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Monday, July 12, 2010
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Glory Riders arrive in Ohio, p3A

Creamer wins US Women’s
Open, p6A
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2A
State/Local 3A
Politics 4A
Community 5A
Sports 6-7A
Announcements 8A
World News 9A
Classifieds 2B
TV 3B
Index
Partly
sunny Tuesday
with a chance
of showers,
storms. High
in the 80s. See page 2A.
Residents need
to return surveys
The City of Delphos is
conducting an income survey
to determine the city’s eligibil-
ity for state and federal fund-
ing for infrastructure improve-
ments to help in reducing
costs of the water and waste-
water systems. The Ohio
Rural Community Assistance
Program is conducting these
confidential income surveys.
The city has sent two
mailings to a random selec-
tion of residents in the city of
Delphos. The first mailing was
to be returned by June 10 and
the second was to be returned
by July 7. Some mailings
have not been returned.
The city reminds resi-
dents that if they received a
random survey to fill it out
and return it to Chris Laurer,
WSOS/RCAP, P.O. Box
590, Fremont OH 43420.
BBB fnds home
rental scams on
Craig’s List
The Better Business
Bureau of West Central Ohio
has found a scam appar-
ently aimed at young adults
and college students.
The scammers are list-
ing homes for rent on Craig’s
List claiming the owners are
in Africa doing missionary
work and want to rent their
vacant house. They want the
deposit — usually several hun-
dred dollars — sent to them
at their African location.
The homes are not for rent
and the real owners are not
in Africa. If someone sends
money, it is just stolen by
the scam artists in Africa.
Caution should be used
at all times when respond-
ing to items listed for sale or
rent on the Internet. Never
send money to someone
unknown without first check-
ing the validity of the listing.
Contact Neil Winget, presi-
dent of the BBB serving West
Central Ohio at 419-223-7010.
Roads closed
for railroad,
bridge repairs
Several roadways in Allen
County will be closed for
railroad crossing and bridge
repairs in upcoming days.
North Dixie Highway
between Swaney Road and
the Village of Beaverdam
will be closed for two
weeks beginning today for
railroad crossing repair.
Breese Road between
Delong and McClain roads
will be closed from 7:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday this week
for bridge repair.
Girls golf sign up
Any St. John’s High School
girl interested in joining the
school’s girls golf team should
come to a meeting at 3 p.m.
Aug. 2 at the Delphos Country
Club.
For questions, contact Andy
Miller at 419-968-2779.
The Lima Area Concert Band brought its toe-tapping marches to the Hanser Family Pavilion Sunday for the third installment of the Delphos Rotary
Club’s 2010 Music in the Park series. The band played to a smaller-than-usual crowd. Above: Listeners wait for the next offering of the concert band.
Below left: four clarinetists perform. The Findlay High School steel drum band Pantasia will perform at 6 p.m. July 25.
Nancy Spencer photos
Lima Area Concert Band performs
Stacy Taff photos
Fifth Habitat House under construction
Volunteers worked on the new Habitat for Humanity house, below, on Erie Street
Saturday morning. Above: Homeowner Julie Smith, right, works on the tresses with
mom, Sue Smith. To help, call Dave Stemen at 419-692-6436.
Lead paint
EPA gives contractors,
painters half of a break
BY MICHAEL FORD
The Delphos Herald
mford@delphosherald.com
The United States
Environmental Protection
Agency introduced new
regulations for lead-based
paint that went into effect
in April. All who work with
the paint are required to take
a recertification course and
the deadline for that has been
extended but the EPA issued
a memo in June indicating it
would still cite those respon-
sible for violations.
The Delphos Area Chamber
of Commerce has sponsored
recertification courses con-
ducted by Training Services
International. Training
Manager Doug Schafer said
the EPA has received numer-
ous complaints from compa-
nies wanting more time to
get recertified. Therefore, the
deadline was extended but
fines can still be issued to
those who have yet to take the
course in which the regula-
tions are taught.
“The deadline extension
is until Oct. 1; the EPA will
not take enforcement action
for violating firm certification.
You have company certifica-
tion that has to be met and they
will not nail contractors until
Oct. 1 but there is also worker
training for on-site workers and
those in charge of the projects,
which they call a certified reno-
vator,” he said. “The EPA will
not enforce against a worker if
they have enrolled or applied
to enroll for a recertification
class no later than Sept. 30.
The class has to be completed
by Sept. 31.
“Now, there is a catch and
that is that they still say they
will cite you if you’re not fol-
lowing the rules. So, they’re
giving you a break on hav-
ing the recertification as a
company and they’re giving
you a break on not having
the training done but if you
violate the work practices that
came out on April 22, they
can still cite you. Ironically,
the place where you learn
what the requirements are is
in the class.”
The federal government
banned lead-based paint from
housing in 1978. Some states
stopped its use even earlier.
Lead can be found in homes in
the city, country, or suburbs;
in apartments, single-family
homes and both private and
public housing; inside and
outside of the house; and in
soil around a home. Soil can
pick up lead from exterior
paint or other sources such as
past use of leaded gas in cars.
Children playing near lead-
based paint inside a home
can ingest or inhale lead dust.
Dust can pick up lead from
deteriorating lead-based paint
or from soil tracked into a
home.
Just knowing that a home
has lead-based paint may not
tell you if there is a hazard.
The EPA indicates chil-
dren’s blood lead levels tend
to increase rapidly from 6 to
12 months of age and tend
to peak at 18 to 24 months
of age.
Consult your doctor for
advice on testing your chil-
dren. A simple blood test can
detect high levels of lead.
Blood tests are important for:
children at ages 1 and 2; chil-
dren and other family mem-
bers who have been exposed
to high levels of lead; and
children who should be test-
ed under your state or local
health screening plan.
The EPA also indicates
homes may be checked in
one of two ways, or both: a
paint inspection tells you the
lead content of every differ-
ent type of painted surface in
your home. It won’t tell you
whether the paint is a hazard
or how you should deal with
it; or a risk assessment tells
you if there are any sources of
serious lead exposure (such as
peeling paint and lead dust). It
also tells you what actions to
take to address these hazards.
Have qualified profession-
als do the work.
There are standards in
place for certifying lead-based
paint professionals to ensure
the work is done safely, reli-
ably and effectively. This is
because lead is a poison that
can harm anyone but children
and unborn babies are espe-
cially at risk.
“Children and pregnant
women are most susceptible
to lead poisoning. The paint
has toxins in it that will inter-
fere with brain function; it
can cause brain damage and
behavioral problems similar
to ADHD and it can cause
learning disabilities. It is
See LEAD, page 2
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2A – The Herald Monday, July 12, 2010
For The Record
POLICE REPORT
OBITUARY
LOTTERY
WEATHER
LOCAL PRICES
www.delphosherald.com
The Daily
Herald
Vol. 141 No. 24
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, business manager
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
William Kohl, general manager/
Eagle Print
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Delphos Police came into
contact with Joel Giesige, 35,
of Delphos in the 300 block
of West Fourth Street at 7:20
p.m. Thursday at which time,
Giesige was taken into cus-
tody on active arrest warrants
out of Allen and Defiance
counties.
Giesige was transported to
the Delphos Police Department
and later turned over to depu-
ties from the Allen County
Sheriff’s Department.
Police came into contact
with Thomas Cooley, 59, of
Delphos at 9:30 p.m. Friday
in the 600 block of North
Washington Street at which
time, Cooley was taken into
custody on an active arrest
warrant issued out of Allen
County.
Cooley was later turned
over to deputies from the Allen
County Sheriff’s Office.
Police came into contact
with Tristan Jackson, 22 of
Findlay at 9:45 p.m. Saturday
at which time, Jackson
was arrested on an active
arrest warrant issued out of
Findlay.
Jackson was transported to
the Allen County Jail.
Police came into con-
tact with Kyle Baden, 24 of
Delphos at 1:28 p.m. Sunday
at which time, Baden was
taken into custody on an
active arrest warrant issued
out of Defiance County.
Baden was transported to
the Delphos Police Department
and was later turned over to
Defiance County.
Police arrest four on warrants
Delphos Police were called
to the 800 block of Jackson
Street at 2:22 p.m. Saturday
in reference to a theft com-
plaint.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated that someone
had entered an unlocked vehi-
cle parked in that area and had
taken items from inside.
Delphos Police received
several complaints of a reck-
less driver in the area of Clime
and Superior streets at 9:10
p.m. Thursday.
Upon officers checking
the area, a vehicle matching
the description was located
in the area of Bredeick and
Cleveland streets.
Upon locating the vehicle,
officers observed the driver
commit several moving viola-
tions and stopped the vehicle
with Brenda Hobbs, 57, of
Delphos driving.
As a result of the investi-
gation, Hobbs was arrested
for operating a motor vehi-
cle while impaired. She was
transported to the Van Wert
County Jail and will appear in
Van Wert Municipal Court on
the charge.
Delphos Police were called
to a business in the 200 block
of South Pierce Street at 9:43
a.m. Friday in reference to a
theft complaint.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated that someone
had taken copper from the
business.
Items taken from
unlocked vehicle
Delphos woman
cited for OVI
Copper stolen
from business
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $52
million
Midday 3
2-0-5
Midday 4
6-9-2-9
Pick 3
0-4-3
Pick 4
8-4-7-7
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $20
million
Rolling Cash 5
03-11-16-17-39
Estimated jackpot:
$100,000
Ten OH
08-10-18-20-21-22-23-24-
30-32-35-45-46-59-60-64-65-
72-75-76
Ten OH Midday
02-04-05-06-07-11-17-20-
21-35-41-42-50-55-61-64-67-
77-79-80
(Continued from page 1)
absorbed by the bones and
at high levels, can cause sei-
zures and death,” said Celeste
Lopez, MD of Wishing Well
Pediatrics. “Children are
more prone to the brain dam-
age because it can only affect
a developing brain but the
toxicity can harm anyone. So,
an adult who is exposed can
die from it.”
Lopez said contractors and
others should understand the
dangers so they can avoid
exposure to themselves and
their families.
“When you try to remove
lead from a house, you
increase the toxicity level
by scraping the paint off the
wall. So whoever is cleaning
it is at risk. Then, they can
bring it home because the
dust gets on their clothes and
this puts the children at risk.
They can pick it up and who-
ever washes the clothes gets
exposed to it and is at risk,”
she said.
The entire rule can be
found at epa.gov/lead/pubs/
renovation.
Lead
Corn: $3.55
Wheat: $4.63
Beans: $10.17
Aug. 11, 1931-July 10, 2010
Doyle Edward Bruskotter,
78, of Fort Jennings, died
at 11:12 p.m. Saturday at
Vancrest Health Care Center
in Delphos.
He was born Aug. 11,
1931, in Fort Jennings to
Leander and Lena (Ricker)
Bruskotter, who preceded
him in death.
On March 31, 1951, he
married Ruth Krietemeyer,
who died March 27, 1998.
Survivors include two sons,
David (Kathy) Bruskotter,
of Findlay, and Thomas
(Jeanne) Bruskotter of Fort
Jennings; four daughters,
Lois (Russ) Fretz, of Ashley,
Ind., Karen (Kenny) Fecker,
of Waldo, Teresa (David)
Burchfield, of Independence
and Nancy (Doug) Wittler
of Bryan; 13 grandchildren,
Matthew of Findlay, Michael
(Nicole) of Gaylord, Mich.,
Lauren (Justin), of Roanoke
Rapids, N.C., Erinn of Fort
Wayne, Ryan of Ashley,
Jared of Independence,
Joel, Brad and Lori of Fort
Jennings and Jordan, Jessica,
Christopher and Connor of
Bryan; three great-grandchil-
dren, Jackson, Regan and
Reece; two brothers, Leonard
(Leona) Bruskotter and
Donald (Carol) Bruskotter of
Fort Jennings; and two sis-
ters, Audrey (Don) Weber of
Estes Park, Colo., and Sharon
Bruskotter of Van Wert.
Mr. Bruskotter was a
retired farmer and a member
of St. Joseph Catholic Church
in Fort Jennings.
Mass of Christian Burial will
begin at 11 a.m. Wednesday at
St. Joseph Catholic Church.
The Rev. John Stites will offi-
ciate. Burial will be in the
church cemetery.
Friends may call from 2
to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Love-
Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township, and for
an hour prior to the service at
the church. A scripture service
will begin at 4 p.m. Tuesday
at the funeral home.
Memorials are to St. Rita’s
Hospice or St. Joseph Catholic
Church.
Doyle E. Bruskotter
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy
with a chance of showers and
thunderstorms. Lows in the
mid 60s. West winds around
5 mph. Chance of rain 50
percent.
TUESDAY: Partly sunny
with a slight chance of show-
ers and thunderstorms in the
morning; mostly cloudy with
a chance of showers and thun-
derstorms in the afternoon.
Highs in the mid 80s. North
winds around 5 mph. Chance
of rain 40 percent.
TUESDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy. A chance of
showers and thunderstorms
in the evening. Lows in the
mid 60s. North winds around
5 mph becoming light east
winds after midnight. Chance
of rain 40 percent.
EXTENDED FORECAST
WEDNESDAY: Partly
sunny. Highs around 90. East
winds around 5 mph becom-
ing light southwest winds in
the afternoon.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows in the
upper 60s.
THURSDAY: Partly
sunny. A chance of show-
ers and thunderstorms in the
afternoon. Highs around 90.
Chance of rain 30 percent.
High temperature Sunday
in Delphos was 86 degrees,
low was 63. A trace of rainfall
was recorded this morning.
High a year ago today was
82, low was 59. Record high
for today is 103, set in 1936.
Record low is 50, set in 1978.
Delphos weather
BP: New oil cap will be
attached today, tested
By TOM BREEN
and HARRY WEBER
The Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS — BP
expected to attach a tight new
cap today on its busted oil well
in the Gulf of Mexico, putting
the oil giant a few tantalizing
steps closer to knowing wheth-
er the fix will be enough to
finally stop crude from gushing
into the Gulf.
The new cap, a 150,000-
pound metal stack known
as “Top Hat 10,” was about
300 feet from the point where
it’s supposed to connect with
the leaking well, BP Chief
Operating Officer Doug Suttles
said in this morning’s news
briefing.
The BP executive was careful
to keep expectations grounded,
stressing that once the cap is in
place, it will take days to know
whether it can withstand the pres-
sure of the erupting oil and feed
it through pipes to surface ships.
The cap and vessels together
make up BP’s plan to stop oil
from spewing into the Gulf for
the first time since April 20.
Gulf residents were wary
after weeks of failed efforts
to stop the spill and downcast
about the damage already done
to the biologically rich Gulf and
the coast’s two leading indus-
tries, fishing and tourism.
Matthew Peterson, a crab-
ber in Yscloskey, La., hasn’t
put out his traps since oil began
washing ashore.
“The oil is still out there, and
it’s going to be there for, what,
maybe 10 years?” he said.
“Until it’s cleaned up, nothing’s
going to get back to normal.”
BP has tried and failed
to counter the gusher with a
giant concrete box over the
well, mud and shredded rub-
ber pumped into it and a pipe
to siphon the crude.
Once the cap is firmly in
place, the company will begin
“shutting in” the well by clos-
ing perforated pipe at the top.
The company will be looking
to see if the pressure rises inside
the cap. If it does, that means
there are no other leaks, and the
cap is stopping oil from leaking
into the Gulf.
But lower pressure readings
may indicate leaking elsewhere
in the well. In that case, Suttles
said, the company will work
to collect the leak with surface
vessels and by dropping yet
another cap on top of the stack.
The testing should last about
48 hours, Suttles said.
Even if the tests show the
cap is successfully holding in the
oil, it will not be the final fix for
the blown well. That will have
to wait until one of two relief
wells reaches the leaking well
from underground and can inject
heavy drilling mud and cement
to form a permanent plug.
BP expects one relief well
will do the job, but it’s drill-
ing a second as a backup.
Gulf oil spill
Octopus oracle Paul to retire
BERLIN (AP) — No more
World Cup, no more octopus
oracle.
Paul, the octopus who
became a pop culture sensa-
tion by correctly predicting the
outcome of as many World Cup
matches as he has legs — all
seven of Germany’s games plus
the Spain-Netherlands final —
is going to retire.
The intuitive invertebrate
will “step back from the official
oracle business,” Tanja Munzig,
a spokeswoman for the Sea Life
aquarium in Oberhausen, told
AP Television News.
“He won’t give any more
oracle predictions — either in
football, nor in politics, life-
style or economy,” she said.
“Paul will get back to his former
job, namely making children
laugh.”
However, Paul took one last
curtain call today. Aquarium
employees presented the octo-
pus with a golden cup — simi-
lar to the official World Cup
trophy.
Although the cup was gar-
nished with three mussels, Paul
ignored it for several minutes as
it was lowered into his tank.
He finally picked off one
mussel and devoured it in front
of television cameras.
Paul won worldwide atten-
tion as he called all of Germany’s
games correctly — including its
semifinal defeat by Spain. He
crowned his career by forecast-
ing correctly that Spain would
beat Holland in Sunday’s final.
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a time, and can burn up to 500 calories. All with a trainer to teach and motivate.
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Non-members only. Limited to three visits. Not valid with any other offer. Valid only at participating locations
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Become an even stronger
woman this summer.
Try our 30-minute circuit that works every major muscle group two muscles at
a time, and can burn up to 500 calories. All with a trainer to teach and motivate.
And come see howCurves and TNT are going to inspire you this summer.
