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BIGGER

IS BETTER
Large chains are
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OUT OF
ALIGNMENT
Franchisees and
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2017 The Frenchs Food Company LLC
CONTENTS
VOLUME 49, NO. 11 | FEBRUARY 2017

IN THIS ISSUE

14 33
THE 2017 FRANCHISE REPORT
SIZE DOES MATTER
Big name brands continue to dominate

37 PLAYING NICE
The franchisor/franchisee relationship
can be a delicate one

40 A FRESH FACE
Opa! of Greece has never wavered
from its founders vision
26
DREAMSTIME.COM [GLASS OF SPRITZ APERITIF APEROL COCKTAIL WITH ORANGE SLICES AND ICE CUBES], RYAN SZULC [ALEXANDRA FESWICK]

45 SPREADING ITS WINGS


Pumpernickels has its sights set
on franchise growth

47 TOP OF ITS GAME


Big growth on the books for Toppers Pizza

FEATURES 49 FRANCHISE REPORT LISTINGS

14 BEEF IS KING

26
The proteins popularity never falters

OH CANADA!
80
Discovering B.C.s culinary influences

73 SHOW PREVIEW DEPARTMENTS


A look inside the 2017
Restaurants Canada Show 2 FROM THE EDITOR

5 FYI
76 GREAT BEGINNINGS
Aperitifs are gaining traction 13 FROM THE DESK OF
in Canadian restaurants ROBERT CARTER

80 CHEFS CORNER:
77 SPACE-AGE SERVICE
Customer service enters the
realm of science fiction
76 Alexandra Feswick,
The Drake Hotel, Toronto

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 1


FROM THE EDITOR

FUELLING
GROWTH

will have to shift their offerings to meet those


changing demands.
Interestingly, while todays franchise land-
scape is changing, the latest industry data from
the Canadian Franchise Association shows that
interest in the quick-service industry grew 131
per cent between 2015 and 2016, while interest
in restaurants/dining rooms grew by 114 per
cent. Not surprisingly, food franchises make
up the largest sector of Canadian franchises,
growing by 45.6 per cent since 2010 and now
forming 40 per cent of the Canadian franchise
market. And, with the fast-casual segment
continuing to accelerate at the expense of full-
service, many emerging concepts will fall into
this category.
Certainly, burgers and fries will always form
the backbone of fast food, but increasingly,
tomorrows concepts will be healthier and

I
more nutritious and even those stereotypical
n the foodservice industry, success is predicated not on fast foods will be forced to evolve to become healthier. Clearly,
what a restaurant operator has successfully accomplished in healthy dining is not a passing fad, its entrenched as a hard-core
the past, but what is being planned for tomorrow. Nowhere reality. Look for meat-based dining to give way to an increase in
is this more evident than in the franchise arena. For more plant-based menus, look for prominent use of pulses, grains and
than four decades, franchising has been the avenue of salads and look for less sugar and processed food. Through it all,
choice for fuelling growth and expansion in the foodservice expect local food to continue to be a huge driver in all segments
industry while consistently spawning new concepts. of the industry.
Although growth is certainly more measured these days, given As with all matters in our lives today, lets not underestimate
that many of the industrys most successful concepts are now the impact of technology on the foodservice industry, which will
reaching middle age, new concepts continue to come to the fore, continue to make the way the industry delivers the food experi-
with one significant difference. Now, emerging concepts are dis- ence quicker and more efficient.
tinguished more by healthy fare, with an ethnic perspective, and
NICK WONG, LOCATION PROVIDED BY VIA CIBO

less on the typical foods usually associated with QSR, such as


burgers, fries and pizza.
Whether this trend is being driven by changing millennial
tastes, aging baby boomers who are more concerned with their
health or recent legislation in Ontario requiring foodservice
chains with more than 20 units to post caloric information, the ROSANNA CAIRA rcaira@kostuchmedia.com
reality is that todays consumers are looking to align themselves
with healthier eating, opting for more wholesome foods while @foodservicemag
looking to consume less saturated fat. That means operators facebook.com/foodservicehospitalitymagazine

2 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


EST. 1968 | VOLUME 49, NO. 11 | FEBRUARY 2017

EDITOR & PUBLISHER ROSANNA CAIRA

ART DIRECTOR MARGARET MOORE

MANAGING EDITOR AMY BOSTOCK


ASSISTANT EDITOR DANIELLE SCHALK
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT ERIC ALISTER

MULTIMEDIA MANAGER DEREK RAE


GRAPHIC DESIGNER COURTNEY JENKINS
SOCIAL MEDIA/EVENTS CO-ORDINATOR JHANELLE PORTER

SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER/U.S.A. WENDY GILCHRIST


ACCOUNT MANAGER MARIA FAMA VIECILI
ACCOUNT MANAGER MAGGIE SPENCE
ACCOUNT MANAGER CHERYLL SAN JUAN

CUSTOMER SERVICE ASSOCIATE ELENA OSINA


ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT DANNA SMITH

CIRCULATION PUBLICATION PARTNERS

CONTROLLER DANIELA PRICOIU

ADVISORY BOARD
CARA OPERATIONS KEN OTTO
CRAVE IT RESTAURANT GROUP ALEX RECHICHI
FAIRFAX FINANCIAL HOLDINGS LIMITED NICK PERPICK
FHG INTERNATIONAL INC. DOUG FISHER
FRESHII MATTHEW CORRIN
JOEY RESTAURANT GROUP BRITT INNES
KATIE JESSOP REGISTERED DIETITIAN KATIE JESSOP
LECOURS WOLFSON LIMITED NORMAN WOLFSON
MANITOWOC FOODSERVICE JACQUES SEGUIN
SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY & TOURISM MANAGEMENT,
UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH BRUCE MCADAMS
SENSORS QUALITY MANAGEMENT DAVID LIPTON
SOTOS LLP JOHN SOTOS
SOUTH ST. BURGER CO. JAY GOULD
THE HOUSE OF COMMONS JUDSON SIMPSON
THE MCEWAN GROUP MARK MCEWAN
UNILEVER FOOD SOLUTIONS NORTH AMERICA GINNY HARE

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Published 11 times per year by Kostuch Media Ltd.,
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WRAP UP
HAPPINESS

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FYI M O N T H LY N E W S A N D U P D A T E S F O R T H E F O O D S E R V I C E I N D U S T R Y

SINCE
2011,
THE
a major blow to the sustainability
of distilleries working to provide
Ontario farm-to-table, grain-to-glass
spirits, and ignores the lessons of
NUMBER what works and what doesnt from
Ontarios own wine and beer-tax
OF SMALL
policy, as well as the successful spirit-
DISTILLERS tax policies in places such as B.C. We
IN THE were expecting a spirit tax tiered by
volume, says Panacci. This bill dem-
PROVINCE
onstrates that the Liberal government
HAS doesnt support the growth of small
GROWN businesses or a healthy and competi-

TAXING FROM
tive domestic market.
But the government, says Benoit,

TIMES TWO sees every bottle sold at a graduated

TO
rate as lost government revenue.
Under the new legislation, small dis-

16
New distillery tax deals a real blow to
iSTOCK.COM/THARAKORN [TAXES], iSTOCK.COM/ESDRAS700 [WHISKY BOURBON IN GLASS], iSTOCK.COM/KRISTIANDAY [BOTTLING WHISKY]

tilleries that cant get LCBO listings


Ontario craft-spirit producers BY AMY BOSTOCK are denied the chance to make their
retail store a profit centre, meaning

I
n December 2016, Bill 70 which give them credit for this that they they can barely break even. It makes
includes a new 61.5 per cent per didnt want to make it more profitable it very tough to make a go of it and
bottle sales tax for stores owned for us to sell in our own stores ver- . . . C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 6
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

and operated by Ontarios small and sus selling in the LCBO. Thats really
independent distilleries received unfortunate and short-sighted.
Royal Assent, angering an industry NDP Finance critic Catherine
that has lobbied for years for a gradu- Fife who has thrown her support
ated tax system by volume and one behind the provinces craft distillery
similar to the current taxation of craft industry said in the legislature that
beer and wine in Ontario. Ontarios craft distillers were blind-
According to Charles Benoit, presi- sided by Bill 70. It will force many of
dent of the Ontario Craft Distillers
Association (OCDA) and co-owner of
them to sell their products abroad
instead of in Ontario, change their
Fast Fact:
Toronto Distillery Co., the govern- business models entirely, or simply The new tax rate is
ment was very clear and I have to shut down. 10 times what Ontario
In a release from OCDA, Rocco
Panacci, co-founder of Yongehurst
wineries pay
Distillery in Toronto, says the tax is for on-site sales.

On Oct, 28, 2016, the LCBO began allowing distillers to deliver grain-to-glass spirits to LCBO
stores for retail. However, despite the significant distribution costs being downloaded to the
distiller, the LCBO opted to still apply its full 140-per-cent markup to the hand-delivered
grain-to-glass product.

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 5


FYI

COMING
. . . CONTINUED F R O M PA G E 5

Meeting the needs of


going forward, this means were not
going to have a thriving eco-system
of small distilleries the way B.C. does
EVENTS
your discerning customers or the way most U.S. states now enjoy.
FEB. 9 CAFP 43rd Top Management Night Gala,
The only entries will be well-capitalized
from coast to coast companies, he says.
The Boulevard Club, Toronto. Tel: 416-422-3431;
email: toronto@cafp.ca; website: cafp.ca
The OCDA is now calling on the
provincial legislature to give the tax a FEB. 17-18 Winefest Edmonton, Shaw
full hearing in committee. If theres no Conference Centre, Hall D, Edmonton.
further reform soon, then the long-term Tel: 403-228-0777; email: katie@celebratew-
effect is that well have a lot of labels inefest.com; website: celebratewinefest.com/
but a lot less real distilling going on, Edmonton
says Benoit, referring to the common
practice of spirits, such as whisky, being FEB. 26-28 2017 Restaurants Canada Show,
EnerCare Centre Toronto, Toronto.
purchased in bulk and rebottled under
Tel: 800-387-5649 Ext. 7469;
another brand name. We want to be
email: theshow@restaurantscanada.org;
makers, not fakers.
website: rcshow.com
He says thanks to the way being
largely paved by brewers, customers are MAR. 18-19 Expo Manger Sant et Vivre
0 calories now exploring new brands and a lot of Vert, Centre de Congrs, Montreal.
marketers will be capitalizing on that. Email: louise@expomangersante.com;
Small artisan producers can do a lot to website: expomangersante.com
revive both urban and rural areas, he
continues. [But Bill 70 means] Ontario MAR. 23 Icons and Innovators Breakfast
will be a less interesting place and well Speaker Series with Arne Sorenson, CEO of
Marriott International, Tel: 416-447-0888 Ext.
really miss out.
235; email:dpricoiu@kostuchmedia.com;
website: kostuchmedia.com/shop

BREAKFAST MAR. 24-26 Expo Manger Sant et Vivre


Vert, Palais de Congrs, Quebec City.
FOR DINNER Email: louise@expomangersante.com;
website: expomangersante.com

Natural
M cDonalds Canada has begun testing
all-day breakfast at select loca-
tions across the country, according to the
APR. 6-7 The Canadian Health Food Association
West Trade Show and Conference, Vancouver
Convention Centre, West Building, Vancouver.
Canadian Press. Canadians can now get
Tel: 800-661-4510; email: info@chfa.ca;
their Egg McMuffin fix, along with other website: chfa.ca
breakfast staples, whenever the mood
strikes. All-day breakfast is being offered APR. 19-20 13th Annual North American
at 17 restaurants in B.C., Ontario and Summit on Food Safety, Old Mill Inn, Toronto.
Quebec. The majority of the locations are in Tel: 866-298-9343 Ext. 200; email:
customercare@strategyinstitute.com;
Ajax and Whitby, Ont. Other locations par-
website: foodsafetycanada.com
ticipating in the test are Mississauga Ont.;
Brampton, Ont.; the Montreal area; Langley, MAY 9 Canadian Foodservice Summit, Toronto.
B.C.; and Coquitlam, B.C. The test follows Tel: 416-533-6066 Ext. 235; email:erick.bauer@
Organic/ McDonalds successful launch of all-day npd.com; website: npdgroup.ca
Fairtrade breakfast in the U.S. in the fall of 2015. In
Canada, the chain currently offers select
breakfast items all day at its two stand-
alone McCaf locations in Toronto.
FOR MORE EVENTS VISIT
For more information, contact your local http://bit.ly/FHevents
distributor or you can reach us at:
WEST EAST
1-800-661-5350 1-888-526-8421
westsales@lantic.ca csr@lantic.ca FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM
RogersSugar.com Lantic.ca
Restaurants Canada Show
(Feb. 26-28) Booth# 1121
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FYI

RESTO BUZZ
Vietnamese-style sandwich shop Bnh M Bnh Yiu has opened in Montreals Mile End dis-
trict. The new restaurant serves Vietnamese sandwiches on French-style baguettes. Other
items on the menu include soup-and-salad options and
Vietnamese iced coffee with condensed milk. All sandwiches
are $6 and soups cost $3The King Street Food Companys
long-anticipated French restaurant La Banane has opened
its doors in Toronto. Executive chef Brandon Olsen brings
significant experience in French cooking, having previously
worked at The French Laundry and Ad Hoc, both located in
Hopscotch Californias Napa Valley. The 85-seat La Banane occupies the
former space of the companys The Saint TavernCalii Love
opened its second location in less than six months at Bay and Cumberland streets in Toronto.
Building on the success of its first restaurant in the citys King West neighbourhood, Calii Love
has expanded its menu with fresh and healthy additions, such as chef Joe Fridays homemade
bone broth. Signature pok bowls cost $10.95 for a small and $14.95 for a largeHopscotch,
co-owned by brothers Aiden and Wyatt Booth, recently opened in Torontos Scotia Plaza. The
new eatery caters to on-the-go customers and offers chef-inspired dishes made with locally
sourced, sustainable ingredients. Hopscotchs menu features innovative dishes such as organ-
ic salads, rice and quinoa bowls, burritos, smoothies and juice, as well as locally roasted cof-
feeAquilini Restaurant Group opened The Sportsbar Live at Vancouvers Rogers Arena in late
December. The 524-seat upscale 14,000-sq.-ft. venue offers in-seat dining privileges and an
unobstructed view of the ice. Executive chef Robert Bartley heads up the elevated food-and-
beverage program, which boasts premium menus featuring classic fan favourites with a twist,
such as The Biggest, Baddest Sportsbar Wings with choice of 10 sauces; the Foot-Long Grilled
Cheese; and Trainers SaladLift Bar & Grill has opened a location at Vancouver International
Airport (YVR).

Opening a new restaurant? Let us in on the buzz.


Send a high-res image, menu and background information
about the new establishment to ealister@kostuchmedia.com.

FRESHII The company has filed a preliminary


prospectus with securities regulators
GOES PUBLIC in Canada for an initial public offering
and secondary offer-
ing of class-A subor-
dinate voting shares.
The IPO will include
a treasury offering
by Freshii Inc. and a
secondary offering
by specific share-
holders, including
Freshiis chairman
and CEO, Matthew
Restaurant chain Freshii Inc. Corrin. A syndicate of underwriters,
is filing for an initial public offering led by joint bookrunners CIBC Capital
2016 The Original Cakerie

of its shares. The Canadian fast-food Markets and RBC Capital Markets,
franchise opened its first restaurant will manage the offering. The number
in 2005 and has since expanded to of shares to be sold and the price have
244 locations across 15 countries. yet to be confirmed.

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM
FYI

IN BRIEF
steamed milk. Restaurant Brands International study conducted in partnership with Libran
Inc. will be purchasing $12,000-espresso Research & Consulting surveyed more than
Tim Hortons is preparing to introduce premi- machines for its Tim Hortons franchisees 1,000 Americans and asked respondents to
um-espresso coffees in an effort to better across Canada. Industry insiders predict a select the top three food stories of the past 12
compete in the QSR coffee wars. The brand has spring-2017 launchChipotles efforts to monthsMTY Food Group Inc. has successfully
made a quiet move to replace its powdered recover from food-safety issues was named acquired 60 per cent of La Diperies assets,
espresso-based coffees with ones made from the number-1 food story of 2016 in Hunter pursuant to the original acquisition announce-
freshly ground Arabica espresso beans and Public Relations annual Food News Study. The ment in Nov. 2016. The total consideration for
the transaction is approximately $0.9 million
Culinary students at Humber College recently
competed in front of a live audience in a cook-
off to create the best food-truck inspired
dishes. The event was part of Humber Colleges
ongoing partnership with Nestl Professional.
Kris Wray earned first place for his Chinese
steam buns with red Thai curry-marinated
chicken thighsFamoso Neapolitan Pizzeria
has opened its 29th franchised location on
Rochdale Boulevard in Regina the second
Regina-based Famoso to open in as many
years and the first of three locations slated for
Saskatchewan in late 2016 and early 2017.

PEOPLE
Scott Ward is the new president and COO of
Experience the newest SelfCookingCenter live today! Browns Restaurant Group. Ward, who joined
Browns in 2009, has already assumed most
day-to-day operational responsibilities for the
companyChef Amanda Ray from Oliver &
Bonacinis Canteen Restaurant was named the

The new SelfCookingCenter winner of the Gold Medal Plates competition in


Toronto. Chef Albet Ponzo of Le Slect Bistro
Ideas change the world. and Ravine Estates Winery Restaurants Ross
Midgley joined Ray on the podium, earning sil-
ver and bronze medals, respectively.
Live. Free of charge. No commitment. Near you.

SUPPLY SIDE
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Blue Point Capital Partners has acquired con-


Register today for a FREE RATIONAL CookingLive event
near you at www.rationalcanada.com. trolling interest in Hendrix Hotel & Restaurant
Equipment and Supplies. Effective immediately,
Canadas two largest foodservice-equipment
dealers, Hendrix and Russell Food Equipment,
will become one company under the banner
of Russell Hendrix Foodservice Equipment
Rubbermaid Commercial Products has
Come and cook with us! launched a colour-coded foodservice system
designed to help commercial kitchens reduce
foodborne illness and cross-contamination.
The colour-coded line, which received the
American Culinary Federation Seal of Approval,
covers everything from prep tools to storage.

10 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY


d_ThinkBIG_4.625x7.5inch_CAN_eng.indd 1 FEBRUARY 2017 09.01.2017 15:37:48 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM
+
Some things are simply better together . . .

Macaroni is to cheese what Russell is to Hendrix, an unbeatable combination. Over the


next several months, Canadas two largest foodservice equipment dealers will become
one. The merged company, Russell Hendrix Foodservice Equipment, will supply customers
across Canada. Stay up to date at russellhendrix.com
MC/TM

MC/TM

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www.saputofoodservice.ca
FROM THE DESK OF ROBERT CARTER

DELVING INTO DELIVERY


Technology and the millennial cohort are the
driving forces behind increased delivery demand

By the Numbers
(year ending 2016)

Total delivery occasions


in Canada: 170 million
Increase in delivery
orders made via
mobile apps: 15%
Average eater-
check size for
delivery orders: $12.89

I
n todays flat foodservice environment, cent on the year in 2016. (18 to 34) are the drivers of delivery
where attracting consumers continues Given that mobile ordering is driving deliv- accounting for 36 per cent of all delivery
to be a struggle, its no wonder delivery ery, it comes as no surprise that the QSR seg- orders. It is also the only segment of consum-
has seen steady growth over the last few ment still accounts for the majority of deliv- ers ordering more meals via delivery on a
years. Total delivery occasions in Canada ery traffic. In 2016, 66 per cent of all delivery year-over-year basis.
amounted to 170-million in 2016 and have occasions were made to QSR, while the fam- Another reason for operators to pay
increased at a relatively steady pace of one ily/mid-scale segment attracted 21 per cent attention to delivery is that compared to all
per cent year-over-year for the last five years. of delivery occasions. That said, the family/ other access modes, delivery garners the larg-
While this number may seem somewhat mod- mid-scale segment actually saw an increase in est average eater-check size of $12.89. This is
est, the development of mobile-payment apps delivery traffic in 2016 (six per cent growth) substantially greater than the other major
and third-party deliv- while QSR declined access modes, where average eater-check size
ery services in recent Millennials (18 to 34) account for nine per cent. This continues to remain below the $10 mark
years have provided 36 per cent of all delivery orders divergence is being (on premise: $10.35, carry out: $5.90, drive
a new and innovative driven by family/mid- thru: $4.61). FH
type of tool that many scale-style restaurants
operators are now leveraging to grow delivery such as Swiss Chalet and St. Hubert, which
orders in place of stagnant on-site traffic. successfully launched and promoted mobile
Delivery orders made via mobile apps apps in 2016, leading to greater demand for Robert Carter is executive
grew by more than 15 per cent last year. delivery meals overall. Furthermore, third- director, Foodservice Canada,
Furthermore, mobile-delivery orders now party delivery services such as Uber Eats are with the NPD Group Inc. He
make up 14 per cent of all delivery occasions now making it easier for smaller independent can be reached at robert.
iSTOCK.COM/RAWPIXEL

in Canadian foodservice. This is relevant operators to make a mobile connection with carter@npd.com for ques-
especially when you compare and contrast their customers. These services have become a tions regarding the latest
the mobile metrics to telephone and internet key driver of delivery, especially in the case of trends and their impact on
ordering, both of which were down one per the key millennial demographic. Millennials the foodservice business.

