that the moon’s monthly swings towards the north and south in the sky will reach their maximum possible values during the year. During each month the rising point of the moon on the horizon changes from being south of east to being north of east, and then back again. The setting point changes similarly. Astronomers working on ancient monuments coined the term ‘standstill’ to refer to times when the moon’s monthly motion along the horizon is at an extreme value. On Friday evening 27 January 2006 Professor Ray Norris, deputy director of the Australia Telescope National Facility, will talk about his past research on ancient European sites, such as Stonehenge and Callanish, and his current research into the astronomy of the Australian Aboriginal people, who have been watching the southern sky for tens of thousands of years. Professor Norris’s lecture will be Sydney Observatory’s prestigious annual ‘By the light of the southern stars’ lecture and will be in the S H Ervin Gallery, adjacent to the Observatory. Nick Lomb, Curator of Astronomy

BOMBAY sAPPHIRE D FACTORY ENGINEERs AusTRALIA, sYDNEY DIvIsION ENGINEERING ExCELLENCE 2005 INDEsIGN MAGAzINE D FACTORY MARIE CLAIRE THE CUTTING EDGE: FASHION FROM JAPAN

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BOEING AUSTRALIA PDC CREATIVE THOMSON PLAYFORD

+gold corporate members
ADOBE JCDECAUx LILYFIELD PRINTING MASSMEDIA STUDIOS MULTIPLEx NHK TECHNICAL SERVICES SINCLAIR KNIGHT MERZ TRANSGRID

+silver corporate members
ARAB BANK AUSTRALIA CAPITAL TECHNIC GROUP DUNLOP FLOORING AUSTRALIA HASBRO MACQUARIE BANK FOUNDATION NSW DEPARTMENT OF LANDS PETTARAS PRESS STREET VISION TABCORP TAFE NSW: SYDNEY INSTITUTE THOMSON TELECOM AUSTRALIA WEIR WARMAN LTD

+ state government partners
THE POWERHOUSE MUSEUM IS A STATUTORY AUTHORITY OF, AND PRINCIPALLY FUNDED BY, THE NSW STATE GOVERNMENT. CASINO COMMUNITY BENEFIT FUND NSW

+australian government partners
AUSTRALIA COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH COUNCIL DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE

+foundations
GORDON DARLING FOUNDATION JAPAN FOUNDATION SUNTORY FOUNDATION VINCENT FAIRFAx FAMILY FOUNDATION

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AND GIVING TO THE POWERHOUSE MUSEUM PLEASE CONTACT MIRANDA PURNELL ON (02) 9217 0577.

exhibitions at a glance
DECEMBER 2005_JANUARY_FEBRUARY 2006
The cutting edge: fashion from Japan
LEVEL 5, UNTIL 29 JANUARY 2006

Powerhouse Membership It makes a great gift!
I wish to join Powerhouse Members Membership number (if renewing): I wish to renew my membership

Engineering Excellence
LEVEL 4, SUCCESS AND INNOVATION GALLERY FROM 17 DECEMBER 2005

INDIvIDuAL
Standard Concession/country* $77 Name to go on card

1 year $60 $30 

years $108 $54 

years $153

Showcases the work of 19 Japanese designers including pioneers Rei Kawakubo, Issey Miyake and Yohji Yamamoto, and the work of a new generation who continue to challenge Western notions of fashion, such as Junya Watanabe, Jun Takahashi and Hiroake Ohya. Inspired! Design across time
LEVEL 4, DECORATIVE ARTS AND DESIGN GALLERY

Outstanding engineering projects from the Engineers Australia, Sydney Division, Engineering Excellence awards. Australian Design Awards
LEVEL 4, FROM 17 DECEMBER

The Powerhouse selection from the Australian Design Awards features outstanding achievements in design. DesignTech 005
LEVEL 3, FROM 6 DECEMBER 2005

*Concession applies to full-time students, seniors, pensioners, unemployed. Country members must live more than 150 km from Sydney GPO.

HOusEHOLD**
Standard Country/concession $127

1 year $85 $50 

years $153 $90 

years $217

Featuring fashion, furniture, textiles, glass, graphics, ceramics and metalwork. Inspired! surveys 300 years of decorative arts and design. Discover the power of objects and the pleasure of people who use and treasure them. Kylie: an exhibition
LEVEL 3, FROM 26 DECEMBER 2005

DesignTech showcases outstanding major design projects by 2005 Higher School Certificate students of Design and Technology. This annual exhibition features furniture, fashion, graphic design, architecture and industrial design. strasburg Clock
LEVEL 4

** A household is up to two adults and all students under 18 years at the same address. Country households must be more than 150 km from Sydney GPO. Concession applies to full-time students, seniors, pensioners, unemployed and all adults in the household must be eligible for concession.