Non-members only. Limited to three visits. Not valid with any other offer. Valid only at participating locations
through 8/28/10. © 2010 Curves International, Inc. The TNT logo, TNT and WE KNOW DRAMA are trademarks
of Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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CURVES WORKS WITH SILVER SNEAKERS
Become an even stronger
woman this summer.
Try our 30-minute circuit that works every major muscle group two muscles at
a time, and can burn up to 500 calories. All with a trainer to teach and motivate.
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Monday, July 12, 2010 The Herald –3A
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
The Glory Ride
Delphos resident Beth
Metzger is participat-
ing in The Glory Ride and
Tabernacle. The vision of the
group is to ride from the west
coast to the east coast by
horseback, worshiping, blow-
ing the shofar and asking
Almighty God to come and
anoint His people to minister
to the millions who are about
ready to receive the answer
to their prayers. Her sister,
Helen Kaverman, chronicles
her ride through phone calls
and e-mails.
BY HELEN KAVERMAN
Beth and her friends reached
Jefferson City, Mo., late on
Friday evening. After eating
KFC for supper on the side-
walk, they did their Glory Ride
around the state capitol. She
mentioned that the old three-
story railroad station nearby the
capitol was very impressive.
Following the ride they con-
tinued on into Illinois. (I had
to give her heck for not getting
enough sleep). They had to
sleep fast!
Upon arrival in Springfield,
Ill., they went to a horse show
where their 10-year-old friend
Liza was riding in competition.
They had stayed with Liza, her
mother and grandmother some
days back.
On Saturday night, they
camped at the fairgrounds at
Taylorville, a short distance
from Springfield. The horses
made their home in the show
arena.
Sunday, the Glory Riders
rode six horses in the Fourth
of July parade in Taylorville.
The pastor of a local church
rode with Beth, Berchett, Chris,
Kathy and Christian, while Joy
drove the truck on which they
flew the flag of the Lion of
Judah. It rained hard during
the parade so they got soaked.
The crowd said they made an
impressive presentation even if
they were soaking wet.
On Sunday night, they drove
to Springfield, where they did a
prayer ride around the Illinois
State Capitol. On Sunday night
the campers were guests of The
Way of Life Ministry Center in
Taylorville.
Monday just seemed to
slip away; they were still in
Illinois.
I should mention there is
more to the state of Illinois than
Chicago.
One of the most important
places in Chicago is the US
Navy Basic Training Center.
The Willis Tower (formerly
the Sears Tower) is the tallest
building.
The big Chicago Fire was
on the night of 8 October 1871.
Many Chicagoans feared it was
the end of the World.
Al Capone was one of
Chicago’s most notorious gang-
sters during the Prohibition
Era.
Some other facts about
Illinois are:
— Farms cover at least 65
percent of the rich black Illinois
soil. One source claims it’s as
high as 80 percent. The farmers
rank very high in the nation in
the production of soybeans and
corn. Cyrus McCormick was
one of Illinois’ most famous
inventers. He made farming
much easier.
— The Mississippi and Ohio
Rivers meet at the southern tip
of Illinois.
— Abraham Lincoln is
probably Illinois’ most famous
resident. He lived there from
1844 until he became presi-
dent in 1861. He is buried in
Springfield.
— Another U.S. president,
Ronald Reagan, was born in
Tampico, Ill., and grew up in
Dixon.
While in Springfield, Beth
and her friends took a walking
tour of the capitol and gover-
nor’s mansion. Beth said the
gardens were beautiful.
On Tuesday, the Glary
Riders went back to St. Louis,
Mo., arriving there about 7
p.m. The group was given a
room at the Marriott thanks
to two benevolent ladies from
Ohio, who even paid for their
meals. They were there for
and International Convention
of End Time Handmaidens of
the Lord.
Kathy Cassidy of
Washington state joined the
group for most of the week.
She flies back and forth to par-
ticipate.
The horses were housed at
the ACE Stables, where Beth
also parked her camper. Some
good Samaratin picked up the
tab for that also. They have
been getting lots of support.
Beth preferred to sleep in her
camper so she could keep and
eye on the horses, dogs and
goat. She did take advantage
of the hotel swimming pool
both days. Christian enjoyed
the pool also. The temperature
was good and hot.
On Thursday, The Glory
Riders started their prayer ride
at the Gateway Arch, then on
into downtown St. Louis. The
Gateway Arch was completed
in 1965. It is as wide as it is tall
— 630 feet in both dimensions
— the gateway to the West.
Some of the favorite sons of
Missouri are: Harry Truman,
Mark Twain, Scott Joplin and
Adolphus Busch. Jesse James
was probably their most notori-
ous resident.
Missouri became an inde-
pendent territory in 1812. In
1821, it became the 24th State
of the Union.
Some other notable facts
about Missouri are:
— Lewis & Clark began
their expedition in 1804 from
St. Louis and went up the
Missouri River to open a route
to the Pacific.
— There were large earth-
quakes along the New Madrid
fault in 1811 and 1812.
— Missouri is centrally
located in the Midwest. It bor-
ders on eight states.
— Baseball is important in
Missouri, with the St. Louis
Cardinals and the Kansas City
Royals.
— Kansas City has more
than 200 fountains, many
originally used to water horses.
Some claim that only Rome,
Italy, has more fountains.
—The Mississippi and
Missouri Rivers meet near St.
Louis.
— The area of Missouri,
south of US 44 is home to nine
locations of the Mark Twain
Forest and the beautiful Ozark
Mountains, especially the Ozark
National Scenic Riverways.
When I talked to Beth
Friday morning they were on
the road again, heading for
Indianapolis.
By the time Nancy Spencer
pulls this story off her com-
puter, Beth will probably be
home.
An old saying — “When
you turn a horse toward home,
there is no stopping it.”
Beth will probably be just
like that.
The group will make the
Metzger home north of Delphos
their headquarters while they
tour Ohio and Michigan.
Photos submitted
The governor’s mansion in Springfield, Ill. Standing in front are Chris Weller, Kathy
Cassidy and Christian Rodriquez.
Two of the Glory Riders on the streets of St. Louis with the Gateway Arc in the back-
ground.
Ohio tax breaks lead to 91 percent job success
COLUMBUS (AP) — An
Ohio program that offers com-
panies tax breaks to create jobs
has a 91 percent success rate,
according to data compiled by
the state.
Records released to The
Columbus Dispatch for a
Sunday report show that Ohio
has given incentives amount-
ing to about $525 million
through the Department of
Development’s job-creation
tax-credit program since 1993.
The money has gone toward
955 projects of which 875
have made it beyond the three-
year period during which com-
panies promise to meet certain
job and investment goals.
Overall, 91 percent of
promised jobs have material-
ized; of the 875 projects past
the three-year point, 92 percent
of promised jobs have been
created.
The newspaper reports that
the state also took 182 enforce-
ment actions in 2009 against
companies that did not make
good on promises. That com-
pares with 107 in 2008 and 18
in 2007. Officials also have
sought to retrieve about $10.6
million from 70 projects that
closed down before meeting
obligations.
More than 100 projects cre-
ated at least 50 fewer jobs
than promised without any
reported ramifications. Among
them is Ford Motor Co., which
received more than $1 million
in tax breaks for a 2002 project
to create 800 vehicle-produc-
tion jobs in Avon Lake. The
data says no jobs were creat-
ed. Ford moved production to
Missouri and tax breaks ended
at that time, officials said.
The newspaper notes that
officials said data from before
2005 may not be reliable,
because of a database switch.
Officials at the develop-
ment department are working
to make the data more accu-
rate with a $500,000 plan to
study and upgrade reporting
systems.
“I think we are moving
ahead, finally, in a direction
that I think is the right direc-
tion,” said Lisa Patt-McDaniel,
director of the Department of
Development. “But we still
have a ways to go, and it will
take more investment on our
part.”
Other moves by the state
include a law passed last year
that requires the attorney gen-
eral to survey each company
that was given a tax break from
July 2004 through June 2009.
The office has received
responses to about 2,000 of
the 3,310 surveys mailed in
October, and Attorney General
Richard Cordray aims for a
report by year’s end.
Since 2008, staff at the
development department have
created databases that track
projects receiving tax credits
since 1993, grants since 2001
and loans since 2002.
They show that 2,090 proj-
ects have been approved for
tax credits through February,
but not all approved compa-
nies get the breaks due to vari-
ous reasons, including failing
to sign a contract or to create
promised jobs.
Overall the state has antici-
pated tax breaks of about $1.6
billion since 1993, but only
about 40 percent of that has
been issued.
4A— The Herald Monday, July 12, 2010
POLITICS
“The tragedy is not that things are broken. The tragedy is that they are not mended
again.”
— Alan Paton (PAYT’-uhn), South African author (1903-1988)
www.delphosherald.com
IT WAS NEWS THEN
One Year Ago
• The Ohio Lincoln Highway has brought back some “Fun
Things to Do Along the Lincoln Highway” as prizes for the
upcoming winners of another Buy-Way yard sale scavenger
hunt – to be played during this year’s BUY-WAY Yard Sale.
This fun three-day shopping and touring event, Aug. 6, 7 and 8,
will showcase America’s first coast-to-coast highway.
25 Years Ago — 1985
• If Delphos Canal Days Planning Committee achieves its
goal, the old-time street fair will be revived Sept. 20, 21 and
22. Among events planned are an auction, sidewalk sales, quilt
show, children’s rides, bike show, food concessions, a 10-K
race, a band spectacular, arts and crafts shows, children’s
games, petting zoo and more.
• The Ohio City Lambert Days committee has announced
final plans for the three-day event to be held Aug. 2, 3 and 4.
The Band Parents will serve in the food and will be in charge
of the tent all three days. The countywide Legion will give the
opening ceremonies with Larry Schumm as featured speaker.
There will be a dance featuring Dave Kill and the Good Old
Boys in the big tent with a new wooden dance floor.
• Eric Horstman and Eric Mueller each went 4-for-4 to
lead the Astros to a 21-20 win over the Indiana in minor
league play. Horstman had a home run and Mueller had the
game-winning RBI. The Reds behind a good pitching outing
by Matt Kroeger and a strong team defense downed the Mets
9-3. Leading hitters for the Reds were Russ Sterling, double,
Adrian Smith, single, and Shaun Rumschlag, single.
50 Years Ago — 1960
• Delphos’ large woodworking concern, the Delphos Bending
Company, was organized just 60 years ago (in 1900) at its pres-
ent site on South Main Street by Louis C. Justus and H. J. North.
At the time of its founding, the company was known as the
Delphos Hoop Company and manufactured bent wood barrel
hoops. Wood needed in the manufacture of these early products
was obtained by floating logs down the Miami and Erie Canal
here into the saw mills. A few years later in 1908 there was a
re-organization by Justus and North and the company became
known as the Delphos Bending Company. The company then
manufactured buggy top bows and automobile top bows. With
the advent of the closed automobile body and the gradual decline
of use of wood parts in automobiles, the Delphos Bending
Company began to develop a juvenile furniture line in 1935
which has practically replaced the old automobile top and body
parts business. Delphos Bending Company has world-wide
sales. It has some export business but its products are distributed
primarily throughout the United States. One of Delphos’ oldest
industries, the Delphos Bending Company continues to expand
by adding new products year after year.
75 Years Ago — 1935
• Playing their first game under artificial lights, Miller’s
Opticians lost to Paulding in a game played at Paulding. The
final score was 4 to 2. Ralston started on the mound and held
the enemy well in check until the fourth frame. Bill Briggs
then took his place on the hill. Delphos scored a run in the first
inning when Jacomet doubled. Another run came in the second
when H. Clinger singled.
• The 1935 Delphos Fair will have more band music than
did any preceding fair here. The Delphos Eagles Band will
again be the official band of the fair and will provide music on
each of the days. Other bands which have been engaged for fair
week are the Jefferson High School Band, the Allen County
Community Band and the Spencerville High School Band.
• Plans for the Boy Scout entertainment to be present at St.
John’s auditorium July 17 are going forward nicely. Robert
Whittington will serve as soloist for the bugle corps opening
flag raising ceremony. Whittington and John Miller will play
special solos. Ed and Jim Clark and Carl Hotz will furnish
harmonica numbers. Bob Lindemann will be on program and
Donald Seymour and Ben Norbeck will play a trumpet duet.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
While they passed along no
U.S. secrets, the 10 Russian
sleeper agents involved in the
spy swap posed a potential
threat to the U.S. and received
“hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars” from Russia, Attorney
General Eric Holder said.
He defended the decision
to allow the 10 to return to
Russia in exchange for the
release of four Russian pris-
oners accused of spying for
the West because the swap
presented “an opportunity to
get back ... four people in
whom we have a great deal of
interest.”
White House press secretary
Robert Gibbs, sidestepping the
question of whether Russia’s
espionage poses a threat to the
U.S., said the swap came amid
improved relations between
the two countries.
“The economic discus-
sions that President (Dmitry)
Medvedev and President
Obama had just recently and
the progress that we’ve made
in reducing nuclear weapons
— and hopefully we’ll get a
treaty through Senate this sum-
mer that will further reduce
nuclear weapons — means our
security is stronger and safer
and our relationship is stron-
ger,” Gibbs said on NBC’s
“Meet the Press.”
Asked about the timing of
the arrests in the U.S., Holder
said one of the Russian agents
was preparing to leave the
country and there was con-
cern that “we would not be
able to get him back.” Holder
also mentioned “other opera-
tional considerations” that he
declined to reveal.
The Washington Post
reported Sunday that on the
day before the arrests, one of
the agents, Anna Chapman,
called her father in Moscow
and told him she suspected
her cover had been blown.
The Post article cited anony-
mous U.S. law enforcement
and intelligence sources.
Holder sought to erase con-
cern over the fate of the chil-
dren of the Russian agents,
saying they all were allowed
to return to Russia “consistent
with their parents wishes” or,
in the case of those who were
adults or nearly adults, were
allowed to make their own
choices of where to live.
“The children have all been
handled, I think, in an appro-
priate way,” he said.
The seven offspring
embroiled in the spy saga ranged
in age from a 1-year-old to a
38-year-old architect. In most
cases they were born and grew
up in the United States, making
them U.S. citizens.
On pending terrorism cases,
Holder acknowledged “there’s
a real question” as to whether
a terrorist suspect such as self-
professed Sept. 11 mastermind
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed
can face the death penalty if
he were to plead guilty before
a military commission.
Holder indicated he still
favors bringing Mohammed
and four alleged accomplices
before civilian courts, but that
has been met with opposition
in Congress and elsewhere.
He said no decision has been
made on where the trials will
be held or whether they would
be civilian or military.
He said one roadblock is
that Congress has yet to come
up with the money for the
trials. “The politicization of
this issue when we’re dealing
with ultimate national security
issues is something that dis-
turbs me a great deal,” Holder
said.
By LOLITA C. BALDOR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
Obama administration’s recent
move to drop rhetorical refer-
ences to Islamic radicalism is
drawing fire in a new report
warning the decision ignores
the role religion can play in
motivating terrorists.
Several prominent counter-
terror experts are challenging
the administration’s shift in
its recently unveiled National
Security Strategy, saying the
terror threat should be defined
in order to fight it.
The question of how to
frame the conflict against
al-Qaida and other terrorists
poses a knotty problem. The
U.S. is trying to mend fences
with Muslim communities
while toughening its strikes
against militant groups.
In the report, scheduled to
be released this week, coun-
terterrorism experts from the
Washington Institute for Near
East Policy argue that the
U.S. could clearly articulate
the threat from radical Islamic
extremists “without denigrat-
ing the Islamic religion in any
way.”
President Barack Obama
has argued that words mat-
ter, and administration offi-
cials have said that the use
of inflammatory descriptions
linking Islam to the terror
threat feed the enemy’s propa-
ganda and may alienate mod-
erate Muslims in the U.S.
In the report, which was
obtained by The Associated
Press, the analysts warn that
U.S. diplomacy must sharp-
en the distinction between
the Muslim faith and violent
Islamist extremism, identify
radicalizers within Islamic
communities and empower
voices that can contest the
radical teachings.
Militant Islamic propa-
ganda has reportedly been a
factor in a spate of recent ter-
ror attacks and foiled attempts
within the U.S. Maj. Nidal
Hasan, the suspect in the Fort
Hood, Texas, mass shootings
last year, is believed to have
been inspired by the Internet
postings of violent Islamic
extremists, as was Faisal
Shahzad, who pleaded guilty
to terrorism and weapons
charges in the May 1 attempt-
ed car bombing in New York’s
Times Square.
The report acknowledges
that the Obama administration
has beefed up efforts to work
with the Muslim community
in the U.S. and abroad and
has also expanded counterter-
rorism operations and tried to
erode and divide al-Qaida and
its affiliated groups.
As it unveiled its new
National Security Strategy
last May, administration offi-
cials said the shift in emphasis
was critical in undercutting
al-Qaida’s efforts to portray
its attacks on the U.S. and the
west as a justified holy war.
Terror leaders “play into
the false perception that they
are religious leaders defend-
ing a holy cause, when in fact
they are nothing more than
murderers, including the mur-
der of thousands upon thou-
sands of Muslims,” said top
administration counterterror
deputy John Brennan during a
May 24 speech explaining the
shift. He added that “describ-
ing our enemy in religious
terms would lend credence
to the lie — propagated by
al-Qaida and its affiliates to
justify terrorism — that the
United States is somehow at
war against Islam.”