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 13


FOOD FILE

Beef is still king in Canadian restaurants


but new cuts are becoming the stars of the show
BY ANDREW COPPOLINO

14 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


FOOD FILE

Canadians hold a special place in Cooked to order, its just a simple


their hearts and tastebuds for beef and burger, says Phil Gallagher, Earls
arent willing to give it up, says Newitt. executive chef for Canada West. Its
Beef has a similar hold at more very good and very consistent. The
formal restaurants: at Earls Kitchen sirloin (6 oz. is $25) is the chains
+ Bar, the 100-per-cent ground- best-selling whole muscle.
FROM BABY BURGERS TO chuck burger (Bigger Better Burger, Burger or steak, beef has a special
$14.50) with no added hormones place here: Canada is the seventh-
triple-decker Grandpa Burgers and the
and antibiotic-free is one of the largest beef exporter in the world
whole A&W hamburger family in between, restaurants most popular items. Its and 11th-largest beef producer, a fact
for Canadians, beef is king. Beef con- beef is western Canadian, with burger reflected in a 2015 report published
sumption in the nation has been steady patties made in-house from scratch by Farm Credit Canada (FCC), which
and seared to a caramelized crisp on is a Crown corporation overseen by
since the mid-1990s and despite cur-
the outside. Canadian Parliament.
rently flat cattle futures, the recently
published Canadas Food Price Report
anticipates beef demand will increase.
The corollary is higher beef prices, but
Canadians want beef, it seems. Tom
Newitt, A&Ws senior director, Marketing,
Brand Communications, says sales have
increased at the chains 850 outlets since
2013 because consumers love beef.

BEEF ACROSS THE BOARD Beef features prominently on the


menu at Earls Kitchen + Bar (left); diners are looking for
smaller portions and leaner cuts (top right and inset)

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 15


FOOD FILE

Nose-to-tail
Noshing
Higher-end restaurants are
getting very creative, using
non-traditional cuts as a way
to make better use of the whole
animal, says Marty Carpenter,
corporate chef with Canada
Beef. Sous-vide and tagine
cooking is ideal for beef cheeks,
bavette (flank steak), oxtail and
shank. These dishes are driven
by the desire to make better

SATISFYING a great way to diversify use of all the cuts available,


he says, adding the approach
FOOD cut and menu options,
requires strong skill-sets in
EXPLORERS Carpenter says.
The tale is told through butchery and cooking.
At one end of the spec- dry-aging, too. At a butcher, In Halifax, Cut Steakhouse
trum, A&W, with a strong such as Kitcheners Victoria general manager Melissa Carey
branding push for its beef, Street Market, dry-aging says customers are looking for
is approaching 900 burger beef for several weeks premium cuts primarily, while
locations; at the other is enhances flavour and ten- Earls works with less familiar
Torontos Barberians steak- derness by allowing natural cuts that contain costs while
house, founded in 1959, enzymatic processes to offering a beefy experience. We
and Kitcheners Charcoal occur. At Torontos Jacobs are using flanks, clodhammers
Steakhouse, which is cel- & Co. Steakhouse, the dry- and skirts, says Phil Gallagher,
ebrating six decades in aging technique the 185- Earls executive chef for Canada
business this year. seat restaurant started 10 West. The latter includes an
But while beef will always years ago is focuses heavily interpretation of an Argentine
have a place on restaurant on primal cuts such as ten- chimichurri with a poblano
menus, many of todays derloin (6 oz. is $39), ribeye
pure, tomatoes and roasted
diners want to eat it a little and striploin. At that point
potatoes. Its selling quite well.
bit less and a little less fre- in time, it seemed like
quently. Restaurants have . . . C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 1 8

responded to the trend by


using less-familiar beef cuts
than traditional middle
meats, as Marty Carpenter,
NEW TWISTS Burgers
corporate chef with Canada remain perennial
Beef, calls them. He attri- favourite but chefs
butes a recent butchery are using different
renaissance to the trend, beef cuts and fat
blends (above); many
along with what might be
restaurants are fea-
called ingredient stories turing new and less-
and menu narratives. known cuts of beef
Chefs are looking to and presenting them
diversify menus to satisfy in innovative ways
(right)
the consumer, who is a food
explorer and always seeking
something new. Featuring
braising cuts such as short-
ribs on the menu has been

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FOOD FILE

Fast, Easy,
Efficient we were the outlier, says
Jacobs general manager
Robert Gravelle. Now, its
been a growing trend to see
dry-aged beef being offered
regularly at many restau-
rants, not just steakhouses.
At Cut Steakhouse in
Halifax, N.S., general man-
ager Melissa Carey says beef
is dry-aged in-house for
35 to 45 days. A cart visits

Juice Extractor
table-side with a presen-
tation of various cuts so
customers can learn about
flavour profiles and mar-
bling content. People really
enjoy the dry-aged beef. In
our market, there is not a
lot of it around, Carey says.
LOVE ME TENDER Primal cuts,
such as tenderloin, remain
top sellers

Gilvesy and his grass-fed farmers . . . C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 6

B
ryan Gilvesy carbon cycle. Thats People really like experimenting,
owns and oper- what plants do. And but we cant get too crazy.
ates Yu Ranch, what our farm does is Ironically, the cost of so-
a grass-fed beef opera- produce grass which called cheaper sub-primals has
tion in Norfolk County. harvests energy from risen. Everyone is using them,
Raising his herd of the sun and carbon says Gallagher. Take the case
Texas Longhorns near from the atmosphere.
of beef bones, notes Dave Meli,
Tillsonburg, Ont., he Then the grasses
executive butcher at Torontos
sells everything from are harvested not
Healthy Butcher. Several years
Auto feed system ground beef and ten-
derloin to shank and
with machines but
with cattle. If you ago, he couldnt give them
beef cheeks. His is a think about it, Gilvesy away. Today, Im bringing in
unique approach to continues, the fuel hundreds of pounds of bones
agriculture, to stew- used to harvest the every single week. And Im being
ardship of the land grasses themselves is
charged an arm and a leg for
and to beef. also from the energy
them. Its unbelievable whats
We view the farm of the sun. Those cattle
as a giant photovoltaic are propelled by the happened with bones, he says.
receptor that harvests energy of the sun, not Carpenter says both inde-
the energy of the sun diesel fuel. pendent restaurants and chain
and pulls down carbon All that energy is operations are using cuts such
from the atmosphere, then converted into as cross rib petit tender (Teres
Gilvesy says. lean protein in the
Major), chuck and shoulder cuts.
The farm hands form of beef with less
Chuck flats braise very nicely, he
tasked with doing that fat. Its a natural
job are the grasses approach to beef, says adds. The quality and versatil-
that grow at Yu. But Gilvesy. Its just a dif- ity of these non-traditional cuts

Free demonstration hes not being face-


tious in alluding to the
ferent way to think
about farming.
has many of these items finding
permanent homes on menus.
800/824-1646
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FOOD FILE

THE LANGUAGE popular, according to Aaron


OF HORMONES Jourden, of Chicago-based
Technomic Inc.
There is growing interest in Local sourcing, animal
what is vaguely called natu- welfare and beef free of
ral beef. For Gallagher, its hormones and antibiotics
the most significant beef all speak to this demand for
trend hes witnessed in his better ingredients, he says.
25 years in the business. However, geography can
Thats beef raised without determine demand. Located
the use of antibiotics and in Longview, Alta., in the
growth hormones, he says. foothills of the Rockies,
The way the animals are Longview Steakhouse is a
treated has also become product of its economic
more important, he adds, and political terroir when it
but the overuse of antibiot- comes to sales. According to
ics in the beef industry in co-owner and chef Karim
some peoples minds has Belmoufid, meat sales have
become a big issue. jumped 80 per cent over the
Carpenter says hormone- last year.
free is a term that can be Its easy for us to get
misrepresented as mar- organic chicken or salmon
keting positions that are and hormone-free food. But
grounded in food-fear in terms of beef, the devel-
[tactics]. All beef contains opment has been miniscule.
naturally occurring hor- While Longviews beef
mones, substances that are dishes are what the majority
produced by the animal of the nearby ranchers pro-
and which are vital to the duce, they do offer variety
regulation of its metabolism, and let their customers
reproduction and natural know about it. When we
growth. When diners ask for buy local cattle from one of
naturally raised beef, what the ranchers that is natu-
they are asking for is a piece ral and hormone-free, its
of meat from cattle grown advertised based specifically
without added growth-pro- on who we purchased it
moting hormones, antibiot- from. If we have an organic
ics and animal by-products. product, its put on our spe-
That request is becoming cials menu, Belmoufid says.

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FOOD FILE

FLAVOUR it comes to traditional cuts


FORWARD such as sirloins and strips,
he says people prefer plain
Jourden cites statistics old salt and pepper.
showing over the last 24 According to Jourden,
months, ginger and dill have despite the rise in popular-
become the fastest-growing ity of more vegetable-for-
flavours associated with ward dishes, beef continues
beef dishes at top restau- to have great appeal for
rants. Asian flavours such diners, especially in crave-
as sesame and teriyaki also able dishes such as burgers
appear on the fastest-grow- and burritos. At Earls, the dish under development. ing other beef cuts can also LAND AND SEA Earls
ing flavours list, he says. In number of beef items on We see sales growing for hold their own. Crafting is Kitchen + Bar gets
the menu hasnt changed, our veggie burger and innovative, blending
its niche market in western gaining ground with chefs
cultural influences in
Canada, Longview might but the size and price-point chicken, so theres clearly a of independent operations its steak and sushi
add some Vietnamese influ- has. For us, the days of the demand for vegetarian and focusing on techniques offering
ence to their cooking, says 12-ounce New York and non-beef options. such as in-house smoking,
Belmoufid. We have some the big ribeyes are gone. We Yet beef burg- charcuterie and dry-aging.
flexibility in playing with have a veggie burger and a ers or steaks con- Braising dishes such as
flavours and something like tofu add-on for a stir-fry tinue to inspire creativity, shortribs and pulled beef
a short rib banh mi-style. it allows vegetarians a way according to Carpenter. have become new standards
At Earls, Gallagher also in to our menu. Customization is getting to and global cuisine influ-
experiments with different A&Ws Newitt points to be a key feature, like build- ences lead to new flavours
flavours, marinades and alternative ways to eat beef, ing your own burger at and cuts that are shaping
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rubs to a degree, but when including a lettuce-wrap McDonalds, he says, add- new menu options. FH

custom cut.

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A WEALTH OF LOCAL INGREDIENTS FUELS THE RICH DIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIAS CULINARY INFLUENCES
STORY BY SARAH B. HOOD

FROM THE SEA Kussi oysters


with shallot mignonette
from Bishops Restaurant
in Vancouver

To understand B.C. at all, you have to look at the ocean.


The indigenous cuisine was all ocean- and river-based, says Lenore
Newman, a professor at the University of the Fraser Valley who recently
crossed the country in search of Canadian cuisine while researching her
new book Speaking in Cod Tongues: A Canadian Culinary Journey.
Traversing the Salish Sea southern B.C.s network of coastal waterways
First Nations peoples had access to an astonishing array of foodstuffs;
most prominent, of course, being the five types of local wild salmon.

26 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


oh Canada!

The wild salmon is really the


British Columbia identity, full
stop, says Ned Bell, executive chef
for the Vancouver Aquariums
Ocean Wise program. The eagle
catches the salmon; the bear picks
it up or hunts it; that decomposing
carcass fuels the trees and the eco-
systems of the longest continuous
coastline in the world. The First
Nations realized this thousands of
years ago.
Robert Clark, former execu-
tive chef at Kambolis Groups C
Restaurant and Raincity Grill, runs
sustainable-seafood outlet The Fish
Counter in Vancouver. When I got
here in 1992, every restaurant in
the city had salmon on the menu,

but it was farmed Atlantic salmon, NATURES BOUNTY


he says. What has evolved in the (clockwise from top
left) Grand Fir tips;
chef community, and now at the
chef Bill Jones smoked
retail level, is that we have gone B.C. salmon; halibut
back to significantly appreciating dish from Boulevard at
our wild B.C. salmon. People want Night at the Vancouver
to know the species, because the Aquarium; wild
Chanterelle mushrooms;
sockeye from the Fraser doesnt
foraged Morel mush-
taste like the salmon from the rooms and nettle
Skeena or the Nass.
But B.C.s bounty extends far
beyond the salmon. We, as chefs,
realize we have an ocean that pro-

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 27


duces sustainable seafood, the
THE EXPO EFFECT

T
Okanagan that produces wonder-
he beginning of fine
ful wine and the Fraser Valley
food in Vancouver,
that produces great produce, says
for all intents and
Vikram Vij, chef and CEO of Vijs
Group of Companies. I think the purposes, was Expo 86.
most important ingredient is the B.C. was never the same
pride of our own backyard. after it, says historian
I feel, as a chef, I have some Lenore Newman.
of the best produce whether More than 22 million
its cherries and peaches in the people attended the fair.
Okanagan, corn in Chilliwack or Vancouvers downtown
blueberries and cranberries in the was remade and the
Fraser Valley, agrees Bell. regional-transportation
Chef, author and renowned system was improved.
forager Bill Jones owns Deerholme Expo was a funny
Farm in the Cowichan Valley and thing, because it focused
runs culinary-consulting com- on downtown, says John
pany Magnetic North Cuisine. Bishop of Bishops. The
The blackberry is an iconic fruit expectation was that we
throughout B.C., but particularly were inviting the world
EATING LOCAL Dishes
on the coast, he says. Not a lot of and restaurants would
at Bishops Restaurant the blackberries picked are native.
be extremely busy. What
feature local ingredients The Himalayan blackberry was
happened was if you
such as Petrale sole with introduced; it grows everywhere as
Morel mushrooms went to Expo, then you
an invasive weed. It has amazing
needed to stay on the
flavour and it loves this climate.
grounds all day and the
And what fruit doesnt? The
pavilions had their own
Okanagan fruit belt is truly amaz-
restaurants. After a day
ing for orchards and fruit: peach-
es, nectarines, apples, cherries. at the fair, they straggled
Thats an area thats in transition; home past these empty
restaurants. But what it
National
a lot of those orchards are being
torn out because thats the biggest did do was shine a spot-

Treasure wine region now, says Jones.


Also, particularly on the coast-
light on Vancouver.
From 1987 to 1989,
The Nanaimo Bar, our weird
al side of B.C., the lamb is very Vancouver restau-
little strange dessertI became
famous. Salt Spring Island lamb rants basked in the
obsessed with where it came
has a great reputation; its very boom of Expo afterglow.
from, admits historian Lenore
Newman. My team spent
mild completely different than It opened B.C. to the
resources and assembled a
New Zealand [lamb]. One of the world, says Newman.
Nanaimo-Bar team. We traced it
things that sets the coast apart is After that, you had the
to mill towns of the Lower Coast
that theres a lot of great grass. waves of immigration
in the 1950s; as a blue-collar Lush grass also produces rich from Hong Kong and
wife, you were expected to pro- dairy products. We have beauti- Mainland China and
ful milk here; we have some great
DREAMSTIME.COM [NANAIMO BAR DESSERT]

duce this kind of finicky dessert. then the Olympics. Its


The Vancouver Sun published local dairy products, says Vij. If been this huge, fast evo-
the first recipe called Nanaimo Bars, and Susan Mendelson of The your cows are well pastured and
lution to the point where
Lazy Gourmet was first to sell them commercially, in the 1970s and she grazed, everything else will follow.
Vancouver is one of the
further popularized them at Expo 86. Elementary things such as eggs,
great restaurant cities
What amazes me is they went from this little recipe to being seen breads, milk and cheese, they
of the world as long
as Canadian, says Newman. Theyre available on B.C. Ferries. Theyve form the backbone of a great cui-
as you like seafood and
been available in Tim Hortons. The only Canadian dessert they play sec- sine; its not the mushrooms and
Asian influence.
ond fiddle to is probably the butter tart. the truffles.

28 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


oh Canada!