Name to go on first card Name to go on second card Card number (for concession memberships) I wish to give a gift membership

Spanning the 17-year music career of Kylie Minogue, this exhibition features a collection of Kylie’s fabulous stage costumes by top international fashion designers. The exhibition, which was developed with the co-operation of Kylie, her team and family, also includes photographs, accessories, artwork, awards, sound and video. Paradise, Purgatory and Hellhole: a history of Pyrmont and ultimo
LEVEL 3 – AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES GALLERY UNTIL JULY 2006

Following a long period of preservation work the treasured ‘Strasburg’ model, based on Strasbourg Cathedral’s famous astronomical clock, returns to a new location next to the new decorative arts and design gallery, Inspired! Design across time.

GIFT MEMBERsHIP RECIPIENT
Name Address Postcode Phone number (BH) Email Please send the membership to Future renewal notices to be sent to: Card message (if applicable) The giver The giver Directly to the recipient The recipient

Experience some of the many human stories from a community that hasn’t stopped shifting and changing from rural estate to industrial suburb and today’s highly developed urban environment.

GIFT MEMBERsHIP GIvER
Name Address Postcode Phone number (BH)
FROM LEFT: NECK RUFF BY JUNYA WATANABE, FROM THE CUTTING EDGE: FASHION FROM JAPAN. PHOTO BY TAISHI HIROKANA. COURTESY KYOTO COSTUME INSTITUTE. MARILYN SOFA BY STUDIO65 FROM THE ExHIBITION INSPIRED! DESIGN ACROSS TIME. VINTAGE GOLD HOT PANTS, ‘SPINNING AROUND’, 2000, FROM KYLIE: AN ExHIBITION, A TOURING ExHIBITION FROM THE ARTS CENTRE, MELBOURNE.

Fax Email Number in household adults children

exhibitions at sydney Observatory
By the light of the southern stars Look behind the Southern Cross, hear Aboriginal stories about the sky and see instruments from Australia’s first major observatory.

Works wonders: stories about home remedies Nyngan and District Museum
UNTIL 11 DECEMBER 2005

PAYMENT DETAILs
Total cost of membership: $ I would also like to make a donation to the Powerhouse Foundation of $ to help build our collection (donations over $2.00 are tax deductible). Total amount to be paid $ I enclose a cheque/money order for this amount made payable to Powerhouse Members. Please charge this amount to my credit card: Visa Amex M/card Diners B/card Expiry /

Geocenter, Broken Hill

17 DECEMBER 2005 – 12 FEBRUARY 2006

Fruits: Tokyo street style Southland Museum, Invercargil, New Zealand

travelling exhibitions
sport: more than heroes and legends Queensland Museum, Brisbane
UNTIL 12 FEBRUARY 2006

3 FEBRUARY 2006 – 27 MARCH 2006

Greek Treasures: from the Benaki Museum in Athens Immigration Museum, Melbourne
UNTIL 28 MAY 2006

Card number Cardholder name Signature

Gambling in Australia: thrills, spills and social ills Wollongong City Gallery
UNTIL 29 JANUARY 2006

Date that gift should be received by
While all effort will be made to meet deadline, please allow 14 days processing.

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Give a gift membership
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TURN OVER FOR DETAILS

Please complete all relevant sections and return to the members department: + By fax on 9217 0140 + By post to: Powerhouse Members PO Box K346, Haymarket, NSW 1238 or phone the Members hotline on 9217 0600.

from the collection
Iraqi-born, London-based Zaha Hadid is one of the most innovative architects of her generation. Hadid’s radical design concepts have created a new architectural language that has extended the boundaries of both design and construction technology. Like her buildings, the Moraine sofa – part of a suite of furniture inspired by glacial forms called ‘Z-scape’ – breaks new ground in its abstract, asymmetrical shape and reflects the role of digital design technology in Hadid’s creative process. Hadid was awarded the highly prestigious Pritzker Prize for Architecture in 2004. The sofa is on display in the exhibition Inspired! Design across time.
ZAHA HADID, MORAINE SOFA, POLYURETHANE FOAM, DYED AND TREATED COW-HIDE, DESIGNED 2000, MADE BY SAWAYA & MORONI, ITALY, 2004. PURCHASED WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF SAWAYA & MORONI AND HUB, MELBOURNE

ISSN 1030-5750
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