But the administration’s
two-pronged approach of step-
ping up counterterror opera-
tions while tamping down its
rhetoric, the critics argue, needs
to also include an ideological
counteratteck with policies and
programs that empower moder-
ate Islamic voices and contest
extremist narratives.
“There is an ideology that is
driving al-Qaida and its affili-
ates,” said Matt Levitt, one of
the authors of the study on
countering violent extremism.
By ANDREW TAYLOR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Keeping unemployment ben-
efits flowing for millions of
workers whose jobs were
eaten by the recession should
have been a slam dunk in an
election year.
But until this month, Senate
Democrats have been unable
to bring themselves to pass
a simple bill that just does it.
Instead they’ve demanded a
series of unrelated and often
controversial tax and spend-
ing add-ons that have enabled
Republicans to mount suc-
cessful filibusters.
Now that the legislation has
been shorn of all the extras,
the bill could win final pas-
sage soon.
Hundreds of thousands of
workers unemployed for more
than six months started losing
the weekly checks in June and
it’s not clear when they could
resume.
But it can’t come soon
enough for more than 2 mil-
lion people whose checks have
been cut off in a five-month
impasse in which there’s plen-
ty of blame to go around:
— Democrats and their
leaders made several deci-
sions that in retrospect look
like miscalculations, like pull-
ing the rug out from under a
bipartisan measure launched
back in February and loading
a subsequent bill with $24 bil-
lion for governors — guaran-
teeing that most Republicans
would vote against it.
— Republican moderates
voted one way in March to
help the bill pass but changed
their minds just weeks later,
having gotten religion from
GOP leaders and tea partiers
on the budget deficit.
Little remembered amid
the ongoing partisanship and
recrimination is that jobless
benefits also got sideswiped
by President Barack Obama’s
health care overhaul.
To reduce the health care
bill’s impact on the deficit,
Democrats decided to close
almost $30 billion in tax loop-
holes. Until the final health
care push, those revenues had
been designated to cover the
cost of extending other popular
family and business tax breaks
as part of a broad bipartisan
jobless benefits package.
Besides the jobless aid, the
measure contained a payroll
tax holiday for businesses,
tax breaks for business, health
insurance subsidies and help
for doctors facing a cut in
their Medicaid payments.
It had support from across
the political spectrum, from
Obama to conservative Senate
Republicans.
Some liberals, however,
balked at the deal, which
was cut principally by Senate
Finance Committee Chairman
Max Baucus, D-Mont.,
and the committee’s senior
Republican, Sen. Charles
Grassley of Iowa. The liber-
als didn’t like that their “jobs
agenda” seemed hijacked by
business lobbyists, who won
items like research and devel-
opment tax credits and some
arcane measures such as tax
breaks for NASCAR tracks.
With unemployment hovering
just under 10 percent, they
also thought it was too light
on subsidies for preserving
and creating jobs.
So Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid blew up the agree-
ment, instead advancing a
pared-back jobs bill excusing
businesses from having to pay
the employer share of Social
Security taxes this year on
any new workers they hire.
Economists were dubious it
would produce many jobs.
Meanwhile, unemployment
aid would wait for later leg-
islation.
“We could have had this
bill passed in three days and
... Reid decided to scuttle it,”
Grassley complained. “Baucus
read about it in the paper.”
The delays meant that
Congress had to pass a short-
term extension of jobless ben-
efits at the end of February.
Reid and Senate Minority
Leader Mitch McConnell,
R-Ky., worked out a deal for
a quick vote to avoid an inter-
ruption in benefits.
By MARK SHERMAN
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Justice
Anthony Kennedy, who
already decides whether lib-
erals or conservatives win the
Supreme Court’s most closely
contested cases, is about to
take on an even more influ-
ential behind-the-scenes role
with the retirement of Justice
John Paul Stevens.
By virtue of seniority,
Kennedy will inherit Stevens’
power to choose the author
of some court opinions, an
authority that has historically
been used — including in as
big a case as the landmark Roe
v. Wade abortion decision —
to subtly shape a ruling or
preserve a tenuous majority.
This change might keep
the court’s most liberal jus-
tices from writing some of its
biggest decisions.
An unwritten high court
rule gives the senior justice
in the majority, most often
the chief justice, the power to
assign opinions.
When the liberals win
an ideologically driven case
by a 5-4 vote, the court’s
two senior justices — Chief
Justice John Roberts and
Justice Antonin Scalia, both
conservatives — are sure to
be on the losing side. With
Stevens gone, Kennedy now
is next in line.
The overall balance of
power on the court is unlike-
ly to change, with President
Barack Obama’s choice of
Elena Kagan to replace the
liberal-leaning Stevens.
But a former Bush admin-
istration solicitor general,
Paul Clement, said putting
the power to assign opin-
ions in Kennedy’s hands is
the “single most important
dynamic change” brought on
by Stevens’ departure.
David Garrow, a
Cambridge University histo-
rian who has written about
the court, said the 74-year-
old Kennedy already writes a
disproportionate share of the
court’s big decisions and will
have even more chances to do
so now because he can assign
opinions to himself.
As if to emphasize
Kennedy’s increasing clout,
he and Scalia now will sit on
either side of Roberts when
the justices take the bench for
their new term in October.
Like most things at the court,
the seating is by seniority. The
justices who have been there
longest sit on either side of the
chief justice, who wields the
gavel regardless of tenure.
Scalia, a justice since 1986,
now is the longest-serving.
He occasionally will get to
assign an opinion, but typi-
cally not in the big cases that
split the liberals and conser-
vatives. Kennedy has been on
the court since 1988.
Handing an opinion to the
least committed member of a
narrow majority is the most
obvious and important use of
assigning power, several for-
mer high court law clerks said.
“You figure that justice will feel
compelled to stay on board,”
said Michael Dorf, former law
clerk to Kennedy who teaches
law at Cornell University.
In an important free speech
case in 1971, the justices
voted 5-4 to overturn a crimi-
nal conviction for wearing
a jacket with a phrase that
used a four-letter expletive
to oppose the military draft.
Justice William O. Douglas
“immediately assigned it to
John Marshall Harlan who
was clearly the weakest link,”
said Lucas A. “Scot” Powe
Jr., a Texas law professor who
was a law clerk for Douglas.
Sometimes justices have
used their power in more mis-
chievous ways.
Chief Justice Warren
Burger’s colleagues used to
complain that he occasionally
changed his vote — after jus-
tices declared their positions at
their closed-door conferences
— just to retain the ability to
assign opinions. Justice William
Brennan, the court’s senior mem-
ber for many years, “thought
Burger was manipulative in
his use of assigning power,”
said University of Chicago law
professor Geoffrey Stone, who
worked for Brennan.
Moderately confused
Obama wants to deny
Islam’s role in terrorism
How 2 million lost jobless benefits
Spies only posed
potential threat
Kennedy’s clout could grow on high court
Monday, July 12, 2010 The Herald – 5A
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
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Office: (419) 238-5555
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LEAVING A LEGACY:
TAX-FREE INCOME FOR YOUR HEIRS
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Have you made plans to pass your assets to your heirs? If you
haven’t, consider the benefits of converting your traditional
IRA to a Roth IRA. With a Roth IRA, you can pass along your
money – tax free – to your heirs and potentially allow them
to enjoy more tax-free growth after inheritance.
There are tax considerations and other factors that deter-
mine whether converting to a Roth IRA is right for you. And
changes set for 2010 will eliminate the $100,000 modified
adjusted gross income (MAGI) limit, which means anyone
can convert to a Roth IRA.
Call today to schedule an appointment to learn more.
We’ll discuss your wealth transfer goals to help deter-
mine if an IRA conversion makes sense for you.
Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors do not provide tax or legal advice.
Please contact a qualified tax or legal professional regarding your particular situation.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
LEAVING A LEGACY:
TAX-FREE INCOME FOR YOUR HEIRS
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Have you made plans to pass your assets to your heirs? If you
haven’t, consider the benefits of converting your traditional
IRA to a Roth IRA. With a Roth IRA, you can pass along your
money – tax free – to your heirs and potentially allow them
to enjoy more tax-free growth after inheritance.
There are tax considerations and other factors that deter-
mine whether converting to a Roth IRA is right for you. And
changes set for 2010 will eliminate the $100,000 modified
adjusted gross income (MAGI) limit, which means anyone
can convert to a Roth IRA.
Call today to schedule an appointment to learn more.
We’ll discuss your wealth transfer goals to help deter-
mine if an IRA conversion makes sense for you.
Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors do not provide tax or legal advice.
Please contact a qualified tax or legal professional regarding your particular situation.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Allen County Courthouse
July 13
Joey Bonito
Amy Heitmeyer
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
6 p.m. — Middle Point
Village Council meets
7-9 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
will be open.
7 p.m. — Marion Township
trustees at township house.
7:30 p.m. — American
Legion Auxiliary meets at the
American Legion hall, State
Street.
Delphos Eagles Aerie 471
meets at the Eagles Lodge.
Middle Point council meets
at town hall.
8 p.m. — Delphos City
Schools Board of Education
meets at the administration
office.
Delphos Knights of
Columbus meet at the K of
C hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
Delphos Fire Association
Steak Feed at the clubhouse
in Leisure Park. The public
is invited.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Lions Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. — Delphos City
Council meets at the munici-
pal building, 608 N. Canal
St.
7:30 p.m. — Ottoville
Emergency Medical Service
members meet at the munici-
pal building.
Ottoville VFW Auxiliary
members meet at the hall.
Fort Jennings Local School
District board members meet
at the high school library.
Alcoholics Anonymous,
First Presbyterian Church,
310 W. Second St.
Price to celebrate
95 with open house
Mildred Price of Rimer
turned 95 in April.
Her family is helping her
celebrate with an open house
from 2-4 p.m. Saturday at
the Ottawa River Church in
Rimer.
Mildred always enjoyed
camping, traveling, her grand-
children, family visits and
crossword puzzles. She was
a homemaker and an excel-
lent seamstress. She spent her
summers canning and freez-
ing vegetables and fruits that
she grew in her large garden.
Price was born April 9,
1915, in Putnam County to
Tommie and Lorena Thomas.
She married Carlyle Price
on Jan. 1, 1935, at the Ottawa
River Church Parsonage.
They celebrated 67 years of
marriage before Carlyle died
May 11, 2002.
She has a son, Tommie
(Kathleen) Price of Key
Colongy Beach, Fla., and a
daughter, Lorene (Robert)
Wehrly of Tavares, Fla.,
two daughters-in-law, Nancy
Price of Rimer of Sue Price-
McMullen of Farmington
Hills, Mich., and 12 grand-
children, four stepgrandchil-
dren, 35 great-grandchildren/
stepgreat-grandchildren and
33 great-great-grandchildren/
stepgreat-great-grandchildren
She was preceded in death
by two sons, Ronald and
Duane Price; two grandsons;
and a brother, Ray Thomas.
Price
Edelbrock graduates from
patrol Junior Cadet Program
A local resident recently
completed training for the
Ohio State Highway Patrol’s
Junior Cadet Program held
June 21-25 at the Highway
Patrol Training Academy in
Columbus.
Ryan Edelebrock, son of
Mike and Karen Edelbrock of
Delphos, was one of 42 Junior
Cadet participants selected
from applications submitted
by young men and women
who attended Buckeye Boys
and Girls State earlier in
June, exhibited exemplary
performance throughout the
previous school year, or eligi-
ble children of patrol employ-
ees who will be high school
seniors this year.
The Junior Cadet Program
is designed to give young
people better insight into
the challenges faced by law
enforcement officers be
enabling them to experience
a typical week at the training
academy. To enhance their
learning experience, junior
cadets are required to spend
the entire week at the acad-
emy, sleeping in dormitories
and dining in the cafeteria.
While at the academy, they
gain knowledge from patrol
academy staff regarding crash
investigation, officer/violator
contacts, self-defense tac-
tics, K-9 operations, building
searches, motorcycle opera-
tions, impaired driver appre-
hension and military drill.
Colonel David W. Dicken,
superintendent of the Ohio
State Highway Patrol, pre-
sented graduation certificates
to the young men and women
who participated in the pro-
gram at a ceremony at the
academy. Family of friends
of the cadets were also in
attendance.
Edelbrock
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H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
as rated by engine manufacturer
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Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges
may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
CUB CADET COMMERCIAL 2009 COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDER
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25 HP
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H.G. VIOLET EQUIPMENT
2103 NORTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 334
DELPHOS, OH
(419) 695-2000
1
as rated by engine manufacturer
2
Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges
may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
CUB CADET COMMERCIAL 2009 COMMERCIAL ZERO-TURN RIDER
CUB CADET 2010 LAWN TRACTOR
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6A – The Herald Monday, July 12, 2010
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By ALAN ROBINSON
The Associated Press
OAKMONT, Pa. — Her
left hand so badly injured
she couldn’t play
for four months, the
future of her golf-
ing career in doubt,
Paula Creamer found
relief by turning on
her DVD player.
She wasn’t inter-
ested in watching a movie or a
concert. Instead, she carefully
studied Angel Cabrera hold
off competitor after competi-
tor to win the 2007 U.S. Open
at rugged-as-it-gets Oakmont
Country Club.
Creamer, an 8-time LPGA
winner but never the cham-
pion of a major, calculated
how to putt on Oakmont’s
often-diabolical greens late in
a tournament. But she also
took time to imagine win-
ning the U.S. Women’s Open
at Oakmont, even if such a
victory seemed illogical at
best given the severity of her
injury and the length of her
recovery.
Wonder of wonders,
Creamer surprised even
herself with the ease of her
4-stroke victory that she
completed Sunday despite a
thumb that is only 60 percent
healthy and a reputation for
winning lesser tournaments
but not a big one.
In women’s golf, this is as
big as it gets.
“I believed I could do this,
even when I had a cast on
my hand,” Creamer said, her
smile as bright as her all-pink
attire. “That’s just what I kept
thinking about — Oakmont,
Oakmont, Oakmont. And here
we are. It’s amazing how,
when you put a plan together,
sometimes it works out.”
But how could she pos-
sibly plan this?
Limited to 40 practice
shots a day because
her still-healing
hyperextended left
thumb swells badly,
Creamer was forced
to play 52 holes over
the final two days —
29 on Saturday, 23
on Sunday — after Friday’s
heavy rains suspended play.
That was far more punish-
ment than she expected, espe-
cially on a course so physi-
cally demanding.
Perhaps adjusting her game
to a still-healing hand forced
her to focus on the basics and
steered thoughts away from
all the doubts that can creep
into a golfer’s head, especial-
ly one who hasn’t excelled in
majors.
This time, she couldn’t
have played better or with
more consistency. She
went 72-70-70-69 to fin-
ish at 3-under 281, the only
golfer below par. She began
the final round off a birdie
on No. 18 during the early
morning completion of the
third round and her 4-shot
lead never dropped below two
shots even as Na Yeon Choi
of South Korea pushed her
with a final-round 66.
Choi and Suzann Pettersen
of Norway tied for second at
1-over 285. In Kyung Kim,
also of South Korea, was
alone in fourth place at 286.
“It shows you how much
the mental side of golf can
really take over,” Creamer
added.
Creamer’s two biggest
confidence-building shots
might have been long, par-
saving putts on No. 7 and 8.
She effectively wrapped it up
by hitting to within 10 feet
out of the thick rough on the
par-4 14th and dropping a
10-footer for birdie.
Only she didn’t know it;
she never looked at a leader
board until the 18th. She hit
another exceptional mid-iron
to 4 feet on the 442-yard 15th
and made that, too.
Now, she doesn’t have
to hear she’s the best LPGA
golfer not to win a major.
She won eight tournaments
by age 21 but, bothered by the
worsening thumb injury, she
hadn’t won since 2008.
Creamer, a Pleasanton,
Calif., native, is only the sec-
ond American in six years to
win the U.S. Women’s Open.
After years of domina-
tion by international golfers,
primarily the South Koreans,
Creamer and Cristie Kerr have
won the last two majors. Kerr
won the LPGA championship
by 12 shots three weeks ago
but never developed a con-
sistent game at Oakmont and
placed 17th.
Another encouraging
development for American
golf: Alexis Thompson, only
15, was one of the longest
hitters while finishing 10th
in her fourth Women’s Open.
Brittany Lang also was steady
with a pair of 69s while tying
for fifth.
Now, Creamer can provide
motivation to golfers who
believe they can’t overcome
adversity or misfortune. After
reinjuring her thumb in the
first LPGA tournament of the
season in Thailand, she was
worried her game wouldn’t
recover.
Despite her prior success,
there were no suggestions she
could play this well in only
her fourth tournament since
returning. She was 42nd at
the LPGA Championship and
she missed the cut last week
at the Jamie Farr Classic.
John Deere Classic
SILVIS, Ill. — Steve Stricker
defended his title, holding on for
a 2-shot victory after leading by
seven strokes.
Stricker shot a 1-under 70 in
the final round to finish at 26-under
258. He edged Paul Goydos, who
dazzled the golf world with a 59 in
the opening round.
Stricker entered the last round
having set a 54-hole PGA Tour
record and ahead by six strokes.
He went up by seven after a birdie
on the first hole.
Stricker had to battle the rest
of the way but sealed his victory
with a 6-foot birdie putt on No. 17.
Goydos’ final chance ended when
he hit into the water on No. 18.
Scottish Open
LUSS, Scotland — Edoardo
Molinari of Italy claimed his first
European Tour victory, shooting
a 3-over 74 to beat Darren Clarke
by three shots.
Scoring was very high after a
long spell of rain in the morning
at Loch Lomond, where Molinari
finished at 12-under 272.