FROM THE LAND (right)


Potato Chanterelle
and Bacon Salad
from chef Bill Jones
(below). Jones dishes
are strongly influ-
enced by foraged
ingredients such as
wild mushrooms
and berries

Those ingredients are employed very few freestanding restaurants. locally sourced ingredients. Wed
in recipes from many cultures. There were hotel restaurants that serve Icelandic scampi, Dover
Today our cuisine is Creole; most Vancouverites would go to sole; even some of the oysters
I think even in early days that for special occasions, weddings, were imported. We imported
was really clear, says Newman. Christmas. What few there were mushrooms from Europe. If you
Finnish, Norwegian and British were either French bistro-style or did develop a clientele, you would
immigrants arrived fairly early, Italian, says chef John Bishop of never, never change your menu.
but right from the start, there the iconic Bishops. It was Greek, a little bit of
was a lot of Asian influence. Quite shockingly, the menus Italian and French, recalls caterer
However, it took a long time didnt feature any locally sourced and author Susan Mendelson of
for that culinary diversity to ingredients at all, he says. I The Lazy Gourmet. I was there,
become evident in Vancouvers [worked] at The Little Yellow really, on that cusp, she says,
restaurants. When I first came House; there was never any referring to her beginnings in the
to Vancouver in 1973, there were thought to promote or pursue mid-1970s, baking sweet treats

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 29


oh Canada!

for the intermission crowds at the were recognizing the value of Pre-contact Ocean Harvests
Vancouver East Cultural Centre. associating and pairing up with
She names a few iconic restau- local goat-cheese makers and so Everyone knows salmon was important to B.C.s First Nations, but few
rants of the period: Lili La Puce on. That certainly influenced my
know about another vitally important fish: the tiny silver ooligan.
(French), Orestes (Greek) and decision to pursue a more locally
Gale Smith, PhD, a founder of the British Columbia Food History
Umbertos (Italian). sourced menu, says Bishop.
Network, writes on its site that the ooligan (Thaleichthys pacifi-
The hippie movement was The real catalyst for me was
cus) is a type of smelt whose body weight is 20 per cent oil. Now a
one of the forces that changed meeting a local farm couple who
threatened species, they were also known as candle fish, since
Vancouver dining habits, said Well get the seed catalogue
they can be burned like a candle, and as saviour fish, because they
Mendelson says. There was a big out and you tell us what you want
were among the first fresh foods available in the spring.
emphasis on eating healthy food us to grow, he recalls. Another
and eating vegetarian. The Greek part of the early equation was that Prizing its nutritional and culinary qualities, certain indigenous

[influence] has really stayed the chef community was made up bands fermented [the ooligan] for the grease and it was trafficked

Mediterranean food has had a largely of European-trained chefs. along Grease Trails into Alberta, says historian Lenore Newman.
whole new life. Another thing is Now, most of the young chefs here European immigrants also failed to notice First Nations coastal
the Japanese influence; what was are trained in Canada. They are clam gardens, a technique unique to this region, says Newman.
created on the West Coast was an less traditional and more prepared They would stack rocks at the low tide line to attract the clams. Its
Asian fusion that was way ahead to break the rules, and also youve like terrace aquaculture.
of the rest of the country. got this fusion connection, with
The opening of Granville a lot of Asian cooks using their
Island in 1979 kick-started a own influence, whether its Indian,
market-shopping culture and Japanese or Chinese.
by the time Bishops opened in Vij opened his first restaurant long white aprons, bow ties, black thinking about it before they
1985, I had been reading stories in 1994. Even then, he says, it pants. make food choices.
of people like Alice Waters down was European-focused, with very Things finally started to change Foraged food and small-batch
in Berkeley with Chez Panisse, French-, Italian- and Swiss-trained with the influx of Asians from artisanal producers now repre-
and Jonathan Waxman. They chefs. The classic old-world style: China, Malaysia, Singapore, sent an important part of the
India Somalis, Punjabis from restaurant food chain. We have
England. [They] were well educat- extraordinary mushrooms and
ed, so they wanted to eat out and foraging in Tofino; unbelievable
INSPIRED CUISINE B.C. even though they liked European wild foods that are jewels are to
chefs no longer look
food, they also liked the cuisine be found all over this province;
to Europe for inspiration;
they look in their from their homes. This started a its teeming with extraordinary
own backyards lot of Asian restaurants with more things, says Bell. The world that
spicing and different flavours I live in as a chef is evolving back
rather than rouladen with sptzle to wild foods and that really
on the side. speaks to me because that focuses
No longer are B.C. kitchens around plants.
looking to Europe, or even to Jones sees cultivated truffles
California, for their inspirations, and sea vegetables as one of
but rather across the Pacific Rim. the most important local com-
And Vancouver diners dont just modities. Were in one of the
want Chinese or Indian food, says best places in the world for wild
Vij; they want the cuisine of a mushrooms. There are probably
particular province. about 40-plus different varieties.
They also want it executed Our aquaculture is considered
with local ingredients. The chefs to be one of the best uses of
in the Okanagan Valley and on the ocean these days, he adds.
Vancouver Island are very united Historically, [seaweed] was a
in supporting local, says Clark. First-Nations product. They
Solid vegetarian restaurants [are] dried it over wood smoke; its
getting a grasp; its the natural very nutritious. We use it to cre-
evolution for food. More people ate vegan gelatins. Its something
are spending more effort and youre going to see more of. FH

30 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


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BIGGER
IS
BETTER
Large chains continue to dominate in the battle for market share
STORY BY AMY BOSTOCK

A
s weak traffic continues to plague the Canadian food- According to Robert Carter, executive director, Foodservice at
service industry, stealing market share remains the Toronto-based NPD Group, the big players in Canada are continuing
prime objective of restaurants across all segments. to lead the charge in these types of initiatives.
In Canada, restaurant sales are not trending as McDonalds is starting to look at how its offerings are changing
strongly as people would like, so its become a market attracting new customers and expanding its menu. That seems to have
share play, says Geoff Wilson, principal at Torontos worked really well for them over the last year and were hearing that
fsStrategy. The successful franchises are the ones franchisees are happy and are buying into the change in direction as
helping franchisees steal more customers. well as the continued investment in the McCaf strategy and kiosks.
iSTOCK.COM/MAXSATTANA

The keys to that, he says, are evident in what some A&W is continuing its aggressive expansion into Ontario, setting
franchisees are already doing: offering more frequent limited-time up a provincial field office and bringing in management from the west
menus and upgrades to the quality of the dining spaces so a QSR now coast. From what we see, consumers are still liking the direction A&W
has a casual-dining feel, which improves a customers overall enjoy- is moving, so the traffic still seems positive, says Carter.
ment of the space. In 2015, Wendys sold off approximately 380 corporately owned

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 33


restaurants to franchisees, followed by 260 more in 2016, to NEW FACES On Target
increase cash flow and reinvest back into the brand. Wendys Although NPD According to Smokes CEO and founder Ryan Smolkin,
is repositioning itself with its new upscale brand and restau- Groups Robert his franchise has hit every expansion target since its launch
rant decor and its getting a bit of traction, says Carter.
Carter hasnt heard in November 2008. Last year saw the chain open its first two
Starbucks continues to grow at a double-digit rate by
much noise on the locations in Sudbury and also marked a significant milestone
expanding beyond its coffee offerings and investing in con-
international invest- for the brand with the introduction of its first food-court
tinued beverage innovations, as well as food programs, a
ment front, he does concept. The three-unit location, which opened in July, next
strategy Carter says is resonating with consumers and driving
name a few brands to Smokes global headquarters in Ajax, Ont., brought the
the brands growth.
with sights on the Smokes Poutinerie, Smokes Weinerie and Smokes Burritorie
Each one of these companies has mapped out where its
Canadian market. brands together in one massive 2,500-sq-ft. space.
going in order to drive greater customer satisfaction and loy-
The big story of 2016 The company is starting 2017 with more than 100 restau-
alty, adds Wilson.
was Costa Coffee rants in Canada up from 76 locations as of early July 2016

Keys to Success coming in from and five in the U.S., with plans to reach a total of 1,300
Europe and partner- restaurants through global expansion to western Europe,
If you look across the landscape, there are companies that ing with Shell. the Middle East, Australia and the Asia-Pacific region by
are doing a great job of certain things within their portfolios A British multi- 2020. Smokes aims to reach its target through master-
to maintain/build market share, says Wilson. national coffeehouse franchise and license agreements, primarily in the Middle
A shining example can be found at Vaughan, Ont.-based company, Costa East and the U.K. In the U.S., Smolkin hopes to expand his
Cara Operations Ltd., which has been steadily growing its Coffee is the second- brands current five-restaurant footprint to 800 by 2020
market share through acquisitions. Cara is growing by buy- largest coffeehouse through multi-unit agreements rather than master-
ing additional brands and continuing to cut back-of-house chain in the world franchising opportunities. Eric Alister
costs while investing in marketing to drive sales thats a behind Starbucks.
pretty healthy organization right now, says Carter. Ive heard talk about
Harveys, in particular, he says has done a great job of [Costa] having free- need to know which are a smart investment and a sound,
repositioning itself and adopting some fast-casual strategies, standing units, so I scalable fit for their specific concepts and growth plans.
such as expanding toppings and introducing new products. expect the brand to Other standout brands in 2016 included The Keg,
Dairy Queen has also been expanding its offerings, expe- continue to invest in
which Carter says continues to outperform, thanks to
riencing good growth through its menu innovation. exceptional customer loyalty. From a regional standpoint,
Canada.
Innovation is key in all aspects of the industry, says St. Hubert enjoyed strong brand loyalty throughout 2016.
Other brands
Wilson, as operators strive to advance the overall experience. Quebecers love that brand, says Carter. Its done a lot
to watch include
A number of chains have done a lot of work to improve the more positioning with the fast-casual strategy and its off-
Chicago-based
service process so that the customer has a better experience. premise, take-away growth is helping drive traffic. Its also
Potbelly Sandwiches
For example, more use of technology to manage transactions done a rebranding and upgrading of its dining rooms.
Shop, which opened
and drive customers back into restaurants to develop loyalty. They are having a good year and will likely have a good
its first Canadian
According to Aaron Jourden of Chicago-based Technomic, 2017 as well
location last year in
chains are making adoption of new technologies a greater Premium small-box casuals such as Browns
part of their business both consumer-facing and back Toronto and Georgia- Socialhouse, Moxys and Joeys also had a good year with
of the house. As new technologies proliferate, franchisors based Chick-fil-A. steady traffic and Carter predicts that trend will continue
into next year. But, he cautions, the segments success will
take away from some of the more traditional casual-dining
locations, such as Boston Pizza, which has been relatively
flat in terms of traffic. Montanas, East Side Marios and
other FSRs are not experiencing the same growth as the
premium-casual players overall, but that whole segment
is off the highs it experienced in 2008; it is the weakest-
performing segment of the market overall, says Carter.

The Real-Estate Game


iSTOCK.COM/MAXSATTANA

The big continue to get bigger and their marketing


muscle is so strong that its hard for smaller players to
break in, says Carter of Canadas franchise landscape. So
when you look at some of the smaller regional players

34 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


Booth #1411
THE FAST TRACK Last year marked another strong year for that are trying to grow, they are up against such behemoths as Cara,
McDonalds and Tim Hortons and its so hard to get your brand out in
Vancouver-based Browns Restaurant Group (BRG). The Browns Socialhouse
front of the public from a start-up franchise point of view.
franchisor closed out 2016 with record-matching system growth, opening
With real-estate restrictions making Canada such a challenging mar-
13 new units for a total unit count of 62 (including three locations outside
ket combined with other influences such as digital, social media and
of Canada). The big news is always our growth, says Bruce Fox, executive
constantly changing consumer preferences its a competitive, chal-
vice-president Business Development. Its really about creating more
lenging market to evolve and grow your brand in.
presence and we continue to do that, particularly in our home territory.
Its a real-estate game now, he continues. [Growth is] all about
As the Browns brand expands, the BRG team is focused on continuous
securing the best real estate so [the big players such as] Cara and MTY
improvement. To this end, the company announced three new additions to
have a distinct advantage because they have so many banners. They can
its culinary team last fall. Damon Campbell, Kristian Eligh and Michael Steh,
come right in and scoop up prime locations.
along with BRG executive sous-chef Dustin Pinder, have taken the reins of He says operators have to be strategic, do everything right from
the companys Innovation Centre. In order to continue to fuel the growth an operations standpoint and be on top of their game in order to
we retooled our entire culinary outlook, explains Fox. The work that succeed. Its unrealistic [for operators]to think they can open large
[these] chefs are doing in the [Innovation] Centre is starting to come into [numbers] of units in a short period of time in this market and to do
play and we will be rolling out new menus starting in the spring. it with a brand thats not that well known in an environment where
BRG expects to continue its pattern of growth in 2017, with 10 units real estate is challenged; to think theyre going to immediately steal
slated to open by year end. The companys new Liberty Kitchen brand is that amount of market share from the big guys in a market thats flat
in the development stages and the first location is set to open late 2017. is completely unrealistic.
The companys emerging London Bull concept, which currently boasts two Good real estate is hard to find in Canada agrees Wilson.
locations, will also receive further refinement. Our primary business is Particularly in the urban areas and, as a result, you have to be careful
putting people in business were a franchisor, thats what we do, says that you have an offer thats going to differentiate you from the compe-
Fox. Danielle Schalk tition or create a new opportunity thats going to be attractive to con-
sumers. Otherwise, its going to be a me-too situation and that doesnt
work in this environment. FH

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OUT OF ALIGNMENT
In todays franchise landscape, challenges abound
for franchisees and franchisors alike

T
STORY BY LAURA PRATT ILLUSTRATON BY MARGARET MOORE

he franchisor and franchisee are, ideally, two sides of to the U.S.-based International Franchise Associations Franchise Business
the same coin. But to hear some weary industry par- Outlook, 2016 marked a sixth consecutive year of growth at rates that
ticipants describe it, theyve been operating, of late, exceed non-franchise business growth. Franchising in Canada is
more like theyre not even being carried in the same thriving, with new franchise concepts entering the market every year,
pocket. I think many people would say theyre not says Lorraine McLachlan, president and chief executive officer of the
in alignment, says Doug Fisher, president at FHG Mississauga-based Canadian Franchise Association.
International, a Toronto-based foodservice and fran- The benefits of franchising are as abundant as they are obvious, with
chise consulting firm. Its a strong position to take, buying power, marketing muscle and brand recognition topping the
but Ive taken it for many years now. The alignment list. Franchisees get to share resources, gain credibility with landlords
between franchisor and franchisee simply isnt there. and work with a national brand, which might mean they are able to get
Broadly speaking, there can be no denying franchising has provided better locations than independents. When they refinance the business,
one of historys greatest growth tools for the service industry and the franchisor nets them some history with banks. Broadly speaking,
remains the principal vehicle for expansion for most brands. Theres franchise operations offer franchisees a structure for launching, operat-
an estimated 1,300 franchise brands in Canada operating more than ing and growing a business, along with the opportunity to exercise an
78,000 units and generating approximately $68 billion a year. According entrepreneurial bent within a supportive environment.

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 37


But troubling episodes at various franchised companies in the recent In the end, Wilkes couldnt pay the rent. She had burned through
past have cultivated a different view of the franchise industry one all her resources, had filled up all her credit cards, had even sat across
racked with internal strife and sometimes marked by aggressive liti- from her bank manager in tears. In March 2015, she filed a $1-mil-
giousness. The scene has prompted an unprecedented intervention of lion lawsuit against Second Cup for misrepresentation and breach
public oversight and the institution of picayune and, say some, overly of the duty of good faith. In response, the company terminated her
rigorous legislation. And, while it was mostly introduced to protect the agreement and took away her caf (it ran it as a corporate caf for six
franchisee side of the equation, theres widespread consensus that it months before having to close it because, as Wilkes says, they proved
favours the franchisor, which, in turn, can produce more heartache. her right it was not sustainable) and countersued.
According to Fisher, the legislation introduced in six of the prov- Wilkes, who fired her lawyer and is now representing herself, is in
inces (P.E.I., N.B., Ont., Man., Alta. and B.C) to regulate franchisor this for the long haul. I am absolutely 100 per cent convinced that I
behaviour doesnt provide the franchisee with the depth will win. There are currently 75 active claims against
of protection it should. While he acknowledges the situ- WHEN A Second Cup in the City of Toronto alone.
ation is better than what it was, he feels it could be fur- FRANCHISOR According to Second Cup, however, franchisee suc-
ther improved if franchisees read their disclosure docu- cess is paramount to the brand. There is nothing more
LOSES SIGHT
ments and didnt just blindly sign them, hired lawyers as important to Second Cup than the success of our franchi-
oversight and conducted independent market research
OF THE sees, says Vanda Provato, VP, Marketing and Category at
on the concept and site. Most of them dont, he says. FUNDAMENTAL Second Cup Coffee Co. [The company] is committed to
Instead, says Fisher, franchisee hopefuls typically get BUSINESS our franchise model because we believe that our franchi-
into the game because they want to be in business for MODEL FROM sees are similarly committed to their cafs. As a company,
themselves and dont want to have a boss. So theyre we have made, and will continue to make enormous
THE PERSPECTIVE
buying themselves a job. But heres this set of rules that investments in our system. These include providing the
someone else has written for them to operate by and OF THE ongoing support and training to help build the profitabil-
which can be changed unilaterally in the future. If they FRANCHISEE, ity and long-term success of our franchisees.
dont follow them exactly, they can be kicked out of their THEYRE BOUND Provato says Second Cup integrated a series of bold
franchise, often without compensation. TO GET INTO and positive initiatives three years ago to advance the
success of its franchisees, including reducing royalties,
TROUBLE.
Hard Lesson to Learn reducing marketing contributions and improving pro-
curement costs. These initiatives resulted in approxi-
Its a lesson Kathy Wilkes has learned the hard way. In mately $3.8 million per year in savings for our franchi-
the beginning, Wilkes relationship with Second Cup, as she developed sees, or an average of $14,800 per store per year, she says. We also
her plans to open a franchise in Upper Stoney Creek, Ont., was posi- reduced our annual corporate administrative costs by $2.3 million and
tive. A great fan of the coffee she would typically drive 15 minutes passed on 100 per cent of these savings to our franchisees.
to pick one up Wilkes was determined to expose her developing Second Cup was unable to comment on Wilkes claims as the case is
area just outside of Hamilton to a Second Cup of its own. currently before the courts.
But after passing a rigorous interview process that included a psy-
chological assessment, qualifying for a massive loan and identifying a When it Works
likely location, things started to sour. For one, the from-scratch con-
struction project lost its co-tenant and Second Cup encouraged Wilkes For every story like Wilkes, there are dozens of thriving franchisee-
to assume both units of the building. She opened her doors on March story counterparts. Firehouse Subs is one. A relative newcomer to the
9, 2013 two years, four months and $100,000 in personal invest- Canadian franchise scene, with four Canadian stores, Firehouse Subs
ment after negotiations began. takes pride in being a responsive, sympathetic partner to its 1,000-plus
By month six, however, with Wilkes tapped out from having paid franchisees. CEO Don Fox attributes that to always being mindful of
every fee (including rents, taxes and common-area maintenance fees) the big picture. When a franchisor loses sight of the fundamental
from her own pocket, she started to notice some red flags. She sent a business model from the perspective of the franchisee, theyre bound
string of e-mails to the franchisor to say she was having some troubles to get into trouble, he says. They forget along the way that, without
over here. The numbers arent working. You guys negotiated this rent. the franchisee, you cant have a franchise system.
And all these years of experience make you guys experts. You obviously Such franchisor greed is a particular problem considering the
know this is doable. You must have an equation. Surely, you would not importance of both sides of the franchise equation working for each
let us sink in the middle of the ocean. others mutual benefit. Its a symbiotic relationship, he says. One
No one responded. She wrote again and again to the CEO, vice- where both parties need to profit fairly.
president of Operations, vice-president of Marketing, the legal depart- Too often, though, franchisors and franchisees interests are vastly
ment, anyone who would listen. I consistently said, you need to send different. The franchisor makes its money off the top line and the fran-
help. But Wilkes, who had been named Second Cups new franchisee chisee makes its money off the bottom line. That means the franchisor
of the year, says she was ignored. is profiting through expansion, thanks to the franchise fee and the sup-

38 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


plies a new person buys from them. While the franchisor makes some
Our new
money from sales, its more concerned with overall market sales. If
every restaurant makes $1 million and I make five per cent from each
restaurant, Im happy to put in as many restaurants as I can, regardless
of whether theyre profitable, explains FHGs Fisher.
Still, Fox has no problem with franchising agreements generally is
favouring the franchisor. The franchisor has a much more diverse set
of interests and concerns than the individual franchisee does, and if a
franchisee fails to perform under the franchise agreement, it could be
disastrous for the whole system. Youve got to have a strong agreement
that doesnt handcuff you from taking the steps it would take to keep
people accountable.
For franchisees, the key is homework. One of the best ways to miti-
gate risk is to seek legal counsel and other professional advice, review
all the legal documents with a franchise lawyer and speak to current
franchisees to learn about their experiences, says the CFAs McLachlan.
At Firehouse, the company also openly encourages franchisee candi-
dates to get in touch with franchisees who have left the system and to
seek out brands that operate company stores, an important qualifier for
ensuring the franchisor is the ultimate expert in operating its brand. If
you ask franchise candidates to invest everything they have into your
brand, to put everything at risk, you should be confident enough to Its time to make our success
invest in it yourself, he says. Of the 1,033 Firehouse Subs locations, the even more accessible!
company owns 32.
If there are problems, says Jay Gould, president of 11-year-old
Toronto-based South St. Burger, a lot of it is because the franchisee
Recognizing that some markets were
a bit too small to fit its original design,
hasnt done enough work. That information mightve been there under
Cora Breakfast and Lunch has launched
their nose, but they didnt look hard enough to find it. a new smaller concept. With, of course,
lower build-out costs than our traditional
Franchisors Have Homework, Too restaurants.