Clarke, of Northern Ireland,
had begun the day a shot behind
Molinari but had a 76.
Frenchman Raphael Jacquelin
closed with a 68 to place third at
8 under.
Wayne Gretzky Classic
CLARKSBURG, Ontario —
Peter Tomasulo shot a 10-under
61 to come from eight shots back
and win on the Nationwide Tour
by one stroke over rookie Keegan
Bradley.
The 28-year old Tomasulo ral-
lied on the final day, racing by the
leaders to finish with a 24-under
total 261 at the Georgian Bay
Club.
Bradley birdied the final hole
for a 6-under 65 to finished in
second. Kevin Chappell, who held
a 5-stroke lead after three days,
managed a 70 to wind up at 22
under and in third place.
Thumb’s up: injured Creamer
wins US Women’s Open
By JEROME PUGMIRE
The Associated Press
MORZINE, France —
Lance Armstrong promised to
shake things up in the French
Alps but the 7-time Tour de
France champion was feeling
shaken after one of his worst
ever days racing.
Armstrong used to be the
one punishing others when
the Tour hit the harsh moun-
tains but Armstrong suffered
the frustration his vanquished
rivals once felt as his Tour bid
fell apart.
The 38-year-old Texan fin-
ished Sunday’s eighth stage
so far back in 61st place that
his ambitions to win an eighth
Tour evaporated in the stifling
heat as he dragged his battered
body up mountain passes he
used to glide up.
“Obviously the Tour’s fin-
ished for me,” Armstrong said
after Luxembourg rider Andy
Schleck won the stage to move
just 20 seconds behind overall
race leader Cadel Evans of
Australia.
This chaotic Tour has been
among the most dangerous in
recent years and Armstrong is
more than 13 minutes behind
Evans ahead of today’s much-
needed rest day.
Rather than think about
Tour win No. 8, Armstrong is
already in reminiscence mode
with two full weeks still to go
until Paris — whose streets
Armstrong used to swagger
down swilling Champagne.
The fist-pumping, hands-
in-the-air showmanship of
Armstrong’s glory era from
1999-2005 — when he used to
smash rivals to pieces — came
to a brutal end on a ferocious
day of climbing that proved
too much for Armstrong’s
aging legs and tired mind to
take.
Armstrong is in no doubt
that, with a bad hip and a
deficit of 13 minutes, 26 sec-
onds on Evans — and with
more punishing Alpine climbs
to come and the even-harder
Pyrenees — he may as well
enjoy his last days in France.
Long gone are the days
when Armstrong and his “Blue
Train” — the name given to
his former U.S. Postal team-
mates — would control the
race and bash rivals merci-
lessly.
On Sunday, Armstrong
was the one getting bashed, or
“pegged” as he called it.
His team was scattered
all over a 117.4-mile trek
from Station des Rousses to
Morzine-Avoriaz that featured
two steep climbs and an uphill
finish.
Postal’s sleek Blue Train
has been replaced by a mixture
of RadioShack veterans past
their prime — like Andreas
Kloeden and Chris Horner —
and young aspirants like Janez
Brajkovic lacking the experi-
ence to salvage tough situa-
tions.
Armstrong’s glittering
career may never be matched
by the likes of defending cham-
pion Alberto Contador — who
has two Tour wins at the age of
27 — and most certainly never
will by Evans or Schleck.
But the trio sensed that they
could destroy Armstrong’s
Tour hopes and the opportu-
nity was too good to miss.
The Tour 1-2-3 reads
Evans-Schleck-Contador.
Armstrong is 39th.
Armstrong’s day started
with a near miss, then came a
brutal crash.
Schleck, meanwhile, pulled
clear with less than a mile to
go and won a 2-man sprint
ahead of Samuel Sanchez of
Spain.
Contador and Evans were
10 seconds back of Schleck,
while Armstrong trailed 11:45
behind a man 13 years his
junior.
Armstrong’s day started
badly — an early-morning
anti-doping control he tweeted
about — and then became an
unfolding nightmare.
With breakaway riders set-
ting a frenetic pace early on,
Armstrong narrowly averted
a spill as he veered onto the
roadside grass. Evans fell but
quickly recovered.
Then about two-thirds of
the way through, with the
daunting La Ramaz pass loom-
ing, Armstrong tumbled — he
clipped his pedal and a tire
rolled off — as he rode through
a roundabout in the fast-mov-
ing pack. He got another bike
and returned to the race with
the back of his jersey torn,
his skin scratched and seeping
blood that quickly dried in the
95-degree heat.
With only Horner helping
him, Armstrong got dropped
up La Ramaz by Schleck,
Contador and Evans.
Approaching the final
ascent up to Morzine-Avoriaz,
Armstrong had to brake hard
— which he did easily — to
avoid a rider who fell in front
of him and a couple more who
slipped on either side of him.
Then, he stood still, peering
at the sprawled riders laying
on the boiling tarmac and — at
that moment and with no anger
— understood that the Tour
finally conquered him.
Lance Armstrong finally
resigned to Tour defeat
The Associated Press
National League
PHILADELPHIA — Cole
Hamels tossed 6-hit ball into
the eighth inning, Jimmy
Rollins drove in the only run
and the Philadelphia Phillies
completed a 4-game sweep
of the NL West-leading
Cincinnati Reds
with a 1-0 win
Sunday.
Hamels (7-7)
struck out three,
walked three and
didn’t allow a run for the first
time in 18 starts this season.
J.C. Romero fanned the only
batter he faced in the ninth
and Brad Lidge got the final
two outs for his sixth save.
It’s the first time
Philadelphia has had con-
secutive 1-0 wins since April
18-19, 1913, according to the
Elias Sports Bureau. Rollins
won Saturday’s game with an
11th inning single after Reds
starter Travis Wood took a
perfect game into the ninth.
Mets 3, Braves 0
NEW YORK — Johan Santana
went seven innings in another spot-
less start and rookie Ike Davis hit
a long home run to help the Mets
avoid a 3-game sweep by their NL
East rival.
Alex Cora and pinch-hitter Josh
Thole delivered RBI singles with two
outs and Angel Pagan had three of
New York’s 13 hits. The Mets also
got flawless relief work from Bobby
Parnell and Francisco Rodriguez in
their major league-best 13th shut-
out.
Santana (7-5) outpitched Derek
Lowe (9-8), who lasted 5 1/3 innings.
Marlins 2, Diamondbacks 0
PHOENIX — Jorge Cantu dou-
bled in a run and Dan Ugla had an
RBI single for the Marlins.
Burke Badenhop (1-5) threw
just two pitches in relief of starter
Alex Sanabia but got the victory.
Relievers Brian Sanches, Jose
Veras and Clay Hensley also were
part of the shutout before
Leo Nunez threw the
ninth for his 20th save in
25 opportunities.
The Diamondbacks
outhit Florida 8-5 but
were stung by three
double plays, one with
the bases loaded, and stranded six
runners. Barry Enright (1-2) allowed
both runs in five innings.
Padres 9, Rockies 7
DENVER — Matt Belisle’s
bases-loaded throwing error led to
two unearned runs in the eighth
inning and Everth Cabrera hit his
first homer of the season in the ninth
for San Diego.
Scott Hairston matched a career
high with four hits in helping the
NL West-leading Padres gain
a 2-game cushion over second-
place Colorado. Heath Bell got the
five outs for his 24th save in 27
chances.
Belisle (4-4) ended up with the
loss, while reliever Luke Gregerson
(3-5) earned the win.
Giants 6, Nationals 2
WASHINGTON — Travis
Ishikawa drove in three runs,
Madison Bumgarner took a shutout
into the seventh inning and the
Giants won for the seventh time in
nine games.
Buster Posey had two RBIs for
San Francisco, while Bumgarner
(2-2) allowed a run and seven hits
in 6-plus innings, walked none and
struck out six. Brian Wilson got the
final four outs for his 23rd save in
25 tries.
Washington’s Livan Hernandez
(6-5) struggled through five innings,
yielding five runs and five hits. He
walked two and struck out four.
Pirates 6, Brewers 5
MILWAUKEE — Corey Hart hit
a 2-run homer in the ninth to give
Brewers a 3-game sweep and hand
Pittsburgh its sixth straight loss.
The Brewers trailed 5-4 when
pinch-hitter Jim Edmonds led off
the ninth with a ground-rule double
off Octavio Dotel (2-2). An out later,
Hart belted one over the wall in left.
John Axford (5-1) allowed a run in
the ninth but picked up the win.
Cardinals 4, Astros 2
HOUSTON — Matt Holliday
hit a 3-run homer, Colby Rasmus
drove in a run with a pinch-hit single
and the Cardinals finally solved the
Astros’ Wandy Rodriguez.
Blake Hawksworth (3-5) yielded
seven hits and two runs in 5 1/3
innings for the win. Closer Ryan
Franklin pitched a scoreless ninth for
his 16th save in 17 opportunities.
Wandy Rodriguez (6-11) retired
the first 10 batters he faced before
allowing four hits and three runs
with six strikeouts.
Dodgers 7, Cubs 0
LOS ANGELES — Vicente
Padilla pitched eight innings of 2-hit
ball and James Loney hit a 3-run
homer off Carlos Silva before the
Cubs pitcher was ejected in the sec-
ond inning of baseball’s last game
before the All-Star break.
Padilla (4-2) struck out six and
walked one in his longest outing of
the seasons.
-----
American League
CHICAGO — Carlos Quentin hit
a grand slam and a solo homer and
the Chicago White Sox surged into
first place in the American League
Central with a 15-5 win over the
Kansas City Royals on Sunday.
Andruw Jones hit his 400th
career homer during a 7-run,
4-homer third inning for Chicago.
Alex Rios and Dayan Viciedo also
homered for the White Sox (49-38).
Tony Pena (3-1) pitched 3-hit ball
for three innings.
Royals starter Anthony Lerew
(1-3), subbing for Zack Greinke
(sore shoulder), got two outs in the
third inning, then was tagged for
four home runs.
Red Sox 3, Blue Jays 2
TORONTO — Darnell McDonald
and David Ortiz hit back-to-back
home runs, Daisuke Matsuzaka
won for the first time in more than
a month and Boston beat the Blue
Jays.
Matsuzaka (6-3) allowed two
runs and six hits in 6-plus innings.
He struck out five. Marco Scutaro
ended Jesse Litsch’s no-hit bid in
the sixth with a 2-out double to
right-center. Litsch (0-4) then gave
up homers to McDonald and Ortiz
but Boston lost All-Star 3B Adrian
Beltre in the sixth with a strained left
hamstring.
Twins 6, Tigers 3
DETROIT — Michael Cuddyer
drove in a pair of runs and Carl
Pavano pitched into the eighth
inning, helping slumping Minnesota
snap a 4-game skid.
Pavano (10-6) allowed three
runs on six hits in 7 2/3 innings.
He walked one and struck out six
before turning it over to Jon Rauch,
who pitched a scoreless ninth for his
20th save in 24 tries.
Andrew Oliver (0-3) gave up
four runs on five hits and four walks
in 4 2/3 innings.
Yankees 8, Mariners 2
SEATTLE — CC Sabathia
allowed a run in seven innings and
joined Tampa Bay’s David Price as
the only 12-game winners in the
American League as the Yankees
roughed up Seattle.
After consecutive singles from
Casey Kotchman and Justin Smoak
in the second inning, Sabathia (12-
3) set down the next 11 before
Michael Saunders’ single leading
off the sixth.
Meanwhile, the Yankees rocked
Ryan Rowland-Smith for six hits
and six runs in just four innings.
Rowland-Smith (1-9) wasn’t helped
by two errors that allowed two
unearned runs in the first inning.
Rays 6, Indians 5, 10 innings
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. —
Jason Bartlett hit a game-ending
single over a drawn-in outfield in the
10th, giving Tampa Bay a win.
Ben Zobrist opened the 10th
with a single off Kerry Wood (1-4)
and later was forced at second by
Carl Crawford. After Crawford stole
second, Evan Longoria was inten-
tionally walked. Bartlett then won it
with a long single to right-center.
Crawford homered for the Rays.
Athletics 5, Angels 2
OAKLAND, Calif. — Jack Cust
homered, Adam Rosales added a
2-run single and the Athletics beat
the Angels.
Trevor Cahill (9-3), Oakland’s
lone All-Star representative before
closer Andrew Bailey was added
to the roster Sunday, scattered
five hits over seven innings. Cahill
worked out of a bases-loaded, no-
out jam in the sixth without allowing
a run to earn the win.
Bobby Abreu homered for the
second straight day for the Angels.
Jared Weaver (8-5) lost for only the
second time in his last six starts.
Since he also pitched Sunday,
Weaver was taken off and replaced
by Bailey, who pitched a scoreless
ninth for his 18th save.
Orioles 4, Rangers 1
ARLINGTON, Texas — Corey
Patterson had another big hit against
Texas, rookie Jake Arrieta pitched
into the seventh and Baltimore com-
pleted a 4-game series sweep of the
AL West-leading Rangers.
Arrieta (3-2) limited Texas to one
run and six hits over 6 1/3 innings.
C.J. Wilson (7-5) threw only 60 of
his 111 pitches for strikes during an
inconsistent 4 2/3 innings. The left-
hander struck out five, walked five
and threw three wild pitches.
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AT YOUR
Monday, July 12, 2010 The Herald —7A
www.delphosherald.com
Today’s Games
Buckeye Boys Pony League
Grover Hill vs. Middle Point, 8 p.m.
Middle Point-Field A
Tri-County Little League Tournament
Greif Rangers vs. Delphos Pirates, 6
p.m. Smiley Park-Field 3
VFW Cardinals vs. Delpha Chevy
Reds, 7:45 p.m. Smiley Park-Field 3
Delphos Minor League Tournament
Dodgers vs. Reds, 6 p.m. LL
Orioles vs. Tigers, 6 p.m. Dia. 4
Indians vs. Pirates, 8 p.m. LL
Cubs vs. Mets, 8 p.m. Dia. 4
Tuesday’s Games
Buckeye Boys Pony League
Payne vs. Convoy, 6 p.m. Convoy
Wren vs. Grover Hill, 6 p.m. Grover
Hill
Middle Point vs. Ohio City, 6 p.m. Ohio
City-Fireman’s Field
Van Wert Elks vs. VW Alspach-
Gearhart, 6 p.m. Smiley Park-Field 3
Delphos Minor League Tournament
Dodgers/Reds winner vs. Indians/
Pirates winner, 6 p.m. LL
Orioles/Tigers winner vs. Cubs/Mets
winner, 8 p.m. LL
Wednesday’s Games
Tri-County Little League Championship
Finals
Greif Rangers/Delphos Pirates win-
ner vs. VFW Cardinals/Delpha Chevy
Reds winner, 6:30 p.m. Smiley Park-
Field 2
Thursday’s Games
Delphos Minor League Tournament
Finals
Dodgers/Reds-Indians/Pirates winner
vs. Orioles/Tigers-Cubs/Mets winner,
6 p.m. LL
1st Round of Buckeye Pony League
Tournament, 6 p.m. Payne Community
Park
Tri-County All-Star Game, 7 p.m.
Smiley Park-Field 2
1st Round of Buckeye PL Tournament,
8 p.m. Payne Community Park
Friday’s Games
1st Round of Buckeye PL Tournament,
6 p.m. Payne Community Park
1st Round of Buckeye PL Tournament,
8 p.m. Payne Community Park
Saturday’s Games
2nd Round of Buckeye PL Tournament,
4:30 p.m. Payne Community Park
2nd Round of Buckeye PL Tournament,
7 p.m. Payne Community Park
Sunday’s Game
Championship of Buckeye PL
Tournament, 6 p.m. Payne Community
Park
YOUTH BASEBALL
The Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 52 36 .591 —
New York 48 40 .545 4
Philadelphia 47 40 .540 4 1/2
Florida 42 46 .477 10
Washington 39 50 .438 13 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 49 41 .544 —
St. Louis 47 41 .534 1
Milwaukee 40 49 .449 8 1/2
Chicago 39 50 .438 9 1/2
Houston 36 53 .404 12 1/2
Pittsburgh 30 58 .341 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Diego 51 37 .580 —
Colorado 49 39 .557 2
Los Angeles 49 39 .557 2
San Francisco 47 41 .534 4
Arizona 34 55 .382 17 1/2
———
Saturday’s Results
Atlanta 4, N.Y. Mets 0
Chicago Cubs 7, L.A. Dodgers 3
Philadelphia 1, Cincinnati 0, 11
innings
San Francisco 10, Washington 5
Houston 4, St. Louis 1
Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 3
Arizona 5, Florida 4
Colorado 4, San Diego 2
Sunday’s Results
N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 0
Philadelphia 1, Cincinnati 0
San Francisco 6, Washington 2
St. Louis 4, Houston 2
Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 5
San Diego 9, Colorado 7
Florida 2, Arizona 0
L.A. Dodgers 7, Chicago Cubs 0
Today’s Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday’s Game
All-Star Game at Anaheim, CA, 8:05
p.m.