Finally, its incumbent on the franchisor to do a share of preparatory With this new model, we will be sure
legwork, as well. I think some franchisors look at some franchisees as a to bring our delicious breakfasts
to even more markets.
giant pain in their left side, says Gould. Thats not a healthy relation-
ship. There are good operators out there, but I also think there are lots Canadas premier breakfast chain
of operators that manage with a heavy hand. The answer, he hastens with over 130 locations across Canada
to add, does not lie in more government interference. Weve become a is looking for dynamic entrepreneurs
nanny state. Theres a huge cost to that. Just getting the licensing, per- with the passion and drive to rise
mits and inspections you need is absolutely insane these days. and shine with our new model.
At Pizza Pizza, franchisees are often recruited from within the sys-
As an awardwinning franchisor,
tem. In Toronto, the company has a waiting list, from which victors you have our full and ongoing
are chosen based on their demonstrated full-time commitment to the support through exceptional training,
system as well as financial resources. Were looking to see if we can operations and marketing.
feel confident about the franchisee, financially. And whether he or
she will be in a position to reinvent, says Sebastian Fuschini, SVP of For franchise opportunities,
Franchising with Pizza Pizza Ltd. And you cant just look at today, you start by contacting:
Danica Varjacic
have to look at 10 years out.
Franchisee recruiter
Ultimately, the best franchisee-franchisor relationships are partner-
1 888 673-2672 or
ships. Weve always worked hard to avoid the we-they [dynamic] that dvarjacic@chezcora.com
can fester in a franchise environment, says Gould. Youve got to have
faith in each other; that means being a good sounding board on both
sides of the equation. The franchisor and franchisee alike have to enter
into a negotiation in earnest and do their hard work as they would if
they were starting their own business. FH

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM
KEEPING IT
Mike MacDonald (left), director
of Marketing and Dorrie Karris,
president, Opa! of Greece

Opa! of Greece has built its brand on a


commitment to fresh, high-quality ingredients

STORY BY AMY BOSTOCK | PHOTOGRAPH BY COLIN WAY

40 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


I
n Greek culture, the word Opa is used to
express a feeling of joy, high spirits and happi-
ness. In Calgary, Alta., the word is synonymous
with fresh, high-quality Greek food. Launched
in 1998 by founder Niko Tiginagas, Opa! of
Greece has grown from a single unit in Calgarys
Market Mall to 97 locations at the end of 2016.
Although the bulk of Opas restaurants are
in Calgary (30 units), the Western Canadian
brand has opened five units in Ontario to date,
with its sights set on further expansion in that
market. But, says Mike MacDonald, director of
Marketing for Opa! Of Greece, mall locations
help build the brand and Opas Ontario expansion has
been dwarfed due to its inability to get into those prime
mall locations.
Jimmy the Greek owns Ontario and were the first
to market there, says MacDonald. Well never own the
same triple-A real estate they do because only one Greek TOP SELLER The souvlaki pita is
-food operator is allowed in each food court. We only the number-1 best selling item
have five locations in Ontario right now, so people dont on the Opa! menu

know who we are. In fact, a lot of people think we are


Jimmy the Greek.
Conversely, he says, Jimmy the Greek will never really ing properly before looking outside the country, says
expand in the west because we own this market. So Opa MacDonald. The biggest mistake brands make is trying
is focusing the majority of its expansion efforts closer to to expand before figuring out what theyre doing in their
home B.C., Edmonton, the Prairies and Winnipeg. own backyard.
There are no plans for international expansion right With yearly sales of $54 million, Opa! Of Greece has
now. We want to get the Canadian business operat- seen an incredible amount of growth, despite a volatile
economic climate in its home province. We were ahead
of the curve and weve been able to weather the storm in
Alberta, says MacDonald. Most brands were complain-
ing a year ago about sales being down 20 to 30 per cent,
whereas we only started seeing a decline in sales nine
months ago now [sales are] mostly flat.
The brand was built on the franchise model and has
never operated a corporate store. Franchisees can join
OPA! OF GREECE [INTERIOR AND SOUVLAKI PITA]

the Opa team for an initial franchise fee of $25,000. Site


costs range from $300,000 for a mall food court unit to
$450,000 for a new build, stand-alone location. Existing
stores can also be purchased based on market value.
The company employs regional managers who cover
markets in Ontario, the Prairies, Manitoba, Alberta and
B.C. and are in the stores on a weekly basis. From an
operations standpoint, our regional managers are making
sure stores are doing what they need to be doing to be

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 41


BY THE a 30-per-cent lift in sales because now were focused on
NUMBERS core menu items people love.
Items such as the Opa Platter, which includes a sou-
Initial franchise fee:
vlaki skewer served with rice pilaf, oven-roasted potato,
$25,000 pita wedges, signature Opa tzatziki and a choice of Greek
Equipment/site costs: or Caesar salad ($9.29); calamari and salad ($8.99); and
$300,000 low-carb souvlaki and salad ($8.69). But the number-1
(mall) best seller, according to MacDonald, is still the pita wrap
and fries ($8.99). Opa is known for its Greek fries that
$450,000 are sprinkled with seasoning salt, lemon juice and orega-
(street front)
no they are to die for, he says.
Advertising fee: Niko came to Canada with $5 in his pocket, says
3% MacDonald. His first job was in a Greek restaurant and
it was always his dream to have his own Greek restaurant.
Royalty fee:
To this day, we are building our stores based on what
6% [Niko] built the brand on freshly prepared, higher
quality menu options.
Opas product offerings make the brand appealing
across all demographics. People are more conscious
about what they consume, says MacDonald. This has
helped better position us, as the brand was built on being
a unique, better quality option.

FAST AND FRESH Opa! of Greece has built its brand on providing a
FRIES 2.0 The brand is Spreading the joy
menu full of fresh, high-quality ingredients
known for its Greek fries
topped with seasoning Opa! Of Greece plans to open six new stores in 2017. The
salt, lemon juice company has also started rolling out a new store concept
and oregano
featuring a fresh, modern Greek theme. The biggest
successful while our franchise development team manag- complaint we got about our existing units is that they
es the initial communications with potential franchisees, look like theyre selling time shares in Greece, he quips.
says MacDonald. In terms of marketing, Opa has its own The challenge to growth, he says, is finding the right
department, which helps stores from a LSM (local store location and the right franchisees to drive it. Malls are
marketing) perspective and with all day-to-day promo- INSIDE good locations because you are accessing people who
tional and campaign creative. OPA are already at the mall, whereas store fronts, you have
The number-1 priority, he says, is operations because to mentally go to that store. We have some great street
if customers dont have a good experience in the store fronts with great sales and we have some great mall
theyre not going to be back and theyre also going to tell [units] with great sales. Theres no perfect location, he
people not to go. I tell all new franchisees that are being adds; the secret is getting the right location together with
on-boarded that they have to nail down the operations the right operator.

OPA! OF GREECE [LAMB PLATTER, CHICKEN WRAP FRIES AND TZATZIKI FRIES]
and then, if theyre doing everything right from that This is a difficult industry to be in. You couldnt pay
standpoint marketing can help them. If operations are Average square footage me to open up and manage a restaurant. Its 24/7 and
not up to snuff, then no amount of marketing cant help. 400 to 650 with increased food, real estate and labour costs, its get-
(mall) ting more challenging to do business in this industry.
Keeping it Simple Despite the challenges, Opa! Of Greece continues to
1,200 to 1,400 expand and to recognize the important role community
(street front)
According to MacDonald, who has been with Opa! of pays in its success. With every new store opening we
Greece for six years, the menu hasnt really changed Average check size: have free pita wraps on the first day, says MacDonald.
but it has been simplified. We ask customers to make a donation and we align our-
$11.50
The big mistake in QSR is trying to be too many selves with food banks in each market.
(mall)
things to too many people, he says. We analyzed our All funds raised on opening days go directly to
sales and anything that accounted for less than one per $15.60 local food banks. Opa is also a long-time supporter of
cent was taken off the menu. (street front), Operation Christmas Child, a sponsor for Greek commu-
He says it was easier said than done but when we nity churches and festivals and the main food sponsor for
updated the menu boards we actually experienced about a number of national sporting events. FH

42 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


STEADY AS
SHE GROWS
Pumpernickels is ready to
spread its franchising wings
STORY BY DENISE DEVEAU

S
hlomo (Soly) and Zvia Ziv were well
ahead of the freshness trend when they
opened their first Pumpernickels at
Torontos First Canadian Place in 1986.
They have always taken pride in every-
thing being fresh and made from scratch
in-store, says Joel Friedman, franchise
consultant with Pumpernickels.
It was the veal sandwich that put Pumpernickels on
the map, but the owners have since expanded the menu
considerably, ranging from Asian-inspired combinations
to recently introduced slow-cooked roast beef.
They have also grown the brands footprint to 13 locations, as well as upgraded its systems for deliveries FRESH FACE As part of
stores within the Greater Toronto Area. For the first few and catering-order processing. its expansion strategy,
Pumpernickels has
years, additions were corporate stores; with the first fran- For a franchise fee of $35,000, Pumpernickels fran-
given its locations a
chise opening in 1995. To date, there are six corporate chisees receive a 6.5 per cent royalty, plus two per cent design overhaul
stores and seven franchises. for brand development, along with six to eight weeks
Most locations are strategically located in Torontos of training and two weeks of in-store support. Theres
underground office towers, with a small handful of street nothing unusual in the terms, but we do give territories
fronts with office compo- based on postal codes for catering and delivery orders to BY THE
nents. A huge part of the avoid any confusion, Friedman explains. The franchise NUMBERS
brands business is cater- agreement is for 10 years, but can be renewed for 10 Initial franchise fee:
ing, which can account additional years. $35,000
for 40 to 70 per cent of its Until now, Pumpernickels has worked solely with
Equipment/site costs:
revenue. independent franchisees, but that will change as it strikes
After 20 years of steady out to other regions, Friedman says. Going forward, we
$144,000
growth in the GTA, would look for multi-unit franchisees to get the econo- Other costs:
Pumpernickels is now mies of scale and skills needed to be in markets outside
ready to expand its fran- of Ontario.
$381,000
chising efforts in earnest, He adds the company is exploring opportunities in Advertising fee:
Friedman reports. In Ottawa, Calgary, Vancouver, Quebec and Halifax. 2%
order to make the move beyond the GTA, he says brand- As part of the plan, the company joined the Canadian
Royalty fee:
ing needed to be nailed down. We have been working for Franchise Association a move that has accelerated
the past four years on rebranding our current locations requests exponentially, he says. I received about 50
6.5%
and were waiting for that to finish before going out and enquiries last month and were working with five of
franchising actively. The brand has recently updated its them. Were getting a lot of interest from investors and
operational manuals to ensure consistency across all the operators looking for a fresh and healthy product. FH

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 45


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POISED FOR
GROWTH
Ontario-based
Toppers Pizza is
ramping up to
more than double
its presence in the
next decade

A
STORY BY DANIELLE SCHALK

fter remaining at 37 locations for


over a year, Sudbury, Ont.-based
Toppers Pizza finished 2016 with
a bang, opening new restaurants
in Thunder Bay and Richmond
Hill, Ont. During the latter half
of the year, the chain, which
recorded gross sales of $32.2 mil- chise recruiting position having more senior people PIES FOR THE PEOPLE
lion in 2015, also opened a relo- take that role, adds Toppazzini. For the last three or Toppers strives to bring
its fresh, quality pizza
cated Sudbury unit, as well as a new, enhanced customer- four years, weve been really hammering home our
to customers across
care centre almost doubling its customer-care-agent Average Unit Volumes (AUVs)Weve also got a lot of Ontario and beyond
capacity in preparation for future growth. publicity with regards to that, so thats spurred interest.
This focus on overall brand improvement has brought Toppers locations are a mix of company-owned and
about several recent innovations. In the new makeup franchised units, with the cost to buy at approximately
of our pizzerias, weve added a few elements that are $363,000 for take-out franchise units averaging 1,500 to
somewhat unique to our industry, says Kelly Toppazzini, 2,000 sq.-ft.
co-CEO. One such addition is the introduction of visible The brand is keeping the momentum going, kicking BY THE
dough-maker areas, which provide an interactive guest off 2017 with two new units in Espanola and Kirkland NUMBERS
experience and allow customers to witness the creation of Lake, Ont. with plans to reach 100 locations in the next
Initial franchise fee:
the brands authentic Italian bread crust first hand. We five to 10 years. We want our growth to be steady and
make dough fresh daily and, in the past, those dough consistent to ensure the financial model is working for
$25,000
makers were in the back of our restaurants. Now theyre [our operators], explains Toppazzini. Equipment/site costs:
prominently displayed in the front [of the restaurant] in Toppers growth throughout Ontario has been through $338,000
a windowed space in the customer area, he adds. a strategy Toppazzini characterizes as pod growth
Advertising fee:
These dough-maker windows are being implemented introducing three or four pizzerias to a region in order
on a go-forward basis, with the brand offering three loca- to generate demand and interest for future growth. Now 2%
tions featuring the window at the end of 2016. In the last that were at the point where we have pizzerias in all of Royalty fee:
quarter of 2016, the brand also introduced customer [the Ontario] pods, our goals for the next few years will 5%
screens, which display the status of customers orders. be primarily Ontario growth, but we have inquiries for
These screens are set to be introduced to all existing and other provinces at this point, says Toppazzini. The pod
future locations of the pizzeria. growth has worked. Its been steady and were starting to
In the last two years, weve really improved the fran- get good branding in all of those areas. FH

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 47


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Were cooking up NEW ideas at RC Show 2017 booth 2421 and 2521.

www.alto-shaam.com
COOK . HOLD . CHILL . DISPLAY . SYSTEM SOLUTIONS WISCONSIN MANUFACTURER OF THE YEAR
241 PIZZA (2006) LTD. Services BAKERS DOZEN DONUTS History, Plans
CHAIRMANS BRANDS CORP. - advertising/marketing BAKERS DOZEN CORP. - established in 1992 in Laval, Que.
77 Progress Ave. - design 2369 Cliff Rd., Unit 1 - 31 units in Canada (29 franchised)
Toronto, ON M1P 2Y7 - lease negotiation Mississauga, ON L5A 2P1 - plans to expand in Ontario and
416-288-8515 - management 905-272-1825 Quebec in 2017
VP, Franchising and Real Estate - purchasing President: Peter Paraskakis Franchise Costs
Development: Larry Santolini - site location
History, Plans - initial franchise fee $60,000
- staff training
History, Plans - established in 1978 in - total costs $1,500,000 to $2,200,000
- supplies
- established in 1986 in Toronto Mississauga, Ont. - advertising fee 2%
- royalty fee 5%
- 84 units in Canada (82 franchised) APPLEBEES - 14 units in Canada
- five units under development DINEEQUITY, INC. Services
Franchise Costs
Franchise Costs 450 North Brand Blvd. - initial franchise fee $30,000 - advertising/marketing
- franchise fee $20,000 Glendale, CA 91203 - equipment/site cost $300,000 - design
- equipment/site cost $185,000 647-533-3333 - advertising fee 2% - lease negotiation
- other costs $30,000 Manager, Canada Applebees: - royalty fee 5% - management
- advertising fee 3% Kenney Goldman - purchasing
Services - site location
- royalty fee 5% History, Plans - advertising/marketing - staff training
Services - established in 1983 in Decatur, Ga. - design
- 17 units in Canada
- advertising/marketing - lease negotiation BEAVERTAILS
- design - management
- financial assistance
Franchise Costs
- purchasing
CANADA INC.
- initial franchise fee US$40,000 BEAVERTAILS BRANDS, INC.
- lease negotiation - estimated build costs US$1,500,000+ - site location
3700 St. Patrick St., Ste. 106
- purchasing - national advertising fee 0.5% - staff training
Montreal, QC H4E 1A2
- site location - royalty fee 4% - supplies
514-392-2222
- staff training
Director of Franchising:
- supplies Services BASKIN-ROBBINS Kristina Zappavigna
- information available upon request DUNKIN BRANDS
130 Royall St. History, Plans
AROMA ESPRESSO BAR Canton, MA 02021 - established in 1978 in Ottawa
AROMA ESPRESSO BAR CANADA INC. 800-859-5339 - 100+ units in Canada
446 Spadina Rd., Ste. 300 CEO: Nigel Travis - currently focusing on U.S. expansion in
Toronto, ON M5P 3M3 tourist and leisure destinations
History, Plans
A&W FOOD SERVICES 416-281-2233
- first Canadian store opened in 1971 Franchise Costs
OF CANADA INC. History, Plans - 96 units in Canada (all franchised) - initial franchise fee US$30,000
171 West Esplanade, Ste. 300 - founded in 2007 in Toronto - expanding newly designed units in - trailers start at US$75,000
North Vancouver, BC V7M 3K9 - 39 units in Canada (all franchised); Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal - tourist kiosks start at US$65,000
604-988-2141 - plans to expand in Toronto, Greater and Vancouver - advertising fee 3%
Director of Franchising: Yanick Morin Toronto Area, Calgary, Montreal - royalty fee 5%
and Vancouver Franchise Costs
History, Plans - initial franchise fee $20,000 for Services
- established in 1956 in Winnipeg Franchise Costs a 10-year agreement - advertising/marketing
- 850+ units in Canada - initial franchise fee $50,000 - equipment/site cost $100,000 - purchasing
- plans to add 300 new units in Canada; - equipment/construction/setup cost to $220,000 - staff training
focus on Ontario, Quebec $500,000 to $900,000 - other costs $15,000 to $42,000
Franchise Costs
- advertising fee 2% - total costs $130,000 to $292,000 BEN & FLORENTINE
- royalty fee 7%
Standard Franchise Program: - advertising fee 5% RESTAURANTS INC.
- initial franchise fee $55,000 - royalty fee 1% IMVESCOR RESTAURANTS GROUP INC.
Services
- equipment/site cost $722,000 - advertising/marketing Services 5255 Henri-Bourassa W., Ste. 210
to $1,335,000 - design - advertising/marketing Montreal, QC H4R 2M6
- other costs up to $145,000 - lease negotiation - lease negotiation 514-667-6099
- total $862,000 to $1,976,000 - management - management President: Lorne Cassoff
- advertising fee 2.5% - purchasing - purchasing History, Plans
- royalty fee 3.5% - site location - site location - founded in 2008 in Montreal
- local advertising fee 1% - staff training - staff training - 36 units in Canada (35 franchised)
- supplies - supplies
Urban Franchise Associate Program: - plans to add 25 units in the next three
- initial franchise fee $55,000 years in Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba
- equipment/site cost BATON ROUGE
approximately $347,000 DONT GET IMVESCOR RESTAURANT GROUP INC. Franchise Costs
- other costs to LEFT OUT! 8250 Dcarie Blvd., Ste. 310 - initial franchise fee $35,000
- equipment/site cost $600,000
approximately $28,000 Email your updated franchising info Montreal, QC H4P 2P5
514-341-5544 - advertising fee 2%
- total approximately $443,000 to dschalk@kostuchmedia.com to be
Director of Franchising: Peter Tsafoulias - royalty fee 5%
- advertising fee 2.5% included in our 2018 Franchise Report
- royalty fee 3.5%