----
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 56 32 .636 —
Tampa Bay 54 34 .614 2
Boston 51 37 .580 5
Toronto 44 45 .494 12 1/2
Baltimore 29 59 .330 27
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 49 38 .563 —
Detroit 48 38 .558 1/2
Minnesota 46 42 .523 3 1/2
Kansas City 39 49 .443 10 1/2
Cleveland 34 54 .386 15 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 50 38 .568 —
Los Angeles 47 44 .516 4 1/2
Oakland 43 46 .483 7 1/2
Seattle 35 53 .398 15
———
Saturday’s Results
Toronto 9, Boston 5
Detroit 7, Minnesota 4
Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 1
Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0
Baltimore 6, Texas 1
Oakland 15, L.A. Angels 1
Seattle 4, N.Y. Yankees 1
Sunday’s Results
Minnesota 6, Detroit 3
Boston 3, Toronto 2
Tampa Bay 6, Cleveland 5, 10
innings
Chicago White Sox 15, Kansas City
5
Baltimore 4, Texas 1
Oakland 5, L.A. Angels 2
N.Y. Yankees 8, Seattle 2
Today’s Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday’s Game
All-Star Game at Anaheim, CA, 8:05
p.m.
MLB
Standings
Buckeye Boys Pony League
Team Record Win % GB Home Away RF RA Last 10 Streak
Wren 6-1 .857 - 2-1 4-0 110 43 6-1 Won 4
Ohio City 9-2 .818 - 3-2 6-0 115 44 8-2 Won 2
Payne 6-4 .600 1.5 3-2 3-2 100 62 6-4 Lost 1
VW Alspach-Gearhart 7-5 .583 1.5 2-4 5-1 116 90 6-4 Lost 2
Grover Hill 5-5 .500 2.5 2-2 3-3 75 62 5-5 Won 2
Convoy 5-7 .417 3.5 4-2 1-5 94 101 4-6 Won 1
Van Wert Elks 3-7 .300 4.5 2-4 1-3 71 122 3-7 Lost 1
Middle Point 0-10 .000 7.5 0-6 0-4 28 183 0-10 Lost 10
Tri-County Little League
Team Record Win % GB Home Away RF RA Last 10 Streak
Delphos Pirates 18-1 .947 - 9-1 9-0 184 56 9-1 Won 5
Delpha Chevy Reds 15-5 .750 3.5 6-4 9-1 149 61 9-1 Won 9
K of C Indians 14-5 .737 4 7-3 7-2 156 82 8-2 Lost 1
Greif Rangers 13-6 .684 5 7-3 6-3 140 74 7-3 Won 1
VFW Cardinals 12-7 .632 6 7-3 5-4 150 71 7-3 Won 3
1st Federal Athletics 9-11 .450 9.5 6-3 3-8 125 129 3-7 Lost 1
Delphos Braves 7-12 .368 11 5-5 2-7 169 135 3-7 Lost 1
Ft.Jennings Musketeers 5-14 .263 13 3-8 2-6 104 205 3-7 Lost 2
Eaton White Sox 2-17 .105 16 1-7 1-10 68 193 2-8 Lost 6
Young’s Waste Ser.Yankees 1-18 .053 17 0-9 1-9 45 281 0-10 Lost 17
Inner County League
Team Record Win % GB Home Away RF RA Last 10 Streak
Middle Point 13-3 .813 - 5-3 8-0 163 44 10-0 Won 10
VW Vision Cubs 13-3 .813 - 7-2 6-1 122 28 8-2 Won 3
Convoy Rockies 11-5 .688 2 6-1 5-4 121 58 6-4 Lost 1
Optimist Reds 11-5 .688 2 6-3 5-2 91 50 7-3 Lost 1
Convoy Dodgers 6-9 .400 6.5 4-4 2-5 67 113 4-6 Lost 2
VW Ser. Club Red Sox 4-11 .267 8.5 2-5 2-6 61 127 2-8 Lost 7
VW Federal Astros 3-12 .200 9.5 3-5 0-7 42 129 3-7 Lost 1
Lee Kinstle Pirates 1-14 .067 11.5 1-5 0-9 38 159 1-9 Lost 4
McDonalds Junior Series
Independent Insurance Classic - Lost Creek Golf Club
Tuesday’s Tee Times
Hole Tee Time Name Age Division
01 8:00 a.m. Team #1: Joel Miller/Mathew Watkins/Corey Maxwell C 16-18
01 8:08 a.m. Team #2: Corey Bremigan/Travis Reynolds/Grant Flanigan C 16-18
01 8:16 a.m. Team #3: Kyle Karhoff/Ian Haidle/Ian Baker C 16-18
01 8:24 a.m. Team #4: Anthony Schmidt/Brad Ellis/Matthew Waldick C 16-18
01 8:32 a.m. Team #5: Blake Doidge/Josh Klaus/Brandyn Heitman/Nathan Smith C 16-18
01 8:40 a.m. Team #6: Corey Teague/Kyle Evers/Dalton Buffenbarger/Wil Fridley C 16-18
01 8:48 a.m. Team #7: Reed Bok/Mathew Cucciarre/Mike Lawler/Evan Wilker C 16-18
01 8:56 a.m. Team #8: Cody Ciminillo/Zach Weber/Zach Krick/Christian Koch C 16-18
01 9:04 a.m. Team #9: Phillip Gabel/Matt Holt/Trevor Crites/Jacob Miller C 16-18
01 9:12 a.m. Team #10: Tyler Bergman/Austin Clarkson/Ross Jenkins/Brey Buetner C 16-18
01 9:20 a.m. Team #11: Ben Walter/Lance Clark/Paul Carmean/Anthony Teman C 16-18
01 9:28 a.m. Team #12
01 9:36 a.m. Team #13: Josh Tumbusch/Zachary Jamal/Teague McNett B 14-15
01 9:44 a.m. Team #14: Blaine Ricketts/Lucas Herrmann/Jordan Bollenbacher B 14-15
01 9:52 a.m. Team #15: Michael Omlor/Grady Gudakunst/Tyler Turnwald B 14-15
01 10:00 a.m. Team #16: Jacob Brake/Austin Goodridge/Tim Levers/Evan Nartker B 14-15
01 10:08 a.m. Team #17: Nathan Myers/Nate Cellar/Zakary Thomas/Evan Crites B 14-15
01 10:16 a.m. Team #18
01 10:24 a.m. Team #19: Chandler Rex/Abbey Martin/Jordin Moots E G 16-18
01 10:32 a.m. Team #20: Kristina Kessen/Elise Wiechart/Michelle Scholz/Lesli Stolly E G 16-18
01 10:40 a.m. Team #21: Amanda Sanko/Brooke Albers/Abby Morgan/Shelby Warner E G 16-18
01 10:48 a.m. Team #22:Shelby Kohler/Morgan Van Meter/Courtney Knippen/Deanna Ray E G 16-18
01 10:56 a.m. Team #23
10 8:00 a.m. Team #24: Grant Ricketts/Ryan Smelewski/John Cornell A 12-13
10 8:08 a.m. Team #25: Brandon Hernandez/Johnny Rudolph/Wesley Markward A 12-13
10 8:16 a.m. Team #26: James Ebeling/Jacob Judy/Westin Young A 12-13
10 8:24 a.m. Team #27: Aaron Wilker/Alex Britton/James Riepenhoff/Adam Vieira A 12-13
10 8:32 a.m. Team #28: Kelsi O’Leary/Sydney Hooks/Nicole Joseph/Jenna Moots D 15U
10 8:40 a.m. Team #29
10 8:48 a.m. Team #30
LIMA JUNIOR GOLF
ASSOCIATION
By BARRY WILNER
The Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG —
They kissed and hugged and
held high the golden trophy
for all of Soccer City and
Africa and the world to see.
The exhaustion was gone now
for Spain’s players, replaced
by the exhilaration of win-
ning the World Cup at long,
long last.
A testy and often dirty
match was won by Andres
Iniesta’s goal late in extra
time Sunday night. The 1-0
victory over the Netherlands
before a shivering crowd at
Soccer City Stadium gave
Spain its first World Cup and
put the European champion
Spaniards in elite company.
“I remember (Italy captain
Fabio) Cannavaro told me
that being world champion
doesn’t happen every day,”
captain Iker Casillas said.
“This really is quite a cup. The
European Championship was
the most important moment
of our lives but today is much
bigger than anything else.”
For years, Spain has been
a disappointment in the big-
gest tournaments. Now, it has
joined West Germany and
France as the only nations to
hold the world and European
titles at the same time.
It took four straight 1-0
wins — the Spaniards scored
eight goals, an all-time low
for a World Cup champion —
and the heroics of Iniesta and
Casillas to reach the pinnacle
so often predicted for Spain
and never before reached. In
the tightest World Cup ever,
with 31 games decided by
one goal, Spain always found
a way.
The winners struggled but
managed to lift their coach,
Vicente del Bosque, in the air
in celebration.
Then the players made a
quick costume change from
their sweat-soaked blue jer-
seys into their traditional red
ones.
Casillas, voted the World
Cup’s top goalkeeper, accept-
ed the trophy from FIFA pres-
ident Sepp Blatter, who was
bundled in a scarf because
temperatures dipped into
the 40s on this chilly win-
ter’s night in the Southern
Hemisphere.
The game was anything
but spectacular — the entire
tournament was like that
— and Spain’s victory was
marred by a pair of bombings
in the East African nation of
Uganda.
The final was a physical
test of attrition that some-
times turned filthy — a finals-
record 14 yellow cards were
handed out and the Dutch fin-
ished with 10 men. In the end,
it was Iniesta breaking free
in the penalty area, taking a
pass from Cesc Fabregas and
putting a right-footed shot
from 8 yards just past the out-
stretched arms of goalkeeper
Maarten Stekelenburg with
about seven minutes left to
play, including injury time.
For the Dutch and their
legions of orange-clad fans
wearing everything from jer-
seys to jumpsuits to clown
gear to pajamas, it was yet
another disappointment.
Even with their first World
Cup title tantalizingly within
reach, they failed in the final
for the third time. This one
might have been the most bit-
ter because, unlike 1974 and
1978, the Netherlands was
unbeaten not only in this tour-
nament but in qualifying for
the first World Cup staged in
South Africa.
Soccer City was soaked in
Oranje, from the seats painted
in that hue throughout the
stadium to pretty much every-
one seated in them, includ-
ing crown prince Willem-
Alexander. It was different
when they lost to hosts West
Germany and Argentina in
previous finals; this time, the
Dutch were something of a
home team. And the visitors
won.
“It’s a pity but I think we
can be proud of it, the whole
country,” midfielder Wesley
Sneijder said.
Spain had pockets of sup-
porters, too, with fans dressed
in red and scattered through-
out the stadium. Among those
cheering were Queen Sofia,
Rafael Nadal and Pau Gasol.
Spain’s fans might have
been in the minority but when
the final whistle blew, they
were tooting their vuvuzelas
with a vengeance in tribute to
their champions.
But they had to shiver and
wait anxiously for the goal to
come.
A second straight World
Cup final headed into extra
time, with the goalkeepers
unbeatable. Stekelenburg,
relatively inexperienced on
the international level, made a
spectacular left leg save when
Fabregas broke free early in
overtime.
The goal in the 116th min-
ute came off a turnover by the
Dutch defense that Fabregas
controlled just outside the
penalty area. Iniesta stayed
on the right and sneaked in to
grab the pass and put his shot
to the far post.
And with that, Iniesta tore
off his jersey and raced to the
corner where he was mobbed
by his teammates.
Several Dutch players
wiped away tears as they
received their runners-up
medals — yet again. They
had won every qualifying
match and all six previous
games in South Africa before
the bitter ending.
The Netherlands now has
more victories in World Cup
games without a title than any
nation: 19. Spain held that
dubious record with 24.
Netherlands coach Bert
van Marwijk took off his sil-
ver medal as soon as he left
the podium, a look of disgust
on his face.
Aside from a European
title in 1988, the Dutch have
been classic underachievers
on the pitch.
Yet the Spaniards haven’t
been much better. Other than
Euro championships in 1964
and 2008, they rarely have
contended in major tourna-
ments. At least the Netherlands
made those two World Cup
finals and advanced to the
semifinals in 1998.
Second-ranked Spain start-
ed this World Cup in the worst
way, losing to Switzerland.
But Spain won every game
after that, including a 1-0 vic-
tory over powerful Germany
that was far more one-sid-
ed than the score indicated.
No other nation has won the
World Cup after losing its
opener.
Yet the most danger-
ous player Sunday was
Netherlands forward Arjen
Robben. He had a rare break-
away in the 62nd minute after
a brilliant through pass from
Sneijder. He had the ball on
his preferred left foot but a
charging Casillas barely got
his right leg on the shot to
deflect it wide of the gaping
net.
Spain beats Netherlands
1-0 for first World Cup
SPORTS BRIEFS
The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX—
Recalled RHP Daniel Hudson
from Charlotte (IL).
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS—
Fired hitting coach Sean Berry.
Named Jeff Bagwell hitting
coach.
NEW YORK METS—
Optioned Jesus Feliciano to
Buffalo (IL).
Eastern League
TRENTON THUNDER—
Announced OF Justin Christian
was assigned from Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre (IL).
United League
E D I N B U R G
ROADRUNNERS—Signed
RHP Evan Cunningham.
Released LHP Robbie Nelson.
RIO GRANDE VALLEY
WHITEWINGS—Signed OF
Juan Cabrera and LHP Tate
Kelly.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball
Association
NEW JERSEY NETS—
Agreed to terms with G Jordan
Farmar.
TRANSACTIONS
The Associated Press
SOCCER
JOHANNESBURG — Uruguay
striker Diego Forlan was awarded the
Golden Ball as the World Cup’s best
player and Germany forward Thomas
Mueller won the Golden Boot as the
tournament’s top scorer with five goals.
Forlan was voted the most out-
standing player of the tournament by
accredited media after leading his team
to the semifinals.
The 20-year-old Mueller helped
Germany take third place with his five
goals and three assists and also won
the Best Young Player award. Forlan,
Spain striker David Villa and Netherlands
playmaker Wesley Sneijder also scored
five times but each had only one assist.
Villa and Sneijder both failed to score in
Sunday’s final.
FOOTBALL
UNDATED — The future of testing
for human growth hormone is shaping
up to be a contentious issue in nego-
tiations between the NFL and the play-
ers’ union, with the league supporting
blood-based testing and the union less
convinced about its validity.
Kevin Mawae, the president of
the NFL Players Association, told The
Associated Press on Sunday that the
union is aware of developing tests, one
of which is a blood test that could detect
HGH for up to 14 days, but added
the union believes the test that is cur-
rently available, which has only about
a 48-hour window of detection, “is not
completely reliable.”
BASEBALL
NEW YORK — Bob Sheppard,
whose stylish, elegant stadium intro-
ductions of New York Yankees from
Joltin’ Joe to Derek Jeter spanned more
than a half century and earned him the
nickname “The Voice of God,” died
Sunday. He was 99.
Sheppard, a gentle man who spoke
with the sonorous authority of a giant,
died at his Long Island home in Baldwin
with his wife, Mary, at his side, the
Yankees said.
His voice, however, will live on in
recordings. His mellifluous tone still is
heard at Yankees games, nearly three
years after his finale, when it is played
to introduce captain Derek Jeter.
Sheppard started with the Yankees
in April 1951 and worked his last game
at Yankee Stadium in September 2007,
when he became ill with a bronchial
infection.
His “Good afternoon, ladies and
gentleman, and welcome to Yankee
Stadium,” was as much a part of the
team’s identity as the pinstripes itself.
And for a person heard far more often
than seen, he became a fan favorite
alongside Joe DiMaggio, Yogi Berra,
Mickey Mantle and Jeter.
Even slowed by illness, Sheppard
recorded a greeting to fans, a poem
and the introductions that were played
at the original ballpark’s final game on
Sept. 21, 2008.
Sheppard was perhaps the
only Yankees employee never criti-
cized by hard-driving owner George
Steinbrenner, who called him “the gold
standard.”
While Sheppard didn’t like to
give his age, the Yankees confirmed
Sheppard was born Oct. 20, 1910.
In addition to his wife, Sheppard is
survived by sons Paul and Christopher,
daughters Barbara and Mary, four
grandchildren and at least nine great-
grandchildren.
ANAHEIM, Calif. — Hank Conger
hit a 3-run homer and the United States,
boosted by a pair of Angels up-and-
comers, snapped a 3-year losing streak
in the Futures Game with a 9-1 win over
the World squad Sunday.
Eric Hosmer doubled among his
four hits and drove in two runs for the
U.S. team in a game showcasing top
prospects from all of baseball’s minor
leagues — featuring 50 players repre-
senting 10 countries.
BASKETBALL
LAS VEGAS — Dallas Mavericks’
owner Mark Cuban claims the NBA
should examine how free agents LeBron
James, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade
all ended up with the Miami Heat.
Cuban told a group of reporters at
the NBA’s summer league in Las Vegas
that he intends to ask the league’s
Board of Governors to inquire about
the situation.
According to a story posted on
the Cleveland Plain Dealer’s website
Sunday, Cuban says the league needs
to develop more definitive rules govern-
ing the issue of player tampering.
NBA owners are scheduled to meet
today in Las Vegas.
MOTOR SPORTS
KENT, Wash. — A 60-year-old drag
racing driver became the third person to
die at an NHRA event this year when
he crashed after crossing the finish
line during his semifinal heat at the
Northwest Nationals on Sunday.
Mark Niver of Phoenix was compet-
ing in the Top Alcohol dragster class
in the NHRA Lucas Oil Drag Racing
series, the top feeder circuit for the
NHRA Full Throttle Drag Racing series.
The parachutes on his car ripped away
after they were deployed and Niver
couldn’t stop his dragster before it
slammed into the protective netting at
the end of the runway.
The NHRA reported it’s investigat-
ing the accident.
TENNIS
NEWPORT, R.I. — Australia’s
Todd Woodbridge and Mark Woodforde
headed a class of seven inductees into
the International Tennis Hall of Fame
on Saturday.
Woodbridge and Woodforde
— known as the “Woodies” — were
enshrined along with doubles partners
Gigi Fernandez and Natasha Zvereva.
The pair combined for 11 major
titles and 61 world tour championships
from 1991-2000.
Fernandez and Zvereva captured
14 Grand Slam tournament titles
together.
Brad Parks was the Hall’s first
wheelchair inductee. Owen Davidson
also was enshrined in the Master player
category along with Derek Hardwick,
who was enshrined posthumously.
2
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H
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D
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
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LINCOLN HIGHWAY YARD SALE
DELPHOS COMMUNITY GARAGE SALES
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
August 5-7, 2010
Place your ad in the Delphos Herald by July 28 and your location
will appear on our Delphos Community Garage Sale Map that
will be available at local businesses, the Chamber and the
Delphos Herald office starting August 5th.
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email: sspears@delphosherald.com
8A – The Herald Monday, July 12, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
St✩r G✩zing
Come on, baby! Checker
marks 50 years of the Twist
By JOANN LOVIGLIO
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA — Fifty
years to the day after the
release of the hip-swiveling
tune “The Twist,” the man
who made it famous celebrat-
ed the occasion in his home-
town.
Chubby Checker per-
formed Friday at a free noon-
time concert at Philadelphia
City Hall. About 1,000 peo-
ple joined in on the gyrations,
some even invited onstage by
the South Philadelphia-bred
singer.
“The Twist,” released
as a single on July 9, 1960,
burst into the rock ’n’ roll
stratosphere after Checker
performed it for Dick Clark
on his Philadelphia-based
“American Bandstand.”
Checker’s 1960 cover
version of the Hank Ballard
and the Midnighters song —
released a year earlier to mild
success — became a smash
hit and turned the dance into
a pop culture touchstone.
It remains the only single
to reach No. 1 on the U.S.
charts during two separate
runs, in 1960 and again in
1962.
The dance popularized
couples dancing apart to the
beat of the music, a revolu-
tionary idea that’s now the
norm, Checker said.
“When you’re on the
floor dancing to Lady Gaga,
Chubby Checker is there,”
he said.
The trim 68-year-old sing-
er, clad in a denim jacket and
skintight jeans, performed
some of his other dance-
craze hits including “The
Fly,” “Pony Time” and “The
Hucklebuck,” a dance with
some suggestive hip thrusts
that Checker executed with
ease.
“Back in the 60s, you
couldn’t do the huckle-
buck because it was nasty,”
Checker told the crowd. “It’s
2010; everything’s nasty, so
we’re going to do it.”
Checker brought groups
of fans onstage throughout
the concert. Ages, sizes and
senses of rhythm varied wide-
ly, but no one was short of
enthusiasm.
He also sang a medley of
other singers’ hits from the
era, from Chuck Berry and
Little Richard to The Beatles’
“I Saw Her Standing There.”
The finale, of course, was
“The Twist,” which kept the
crowd going despite tempera-
tures around 90 degrees.
“If you ain’t moving to
this, well, then, you’ve got
to be dead,” said Martin
Jackson, 59, as he held his
cell phone aloft so his sister
in Washington, D.C., could
listen in. “This is the 12-bar
blues right here. That’s what
it’s all about.”
‘Decision’
watched by nearly
10M people
NEW YORK (AP) — The
Nielsen Co. estimates that 9.95
million people watched LeBron
James announce on ESPN that
he’s leaving Cleveland to play
for the Miami Heat, making
it the third-most-watched pro-
gram on cable television this
year.
“The Decision” that aired
Thursday night ranks behind
the 12.3 million who watched
the NFL Pro Bowl and 11.2 mil-
lion who watched an episode
of “ICarly” on Nickelodeon in
January.
The special was of particu-
lar interest in Cleveland, where
an estimated one in four homes
with televisions tuned in.
James’ future can’t yet com-
pare to Kobe Bryant’s present,
however. More than 28 million
people watched Bryant win his
fifth championship last month
in the seventh game of the
NBA Finals between the L.A.
Lakers and Boston Celtics.
Carrie Underwood marries
hockey player Mike Fisher
ATLANTA (AP) —
Grammy-winning country
singer Carrie Underwood
has married NHL player
Mike Fisher at a resort in
Georgia.
“Yes, Mike and Carrie are
married,” Underwood’s pub-
licist Jessie Schmidt said in
an e-mail to The Associated
Press early Sunday.
The wedding took place
Saturday at the Reynolds
Plantation resort in
Greensboro, Ga.
Underwood, 27, rose to
fame after winning the fourth
season of “American Idol.”
Fisher, 30, is a forward for
the Ottawa Senators.
No details on where
Underwood and Fisher will
spend their honeymoon have
been released.
Usher to sing in Chinese in debut
BEIJING (AP) — Usher
will sing in Chinese, briefly,
during his China debut con-
cert Sunday in Beijing.
Usher will sing one of
Asian pop sensation Wang
Lihong’s songs in Chinese,
Wang told a joint press con-
ference Saturday night, and
the two will also sing Usher’s
No. 1 “OMG.”
“I wanted to make a great
impression, so I wanted to
do something very special,”
Usher said. “After hearing
(Wang’s) music, I wanted to
collaborate with him.”
The American recording
artist said he came to China
because he knows there’s an
audience for him. He arrived
in Beijing from Manila.
He said he found while
audiences in the United States
sing along as loud as they
can, a crowd in Asia can be
more quiet out of respect for
the singer.
Engagement
Wannemacher/Johnson
Dave and Connie Wannemacher of Delphos announce
the engagement of their daughter, Brittney, to Nick
Johnson, son of Jane and Randy Hemker and Jeff and Lyn
Johnson of Delphos.
The couple will exchange vows on Aug. 28 at New
Hope Christian Center.
The bride-elect is attending the University of Cincinnati
and will graduate in August. She is employed in organiza-
tional leadership at Nordstrom.
Her fiance is attending the University of Cincinnati and
will graduate in 2011.
Engagement
Weinandy-Gasser/Gerdeman
Denise Catherine Weinandy-Gasser and Darrin Jay
Gerdeman are announcing their engagement.
She is the daughter of Robert and Paula Weinandy
of Elida. He is the son of Jim and Jane Gerdeman of
Delphos.
The couple will exchange vows on Aug. 21 at St. John
the Evangelist Catholic Church.
The bride-elect is a graduate of St. John’s High School;
Lima Technical College, with an associate degree in
computer information systems and accounting; and the
University of Northwestern Ohio, with a bachelor’s degree
in business administration. She is employed as an account-
ing clerk with Community Health Professionals of Van
Wert.
Her fiance is a graduate of St. John’s High School and
ITT Technical Institute, with an associate degree in elec-
tronics. He is employed by Fleetwood RV in Decatur.
1
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& Rebate ..................... $6,335

$
29,410*
#NB457
CX pkg., mocha steel
MSRP ....................... $29,085
Delpha Discount ............ $613
$28,472
Loyalty Rebate ............ $1,500
$
26,972*
6 AVAILABLE STARTING AT $20,990 ONLY 1 AVAILABLE
2006 CHEVY
SILVERADO
2004 VOLVO
XC90
3/4 ton, crew cab,
4x4, Duramax
Was $31,500
T6 AWD
Was $15,990
$
28,900
$
13,890
COOL JULY BARGAINS
WAS NOW
09 Pontiac Vibe #A4 ............................................ $13,400 .... $12,800
09 Chev HHR LT Red #A10 ................................. $15,900 .... $13,900
09 Buick Lucerne CXL #B16 .......................... $22,900 .... $21,800
09 Chrysler Town & Country Van #D48 . $20,500 .... $19,800
09 Dodge Grand Caravan #D49 ................... $19,700 .... $18,400
09 Pontiac G5 2 Dr. cpe, #D53 ............................. $13,500 .... $12,700
09 Chev Cobalt 4 Dr., #A1 ................................... $10.750 ...... $9,641
08 Chev Colorado Crew Cab #D57 ........... $21,900 .... $20,895
08 Pontiac Solstice Convertible #E67 .... $19,900 .... $19,400
07 Chev Trailblazer Blacl #D52 ........................ $18,900 .... $17,900
07 Chev HHR LT #E60 ........................................ $11,500 .... $10,475
07 Buick Rendezvous #F81............................ $19,595 .... $18,975
07 Buick Rendezvous #F82............................ $20,795 .... $19,975
06 Buick Rendezvous #J85A .......................... $13,975 .... $12,200
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SPECIALS
WAS NOW payments/MO.
2010 Pont G6 4 dr., #F78 ................................... $17,875 ....$17,300 $267.51
2010 Pont G6 4 dr., #F79 ................................... $16,795 ....$15,100 $229.04
2009 Chev Impala #H139 ............................... $16,995 ....$15,200 $242.50
2008 Chev Impala #C42 ................................. $16,900 ....$14,700 $233.32
2007 Chev Impala #F87 ...................................................$12,495 $192.81
2007 Chev Impala #F86 ...................................................$12,495 $192.81
2007 Chev Impala SS #F71 ........................ $16,900 ....$15,700 $288.43
2007 Chev Impala #F91 ...................................................$12,495 $192.81
2007 Chev Impala #F90 ...................................................$12,495 $192.81
2007 Pont G6 4 dr., #F75 ................................... $13,500 ....$11,695 $204.48
IMPALA 3.9% APR - 60 MOS. G6 - 1.9% APR - 60 MOS. THRU GMAC AND
$2000.00 CASH OR TRADE WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PLUS TAX & TITLE.
Monday, July 12, 2010 The Herald — 9A
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Saturday’s questions:
A cluster of bananas is called a hand. The individual
bananas are fingers.
Canned herring is called sardines because the can-
ning process for herring was developed in Sardinia and
the fish were first canned there.
Today’s questions:
What would you get if you ordered a Mae West in
a diner?
What part of the orange is the albedo?
Answers in Tuesday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Ditokous: producing twins
Saprostomous: having bad breath
Elusive ‘Barefoot Bandit’ finally nabbed
By JUAN McCARTNEY
and MIKE MELIA
Associated Press Writers
NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — For two years
he stayed a step ahead of the law — stealing
cars, powerboats and even airplanes, police
say, while building a reputation as a 21st-
century folk hero. On Sunday, Colton Harris-
Moore’s celebrity became his downfall.
Witnesses on the Bahamian island of
Eleuthera recognized the 19-year-old dubbed
the “Barefoot Bandit” and called police,
who captured him after a high-speed boat
chase, Bahamas Police Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade said at a celebratory news confer-
ence in Nassau, the capital.
Greenslade said shots were fired during
the water chase but he did not say who fired
them. He also said Harris-Moore was carrying
a handgun that he tried to throw away.
Another senior police official, however,
said police fired to disable the motor on the
suspect’s stolen boat, and that Harris-Moore
threw his gun in the water. The official, who
spoke on condition of anonymity because he
was not authorized to discuss the case, also
said that police recovered a laptop and a GPS
locator from the suspect.
Police flew Harris-Moore in shackles to
Nassau. True to his nickname, the teen with
close-shorn hair was shoeless as he walked
off the plane wearing short camouflage cargo
pants, a white long-sleeved shirt and a bul-
letproof vest.
Harris-Moore is blamed for several thefts in
the Bahamas in the week since allegedly crash-
landing a stolen plane there, and Bahamian
authorities said he will be prosecuted for those
crimes before the start of any U.S. extradition
proceedings.
The 6-foot-5-inch Harris-Moore had been
on the run since escaping from a Washington
state halfway house in 2008. He is accused of
breaking into dozens of homes and committing
burglaries across Washington, as well as in
British Columbia and Idaho.
He is also suspected of stealing at least five
planes — including the aircraft he allegedly
lifted in Indiana and flew more than 1,000
miles (1,600 kilometers) to the Bahamas,
despite a lack of formal flight training.
Some of his alleged actions appeared intend-
ed to taunt police: In February, someone who
broke into a grocery store in Washington’s San
Juan Islands drew cartoonish, chalk-outline
feet all over the floor.
Through it all, his ranks of supporters grew.
Some of his more than 60,000 Facebook fans
posted disappointed messages Sunday, while
others promoted T-shirts and tote bags with the
words “Free Colton!” and “Let Colton Fly!”
Even someone in the Bahamas had mixed
feelings about his arrest.
“I feel like it would have been good if he
got away because he never hurt anybody, but
then he was running from the law,” said Ruthie
Key, who owns a market on Great Abaco
Island and let Harris-Moore use her wireless
Internet connection July 5.
“He seemed very innocent when I spoke
with him at the store. I don’t think he’d hurt
anybody,” Key said.
Island police had been searching for the teen
since he allegedly crash-landed the plane on
Abaco, where he was blamed for at least seven
burglaries. The search expanded to Eleuthera
after police there recovered a 44-foot (13-
meter) powerboat reported stolen from Abaco.
Police said several people reported seeing
the teenager Wednesday night in the waters
between Eleuthera and Harbour Island, a near-
by tourist destination known for its art galler-
ies, but did not know about the Barefoot Bandit
until after discovering a series of break-ins
the next day. Harris-Moore’s mistake was to
return to the same area.
James Major, who rents cars on Eleuthera
opposite Harbour Island, said a witness on
his side of the channel reported a sighting of
Harris-Moore to police early Sunday. He said
locals had been on the lookout since the fugi-
tive was blamed for trying to steal four boats
and breaking into two buildings at the ferry
landing.
“He might have been dangerous to the pub-
lic,” Major said. “Everybody is glad he was
caught.”
Greenslade said the high-speed chase began
around 2 a.m. Sunday after police received tips
from members of the public that the suspect
was on Harbour Island.
The chase ended in the waters off the
Romora Bay Resort & Marina on Harbour
Island, where security director Kenneth
Strachan reported seeing a young man running
through the bush barefoot with a handgun,
according to Anne Ward, who manages the
property.
ASHLAND, Ore. (AP) — A southern Oregon city says the
nightlife in its downtown is more like wildlife.
The Ashland Daily Tidings reports that on July 3, a deer
crashed through the window of Nimbus, a high-end clothing
store downtown.
State wildlife biologist Mark Vargas says the doe likely had
been spooked and didn’t see the glass.
A store saleswoman says the deer left no blood and didn’t
appear seriously injured.
Police say several residents have been attacked by the ani-
mals this year, particularly while they were walking their dogs.
Local and state officials say killing the deer or using birth
control darts is difficult and probably wouldn’t solve the prob-
lem. Ashland is next to forests that are full of deer.
Vargas says people need to stop feeding the animals and
should scare them away.
By MIKE ROBINSON
The Associated Press
CHICAGO — Federal prosecutors have spent five weeks
showing Rod Blagojevich spewed a river of profanity while
lavishing money on his wardrobe and ducking his job as gov-
ernor of Illinois. But will jurors believe he was a racketeer who
schemed to sell or trade Barack Obama’s former U.S. Senate
seat for personal gain?
The government plans to rest as early as Tuesday, after
presenting a case based heavily on wiretaps in which jurors
heard Blagojevich saying he wanted something in return for
the seat.
“I’ve got this thing and it’s (expletive) golden — I’m just
not giving it up for (expletive) nothing,” Blagojevich plainly
says on one of the most-quoted tapes.
But once prosecutors finish, the ousted governor’s defense
team is guaranteed to tell jurors that while Blagojevich may
have had a vivid imagination, he wasn’t the bad guy prosecu-
tors allege.
“The first thing they do is portray Blagojevich as the buf-
foon that he is,” says DePaul University law professor Leonard
Cavise, who has been on hand for much of the testimony.
“They say, look, he has a bad mouth, he has a loose mouth. He
spent a lot of time thinking about things other than the state of
Illinois. But he’s not a crook.”
Blagojevich, 53, has pleaded not guilty to scheming to get
a high-paying job, a Cabinet post or a large campaign con-
tribution in exchange for the appointment to the Senate seat.
He also has pleaded not guilty to plotting to use his power as
governor to engage in racketeering.
His brother, Robert Blagojevich, 54, has pleaded not guilty
to taking part in the alleged Senate scheme and what prosecu-
tors call illegal efforts to pressure two businessmen for cam-
paign contributions.
BOSTON (AP) — Homeland Security Secretary Janet
Napolitano met privately on Sunday with her successor as
Arizona governor as the Obama administration challenges the
state’s immigration law.
Napolitano, a Democrat, huddled for a half-hour behind
closed doors with Republican Jan Brewer in Boston during the
National Governors Association summer meeting. Napolitano
was in town to provide the governors with a classified national
security briefing.
Slated to be implemented July 29, the Arizona law would
require state and local police to question and possibly arrest
illegal immigrants during the enforcement of other laws such
as traffic stops. Last week, the Obama administration filed
suit in federal court to block it, arguing that immigration is a
federal issue.
Napolitano ignored a request for comment following their
meeting, but Brewer said the two did not discuss the lawsuit.
Instead, she said they had a cordial conversation centered on
her efforts to win Arizona more National Guard troops to guard
its border with Mexico, as well as her plea for reconnaissance
helicopters and more unmanned aerial vehicles to prevent
illegal crossings.
BRENTWOOD, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire couple
says a 25-pound pet tortoise has reappeared four years after
escaping from its pen.
Mike and Christine Wellington say their African spur thigh
tortoise named Lucy made off from their greenhouse business
in Brentwood. But on Friday, the Wellingtons received a call
from a neighbor half a mile up the road that Lucy had reap-
peared.