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 49


Services - 379 units in Canada (376 franchised) - staff training - design
- advertising/marketing - new franchising opportunities available - supplies - lease negotiation
- design across Canada - purchasing
- financial assistance
Franchise Costs CAPT. SUBMARINE - site location
- lease negotiation (Atlantic Canada opportunities) - staff training
- initial franchise fee $60,000
- management GRINNERS FOOD SYSTEMS LTD. - supplies
- equipment/site cost $1,500,000
- purchasing 105 Walker St.
to $2,500,000
- site location
- advertising fee 3% Truro, NS B2N 5G9 CHICKEN CHEF
- staff training
- supplies
- royalty fee 7% 902-893-4141 FAMILY RESTAURANTS
History, Plans CHICKEN CHEF CANADA LTD.
Services 97 Plymouth St.
- founded in 1972 in Charlottetown
BLENZ COFFEE - advertising/marketing
- 40 units in Canada Winnipeg, MB R2X 2V5
2285 Clark Dr., Ste. 250 - design 204-694-1984
- financial assistance - plans to expand in P.E.I., New Brunswick,
Vancouver, BC V5N 3G9 President: Jeff Epp
- lease negotiation Nova Scotia and Newfoundland
604-682-2995
President: Marc West - management Franchise Costs History, Plans
- purchasing - initial franchise fee $20,000 - established in 1978 in Carmen, Manitoba
History, Plans - site location - 35 units in Canada (all franchised)
- equipment/site cost $90,000
- established in 1992 in Vancouver - staff training - opening three new locations in 2017
- other costs $90,000
- 60 units in Canada - supplies - total costs $200,000 Franchise Costs
Franchise Costs - advertising fee 4% - initial franchise fee $12,000
- franchise fee $35,000 BROWNS SOCIALHOUSE - royalty fee 5% (Canada, only)
- store cost $250,000 to $350,000 BROWNS RESTAURANT GROUP - license agreements also available - equipment/site cost varies
- advertising fee 2% 3540 West 41st Ave., Ste. 207A - royalty fee 3% (Canada, only)
Services
- royalty fee 8% Vancouver, BC V6N 3E6
- advertising/marketing Services
604-630-0885
Services - design - advertising/marketing
EVP Business Development: Bruce Fox
- advertising/marketing - lease negotiation - design
- operational support History, Plans - management training - lease negotiation
- training - established in 2004 in - purchasing - purchasing
North Vancouver, B.C. - site location training and support - site location
BOOSTER JUICE - 59 units in Canada; three outside of - staff training
8915-51st Ave., Ste. 205 Canada (58 franchised) CARLS JR. - supplies
Edmonton, AB T6E 5J3 - continued growth across Western CKE RESTAURANTS, LLC
Canada, Ontario and beyond in 2017
780-440-6770 6303 Carpinteria Ave. (THE) CHOPPED LEAF
Director, Business Franchise Costs Carpinteria, CA 93013 CHOPPED LEAF RESTAURANTS LIMITED
Development: Tim Hengel - initial franchise fee $50,000 805-745-7841 700 Kerr St.
- equipment/site cost $2,000,000 VP, Franchising: Michael DArezzo Oakville, ON L6K 3W5
History, Plans
- established in 1999 in Sherwood - other costs $250,000 History, Plans 905-337-7777
Park, Alta. - total costs $2,300,000 - established in 1941 in Los Angeles Director of Franchising: Nik Jurkovic
- 310 units in Canada (nearly all units - royalty fee 6% - 18 units in Canada History, Plans
franchised) Services - established in 2012 in Kelowna, B.C.
Franchise Costs
Franchise Costs - design - initial franchise fee $15,000 to $25,000 - 40 units in Canada
- initial franchise fee $20,000 - lease negotiation - advertising fee up to 7% - plans to open 40 units in 2017
- equipment/site development cost - purchasing - royalty fee 4% Franchise Costs
$225,000 to $249,000 - site location
Services - initial franchise fee $25,000
- total costs $245,000 to $269,000 - staff training
- information available upon request - equipment/site cost $300,000
- advertising fee: national ad fund - supplies
- leasehold improvements $200,000
2%, regional 1.5% to $300,000
- royalty fee 6% CAFFE SORRENTINO (THE) CHEESECAKE CAFE - total costs $325,000
SORRENTINOS RESTAURANTS CAKEMAKER CANADA INC.
Services - advertising fee 3%
10665 109 St. 10319 Saskatchewan Dr. N.W.
- advertising/marketing - royalty fee 6%
Edmonton, AB T5H 3B5 Edmonton, AB T6E 4R7
- design 780-428-5454 780-406-1700 Services
- financial assistance Director of Franchising: Bob Beeson - advertising/marketing
- lease negotiation History, Plans - design
- management - founded in 2005 in Edmonton History, Plans
- lease negotiation
- purchasing - eight units in Canada - established in 1988 in Calgary
- management
- site location - four units in Canada (two franchised)
Franchise Costs - purchasing
- staff training - planned growth in Edmonton and
- initial franchise fee $20,000 - site location
throughout Alberta
- total costs $325,000 to $395,000 - staff training
BOSTON PIZZA - advertising fee 2% Franchise Costs
BOSTON PIZZA INTERNATIONAL Inc. - royalty fee 7% - initial franchise fee $40,000 CHUCKS ROADHOUSE
10760 Shellbridge Way, Ste. 100 - equipment/site cost $600,000
Richmond, BC V6X 3H1 Services BAR AND GRILL
- other costs $500,000
- advertising/marketing OBSIDIAN GROUP INC.
604-270-1108 - total costs $1,140,000
- design 1770 Argentia Rd.
Senior Director, Development: - advertising fee 2%
- lease negotiation Mississauga, ON L5N 3S7
Felix Decata - royalty fee 5%
- management 905-814-8030
History, Plans - purchasing Services VP, Franchising: George Karamountzos
- established in 1964 in Edmonton - site location - advertising/marketing

50 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


History, Plans - staff training COFFEE TIME
- established in 2015 in Ontario - supplies
- 16 units in Canada
(2015) CORP.
77 Progress Ave.
Franchise Costs COFFEE CULTURE Toronto, ON M1P 2Y7
- initial franchise fee $50,000 CAFE & EATERY 416-288-8515
- equipment/site cost $250,000 OBSIDIAN GROUP INC. VP, Franchising and Real Estate
to $500,000 1770 Argentia Rd. Development: Larry Santolini
- other costs $65,000 to $95,000 Mississauga, ON L5N 3S7
905-814-8030 History, Plans
- total costs $365,000 to $645,000 COBS BREAD VP, Franchising: George Karamountzos - established in 1982 in Toronto
- advertising fee 1% 369 Terminal Ave., Unit 210 - 100 units in Canada (93 franchised)
- royalty fee 3.75% on gross sales up Vancouver, BC V6A 4C4 History, Plans - 10 units under development
to $2 million; 7% on all gross sales in 844-838-2627 -established in 2006 in Ontario
excess of $2 million Franchise Costs
- 57 units in Canada; one in the U.S.
History, Plans - franchise fee $25,000
Services - first Canadian franchised location
Franchise Costs - equipment/site cost $320,000
- advertising/marketing opened in 2006
- initial franchise fee $35,000 - other costs $30,000
- design - 91 units in Canada
- equipment/site cost $300,000 - advertising fee 3%
- financial assistance - expansion in Alberta, B.C., Ontario,
to $350,000 - royalty fee 5%
- management Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia
- purchasing - other costs $45,000 to $70,000 Services
and Manitoba
- site location - total costs $375,000 to $455,000 - advertising/marketing
- staff training Franchise Costs - advertising fee 2%
- initial franchise fee $25,000 - royalty fee 7%
- total costs $200,000 to $1,000,000
COLDSTONE CREAMERY
Services KAHALA CORPORATION
Services - advertising/marketing 9311 Via De Ventura E.
- advertising/marketing - financial assistance Scottsdale, AZ 85258
- design - lease negotiation 480-362-4800
- full comprehensive training - management SVP of Restaurant Operations:
- human resources - purchasing Tony Crosby
- lease negotiation - site location
History, Plans
- purchasing - staff training
- established in 1988 in Arizona
- site location - supplies
- seven units in Canada
- plans to expand domestically CRABBY JOES TAP & GRILL - design - design
and globally OBSIDIAN GROUP INC. - financial assistance - lease negotiation
1770 Argentia Rd. - lease negotiation - management
Franchise Costs
Mississauga, ON L5N 3S7 - site selection - purchasing
- initial franchise fee US$27,000 (first
905-814-8030 - staff training - site location
unit); US$15,000 (subsequent units)
VP, Franchising: George Karamountzos - supplies
- advertising fee 3%
- royalty fee 6% DRUXYS
History, Plans DE DUTCH DRUXYS INC.
Services - established in 1996 in Ontario DE DUTCH PANNEKOEK HOUSE 52 Abbotsford Rd.
- advertising/marketing - 33 units in Canada RESTAURANTS INC. Gormley, ON L0H 1G0
- design Franchise Costs 8484-162nd St., Ste. 108 416-637-5976
- lease negotiation - initial franchise fee $35,000 Surrey, BC V4N 1B4 VP, Marketing: Peter Druxerman
- management - equipment/site cost $700,000 604-543-3101
- purchasing History, Plans
to $800,000 President: William (Bill) K. Waring
- site location - established in 1976 in Toronto
- other costs $75,000 to $100,000 History, Plans - 39 units in Canada
- total costs $810,000 to $935,000 - established in 1975 in Vancouver
- advertising fee 2% Franchise Costs
- royalty fee 5% Franchise Costs - information available upon request
- initial franchise fee $35,000, plus
Services Services
training fee starting at $7,500
- advertising/marketing - information available upon request
CORA BREAKFAST - design
- equipment/site cost $480,000
- advertising fee 3%
AND LUNCH - financial assistance - royalty fee 5% EAST SIDE MARIOS
CORA FRANCHISE GROUP INC. - lease negotiation CARA OPERATIONS LIMITED
2798 Thamesgate Dr. - management Services 199 Four Valley Dr.
Mississauga, ON L4T 4E8 - purchasing - information available upon request Vaughan, ON L4K 0B8
905-673-2672 - site location 905-760-2244
Franchise Recruiter: Danica Varjacic - staff training DENNYS VP of Franchising: Mark Eaton
- supplies DENNYS, INC.
History, Plans History, Plans
- established in 1987 in St-Laurent, Que. 203 East Main St.
- established in 1987
- 135 units in Canada (130 franchised) CULTURES Spartanburg, SC 29319
- 78 units in Canada (72 franchised)
- 10 units planned for 2017; plans to MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. 864-597-8403
expand in the U.S. 8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 Senior Director of Franchise Recruiting: Franchise Costs
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 Doug Wong - initial franchise fee $60,000
Franchise Costs 514-336-8885 - average investment $1,300,000
- initial franchise fee $45,000 History, Plans
President: Stanley Ma to $1,600,000
- equipment/site costs $600,000+ - 73 units in Canada
- advertising fee 3% national, 1% local
- advertising fee 3.5% History, Plans - 45 to 50 new openings planned for 2017
- royalty fee 5%
- royalty fee 6% - founded in 1979
Franchise Costs
- 52 units in Canada (51 franchised) Services
Services - initial franchise fee $40,000
- advertising/marketing
- advertising/marketing Franchise Costs - equipment/site cost $1,098,000
- design
- design - initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000 to $2,085,000
- financial assistance
- lease negotiation - advertising fee 3% - other costs $130,568 to $336,184
- lease negotiation
- purchasing - royalty fee 6% - total costs $1,228,568 to $2,421,184
- management
- site location - advertising fee 3%
Services - purchasing
- staff training - royalty fee 4.5%
- advertising/marketing - site location
- supplies - lease negotiation Services - staff training
- purchasing - advertising/marketing - supplies
COUNTRY STYLE - site location - design
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - staff training - lease negotiations EDO JAPAN
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - supplies - purchasing EDO JAPAN LIMITED PARTNERSHIP
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - site location 4838 32nd St. S.E.
514-336-8885 DAIRY QUEEN CANADA INC. - staff training Calgary, AB T2B 2S6
President: Stanley Ma 5045 South Service Rd., Ste. 3000 - supplies 403-215-8800
History, Plans Burlington, ON L7R 3Y3 Director, Operations: Terry Foster
- established in 1963 905-639-1492 DIXIE LEE History, Plans
- 384 units in Canada Director, Franchising: Chris Falle DIXIE LEE CAPITAL CORPORATION
- established in 1979 in Calgary
559 Princess St.
Franchise Costs History, Plans - approximately 115 units in Canada
Kingston, ON K7L 1C8
- information available upon request - established in 1940 in Illinois (110 franchised)
613-650-5494
- 651 units in Canada (all franchised) Operations Co-ordinator: Ken Yonelinas
Services Franchise Costs
- advertising/marketing Franchise Costs - initial franchise fee $35,000
History, Plans
- design - initial franchise fee $30,000 to $45,000 - equipment/site cost $375,000 to
- established in 1964 in Belleville, Ont.
- lease negotiation - equipment/site cost $200,000 $475,000 (street location); $300,000
- purchasing to $1,700,000 Franchise Costs to $350,000 (food court location)
- site location - other costs $45,000 to $80,000 - initial franchise fee $25,000 - advertising fee 3%
- staff training - advertising fee 5% to 6% - advertising fee 5% - royalty fee 6%
- supplies - royalty fee 4% to 5% - royalty fee 6%
Services
Services Services - information available upon request
- advertising/marketing - advertising/marketing

52 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


EGGSMART FOOD CORP. Services FAMOSO - plans to expand in Saskatchwan,
- advertising/marketing Ontario and B.C. markets
CHAIRMANS BRANDS CORP.
- design
NEAPOLITAN PIZZERIA
77 Progress Ave. FAMOSO INC. Franchise Costs
Toronto, ON M1P 2Y7 - financial assistance
3600 Lysander Lane, Ste. 370 - initial franchise fee $30,000
416-288-8515 - lease negotiation
Richmond, BC V7B 1C3 - total costs $800,000 to $1,040,000
VP, Franchising and Real Estate - purchasing
877-210-5838 - advertising fee 2%
Development: Larry Santolini - site location
Director, Franchising: Christian Bullock - royalty fee 6%
- staff training
History, Plans History, Plans Services
- established in 2008 in Toronto - founded in 2007 in Edmonton - advertising/marketing
- 45 units in Canada (44 franchised) - 30 units in Canada (all franchised) - design
- five units under development

Franchise Costs
- initial franchise fee $25,000
- equipment/site cost $350,000
- other costs $30,000
- advertising fee 3%
- royalty fee 5%

Services

MAY CAUSE
- advertising/marketing
- design/construction

EXTREME
- financial assistance
- lease negotiation
- purchasing
- site location

SMOOTHNESS.
- staff training
- supplies

EGGSPECTATION
EGGSPECTATION RESTAURANTS CANADA
7960 St. Denis St., Second Floor
Montreal, QC H2R 2G1 KITCHENAID COMMERCIAL
514-282-0677
CEO: Castrenze Renda
COUNTERTOP BLENDER
History, Plans
- established in 1993 in Montreal Patented Talon asymmetrical
- 12 units in Canada blade for more consistent results
- plans to add two units in the
Middle East in 2017
Powerful 3.5HP* motor handles
Franchise Costs
the toughest ingredients
- initial franchise fee $50,000
- total cost varies according to size
and other factors Optional double-walled container
- advertising fee 2% for better thermal retention
- royalty fee 5%
- local marketing 1%
Die-cast metal base stands up to
Services rough kitchen and bar conditions
- advertising/marketing
- lease negotiation
- management
- purchasing
- site location
- staff training
Ofcial Blender of the
EXTREME PITA Restaurants Canada Show 2017
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC.
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5
514-336-8885
President: Stanley Ma

History, Plans *Motor horsepower for our commercial blender motors were
- established in 1997 in Waterloo, Ont. measured using a dynamometer, a machine laboratories
routinely use to measure the mechanical power of motors. Our
- 133 units in Canada (130 franchised) 3.5 horsepower (HP) motor reference reflects the horsepower
rating of the motor itself and not the commercial blenders
Franchise Costs horsepower output to the blending vessel. The output
horsepower to the blending vessel will be somewhat reduced.
- initial franchise fee $20,000 For more information, visit KitchenAid.ca/Commercial
- advertising fee 3% / KitchenAid 2016. Used under license in Canada.
- royalty fee 6% All rights reserved.

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 53


- lease negotiation - 13 units in Canada (all franchised) History, Plans - two franchised units in Canada
- management - franchising opportunities available in - established in 1987 in Toronto - one unit under development
- purchasing Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, B.C. - 30 units in Canada
Franchise Costs
- site location and Alberta
Franchise Costs - franchise fee $25,000
- staff training
Franchise Costs - initial franchise fee $30,000 - advertising fee 3%
- supplies
- information available upon request - equipment/site cost $700,000 - royalty fee 5%
- other costs $100,000
FAMOUS LAFFA Services
- total cost $830,000
Services
RESTAURANT - information available upon request
- advertising fee 1%
- advertising/marketing
JSF FRANCHISE GROUP INC. - design/construction
- royalty fee 5%
40 Magnetic Dr., Ste. 1 FIONN MACCOOLS - financial assistance
Toronto, ON M3J 3H9 CARA OPERATIONS LIMITED Services - lease negotiation
416-819-2644 199 Four Valley Dr. - advertising/marketing - purchasing
VP of Franchising: Joel Friedman Vaughan, ON L4K 0B8 - design - site location
905-760-2244 - lease negotiation - staff training
History, Plans VP of Franchising: Mark Eaton - management - supplies
- four units in Canada (three franchised) - purchasing
History, Plans
- plans to open three to four units per
- established in 1996
- site location FROZU!
year in the Greater Toronto Area - staff training GRINNERS FOOD SYSTEMS LTD.
- 34 units in Canada (25 franchised) - supplies
Franchise Costs 105 Walker St.
- initial franchise fee $40,000 Franchise Costs Truro, NS B2N 5G9
- equipment/site cost $200,000 - initial franchise fee $60,000 FOX & FIDDLE 902-893-4141
- other costs $110,000 - average investment $1,300,000 PEGASUS HOSPITALITY GROUP
44 Upjohn Rd. History, Plans
- advertising fee 2% to $1,600,000
Toronto, ON M3B 2W1 - founded in 2013 in Truro, N.S.
- royalty fee 6% - advertising fee 3% national, 1% local
416-385-7705 - 13 units in Canada
- royalty fee 5%
Services Director, Franchising: Mark Teneyke - plans to expand in Atlantic Canada,
- advertising/marketing Services Ontario and Western Canada; clip-on
- design - advertising/marketing History, Plans concept also available
- lease negotiation - financial assistance - established in 1989 in Toronto
- 21 units in Canada (all franchised) Franchise Costs
- management - lease negotiation
- initial franchise fee $20,000
- purchasing - management
Franchise Costs - equipment/site cost $74,000
- site location - purchasing
- initial franchise fee $40,000 - other costs $30,000
- staff training - site location
- equipment/site cost $800,000 - total costs $124,000
- supplies - staff training
- other costs $250,000 - advertising fee 4%
- total costs $1,090,000 - royalty fee 5%
FATBURGER
FATBURGER - CANADA Services Services
401-1901 Rosser Ave. - advertising/marketing - advertising/marketing
Burnaby, BC V5C 6S3 - design - design
888-597-7272 FIREHOUSE SUBS - lease negotiation - lease negotiation advice
FIREHOUSE SUBS OF CANADA -management - management training
History, Plans 12735 Gran Bay Pkwy., Ste. 150 - purchasing - purchasing
- first Canadian location opened in Jacksonville, FL 32257 - site location - site location training and support
Vancouver in 2005 904-886-8300 - staff training
- 52 units in Canada (41 franchised) VP, Franchise Development: - supplies GABBYS
- opening five to seven locations in Greg Delks RESTAURANT & BAR
Western Canada; now developing FRESHII GABBYS FRANCHISEE SYSTEMS LTD.
History, Plans 2 Toronto St., Ste. 235
in Eastern Canada 192 Bloor St. W., Ste. 201
- established in 1994 in Jacksonville, Fla. Toronto, ON M5C 2B5
Franchise Costs Toronto, ON M5S 1T8
- four units in Canada Founder & CEO: Matthew Corrin
- initial franchise fee $50,000 416-967-9671
- expanding throughout Ontario
- advertising fee 4% History, Plans President: Todd Sherman
Franchise Costs - established in 2005 in Toronto
- royalty fee 6% History, Plans
- initial franchise fee $30,000
Services Franchise Costs - established in 1989 in Toronto
- advertising fee 2%
- advertising/marketing - initial franchise fee $30,000 - 13 units in Canada (eight franchised)
- royalty fee 6%
- design - advertising fee 1.5% - plans to convert existing independent
- system marketing fund 1%
- lease negotiation - royalty fee 6% operators to the Gabbys brand to keep
Services opening costs down
- purchasing
- advertising/marketing Services
- site location Franchise Costs
- purchasing - information available upon request
- staff training - initial franchise fee $25,000
- site location
- supplies - equipment/site cost $250,000
- staff training (THE) FRIENDLY GREEK - other costs $200,000
CHAIRMANS BRANDS CORP.
FETA & OLIVES - total costs $450,000
FETA & OLIVES MEDITERRANEAN GRILL (THE) FIRKIN 77 Progress Ave.
- advertising fee 1%
1 Palace Pier Ct., Ste. 809 GROUP OF PUBS Toronto, ON M1P 2Y7
- royalty fee 4%
FIRKIN CAPITAL CORP. 416-288-8515
Toronto, ON M8V 3W9
20 Steelcase Rd. W., Unit 1C VP, Franchising and Real Estate Services
416-251-3353
Markham, ON L3t 1B2 Development: Larry Santolini - advertising/marketing
President: Vicki Vasiliou
905-947-4444 - design
History, Plans
History, Plans Director, Franchising: Paul Saraiva - lease negotiation
- established in 1982 in Toronto
- established in 2006 in Barrie, Ont. - management

54 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


- purchasing Services - management HARVEYS
- site location - advertising/marketing - purchasing CARA OPERATIONS LIMITED
- staff training - design - site location 199 Four Valley Dr.
- supplies - lease negotiation - staff training Vaughan, ON L4K 0B8
- purchasing 905-760-2244
- site location GRECO PIZZA VP of Franchising: Mark Eaton
- staff training GRINNERS FOOD SYSTEMS LTD.
105 Walker St. History, Plans
(THE) GREAT Truro, NS B2N 5G9 - established in 1959 in Ontario
- 268 units in Canada (245 franchised)
CANADIAN BAGEL 902-893-4141
THE GREAT CANADIAN BAGEL LTD. History, Plans Franchise Costs
3300 Highway 7, Ste. 101 - initial franchise fee $25,000
GOOD EARTH COFFEEHOUSE Concord, ON L4K 4M3
- established in 1977 in Moncton
- total costs $650,000 to $950,000
GOOD EARTH CAFES LTD. - 99 units in Canada
905-566-1903 - plans to expand in Nova Scotia, New - advertising fee 4% national, 1% local
4020 7th St. S.E.
President: Ed Kwiatkowski Brunswick, P.E.I. and Newfoundland - royalty fee 5%
Calgary, AB T2G 2Y8
403-294-9330 History, Plans Franchise Costs Services
President & COO: Gerry Docherty - established in 1984 in Toronto - initial franchise fee $20,000 - advertising/marketing
Director of Franchising: Michael Going - 27 units in Canada (26 franchised) - equipment/site cost $90,000 - design
- plans to expand in Saskatchewan and - other costs $90,000 - financial assistance
History, Plans
the Greater Toronto Area - total costs $200,000 - lease negotiation
- established in 1991 in Calgary
- advertising fee 4% - management
- 51 units in Canada (48 franchised) Franchise Costs
- royalty fee 5% - purchasing
- plans to expand in the Greater - initial franchise fee $30,000
- site location
Vancouver Area and Lower Mainland, - equipment/site cost $250,000 Services - staff training
B.C., as well as the Greater Toronto - other costs $10,000 - advertising/marketing - supplies
Area, Ottawa and Southwestern Ontario - total cost $290,000 - lease negotiation advice
- advertising fee 1.5%
Franchise Costs
- royalty fee 6%
- management training HERO CERTIFIED BURGERS
- initial franchise fee $35,000 - purchasing ANGUS INC.
- equipment/site costs $575,000 Services - site location, training and support 78 Signet Dr., Ste. 201
- total costs $610,000 - advertising/marketing Toronto, ON M9L 1T2
- advertising fee 3% - design 416-740-2304
- royalty fee 7% - lease negotiation President: John Lettieri

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History, Plans Services History, Plans Franchise Costs
- established in 2003 in Toronto - advertising/marketing - established in 1985 in Calgary - equipment/site cost $600,000 to
- 63 units in Canada; one outside - design - 52 units in Canada (51 franchised) $750,000
of Canada - lease negotiation - plans to open three to six new Joeys - total costs $300,000 to $450,000
- management Urban units in 2017 and another three - advertising fee 2%
Franchise Costs
- purchasing to four units in 2018. - royalty fee 4%
- equipment/site cost $160,000
- site location
- other costs $140,000 Franchise Costs
- staff training Services
- total costs $275,000 to $300,000 - initial franchise fee $25,000
- supplies - advertising/marketing
- advertising fee 2% - equipment/site cost $250,000
- design
- royalty fee 6% - other costs $36,250
IHOP RESTAURANT - total costs $311,250
- lease negotiation
Services DINEEQUITY, INC. - purchasing
- advertising fee 2%
- advertising/marketing 450 North Brand Blvd. - site location
- royalty fee 4.5%
- design Glendale, CA 91203 - staff training
- lease negotiation 647-533-3333 Services
- management Manager, Canada IHOP: - advertising/marketing (THE) KEG STEAKHOUSE
- purchasing - design
- site location
Kenney Goldman
- lease negotiation
& BAR
History, Plans KEG RESTAURANTS LTD.
- staff training - management
- founded in 1958 in Toluca Lake, Calif. 10100 Shellbridge Way
- supplies - purchasing
- 1,600+ worldwide Richmond, BC V6X 2W7
- site location
604-276-0242
HOUSTON AVENUE Franchise Costs - staff training
EVP, Business Development:
- supplies
BAR & GRILL - initial franchise fee US$50,000 James Henderson
HOUSTON CANADA INC. - national advertising fee 3.5%
4628 Louis B. Mayer St. - royalty fee 4.5% JUGO JUICE History, Plans
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - established in 1971 in North Vancouver
Laval, QC H7P 6E4 Services
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - 90 units in Canada; 101 in North America
450-688-3793 - asset design and architecture
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 (58 franchised)
Director of Franchising: Richard Carrer - food innovation
514-336-8885 Franchise Costs
History, Plans - marketing and advertising
President: Stanley Ma - initial franchise fee $75,000
- established in 1998 in Rosemre, Que. - restaurant opening support
- site selection History, Plans - equipment/site cost $3,000,000
- 10 units in Canada (two franchised)
- supply chain - founded in 2002 to $5,000,000
- seeking new expansion opportunities in
- training and operations - 127 units in Canada - advertising fee 2%
Vaudreuil-Dorion, Que. and Qatar
systems/processes - royalty fee 6%
Franchise Costs Franchise Costs
- initial franchise fee $25,000 Services
- total costs $1,500,000
- advertising fee 2%
JIMMY THE GREEK INC. - advertising fee 4% - advertising/marketing
1 First Canadian Place - royalty fee 6% - design
- royalty fee 5%
100 King St. W., P.O. Box 334 - lease negotiation
Services Toronto, ON M5X 1E1 Services - purchasing
- advertising/marketing 416-214-9237 - advertising/marketing - site location
- design President: Jim Antonopoulos - design - staff training
- financial assistance - lease negotiation
History, Plans - purchasing
- lease negotiation
- established in 1985 in Toronto - site location
KELSEYS
- management CARA OPERATIONS LIMITED
- 52 units in Canada (51 franchised) - staff training
- purchasing 199 Four Valley Dr.
- continued expansion planned for - supplies
- site location Vaughan, ON L4K 0B8
Ontario and Alberta
- staff training 905-760-2244
- supplies Franchise Costs VP of Franchising: Mark Eaton
- initial franchise fee $40,000
History, Plans
HUMPTYS FAMILY - equipment/site cost $250,000
- established in 1978 in Ontario
- total costs $290,000
RESTAURANTS/ - advertising fee 2% - 72 units in Canada (54 franchised)
HUMPTYS CLASSIC CAFES - royalty fee 5%
HUMPTYS RESTAURANTS Franchise Costs
INTERNATIONAL INC. Services - initial franchise fee $60,000
2505 Macleod Trail S.W. - advertising/marketing - total costs $1,300,000 to $1,600,000
Calgary, AB T2G 5J4 - design JUNGLE JIMS - advertising fee 3%
403-269-4675 - lease negotiation SAFARI ENTERTAINMENT INC. - royalty fee 5%
Director, Franchising: Sergio Terrazas - site location 657 Topsail Rd.
Services
- staff training St. Johns, NL A1E 2E3
History, Plans - advertising/marketing
709-745-5467
- established in 1977 in Calgary - financial assistance
- 45 units in Canada (42 franchised)
JOEYS URBAN TAQUERIA Partner: Stephen Pike, Barry Walsh
- lease negotiation
and Sean Brake
| POUTINERIE | FISH & CHIPS - management
Franchise Costs JOEYS FRANCHISE GROUP - purchasing
- initial franchise fee $30,000 History, Plans
3048 9th St. S.E. - site location
- equipment/site cost $620,000 - founded in 1991 in St. Johns
Calgary, AB T2G 3B9 - staff training
- other costs $50,000 - 26 units in Canada (22 franchised)
403-243-4584 - supplies
- total costs $700,000 - plans to add one to two stores per year
VP, Business Development: Rob Hilditch
- advertising fee 2% during the next two years
- royalty fee 5%

56 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


KFC KORYO KOREAN BBQ - 20 units in Canada (all franchised) - total cost $1,035,000
KFC CANADA COMPANY MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - advertising fee 2%
Franchise Costs
191 Creditview Rd., Ste. 100 8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - royalty fee 5%
- initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000
Vaughan, ON L4L 9T1 St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - advertising fee 2% Services
416-664-5200 514-336-8885 - royalty fee 7% - advertising/marketing
Director of Development: Nazia Millwala President: Stanley Ma - design
Services
History, Plans History, Plans - lease negotiation
- advertising/marketing
- established in 1952 in Salt Lake - founded in 2004 - management
- design
City, Utah - 12 units in Canada - purchasing
- lease negotiation
- 640 units in Canada - site location
Franchise Costs - purchasing
- expects to increase Canadian store - staff training
- initial franchise fee $30,000 - site location
count to 800 restaurants - supplies
- advertising fee 2% - staff training
Franchise Costs - supplies
- royalty fee 6% LA CAGE -
- initial franchise fee US$49,100
- equipment/site cost available
Services LA BELLE ET LA BOEUF BRASSERIE SPORTIVE
- advertising/marketing FOODTASTIC INC. SPORTSCENE GROUP INC.
upon request
- design 2365 Guenette 1180 Place Nobel, Ste. 102
- advertising fee 5%
- lease negotiation Montreal, QC H4R 2E9 Boucherville, QC J4B 5L2
- royalty fee 6%
- purchasing 514-856-5555 450-641-3011
- site location Director of Franchising: President: Jean Bdard
Services
- staff training Lawrence Mammas
- advertising/marketing History, Plans
- supplies
- design - established in 1984 in Montreal
History, Plans
- management - 46 units in Canada (11 franchised)
- purchasing KOYA JAPAN - established in 2012 in Montreal, Que.
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - seven units in Canada; one outside of Franchise Costs
- site location
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 Canada (seven franchised) - initial franchise fee $75,000
- staff training
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - opening four new units in 2017; - equipment/site cost $2,300,000
514-336-8885 expanding into Ontario - other costs $25,000
President: Stanley Ma Franchise Costs - total costs $2,400,000
- initial franchise fee $35,000 - advertising fee national 3%, local 2%
History, Plans
- equipment/site cost $950,000 - royalty fee 5%
- founded in 1985
- other costs $50,000

wood + fire + smoke

Smokin' Hot
New Franchise

For a franchise package, contact Stu Rathwell at


stu@rockwoodgrill.ca or 1-306-581-9319
www.rockwoodgrill.ca
Services - royalty fee 6% Franchise Costs MENCHIES
- advertising/marketing - initial franchise fee $250,000
- lease negotiation
Services
- equipment/site cost $2,200,000
FROZEN YOGURT
- advertising/marketing YOGURTWORLD ENTERPRISES
- management - other costs $200,000
- design 259 Yorkland Rd, 3rd Floor
- purchasing - total costs $2,650,000
- lease negotiation Toronto, ON, M2J 5B2
- site location - advertising fee 2%
- supplies 416-645-5110, ext. 401
- staff training - royalty fee 5%
President: David Shneer

LA CREMIERE MAGIC OVEN Services


History, Plans
798 Danforth Ave. - advertising/marketing
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - established in 2010 in Toronto
Toronto, ON M4J 1L6 - design
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - 104 units in Canada; 400 outside
416-462-0333 - lease negotiation
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 of Canada
President: Tony Sabherwal - management
514-336-8885 - purchasing Franchise Costs
President: Stanley Ma History, Plans - site location - initial franchise fee $40,000
- six units in Canada (five franchised) - staff training - equipment/site cost $250,000
History, Plans - plans to open 10 units in the Greater - supplies to $300,000
- established in 1979 Toronto Area in the next two to - other costs $50,000
- 58 units in Canada five years
MARY BROWNS FAMOUS - total costs $340,000 to $400,000
Franchise Costs Franchise Costs CHICKEN & TATERS - advertising fee 2%
- initial franchise fee $25,000 to $30,000 - initial franchise fee $29,950 MARY BROWNS INC. - royalty fee 6%
- equipment/site cost $250,000 250 Shields Ct., Unit 7 Services
Services
- other costs $75,000 Markham, ON L3R 9W7 - advertising/marketing
- advertising/marketing
- total costs $329,950 905-513-0044 - design
- design
- advertising fee 2% VP, Franchise Development: Peter - lease negotiation
- lease negotiation
- royalty fee 5% Raykovalis - management
- purchasing
- site location Services History, Plans - purchasing
- staff training - advertising/marketing - established in 1969 in Newfoundland - site location
- supplies - design - 135 units in Canada - staff training
- lease negotiation - expansion planned coast to coast; set - supplies
LA PREP - purchasing to double the number of stores during
1233 Rue de la Montagne, Ste. 101 - site location the next five years MICHELS BAKERY CAFE
Montreal, QC H3G 1Z2 - staff training THREECAF BRANDS CANADA INC.
- supplies Franchise Costs 55 Administration Rd., Unit 37
514-510-5001
- initial franchise fee $25,000 Vaughan, ON L4K 4G9
CEO: John Essaris
- total average cost $400,000 to $500,000
VP of Franchise Development: MANCHU WOK - liquid capital $100,000 to $200,000
905-482-7300 or 877-434-3223,
John Beauparlant MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. ext. 7314
- advertising fee 4% Development Coordinator: Nicole Moore
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200
History, Plans - royalty fee 4%
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 History, Plans
- established in 2010 in Montreal
514-336-8885 Services - established in 1980 in Toronto
- expansion planned in Canada and U.S.
President: Stanley Ma - advertising/marketing - five units in Canada (four franchised)
Franchise Costs - design
History, Plans Franchise Costs
- initial franchise fee $35,000 - lease negotiation
- established in 1990 - initial franchise fee $40,000
- total cost $300,000 to $425,000 - management
- 73 units in Canada (all franchised); - total costs $450,000 to $775,000
- advertising fee 2% - purchasing
38 outside of Canada - advertising fee 2%
- royalty fee 6% - site location
Franchise Costs - staff training - royalty fee 7%
Services
- information available upon request Services
- advertising/marketing
- design Services
MCDONALDS - advertising/marketing
- financial assistance - advertising/marketing RESTAURANTS OF - lease negotiation
- lease negotiation - design CANADA LIMITED - purchasing
- management - lease negotiation 1 McDonalds Place - site location
- purchasing - purchasing Toronto, ON M3C 3L4
- site location - site location 416-443-1000 MIKES RESTAURANTS
- staff training - staff training Franchising Manager: Tom Marlow IMVESCOR RESTAURANT GROUP
- supplies - supplies 8250 Dcarie Blvd., Ste. 310
History, Plans
Montreal, QC H4P 2P5
- established in 1967 in Richmond, B.C.
LITTLE CAESARS PIZZA MANDARIN RESTAURANT - 1,443 units in Canada (80 per cent
514-341-5544
LITTLE CAESAR OF CANADA ULC MANDARIN RESTAURANT FRANCHISE Director of Franchising: Peter Tsafoulias
franchised)
2301 Royal Windsor Dr. CORPORATION History, Plans
Mississauga, ON L5J 1K5 8 Clipper Ct. Franchise Costs
- 68 units in Canada (66 franchised)
905-822-7899 Brampton, ON L6W 4T9 - information available upon request
- new development in Quebec in 2017
Director of Real Estate & Franchise 905-451-4100
Services
Development: James Jenkins Director, Franchising: Tina Chiu Franchise Costs
- advertising/marketing
- initial franchise fee $45,000
History, Plans History, Plans - design
- total costs $600,000 to $700,000
- established in 1959 in Garden City, Mich. - established in 1979 in Brampton, Ont. - lease negotiation
- advertising fee 3%
- opportunities available across Canada - 26 units in Canada (25 franchised) - purchasing
- royalty fee 5%
- two new Ontario locations opening - site location
Franchise Costs
in 2017 - staff training
- initial franchise fee $20,000 Services

58 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


- advertising/marketing - staff training MR. GREEK
- design MR. GREEK RESTAURANTS INC.
- lease negotiation MONTANAS 44 Upjohn Rd.
- management CARA OPERATIONS LIMITED Toronto, ON M3B 2W1
- purchasing 199 Four Valley Dr. 416-444-3266, ex. 30
- site location Vaughan, ON L4K 0B8 VP, Business Development: Fred Buston MR. MIKES RESTAURANT
- staff training 905-760-2244
History, Plans CORPORATION
VP of Franchising: Mark Eaton RAMMP HOSPITALITY BRANDS INC.
MILESTONES GRILL - established in 1988 in Toronto
100-3700 North Fraser Way
- 21 units in Canada
AND BAR History, Plans
- plans to expand in Canada Burnaby, BC V5J 5H4
CARA OPERATIONS LIMITED - established in 1995 in Ontario 604-536-4111
- 102 units in Canada (83 franchised) and internationally
199 Four Valley Dr. SVP, Business Development:
Vaughan, ON L4K 0B8 Franchise Costs Rick Villalpando
Franchise Costs
905-760-2244 - initial franchise fee $60,000 - initial franchise fee $35,000
VP of Franchising: Mark Eaton History, Plans
- total costs $1,600,000 to $2,300,000 - other costs $450,000+
- established in 1960 in Vancouver
History, Plans - advertising fee 3% - advertising fee 2%
- 32 units in Canada (29 franchised)
- established in 1989 in B.C. - royalty fee 5% - royalty fee 5%
- planning to open 30 units in Canada in
- 53 units in Canada (27 franchised) Services the next five years
Services
Franchise Costs - advertising/marketing
- advertising/marketing Franchise Costs
- initial franchise fee $75,000 - design
- lease negotiation - initial franchise fee $50,000
- total costs $2,500,000 to $3,500,000 - financial assistance
- purchasing - advertising fee 2%
- advertising fee 3% - lease negotiation
- site location - royalty fee 6%
- royalty fee 5% - management
- staff training
- purchasing Services
Services - site location - advertising/marketing
- advertising/marketing - staff training - design
- design - supplies - lease negotiation
- financial assistance DONT GET LEFT OUT! - management
- lease negotiation Email your updated franchising info - purchasing
- management to dschalk@kostuchmedia.com to be - site location
- purchasing included in our 2018 Franchise Report - staff training
- site location - supplies

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MR. SOUVLAKI Services NEW ORLEANS PIZZA NEW YORK FRIES
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - advertising/marketing CHAIRMANS BRANDS CORP. CARA OPERATIONS LIMITED
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - design 77 Progress Ave. 199 Four Valley Dr.
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - lease negotiation Toronto, ON M1P 2Y7 Vaughan, ON L4K 0B8
514-336-8885 - purchasing 416-288-8515 905-760-2244
President: Stanley Ma - site location VP, Franchising and Real Estate VP of Franchising: Mark Eaton
- staff training Development: Larry Santolini
History, Plans - supplies History, Plans
- founded in 1997 History, Plans - established in 1983 in Toronto
- 13 units in Canada (all franchised) MUCHO BURRITO - established in 1978 in Waterloo, Ont. - 168 units in Canada; 36 outside of
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - 41 units in Canada (39 franchised) Canada (106 franchised)
Franchise Costs
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - five units under development
- initial franchise fee $30,000 Franchise Costs
- advertising fee 3% St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 Franchise Costs - initial franchise fee $30,000
- royalty fee 6% 514-336-8885 - initial franchise fee $20,000 - total costs $232,000 to $322,000
President: Stanley Ma - equipment/site cost $178,000 - advertising fee 2%
Services
History, Plans - other costs $30,000 - royalty fee 6%
- information available upon request
- established in 2006 in Mississauga, Ont. - total costs $195,000
Services
- 102 units in Canada (all franchised) - advertising fee 2.5%
MR. SUB - royalty fee 5%
- advertising/marketing
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. Franchise Costs - design
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - initial franchise fee $25,000 to $30,000 Services - lease negotiation
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - advertising fee 4% - advertising/marketing - management
514-336-8885 - royalty fee 6% - design/construction - purchasing
President: Stanley Ma - financial assistance - site location
Services - lease negotiation - staff training
History, Plans - advertising/marketing - purchasing - supplies
- founded in 1971 - design - site location
- 259 units in Canada (all franchised) - financial assistance - staff training
- lease negotiation - supplies
Franchise Costs
- purchasing
DONT GET LEFT OUT!
- initial franchise fee $25,000 Email your updated franchising info
- site location
- advertising fee 3% to dschalk@kostuchmedia.com to be
- staff training
- royalty fee 6% included in our 2018 Franchise Report
- supplies

join us at our
info gala
& learn more about
opportunites as a
franchisee investor
Operating Partner
see registration
details below

RSVP to a
Small Bites, info gala near you:
BIG Presentation!
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(W) shoelessjoes.ca/franchising/ Join our team today!