The Wellingtons say they’re certain the tortoise is theirs
because of the unusual protruding bumps on its back.
Mike Wellington says turtles of Lucy’s species dig deep
holes in the ground for protection in extreme weather. He says
he supposes Lucy did just that to survive New Hampshire’s
winters the past four years.
Deer crashes through store window
What have prosecutors
proved about Blagojevich?
Napolitano meets with Brewer
Tortoise shows up 4 years later
2
1108 West Main St., Van Wert, OH
800-262-3866 or 419-238-0125
Mon. & Wed. 9 AM - 8 PM;
Tues., Thurs., Fri. 9 AM-6 PM; Sat. 9 AM-3 PM
PERSONAL
SERVICE
LOCAL
OWNERSHIP
THE WAY IT OUGHT TO BE!
StateWide
Visit Our Website: www.statewideford.com
2008 Ford
Taurus X
# 9479P Limited with heated leather,
reverse sensing, lots of extras!
$
19,976
2009 Ford
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15,000 miles! Sony sound system!
$
25,998
2007 Ford F 150
4X4 Supercab
# 9486P STX pkg, only 32,000 miles,
trailer tow pkg, extra clean!!
$
20,598
2009 Ford
Flex SE
# 9368P 7 passenger seating, 19,000
miles, shop this price!!
$
20,949
2006 Chevrolet
Impala LS
# 9493P Priced to sell, lots of car for
the money, don’t miss it!
$
8975
2006 Kia
Sedona
# 9515A 7 passenger, local trade-in,
low miles, priced right!
$
10,483
2007 Mini
Cooper
# 9482P moonroof, leather, 2-tone top,
stripe package, only 37,000 miles!
$
16,932
2008 Ford Escape
Limited
## 9488P power moonroof, chrome
wheels, heated leather seating, sharp!
$
18,998
2007 Chrysler
Town & Country
# 9492P 7 passenger, value priced, hard
to find, everybody rides!
$
9988
2009 Lincoln
MKS
# 9462P Technology pkg, heated &
cooled seats, only 20,000 miles!
$
27,979
2007 Chrysler
Pacifica Limited
# 3865A All wheel drive, moonroof,
wood pkg, chrome wheels, WOW!
$
17,589
2007 Ford
Focus SE
#9485P Cruise control, all the power
equipment, great fuel economy!!
$
9825
USED VEHICLES
2009 Ford
Focus SE
# 9484P 4 door, alloys, factory
warranty, deep discount!
$
12,598
2008 Lincoln
MKZ
# 9478P chrome wheels, moonroof,
heated & cooled seating, nice!
$
19,458
2005 Hyundai Santa
Fe GLS
# 9454P Leather, local car, priced to
sell, don’t miss it!
$
8998
2006 Chrysler PT
Cruiser
# 94349A Limited, moonroof, heated
leather seats, local trade-in!
$
9176
2007 Mercury
Milan Premier
# 9487P Leather, power moonroof, lots
of equipment!!
$
12,994
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• Driver’s Group
• Sync system
• #9496
• Tailgate step
• XLT chrome pkg.
• Trailer tow
• #9498
New 2011 Ford
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2008 Ford
Fusion SE
# 9480P Power moonroof, fuel saver,
only 29,000 miles!!
$
14,999
2007 Ford Five
Hundred SEL
# 9481P Chrome wheels, power
moonroof, very roomy sedan!!
$
13,487
2009 Lincoln
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# 9432P Signature limited, heated
leather seating, lots of warranty!
$
21,995
$
1000 rebate
0
%
FOR
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0
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NEW 2010 FORD
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* 0% financing available through Ford Credit with finance approval. All National incentives included, some may require FMCC financing.
800-262-3866
www.statewideford.com
Statewide Summer
10A – The Herald Monday, July 12, 2010
www.delphosherald.com
1
Bad Credit? No Credit?
WE CAN HELP YOU!
TRACY
BISHOP
Special Credit Finance Location Manager
phone
419-238-5255
fax
419-238-3485
tracy@statewideford.com
1003 West Main Street, Van Wert, OH 45891
133 E. Main St.
Van Wert, Ohio
Ph. 419-238-1580
Another Van Wert County Tradition
Balyeat’s
Coffee Shop
Lloyd’s Auto Service
We Service All Makes and Models
707 E. Main Street
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
419-238-3583
Fax 419-238-6579
M - F: 8-5:30
10% OFF
Anything over $50
Good only at White’s Garage
White’s
Garage
Eugene White, Owner
1109 E. Lincoln Highway
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
Phone: 419-238-5018
HOURS:
Mon.-Fri. 9-5:00
Complete
AUTO
Repair
B
U
Y H
ER
E
PAY H
ER
E
USED CARS

•Beautiful New Rooms •Luxury & Affordable Suites
•32” Flat Screens, Microwave, Refrigerators,
Ironing Board, Coffee Maker, WiFi
• Hot & Complimentary Breakfast • Exercise Room
Business Center & Indoor Swimming Pool
•Professional & Full
Service Facility
•Accomodate up to
40 people • WIFI
419-238-2600 or
1-800-HOLIDAY (465-4329)
140 Valam Dr., Van Wert
(Junction HWY 30 & US 127)
www.holidayinnexpresss.com/vanwertoh
ROOM & AMENITIES
MEETING
ROOM
The First County Library in the United States
215 West Main Street • Van Wert, Ohio 45891
419-238-2168 Fax: 419-238-3180
www.brumbacklib.com
The Brumback
Library
to create your own path.
Discover where smart banking
solutions can lead.
Enjoy the freedom to go where you want to go.
Whether you are planning a vacation, dinner
out with friends or more time with family, First
Financial can help you get there sooner. We’ll help
you plan, save and make smart decisions with
expert advice and customized banking solutions.
Choosing the right bank really does go a long
way. Visit us online or stop by a First Financial
banking center today.
419-692-2055
Laudick’s
Jewelry
is holding its
Annual Tent Sale
JULY 20, 21, 22
1224 South Shannon Street, Van Wert, OH 45891
419-238-2266
QUICK CHANGE
OIL & LUBE CENTER
419-238-6116
111 Westwood Drive
Van Wert, OH 45891
Shutterbugg Studio
103 W. Main Street, Van Wert, Ohio 45891
419-238-2844
Great Package Prices on both
Senior Pictures
and
Back to School Portraits
Call today to schedule your appointment!
Or check out our website for prices
and samples!
www.shutterbuggstudio.com
Monday, July 12, 2010 The Herald — 1B
www.delphosherald.com
OUR TOWN SALUTE TO
VAN WERT
These businesses
are proud of their
community
and invite you to visit
them in Van Wert.
Offering the best in customer
service, quality and price...
come to Van Wert today!
2B – The Herald Monday, July 12, 2010 www.delphosherald.com
The Daily Herald
CLASSIFIED ADS
To place an ad call: 419-695-0015
VAN WERT MEDICAL SERVICES,
VAN WERT, OHIO
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Two, fulltime positions are available with VWMS
OB/GYN practice. Must have detailed knowl-
edge of medical terminology, pharmaceuticals,
and be able to communicate medical information
to clients. Other skills such as phone operation,
scheduling, filing and use of office equipment
are necessary. Graduate of a medical assistant
training program or graduate of a similar train-
ing program. Work experience in patient care,
preferably in a medical group setting is strongly
preferred.
Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit
a resume/application to:
Kim Sarchet
Human Resources
1250 S. Washington St.
Van Wert, OH 45891
E-mail: ksarchet@vanwerthospital.org
Visit the Hospital’s website at: www.vanwerthospital.org
Phone: 419-238-8633
Fax: 419-238-9390
LOCATION: 18400 State Road; Van Wert, OH;
8 miles SE of Van Wert – ¼ miles east of St. Rt.
116 – watch for signs – sale on site; home sells
promptly at 11:00 AM
Great . . . great . . . GREAT LOCATION!! Over an
acre in the country – truly a fine “farm” home that
will sell in an AFFORDABLE price range; living;
formal dining, full modern bath, bedroom, mod-
ern kitchen (newer cabinets), utility and enclosed
porch on the first floor along with attached one
car; upper level more resembles an older home
but has 3 bedrooms; the home has propane fired
hot water heat (comfortable) along with heat
pump/central air; private utilities; FINE shaded
setting and a WELL MAINTAINED square straight
fine looking country home – raised many a child
and will continue to do so. Siding is aluminum
and roof is almost new; 30’ x 40’ building has con-
crete floor. If you are SERIOUSLY LOOKING . . .
. LOOK SERIOUSLY . . . as this will be a great
opportunity . . . . for those prepared.
Full liquidation -all types of normal household
goods; furniture; appliances; bedding; linens;
kitchen items; numerous types of COLLECT-
IBLES including lamps; books; black chalk ware;
3 long guns; pool table; cane bottom chairs;
crocks; old stroller; blanket chest; child’s chalk
board w/roll-up; mantle clock; non-working old
regulator; viewmaster; Dietch lantern; clawfoot
table; old (30’s) bedroom suite; table/chairs; York
h/s yearbooks; Bruno 3 wheel electric scooter;
butter churn; glassware; brass bed; BARN ITEMS
including power hacksaw; table saw; drill press;
Lincoln welder; tools/ chest;
rototiller; flat bed wagon; numerous parts/ pieces
of old buggies; Stihl chain saw; concrete mixer; 2
horse hitch cultivator; winter time running gear w/
tongue for ice wagon; log splitter; large ad sign;
several 5’ brass lightning rods – 1 with glass
globe; fishing poles; car towing hitch; numerous
yard equipment items for garden tractor – spray-
er; cart –ect; nice 4’x8’ trailer; manure spreader;
old Hiawatha bike; Western flyer w/speedo; TWO
RING SALE – SEE WWW.STRALEY.REALTY.
COM for pictures – too many items to list – home
sells at 11:00 AM.
TERMS: cash/check for personal items; $2000
deposit on real estate w/balance due in 30 days;
warranty deed awarded; taxes prorate; posses-
sion upon closing; call for showings at your con-
venience; food/restroom/parking
419 W. Ervin Road
Van Wert, OH 45891
Office#: 419-238-9733
or 800-727-2021
Fax#: 419-238-5891
THE HEIRS OF:
MR. DAVID J. EVANS
Mrs. Marcia Pollock
Mrs. Gordon Evans
Auctioneers: Rich-
ard Miller; William B.
Priest; Ronald Myers;
William C. Strayer, CAI;
Joe Bagley; Apps; Rob-
bin Benner;
Jane Germann;
Chester M. Straley
9:00 A.M. • SATURDAY, JULY 17 • 9:00 A.M.
TWO STORY HOME - GARAGE-BUILDING
PERSONAL PROPERTY
PUBLIC AUCTION
SCHRADER
REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
www.schraderrealty.net
VIEW ALL LISTINGS AND PICTURES ON OUR WEBSITE:
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
Krista Schrader .................419-233-3737
Ruth Baldauf-Liebrecht ....419-234-5202
Amie Nungester ................419-236-0688
Janet Kroeger ...............419-236-7894
Stephanie Clemons.......419-234-0940
Judy M.W. Bosch ..........419-230-1983
167 W. CANAL STREET
OTTOVILLE NEW LISTING! Turn
key restaurant includes building,
business & Equipment. Call Judy.
NEW LISTING! 4 BR, 2 BA, 2 car
att. Garage, walk to school, library,
parks & More. Call Janet.
NEW LISTING! 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA,
2 car att. garage, family rm, new
kitchen, many updates. Call Krista.
PRICE REDUCED! Now only
$80’s. Feels like country! Over
1 acre! 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA, finished
basement. Call Krista.
NEW LISTING! Back on Market! 1
story, 2 BR, 1 BA. Call Janet.
2 BR, electric heat, 1 car att garage,
large backyard, only $40’s. Call
Krista.
747 Eastgate Dr., Spencerville
628 W. Wayne St., Delphos
241 King St., Delphos
804 Suthoff St., Delphos
637 E. Sixth St., Delphos
SOLD!
FEATURED THIS WEEK
11595 RIDGE RD. REDUCED $124,900
419-339-9196 or 419-303-7347
davpohlman@yahoo.com
2 Bedrooms 12’x14’ each 1838 Sq. ft. on crawl
1 full bath 2 car garage
2 - half baths All season room
Office/Bdrm Living room 12’x21.4’
Family room 16.5’x22’ Built 1977
Dining room 10’x12’ Pond view
HO M E F OR S ALE
304 S. PIERCE ST., DELPHOS
Charming Amenities
Comfortable
Stately
Excellent Condition
Beautiful Woodwork
Corner Lot
If interested call 419-695-1706
For showing by appointment
746 Skinner St., Delphos
Foreclosure for sale. $76,500. A 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
appraised for $98,000.
Neil Staley
419-586-8220
www.creativehomebuyingsolutions.com
SCHRADER
REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
Schrader Realty is pleased to
announce
Judy (Wannemacher) Bosch
as the newest member to our staff!
Judy can be reached at
419-230-1983
She may also be contacted via
email at: jbo@woh.rr.com
or thru our website at
www.schraderrealty.net.
Call
419-586-8220
www.creativehomebuyingsolutions.com
OPEN
HOUSE
Sun. 12-6
19206 State Rd, Delphos
$0 Down, $0 Closing Cost, New Appliances and Home
Warranty, great country 4 bed, 2 bath home with multiple
decks, a large master suite, Jacuzzi tub and french doors, a
full basement.
CREATIVE
HOME BUYING
SOLUTIONS, INC.
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*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.
*Will be trained by Microtel
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Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage
close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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928 N. Franklin St., Delphos
These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
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$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity
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$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!
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$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find
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$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC
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Exquisite Sense Of Luxury
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Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story
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A Charming Personality
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Peace And Privacy
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Enticing Two-story
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692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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Call for showing ...
1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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S.
Cass
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Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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BILL HOFFMAN,
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Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE
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OPEN HOUSE
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
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Add Finishing To This Home!
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A Fine Fix- up Find
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Exquisite Sense Of Luxury
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Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story
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A Charming Personality
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Peace And Privacy
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Enticing Two-story
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MAKE THE CALL
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IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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www.jimlanghalsrealty.com
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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Call for showing ...
1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.
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Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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RAABE RAABE
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GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT
®
BATTERIES
TESTED
TOUGH
®
MAX
with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN
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2007
CHRYSLER
SEBRING
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Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells
Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today
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TOM AHL
617 KING AVE., LIMA, OH 45805
419-228-3413
CELL 419-296-7188
RAABE
FORD, LINCOLN-MERCURY, INC.
RAABE
FORD, LINCOLN-MERCURY, INC.
Sales Department Hours: Mon. 8am-8pm;
Tues.-Fri. 8:00am-6pm; Sat. 9am-2:30pm
Service•Parts•Body Shop: Mon. 7:30am-8pm;
Tues.-Fri. 7:30am-6pm; Sat. 9am-2pm
www.raabeflm.com
11260 ELIDA RD. DELPHOS, OH (419) 692-0055
John Bensman Kevin Lindeman Edward Ditmyer Dave Wilgus
TRUCKS-VANS-SUVs
CARS
Stock No. NOW
6637 2009 FORD ESCAPE XLT FWD.......... V/6, full power, moonroof, 22,000 miles. ....... $19,495
6620 2009 FORD F150 S. CREW XLT ...... 4x4, chrome pkg. ............................................ $26,995
6672 2008 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER.V/6, 4X4, 15,000 miles, moonroof, leather $27,995
6657 2008 FORD F150 S. CREW XLT ...... 4x4, V/8, full power, 15,000 miles, moonroof. $28,995
6617 2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED ............... AWD , Vista roof, 20” wheels ......................... $26,995
6596 2008 FORD E250 CARGO VAN ...... V8, auto, full pwr ............................................ $15,795
6579 2008 FORD EDGE LIMITED ............... Full power, leather, 31,000 miles ................... $22,995
6671 2007 FORD EDGE SE FWD ................ V/6, full power, clean unit. ............................. $18,995
6673 2007 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED ........... V/6, 4x4, full power, leather, moonroof. ......... $17,495
6674 2007 FORD ESCAPE XLT .................... V/6, FWD, full power, moonroof. .................... $16,495
6577 2007 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4 .......... V6, AT, full power, moon roof, 33,000 mi....... $16,495
6655 2007 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY Touring, V6, DVD, Nav., moonroof, leather. . $19,995
6667 2006 GMC ENVOY DENALI ............... 4 Dr., V/8, 4x4, moonroof, leather ............... $20,495
6619A 2006 FORD F150 LARIAT ................. Super crew, 4x4, full power, moonroof, leather . $24,995
6602 2006 FORD FREESTAR SEL ................ Reg. Cab, 4x2, V/8, air, cruise, 53,000 mi. .. $13,995
6645 2005 ACURA MDX TOURING ................ 4x4 V/6, DVD, nav, moonroof, leather. ........... $18,495
6501 2005 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER .... AWD, V8, full power, leather ........................ $11,995
6633 2004 CHEVY SILVERADO ................... Ext. cab 4x2, full power, 55,000 miles ........... $12,495
6664 2003 FORD F350 LARIAT ................. Crew cab, 4x2, diesel, DRW, full power ..... $18,995
6670 2002 FORD E150 CLUB WG ............ Chateau, leather, DVD, remote start. .................$9,995
Stock No. NOW
6663 2009 LINCOLN MKS ........................4 Dr., full power, leather, 19,000 miles ............... $31,995
6493A 2009 FORD FUSION SE SPORT..4 Dr., 4 cyl., FWD, moonroof & full power, 19,000 mi. ... $16,495
6668 2008 FORD MUSTANG ..................Shelby Coupe, V8 full power, 8,000 miles .......... $39,495
6635 2008 MERCURY MILAN ................Premier 4 cyl, full power, moonroof, leather .... $16,495
6639 2008 FORD FOCUS SE ....................4 Dr., 4 cyl., AT, air, PW, PL, CD ....................... $12,995
6540 2009 TOYOTA COROLLA LE .........4 Dr., 4 cyl., FWD, AT, full power, 12,000 miles $12,995
6631 2008 MERCURY GR MARQUIS LS 4 Dr., 29,000 miles, full power, leather .............. $15,495
6628 2008 MERCURY MILAN ................4 Dr., 4 cyl., FWD, full power, 20,000 miles ...... $16,495
6659 2007 MERCURY MILAN ................Premier FWD, V/6, leather, moonroof, full power ... $15,995
6626 2007 DODGE CALIBER SXT .........WG, FWD, moonroof, 23,000 miles ................... $11,995
6587 2007 FORD FUSION SE ..................4 Dr., 4 cyl., full power, 26,000 miles............... $13,895
6651 2006 FORD FUSION SE ..................4 Dr., FWD, V/6, full power .................................... $9,995
6607 2005 MERCURY GR. MARQUIS 4 Dr., full power, 32,000 miles ........................ $11,495
6662 2004 LINCOLN TOWN CAR ..........Ultimate, full power, leather .............................. $11,995
6632A 2004 PONTIAC GRAND AM SE1 4 dr., V/6, full power, moonroof ............................ $5,995
6638 2002 CHEVY MONTE CARLO SS .Coupe, full power, moonroof, leather .................. $5,995
6647A 2001 FORD TAURUS SE.................4 Dr., V/6, full power, 86,000 miles ........................ $5,995
6666 1985 FORD TEMPO GL ..................4 Dr., 4 cyl., at, 56,000 miles, one owner ............... $2,995
We BUY Used Cars!
Turn Yours into CASH Today!
NEW HOURS
Sales: Mon. 8:00-8; Tues.-Fri. 8-6; Sat. 9-2:30
Service • Parts • Body Shop
Mon. 7:30-8 p.m.; Tues.-Fri. 7:30-6 p.m.; Sat. 9-2
SATURDAY SERVICE • NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED OIL CHANGES.
*As time allows per service hours*
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
SIBE HOME REPAIR
Small Jobs:
Caulking, window, gutters
& spouts, painting
Medium Jobs:
Roofing, doors, siding,
electrical, plumbing.
Ask for Mike
419-863-0368
080

Help Wanted
EXPERIENCED CAKE
decorator, Part-time hours
will vary. In Van Wert.
Please send resume and
r e f e r e n c e s t o :
store074@nashfinch.com
EXPERIENCED STNA’S
F/T and P/T
ALL shifts available
Apply in person
8:00am to 4:00pm
Monday through Friday
Vancrest of Delphos,
1425 East Fifth St.
Delphos
No phone calls please
EOE
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
Would you like to be an
in-home child care pro -
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
270

Auctions
VISA
MC
DISCOVER
PUBLIC
AUCTION
Every Saturday
at 6pm
Large Variety of
Merchandise
Everyone Welcome
Porter Auction
19326 CO. Rd. 60
Grover Hill, OH
For info call
(419) 587-3770
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket
Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BUNK BEDS, or can be
set apart as two twin beds.
Mattresses included. Ex-
cellent condition. $200
obo. Call 419-659-5507.
FURNITURE SALE
2 recliners, 1 big man and
swivel rocker recliner. 1
plaid sofa bed. All good
condition. 419-235-3543
NEW, QUEEN plush top
mattress, never used, still
sealed in original wrapper.
$75.00. (260)220-1596.
310

TV, Radio,
Recording
HOHENBRINK TV
Has great buys on used
TV’s and VCR’s.
11230 Elida Rd, Delphos
419-695-1229
550

Pets & Supplies
PUREBRED YORKSHIRE
Terrier puppies available
soon. 4 males born May 7.
Tails and dewclaws done,
excellent health guaran-
teed. Own both parents,
family raised. Perfect
non- sheddi ng pet s!
$ 3 9 5 . 0 0 C a l l
419-863-9441
580

For Rent or Lease
DELPHOS SELF Storage
on Gressel Drive: Maxi-
mum security achieved in-
side our fenced facility
with access via your per-
sonal gate code. Why set-
tle for less? Phone any-
time 419-692-6336.
590

House For Rent
2 BDRM, 1 1/2 BA, At-
tached garage. Available
soon. 419-692-3951
Small 2 bedroom, close to
Stadium Park, CA, 2-car
garage wi th carport.
$500/mo.+ deposit. Call
419-695-3594

620

Duplex For Rent
TWO BEDROOM in Ft.
Jennings. Stove & Refrig-
erator furnished. W/D
hookup CA, garage NO
Pets. Lease & Deposit.
419-453-3597
800

House For Sale
746 SKINNER St., Del-
phos, $0 Down, $0 Clos-
ing Cost, New Appliances,
and Home Warranty. A big
4 bed, 2 bath home with
an att. garage. Cal l
419-586-8220 creative-
homebuyingsolutions.com
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
Over 85
years
experience
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00
Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
BRAKE
SERVICE
GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT
®
$
104
95
GET THE BRAKES
ENGINEERED
SPECIFICALLY FOR
YOUR VEHICLE
Install genuine Motorcraft® pre-
ferred Value pads of shoes on
most cars/light trucks. One axle.
Excludes machining rotors and
drums. Some vehicles slightly
higher. taxes extra. See Service
Advisor for details.
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
Garage Sale
3 BOTTLE Fed kittens,
box trained, litter trained,
and ready to go. Phone:
419-339-4884
FREE: KITTENS & also a
f e w a d u l t c a t s
(419)695-3403
Classifieds Sell
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
212 N. Main St. • Delphos 419-692-2777
F
e
tz
e
r

s
REMOUNT
YOUR
DIAMONDS AND
GEMSTONES
AT OUR CLINIC
ON
FRI., JULY 16
& SAT., JULY 17
Jewelry
Visual Image photo
DEAR DR.
GOTT: I am
a 60-year-
old male with
hepatitis C.
I’m doing
as much
research as
I can on this
subject and
would like
your opinion on milk thistle and its benefits, if any.
DEAR READER: There are six hepatitis viruses,
A, B, C, D, E and G, with C commonly considered
to be the most serious. All forms attack the liver by
causing inflammation that results in that organ’s
inability to function normally. With a long-standing
diagnosis of hep C, cirrhosis, scarring and even
cancer can result.
Symptoms may or may not be present in the
early stages of the disease. When they do occur,
they present with liver tenderness, fatigue, nausea,
muscle and/or joint pain, and poor appetite. As
the disease progresses, low-grade fever and
jaundice, a yellowing of the skin, eyes and mucous
membranes can result.
Common causes include exposure to
contaminated blood, such as sharing needles
from drug use; the use of contaminated needles
for tattooing or body piercing; or receiving a blood
transfusion before 1992. Before that date, blood-
screening tests were not sophisticated enough to
detect the disorder. A woman with the diagnosis
can pass the virus on to a newborn. Contrary to
some beliefs, hepatitis C isn’t ordinarily transmitted
through sexual contact, although in rare instances
it can happen.
Testing is accomplished through a simple blood
analysis. If the results come back positive, a
physician might choose to measure the viral load
in the blood so the best course of treatment can be
decided. He or she may also choose to order a liver
biopsy, a procedure in which a small sample of tissue
is removed for analysis. While this procedure isn’t
vital, it will help determine the severity of the disease
and will assist further with treatment options.
Most people infected with hep C develop a
condition known as chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis
develops in about 20 percent of patients. A positive
diagnosis does not mean treatment is necessary.
Some people fight off the virus without treatment
and without permanent damage. With minor
abnormalities detected, a physician may choose to
withhold treatment. That is a decision best left to
the patient and his or her liver specialist.
Standard treatment is weekly injections of a drug
called pegylated interferon alfa in combination
with oral doses of ribavirin, a broad-spectrum
antiviral taken twice a day for up to 48 weeks. This
combination is up to 80 percent effective in clearing
the virus from the bloodstream. Minor side effects
of the duo that may improve over time include skin
irritation, insomnia, flu-like symptoms and more.
End-stage disease treatment is done through liver
transplant. Unfortunately, the number of people
on transplant lists far outweighs the number of
available livers.
On the home front, maintaining a healthy lifestyle,
avoiding medications such as acetaminophen
and some prescription drugs that may cause liver
damage, and reducing alcohol consumption are
appropriate first steps. Milk thistle has been used
for hundreds of years in Europe as a treatment
for jaundice and some liver disorders. It will not
cure hepatitis C, nor will it prevent healthy people
from contracting the virus. What is known about
this over-the-counter product is that silymarin, the
primary ingredient, may help heal the liver because
it appears to stimulate the production of antioxidant
enzymes that neutralize liver toxins and reduce
inflammation.
Milk thistle and hep C
DR. PETER J. GOTT
On
Health
REAL
ESTATE
TRANSFERS
Putnam County
Mae Louise
Baldridge, dec, S 28 Q
NE, Blanchard TWP.,
and S 28 Q NW 1.05
acres, Blanchard TWP.,
to Ronald C. Baldridge
and Linda K. Moser.
Patrick B. Rosselit,
dec, S 14 Q SW .84
acre, Ottawa TWP., to
Catherina A. Rosselit.
GMAC Mortgage
LLC, Lot 297, Leipsic,
to Secretary of
Housing and Urban
Development.
David A. Rambo and
Dawn J. Rambo, S 36
Q NW 2.028 acres,
Van Buren TWP., to
Larry Bartolomucci
and Kathleen L.
Bartolomucci.
Martin E. Schroeder,
TR, and Angela Mildred
Schroeder, TR, S 2
Q NE 52.632 acres,
Palmer TWP., to Roy
A. Schroeder, Kimberly
A. Schroeder, Gordon
A. Verhoff, TR, and
Sharon L. Verhoff, TR.
Dennis D. Schroeder,
TR, and Joan M.
Schroeder, TR, S 25
Q NE 2.001 acres, Van
Buren TWP., to Anthony
D. Schroeder and Kay
M. Schroeder.
Marlene J. Inkrott
and Gerald O. Inkrott,
S 24 Q NW .50 acres,
Liberty TWP., to Arnulfo
Noriega, JR., and Joy
Noriega.
Edward P. Cassidy
and Eve E. Cassidy, Lot
145, Columbus Grove,
and Lot 146, Columbus
Grove, to Robert S.
Jesko.
Jon J. Walker and
Lisa L. Walker, Lot 3,
.448 acres, Columbus
Grove, to Brian J.
Schroeder and Amy M.
Schroeder.
Fannie Mae, aka,
Federal National
Mortgage Association,
Lot 301, Leipsic, to
David J. Birkemeier and
Amy R. Birkemeier.
Thomas M. Knueven
and Ann B. Knueven,
S27 Q SE 33.93 acres,
Ottawa TWP., S 27 Q
Se .45 acre, Ottawa
TWP., S 27 Q SE 3.37
acres, Ottawa, S 35
Q NE 38.545 acres,
Ottawa TWP., S 27 Q
SE 1.0 acre, Ottawa
TWP., S 26 Q SW 27.19
acres, Ottawa TWP., S
26 Q SW .81 acre, S
26 Q SW 22.021 acres,
Ottawa TWP., S 26 Q
SW .81 acre, Ottawa
TWP., to Studer Farm
Limited.
25619 ROAD R.,
Ft. Jennings
(1 mile southwest of
Ottoville)
Wed. 7/14, 5pm-9pm
Thurs. & Fri. 9am-5pm
Kids clothes, 13” and
20” TV, Roll top desk
entertainment center,
Portable basketball poll,
bike, and many misc. items.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PEANUTS
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Monday Evening July 12, 2010
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©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Monday, July 12, 2010 The Herald – 3B
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Vacation ends
in suspicion
Dear Annie: An old
acquaintance agreed to look
in on my cat while I was
on vacation. Upon my return,
I noticed that the lock had
been picked on the door to
the room where I keep my
valuables. My purses, dress-
ers and closets had been rum-
maged through. Missing are
several antique silver pieces
and the contents of my jew-
elry box. There are dozens
of other items I have yet to
find.
Since my
acquaintance is
a respectable,
c h u r c h g o i n g
woman who wants
for nothing, I find
it hard to believe
she would do such
a thing. I asked
whether she had
let anyone else into
my house, and she
said, “No.”
There was no
forced entry, and no one else
had access to my home. What
should I do? -- Thou Shalt
Not Steal
Dear Thou Shalt: Report
the theft to the police imme-
diately. It’s possible someone
else broke into your home
and your friend is unaware
of it. She may have acciden-
tally left the door unlocked
on one of her trips in or out
of the house. And she could
be a thief or a kleptomaniac.
Don’t accuse her. Simply tell
her you noticed several items
were missing from your home
and notified the police. Say
you wanted to let her know
because they may need her
help.
Dear Annie: My young-
est child passed away a few
years ago, and it took my hus-
band and me quite some time
to find a headstone perfect
enough to be the last thing we
would ever buy for our child.
My daughter and I cleaned
and polished the headstone
and put beautiful flower
arrangements in the vases
we had built on each side.
We made sure the flowers
were yellow and white. The
problem is, a few days later,
my mother-in-law took blue
and purple flowers and stuck
them in the same vase.
Although I truly appreci-
ate that my in-laws want to
bring flowers, I want these
vases for my arrangements
only. Putting together the col-
ors involves a lot of tears and
emotions because it makes
me feel like I’m still taking
care of my child.
How do I respectfully tell
my in-laws to stop messing
up my arrangements and to
instead put their flowers in
those plastic vases that stick
in the ground? Is it wrong
for me to feel this way? --
Unsure in Oklahoma
Dear Unsure: You can’t
help how you feel, but surely
you realize that your in-laws
are also grieving and want
to “take care of” their grand-
child, too. They aren’t trying
to usurp your efforts. They
are trying to contribute to
them.
Approach this in a spirit
of cooperation. Explain that
you’d like the side vases
reserved for specific arrange-
ments. Ideally, you would
allow them to add to those
arrangements and feel a part
of your efforts. But if not,
provide them with a few
plastic vases and ask if they
would place their flowers in
those. Make sure
you tell them how
much you appreci-
ate their assistance
in brightening the
gravesite. We also
suggest you contact
The Compassionate
Friends (compas-
sionatefriends.org)
at 1-877- 969-0010,
a wonderful orga-
nization for those
whose children
have died.
Dear Annie: I agree
with your suggestion that
“Lonesome’s” wife should
contact the American Cancer
Society, but I believe your
response lacked compassion
for him. This man has bent
over backward in his concern.
As a five-year cancer sur-
vivor who has to wear a pad
because of leakage and sees
the scar that runs from my
waistline all the way down, I
know what this does to one’s
self-esteem. But cuddling
doesn’t always lead to arous-
al, and sometimes a person
just wants to hold the person
he loves.
Your assumption that
“Lonesome” is only interested
in sex is female-biased. You
need to cut him some slack.
-- Living, Loving without
Sex in Illinois
Dear Living: We realize
some information was lost
in the editing process, but
even so, you are right that we
should have acknowledged
his patience over the past
several years. He obviously
loves his wife, and we hope
they can work this out.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
Tuesday, July 13, 2010
If you’ve done your homework
and have acquired both knowledge
and expertise, it will give you the
edge you need over your competi-
tion in the year ahead. Your odds
for advancement in your career look
strong.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -
Patiently listen to everyone’s sugges-
tions concerning a matter that is of
joint concern. One among the group
could have a dynamite, albeit unusu-
al, idea that’ll be outstanding.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) - Be-
cause you are likely to be far more
emotionally intent upon doing a good
job, you’ll really throw yourself into
your work. By doing so, the project
will seem easier and far more fun.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -
When all is said and done, endeavors
that contain elements of change will
work out for your beneft. Be pre-
pared to go along with some of the
new and different ideas of others.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) - Take
emotion out of the equation and make
sure assessments of an important
matter are pragmatic and doable. This
doesn’t mean you should discount
any intuitive hunches, as long as they
are sound.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -
You can once again depend on an old
friend who has stepped up to the plate
and gone to bat for you in the past.
This person’s support might turn out
to be the clincher.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) - There isn’t a better time than
now for taking care of a matter that
is quite signifcant to you fnancially.
Try to keep your thinking open in or-
der to be able to do so when opportu-
nity knocks.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) - When leadership is required,
be ready to step into the breach. You
will be far better equipped to direct
the delicate matter than will your as-
sociates.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -
Do your part to smooth out the path
when someone who aided you in the
past needs your help, even if it causes
you inconvenience. Fair play is fair
turnaround.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
- Some kind of social commitment
you’ve been dreading will actually
turn out to be a barrel of fun, so stop
trying to fgure out ways to get out of
it. You’ll be glad you participated.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -
Although you might prefer to work
with a partner, you don’t need one
and actually will do better without
one. Once you start working on your
project alone, you’ll realize this to be
true.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Don’t feel like your frst ideas are
carved in stone; they aren’t. You’ll
discover that the longer you deliber-
ate, the better and more creative your
thinking is likely to become.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -
Someone you’re working with might
implement some changes without
your knowledge, which you might
initially resent. Upon application,
however, you’ll be glad s/he did.
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cate, Inc.