60 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


NICKELS DELICATESSEN (THE) OLD Franchise Costs Services
- initial franchise fee $25,000 - advertising/marketing
FOODTASTIC INC. SPAGHETTI FACTORY - equipment/site cost $400,000 - financial assistance
2365 Guenette OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY CANADA LTD.
Montreal, QC H4R 2E9 - other costs $20,000 - lease negotiation
55 Water St., Ste. 210
514-856-5555 - total costs $445,000 - site selection
Vancouver, BC V6B 1A1
President: Peter Mammas - advertising fee 3% - staff training
604-684-1287
Director of Franchising: - royalty fee 6%
Director, Franchising: Ken Lobson
Lawrence Mammas Services PANAGO PIZZA INC.
History, Plans 33149 Mill Lake Rd.
History, Plans - advertising/marketing
- 15 units in Canada (two franchised) Abbotsford, BC V2S 2A4
- eight units in Canada (seven franchised) - design
- plans to add one unit in 2017 604-859-6621
- opening three locations in 2017 - lease negotiation
- management Director of Franchising: Nigel Beattie
Franchise Costs
Franchise Costs - information available upon request - purchasing History, Plans
- initial franchise fee $35,000 - royalty fee 5% - site location - established in 1986 in Abbotsford, B.C.
- equipment/site cost $800,000 - staff training - 195 units in Canada (187 franchised)
- other costs $50,000 Services
- continues to capitalize on new market
- advertising/marketing
- total cost $885,000
- design
ORANGE JULIUS opportunities in Western Canada, while
- advertising fee 2%
- royalty fee 5% - lease negotiation CANADA LTD. building the momentum of the brand in
5045 South Service Rd., Ste. 3000 key Eastern Canadian markets
- purchasing
Services Burlington, ON L7R 3Y3 Franchise Costs
- advertising/marketing 905-639-1492
- design
OPA! OF GREECE - initial franchise fee $25,000
Director of Franchising: Chris Falle - equipment/site cost $453,000
OPA! SOUVLAKI FRANCHISE GROUP INC.
- lease negotiation - total costs $478,000
7235 Flint Rd. S.E. History, Plans
- management - royalty fee 5%
Calgary, AB T2H 1G2 - acquired in 1987
- purchasing - advertising fee 5%
403-245-0033 - 48 units in Canada
- site location
Director of Development: Dave Jensen
- staff training Franchise Costs Services
- supplies History, Plans - initial franchise fee $30,000 - advertising/marketing
- founded in 1998 in Calgary - equipment/site cost $200,000 - design
- 97 units in Canada (all franchised) - other costs $45,000 to $80,000 - lease negotiation
- plans to expand within Canada - advertising fee approximately 1% - purchasing
- royalty fee approximately 5 - site location

Stone Hearth & Specialty


Commercial Cooking Equipment

Introducing Products Ltd


Foodservice Equipment & Supply Est. 1963

T H E WO OD STONE

Gas
Plancha

Discover what the Wood Stone Gas Plancha can do for you.
Visit BOOTH #1807 at the NAFEM Show, Feb. 9-11, 2017
or call 800.988.8103 to learn more.

Changing the Way You Cook since 1990 Canadas Distributor for Southern Pride and Broaster Equipment
800.988.8103 360.650.1111 woodstone-corp.com
Call us to book your FREE demo
(888)-887-9923 | kendale@kendale.ca

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 61


PANINI Services
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - information available upon request
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 PERKINS RESTAURANT
514-336-8885 & BAKERY
President: Stanley Ma PERKINS & MARIE CALLENDERS, INC.
6075 Poplar Ave., Ste. 800
History, Plans
Memphis, TN 38119
- founded in 1995
901-766-6400
- one unit in Canada
VP, Franchising: Dave Blouin
Franchise Costs
History, Plans
- initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000
- established in 1958 in Cincinnati, Ohio
- advertising fee 2%
- seeking to expand in Alberta, B.C.,
- royalty fee 6%
Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec
Services and Saskatchewan
- advertising/marketing
Franchise Costs
- design
- information available upon request
- lease negotiation
- advertising fee 3%
- purchasing
- local advertising commitment 1%
- site location
- royalty fee 4%
- staff training
Services
PANNIZZA - advertising/marketing
RESTAURANTS INC. - design
2035 Cte-de-Liesse, Ste. 207 - management
Saint-Laurent, QC H4N 2M5 - purchasing
514-969-3377 - site location
VP Marketing & Strategic Planning: - staff training
Ritou Maloni

History, Plans
PINKBERRY
PINKBERRY CANADA INC.
- founded in 2013 in Montreal
210 Shields Ct.
- 13 units in Canada (12 franchised)
Markham, ON L3R 8V2
- recently expanded into Ontario; devel-
905-479-8762
oping the brand in locations across
Chairman and CEO: Aaron Serruya
Canada, the U.S. and internationally,
with a focus on expanding in food History, Plans
courts, shopping centres and hospitals, - established in 2005 in Calif.
as well as in-line and stand-alone - eight units in Canada
- plans to expand across Canada and
Franchise Costs
internationally via traditional and
- initial franchise fee $20,000
non-traditional units
- equipment/site cost $175,000
- total costs $190,000 Franchise Costs
- advertising fee 3% - initial franchise fee $45,000
- royalty fee 6% - equipment/site cost $190,000
to $497,000
Services
- total costs $245,000 to $520,000
- advertising/marketing
- advertising fee 3%
- design
- royalty fee 6% of net sales
- lease negotiation
- management Services
- site location - advertising/marketing
- staff training - design
- supplies - lease negotiation
- management
PARAMOUNT FINE FOODS - purchasing
PARAMOUNT FRANCHISE GROUP INC. - site location
10 Four Seasons Place, Ste. 601 - staff training
Toronto, ON M9B 6H7 - supplies
416-695-8900
Manager of Franchising: Holly Graham PITA PIT CANADA
11 Princess St., Ste. 305
History, Plans
Kingston, ON K7L 1A1
- founded in 2006
613-546-4494
- 36 units in Canada (28 franchised)
Franchise Development: Steph Watson
- plans to expand in Alberta and B.C.,
as well as internationally
History, Plans
Franchise Costs - established in 1995 in Kingston, Ont.
- information available upon request - 600+ units worldwide

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM
Franchise Costs - real estate development/renewals PIZZA HUT with plans to add up to 10 units
- initial franchise fee $10,000 - training PIZZA HUT CANADA COMPANY Franchise Costs
- total investment $291,900 to $365,150 191 Creditview Rd., Ste. 100 - total costs $325,000 to $375,000
- advertising fee 1% PIZZA DELIGHT Vaughan, ON L4L 9T1 - advertising fee 4%
- royalty fee 5% of monthly gross sales IMVESCOR RESTAURANT GROUP INC. 416-664-5200 - royalty fee 6%
Services 264 Bostford St., Unit 201 Director of Development:
Moncton, NB E1C 4X7 Marco Moretto Services
- information available upon request
506-853-0990 - advertising/marketing
Franchising Manager: Serge Comeau History, Plans - design
PIZZA 73 - established in 1958 in - lease negotiation
PIZZA PIZZA LIMITED History, Plans Wichita, Kan. - management
4820 52nd St. S.E. - established in 1968 in Shediac, N.B. - 406 units in Canada - purchasing
Calgary, AB T2B 3R2 - 80 franchised units in Canada - site location
403-221-7373, ext. 222 Franchise Costs
Franchise Costs - initial franchise fee US$24,200 - staff training
SVP of Operations and Development: - supplies
- initial franchise fee $30,000 - advertising fee 5%
Philip Goudreau
- total costs $250,000 to $400,000 - royalty fee 6%
History, Plans - advertising fee 3% PIZZA PIZZA
- established in 1985 in Edmonton - royalty fee 6% Services PIZZA PIZZA LIMITED
- 75 traditional locations; 27 non- - advertising/marketing 500 Kipling Ave.
Services - design
traditional locations in Canada Toronto, ON M8Z 5E5
- advertising/marketing - site location 416-967-1010
Joint Venture Costs - design - staff training VP of Franchising:
- initial partnership fee $50,000 - lease negotiation
Sebastian Fuschini
- advertising fee 8% - management PIZZA NOVA
- administration fee 3% - purchasing 2247 Midland Ave. History, Plans
- site location Toronto, ON M1P 4R1 - established in 1967 in Toronto
Services
- staff training 416-439-0051 - 418 units in Canada (399 franchised)
- accounting and finance
Director of Franchising: Vince Morano - continued growth in Saskatchewan,
- call centre operations
Manitoba and Quebec
- IT infrastructure DONT GET LEFT OUT! History, Plans
- operational support Email your updated franchising info - established in 1963 in Toronto Franchise Costs
- payroll to dschalk@kostuchmedia.com to be - 148 units in Canada (147 franchised) - initial franchise fee $30,000
- professional leadership in all facets included in our 2018 Franchise Report - continued expansion into key markets - equipment/site cost $120,000
of the business - other costs $200,000

60 locations strong
Franchise opportunites are now available in the Ontario market for
qualified industry professionals.

For more information, email us today at franchising@brownsrestaurantgroup.com

brownsrestaurantgroup.com
- total costs $350,000 Franchise Costs Franchise Costs - 145 units in Canada (140 franchised)
- advertising fee 6% - initial franchise fee $30,000 - initial franchise fee $25,000 - 10 units under development
- royalty fee 6% - advertising fee 3% - equipment cost $60,000 to $62,000
Franchise Costs
- royalty fee 5% - construction cost $70,000 to $120,000
Services - franchise fee $25,000
- total costs $171,700 to $248,700
- advertising/marketing Services - equipment/site cost $300,000
- advertising fee 3%
- design - advertising/marketing - other costs $80,000
- royalty fee 6%
- lease negotiation - design - advertising fee 3%
- management - management Services - royalty fee 5%
- purchasing - purchasing - advertising/marketing
Services
- site location - site location - design
- advertising/marketing
- staff training - staff training - franchisee training
- design/construction
- supplies - supplies - lease negotiation
- financial assistance
- purchasing
- lease negotiation
PIZZA SHACK PRESSE CAFE - site location
- purchasing
PIZZA SHACK HOLDINGS INC. LES CAFES V.P. - site location
73 Vautour St. 1422 Ntre-Dame W. QUIZNOS - staff training
Cap-Pel, NB E4N 2C3 Montreal, QC H3C 1K9 QUIZNOS CANADA - supplies
506-874-4236 514-935-5553 RESTAURANT CORPORATION
VP, Marketing: Allain Bourque 1267 Cornwall Rd., Ste. 301
History, Plans
Oakville, ON L6J 7T5
ROCK CREEK TAP& GRILL/
History, Plans - founded in 1994
647-259-0333 ROCKWOOD URBAN GRILL
- established in 1984 in Dieppe, N.B. - 70+ units in Canada ROCK CREEK FRANCHISING INC.
Director, Franchising: Marc Choy
- 28 units in Canada 3434 Rideout Bay
Franchise Costs
- one unit in the pipeline History, Plans Regina, SK S4S 7C2
- initial franchise fee $35,000
- established in 1981 in Denver, Colo. 306-581-9319
Franchise Costs - total cost $200,000 to $400,000
- initial franchise fee $6,000 to $9,500 Franchise Costs President: Stu Rathwell
Services
- equipment/site cost $25,000 - initial franchise fee $25,000 History,Plans
- information available upon request
to $100,000 - equipment/site cost and other costs - founded in 2006 in Regina
- total costs $31,000 to $109,500 available upon request - eight units in Canada (seven franchised)
- advertising fee 2% PUMPERNICKELS - total costs $227,500 to $361,000 - plans to expand into Alberta and
- royalty fee 5% JSF FRANCHISE GROUP INC. - marketing fee 4% Manitoba in 2017; seeking operators in
4-30 Pennsylvania Ave. - royalty fee 7%
Services B.C. and eastern Canada
Vaughan ON, L4K 3V8
- advertising/marketing 416-819-2644 Services Franchise Costs
- design Franchising: Joel Friedman - information available upon request - initial franchise fee $40,000
- lease negotiation - equipment/site cost $1,200,000
- purchasing History, Plans RICKYS GROUP OF FAMILY - other costs $160,000
- site location
- staff training
- established in 1986 STYLE RESTAURANTS - total costs $1,400,000
- 13 units in Canada 401-1901 Rosser Ave. - advertising fee 1%
- plans to expand in the Greater Toronto Burnaby, BC V5C 6S3 - royalty fee 5%
PIZZAVILLE INC. Area and other parts of Canada 888-597-7272 Services
741 Rowntree Dairy Rd. Senior VP: Stacey Hansson
Franchise Costs - advertising/marketing
Woodbridge, ON L4L 5T9
- initial franchise fee $35,000 History, Plans - design
905-850-0070
- equipment/site cost $144,000 - established in 1962 in West Vancouver - lease negotiation
Director of Operations: John Higgins
- other costs $381,000 - 97 units in Canada (89 franchised) - purchasing
History, Plans - total costs $560,000 - site location
- established in 1963 in Toronto - advertising fee 2% Franchise Costs - staff training
- 75 units in Canada (74 franchised) - royalty fee 6.5% - initial franchise fee $45,000 - supplies
- plans to add two to three units in the - advertising fee 3%
Services - royalty fee 5%
comming months
- advertising/marketing ROCKY MOUNTAIN
Franchise Costs - lease negotiation Services FLATBREAD
- information available upon request - management - advertising/marketing ROCKY MOUNTAIN FLATBREAD CO. LTD.
- purchasing - design 1876 West 1st Ave.
Services - lease negotiation Vancouver, BC V6J 1G5
- site location
- information available upon request - management 604-730-0321
- staff training
- purchasing President: Dominic Fielden
POPEYES QUESADA - site location
History, Plans
LOUISIANA KITCHEN BURRITOS - TACOS
- staff training
- established in 2004
POPEYES LOUISIANA KITCHEN INC. - supplies
QUESADA FRANCHISING - five units in Canada (two franchised)
400 Perimeter Center Terrace, Ste. 1000
OF CANADA CORP. - plans to grow by one to two units
Atlanta, GA 30346
1240 Bay St., Ste. 304
ROBINS FOODS per year
404-459-4584
Toronto, ON M5R 2A7 (2006) LTD.
Regional Leader Canada: Rob Manuel 77 Progress Ave. Franchise Costs
866-854-2400
Toronto, ON M1P 2Y7 - initial franchise fee $40,000
History, Plans President: Tom ONeill
416-288-8515 - equipment/site cost $550,000
- founded 1972 in New Orleans
History, Plans VP, Franchising and Real Estate - other costs $200,000
- 115 units in Canada (all franchised);
- established in 2004 in Toronto Development: Larry Santolini - total costs $750,000
2,500 outside of Canada
- 79 units in Canada - advertising fee 1%
- continuing Western Canadian expansion History, Plans
- plans to double in size - royalty fee 5%
in 2017 - established in 1975 in Thunder Bay, Ont.

64 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


Kostuch MedIa Launches

MADE IN

CANADA
BIG, BOLD, AND BOUNTIFUL
A YEAR-LONG PHOTO CONTEST
TO HELP CELEBRATE UPLOAD YOUR PHOTO:
CANADAS 150TH BIRTHDAY #KMLMadeinCanada
or email jporter@kostuchmedia.com
To coincide with Canadas 150th birthday, KML readers are invited to tap into their
creative side by entering the Made-in-Canada photo contest. Throughout 2017, Submit pictures in the
readers can snap pictures of various iconic products, ingredients, menu dishes as
well as hotels and resorts that reflect a Canadian sensibility and provide a visual following categories:
perspective on what this country is all about.
Food: appetizers (soups, salads); entres,
Each month a judging panel comprised of the F&H and Hotelier editorial teams, proteins,veggies, fruits, desserts
photographers, contest sponsors, editorial board members and graphic designers Drinks, cocktails, wines, beers
will choose a total of 10 photos that reflect strong composition, exposure and focus Ingredients: spices, herbs, maple
while adhering to a Canadian theme.By the end of 2017, the magazines will have a syrup, et cetera
collection of 150 images from which to choose 10 Grand Winners, whose submis- Iconic restaurants, iconic hotels and
sions will be featured in the December issue of both F&H and Hotelier magazine.
resorts, attractions
Hotel Rooms, lobby spaces,
Enter the Made in Canada contest for a chance to win one of 10 trips to
guestrooms, suites, bars
Canadian iconic hotel destinations.
Personalities: chefs, hoteliers,
farmers/ producers/suppliers.
Winners will be announced and fted at the 2017 December Pinnacle
Awards Luncheon.

For Contest Rules and


Regulations visit
foodserviceandhospitality.com/
madeincanada

SPONSORS
PLATNIUM GOLD GOLD SILVER SILVER


Services - purchasing SECOND CUP COFFEE CO. History, Plans
- advertising/marketing - site location THE SECOND CUP LTD. - four units in Canada (one franchised)
- design - staff training 6303 Airport Rd. - plans to expand in Alberta and the
- lease negotiation - supplies Mississauga, ON L4V 1R8 Greater Toronto Area
- purchasing 905-362-1818 Franchise Costs
- site location SCORES VP, Franchise Development: Audra Wosik - initial franchise fee $35,000
IMVESCOR RESTAURANT GROUP - equipment/site cost $165,000
SAWMILL PRIME RIB 8250 Dcarie Blvd., Ste. 310 History, Plans
- established in 1975 in Toronto - other costs $125,000
& STEAK HOUSE Montreal, QC H4P 2P5
- 301 units in Canada (279 franchised) - total costs $325,000
4180 Calgary Trail S., Second Floor 514-341-5544 - advertising fee 3%
Director of Franchising: Peter Tsafoulias - renovate 15 to 20 per cent of new and
Edmonton, AB T6H 5H5 - royalty fee 5%
existing units to the new Crema design
780-463-4499 History, Plans
Director of Operations: Len McCullough Franchise Costs Services
- established in 1995 in Montreal - advertising/marketing
- 39 units in Canada (38 franchised) - initial franchise fee $40,000
History, Plans - design
- new development in Quebec in 2017 - equipment/site cost $500,000
- founded in 1976 in Edmonton - lease negotiation
- total costs $540,000
- nine units in Canada (seven franchised) Franchise Costs - management
- advertising fee 2%
- continued growth in Alberta, B.C., - initial franchise fee $60,000 - purchasing
- royalty fee 9%
Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, - total costs $1,000,000 to $1,200,000 - site location
New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, P.E.I. - advertising fee 3% Services - staff training
and Newfoundland - royalty fee 4% - advertising/marketing - supplies
- design
Franchise Costs Services
- initial franchise fee $50,000 - advertising/marketing
- lease negotiation SHOELESS JOES
- site location
- equipment/site cost $2,000,000, - design - training
SPORTS GRILL
pending size and location - lease negotiation SHOELESS JOES LTD.
- total costs $2,250,000 551 Jevlan Dr.
- advertising fee 2%
- management SHAMROCK BURGERS Vaughan, ON L4L 8W1
- site location JSF FRANCHISE GROUP INC.
- royalty fee 5% - staff training 905-760-1295
123 Eglinton Ave. E. VP Business Development:
Services Toronto, ON M4P 1J2 Danny Grammenopoulos
- advertising/marketing 416-819-2644
- lease negotiation Director of Franchising: History, Plans
- management Joel Friedman - founded in 1985 in Toronto

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and visit us at NAFEM #1435.
- 46 units in Canada (all franchised) Franchise Costs - total costs $300,000 to $350,000 Franchise Costs
- plans to expand across Canada; pri- - initial franchise fee $35,000 - advertising fee 2% - initial franchise fee $30,000
mary growth in the Ontario, Manitoba, - equipment/site costs $650,000 - royalty fee 6% - total costs $350,000 to $400,000
Saskatchewan and Alberta; secondary - other costs $75,000 - advertising fee 2%
Services
growth opportunities will be accepted - total costs $760,000 - royalty fee 6%
- advertising/marketing
for Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and B.C. -advertising fee 3%
- design Services
- royalty fee 5%
Franchise Costs - lease negotiation - advertising/marketing
- initial franchise fee $45,000 Services - management - design
- equipment/site cost $450,000 - advertising/marketing - ongoing training and - lease negotiation
- other costs $650,000 - design operational support - management
- total cost $1,145,000 - lease negotiation - purchasing - ongoing training
- advertising fee 2% - site location - site location - purchasing
- royalty fee 5% - staff training - staff training - site location
- supplies - supplies - staff training
Services - supplies
- advertising/marketing
- design
SMOKES BURRITORIE SMOKES POUTINERIE
- lease negotiation
SMOKES POUTINERIE INC. SMOKES POUTINERIE INC. SMOKES WEINERIE
85 Kingston Rd. E., Unit 5 85 Kingston Rd. E., Unit 5 SMOKES POUTINERIE INC.
- management
Ajax, ON L1S 7J4 Ajax, ON L1S 7J4 85 Kingston Rd. E., Unit 5
- purchasing
905-427-4444 905-427-4444 Ajax, ON L1S 7J4
- site location
VP Franchising Development: VP Franchising Development: 905-427-4444
- staff training
Mike Graham Mike Graham VP Franchise Development:
Mike Graham
SMITTYS CANADA LIMITED History, Plans History, Plans
501 18th Ave. S.W., Ste. 600 - established in 2015 in Toronto - established in 2008 in Toronto History, Plans
Calgary, AB T2S 0C7 - four units in Canada (all franchised) - more than 100 units in Canada - established in 2015 in Toronto
403-229-3838 - further expansion planned for Canada (all franchised) - seven units in Canada
Director, Franchising: Chris Chan - traditional four-wall, non-traditional, - aggressive expansion planned for (all franchised)
sports and entertainment, educational Canada, the U.S. and internationally; - further expansion planned for Canada;
History, Plans and amusement portfolios traditional four-wall, non-traditional,
traditional four-wall, non-traditional,
- established in 1960 in Calgary sports and entertainment, educational
Franchise Costs sports and entertainment, educational
- 86 units in Canada and amusement portfolios
- initial franchise fee $30,000 and amusement portfolios
- expanding in Ontario and B.C. in 2017

Invest in a brand that you can trust!

Providing Quality Equipment and Service for over half a Century!

672 Dupont Street Toronto, ON M6G 1Z6 Tel: 416.535.1555 Toll Free: 877.323.6226 Web: www.faema.ca
Franchise Costs - purchasing - site location Franchise Costs
- initial franchise fee $30,000 - site location - staff training - initial franchise fee $35,000 - $75,000
- total costs $350,000 to $400,000 - staff training - supplies - total costs $950,000 to $2,400,000
- advertising fee 2% - supplies - advertising fee 4% national, 1% local
- royalty fee 6% SUNSET GRILL - royalty fee 5%
Services SUBWAY SUNSET GRILL RESTAURANTS LTD. Services
- advertising/marketing DOCTORS ASSOCIATES INC. 5100 Erin Mills Town Centre, - advertising/marketing
- design 325 Bic Dr. P.O. Box 53036 - design
- lease negotiation Milford, CT 06461 Mississauga, ON L5M 5A7 - financial assistance
- management 800-888-4848 905-286-5833 - lease negotiation
- ongoing training and Chief Development Officer: Don Fertman CEO: Angelo Christou - management
operational support History, Plans - purchasing
History, Plans
- purchasing - established in 1965 in Bridgeport, Conn. - site location
- established in 1985 in Toronto
- site location - staff training
Franchise Costs - 145 units in Canada (all franchised)
- staff training - supplies
- initial franchise fee $15,000 - expansion planned across Canada
- supplies
- advertising fee 4.5% and in the U.S.
- royalty fee 8%
SYMPOSIUM CAFE INC.
SOUTH STREET BURGER Franchise Costs 6021 Yonge St., Ste. 475
122164 CANADA LIMITED Services - initial franchise fee $55,000 Toronto, ON M2M 3W2
1220 Yonge St., Ste. 400 - information available upon request - total costs $575,000 416-449-3611
Toronto, ON M4T 1W1 - advertising fee 1% Director of Franchising: Ron Ansett
- royalty fee 5%
416-963-5005 SUKIYAKI History, Plans
Director, Franchising: Safiah Arooz MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. Services - established in Toronto in 1996;
History, Plans 8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - advertising/marketing franchising since 2004
- established in 2005 in Toronto St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - design - 24 units in Canada (23 franchised)
- 38 units in Canada; one outside of 514-336-8885 - financial assistance - plans to add six units in 2017, eight units
Canada (20 franchised) President: Stanley Ma - lease negotiation in 2018 and 10 units in 2019
- additional units planned in Canada - management
History, Plans Franchise Costs
and internationally - purchasing
- founded in 1988 - initial franchise fee $50,000
- site location
Franchise Costs - 16 units in Canada; eight outside of - equipment/site cost $625,000
- staff training
- initial franchise fee $35,000 Canada (all franchised) - total costs $675,000
- supplies
- equipment/site cost $615,000 Franchise Costs - advertising fee 2%
- total costs $650,000 - royalty fee 5%
- advertising fee 2%
- initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000 SUSHI SHOP
- advertising fee 2% MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. Services
- royalty fee 5% - royalty fee 6% 8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - advertising/marketing
Services St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - design
Services
- advertising/marketing 514-336-8885 - lease negotiation
- advertising/marketing
- design President: Stanley Ma - management
- lease negotiation
- management - purchasing - purchasing
History, Plans
- lease negotiation - site location - site location
- founded in 2001
- purchasing - staff training - staff training
- 134 units in Canada (132 franchised);
- site location
three outside of Canada
- staff training
SUNNYSIDE GRILL TACO BELL
- supplies Franchise Costs TACO BELL CANADA COMPANY
2 Jane St.,Ste. 202
Toronto, ON M6S 4W3 - initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000 191 Creditview Rd., Ste. 100
ST. LOUIS BAR AND GRILL 416-604-0650 - advertising fee 3% Vaughan, ON L4L 9T1
ST. LOUIS FRANCHISE LTD. President: Jeff Parissi - royalty fee 6% 416-254-4266
2040 Yonge St., Ste. 200B Development Manager: Alex Grudkin
History, Plans Services
Toronto, ON M4S 1Z9
- established in 2004 - advertising/marketing History, Plans
416-485-1094
- seven units in Canada (six franchised) - design - established in 1952 in Downey, Calif.
Director, Franchising: Lisa Roscoe
- plans to grow by one or two units - lease negotiation - 170 units in Canada, (all franchised);
History, Plans per year - purchasing - plans to expand throughout Canada
- established in 2002 in Toronto - site location
Franchise Costs Franchise Costs
- 53 units in Canada - staff training
- initial franchise fee $30,000 - initial franchise fee $49,100
- 10 units slated for opening in Ontario - supplies
- total turnkey build-out cost $150,000 - equipment/site cost $700,000
and Atlantic Canada in 2017
- other costs $500,000
Franchise Costs
to $200,000 SWISS CHALET - total cost $1,249,100
- advertising fee 1%
- initial franchise fee $40,000 - royalty fee 4%
ROTISSERIE AND GRILL - advertising fee 5%
- equipment/site cost $615,000 CARA OPERATIONS LIMITED - royalty fee 6%
- other costs $120,000 Services 199 Four Valley Dr.
- advertising/marketing Vaughan, ON L4K 0B8 Services
- total costs $775,000
- design 905-760-2244 - advertising/marketing
- advertising fee 1.75%
- financial assistance VP of Franchising: Mark Eaton - design
- royalty fee 5%
- lease negotiation - lease negotiation
Services History, Plans - management
- management
- advertising/marketing - established in 1954 in Ontario - purchasing
- ongoing store visits, support
- design - 241 units in Canada (233 franchised) - site location
and training
- lease negotiation - purchasing - staff training

68 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


TACO TIME - 11 units in Canada (10 franchised); three - advertising fee 2% TERIYAKI EXPERIENCE
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. outside of Canada (all franchised) - royalty fee $1,000 flat INNOVATIVE FOOD BRANDS
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 Franchise Costs Services 700 Kerr St., Ste. 100
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000 - advertising/marketing Oakville, ON L6K 3W5
514-336-8885 - advertising fee 2% - design 905-337-7777
President: Stanley Ma - royalty fee 6% - lease negotiation VP, Development: Nik Jurkovic

History, Plans - management History, Plans


Services
- founded in 1978 - purchasing - established in 1986 in Toronto
- advertising/marketing
- 126 units in Canada (all franchised) - staff training - 116 units in Canada; 25 outside of
- design
- supplies Canada (all franchised)
Franchise Costs - lease negotiation
- purchasing - plans to add five units in 2017
- initial franchise fee $30,000
- site location TCBY
- advertising fee 4% MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. Franchise Costs
- royalty fee 5% - staff training - initial franchise fee $25,000
- supplies 8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - equipment cost $85,000 to $125,000
Services
514-336-8885 - construction costs $125,000 to 185,000
- advertising/marketing TASTE OF MEDITERRANEAN President: Stanley Ma - construction administration fee $10,000
- design MEDITERRANEAN FRANCHISE INC. - leasing fee $0 to $10,000
- lease negotiation 2 Toronto St., Ste. 324 History, Plans - total costs $245,000 to $355,000
- purchasing Toronto, ON M5C 2B5 - founded in 1992 - advertising fee 3%
- site location 416-821-5561 - 29 units in Canada (all franchised) - royalty fee 6%
- staff training CEO: Sam Hussein
- supplies Franchise Costs Services
History, Plans - initial franchise fee $10,000 to $25,000 - advertising/marketing
TANDORI - established in 2004 in Toronto - advertising fee 3% - design
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - 10 units in Canada; five outside of - royalty fee 5% - lease negotiation
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 Canada (all franchised) - purchasing
Services
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - opening six new locations in 2017. - site location
- advertising/marketing
514-336-8885 - staff training (assist onsite)
Franchise Costs - design
President: Stanley Ma - initial franchise fee $20,000 - lease negotiation
History, Plans - equipment/site cost $130,000 - purchasing
- established in 2008 in Montreal - other costs $10,000 - site location
- total costs $160,000 - staff training
THAI EXPRESS TIM HORTONS - advertising fee 2% Services
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - royalty fee 5% - information available upon request
RESTAURANTS BRANDS INTERNATIONAL
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 226 Wyecroft Rd. Services
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 Oakville, ON L6K 3X7 - advertising/marketing
TUTTI FRUTTI
514-336-8885 905-845-6511 MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC.
- lease negotiation
President: Stanley Ma President: Elias Diaz Ses 8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200
- purchasing
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5
History, Plans - site location
History, Plans 514-336-8885
- founded in 2000 in Montrea - staff training
- established in 1964 in Hamilton, Ont. President: Stanley Ma
- 274 units in Canada; five international - 3,717 units in Canada
(all franchised) TREATS BAKERY History, Plans
Franchise Costs TREATS INTERNATIONAL - founded in 1996
Franchise Costs - initial franchise fee $50,000 - 36 units in Canada (all franchised)
FRANCHISE CORPORATION
- initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000 - total cost $480,000 to $510,000 1550A Laperrire Ave., Ste. 201
- advertising fee 3% - advertising fee 4% Franchise Costs
Ottawa, ON K1Z 7T2
- royalty fee 6% - royalty fee 6% - initial franchise fee $35,000 to $40,000
613-563-4073
- advertising fee 3%
Services Services - royalty fee 5% (6% Alberta
- advertising/marketing History, Plans
- advertising/marketing and B.C.)
- lease negotiation - established in 1977 in Toronto
- design
- purchasing - 56 units in Canada (all franchised) Services
- management
- site location - purchasing Franchise Costs - advertising/marketing
- staff training - staff training - total cost $185,000 to $350,000 - design
- supplies - furniture - lease negotiation
- equipment Services - purchasing
THAI ZONE - information available upon request - site location
- staff training
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. TIMOTHYS WORLD COFFEE
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 THREECAF BRANDS CANADA INC. TRIPLE OS - supplies
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 55 Administration Rd., Unit 37 WHITE SPOT LIMITED
514-336-8885 Vaughan, ON L4K 4G9 1126 S.E. Marine Dr. UNION BURGER
President: Stanley Ma 877-434-3223, ext. 7314 Vancouver, BC V5X 2V7 OBSIDIAN GROUP INC.
Development Coordinator: Nicole Moore 604-321-6631 1770 Argentia Rd.
History, Plans Business Development Manager: Mississauga, ON L5N 3S7
- founded in 2007 History, Plans Karen Dosen 905-814-8030
- 36 units in Quebec (all franchised) - established in 1975 in London, Ont. VP, Franchising: George Karamountzos
Franchise Costs - 45 units in Canada (36 franchised); History, Plans
- initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000 two units outside Canada - founded in 1997 in Vancouver History, Plans
- advertising fee 2% - exploring sites in various markets - 58 units in Canada; eight international - established in 2010 in Ontario
- royalty fee 6% (60 franchised) - 11 units in Canada
Franchise Costs
- focus on growth in Western Canada
Services - initial franchise fee $25,000 Franchise Costs
- advertising/marketing - total cost $350,000 to $500,000 Franchise Costs - initial franchise fee $35,000
- design - advertising fee 2% - initial franchise fee $40,000 - equipment/site cost $300,000 to
- lease negotiation - royalty fee 9% - equipment/site cost $800,000 $350,000
- purchasing - total cost $840,000 - other costs $45,000 to $70,000
Services
- site location - marketing fee 2% - total costs $380,000 to $455,000
- advertising/marketing
- staff training - royalty fee 6% - advertising fee 2%
- design
- supplies - other fees 1% - royalty fee 7%
- lease negotiation
- purchasing Services
Services
TIKI MING - site location
- advertising/mnarketing
- advertising/marketing
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - financial assistance
- design
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - management
- lease negotiation
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - purchasing
- purchasing
514-336-8885 - site location
- site location
President: Stanley Ma - staff training
- staff training
History, Plans
- founded in 1983 TOPPERS PIZZA TURTLE JACKS URBAN KITCHEN/
- 35 units in Canada (33 franchised); TOPPERS FRANCHISING COMPANY INC.
MUSKOKA GRILL SELECT SANDWICH
seven outside of Canada 551 Bryne Dr., Unit N SELECT FOOD SERVICES INC.
Barrie, ON L4N 9Y3 TORTOISE RESTAURANT GROUP INC.
(all franchised) 155 Gordon Baker Rd., Ste. 214
705-735-2127 3370 South Service Rd., Ste. 300
Toronto, ON M2H 3N5
Franchise Costs Director of Franchising: Todd Sattler Burlington, ON L7L 3M6
416-391-1244
- initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000 905-332-6833 ext. 234
History, Plans Director of Franchising: Carol Kahn
- advertising fee 2% VP, Frachising and Business
- royalty fee 6% - established in 1982 in Sudbury, Ont. Development: Peter J. Fisher History, Plans
- 39 units in Canada (29 franchised) - established in 1979 in Toronto
Services - plans to expand to 140 units by 2018 History, Plans
- information available upon request - established in 1992 in Burlington, Ont. Franchise Costs
Franchise Costs - 17 units in Canada - initial franchise fee $25,000
- initial franchise fee $25,000 - opening three new units in 2017 - advertising fee 3%
- equipment/site cost $296,500 - royalty fee 7%
to $380,000 Franchise Costs
- total costs $321,500 to $405,000 - information available upon request

70 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


Services Services
- information available upon request - advertising/marketing
- design
VALENTINE - lease negotiation
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - management
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - purchasing
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - site location
514-336-8885 - staff training
President: Stanley Ma - supplies

History, Plans
- founded in 1984
VIE & NAM
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC.
- 80 units in Canada (76 franchised)
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200
Franchise Costs St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5
- initial franchise fee $25,000 514-336-8885
- advertising fee 2.5% President: Stanley Ma
- royalty fee 5%
History, Plans
Services - founded in 2008 in Montreal
- advertising/marketing - four units in Canada (all franchised)
- lease negotiation
Franchise Costs
- purchasing
- initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000
- site location
- advertising fee 2%
- staff training
- royalty fee 6%
- supplies
Services
VANELLIS - advertising/marketing
MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC. - design
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200 - lease negotiation www.BUMCONTRACT.com
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 - purchasing
- site location STOCKED READY TO SHIP
514-336-8885
President: Stanley Ma - staff training
- supplies
NEW location
History, Plans
- founded in 2003 in Montreal VILLA MADINA OFFICE SHOWROOM DISTRIBUTION
- 23 units in Canada (22 franchised); MTY TIKI MING ENTERPRISES INC.
51 outside of Canada 2400 Winston Park Drive #1
8150 Trans-Canada Highway, Ste. 200
St-Laurent, QC H4S 1M5 Oakville, ON
Franchise Costs 514-336-8885 855-337-2995
- initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000 President: Stanley Ma
- advertising fee 2% info@bumcontract.com
- royalty fee 6% History, Plans
- founded in 2003 Open Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm
Services - 45 units in Canada (44 franchised)
- advertising/marketing Evenings & Weekends by Appt
- design Franchise Costs
- lease negotiation - initial franchise fee $30,000 to $40,000
- purchasing - advertising fee 3%
- site location - royalty fee 6%
- staff training
Services
- supplies
- advertising/marketing
- design
VERAS - lease negotiation
BURGER SHACK - purchasing
42 W. 8th Ave., Ste. 3 - site location
Vancouver, BC V5Y 1M7 - staff training
604-683-8372
President: Gerald Tritt WE BREW CAFE INC.
History, Plans 192 Bloor St. W., Unit 201
- established in 1977 in Vancouver Toronto, ON M5S 1T6
- 16 units in Canada (14 franchised) 416-967-9671
- plans to expand nationally , focusing President: Todd Sherman
on Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and
Nova Scotia History, Plans
- established in 2015
Franchise Costs - three units in Canada.
- initial franchise fee $30,000 - plans to add units in the Greater
- equipment/site cost $200,000 Toronto Area
- other costs 250,000
- total cost $480,000 Franchise Costs
- advertising fee 2% - initial franchise fee $20,000
- royalty fee 6% - equipment/site cost $200,000

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM
- other costs $275,000 WILLIAMS FRESH Franchise Costs - staff training
- total costs $500,000 - initial franchise fee $45,000 - supplies
- advertising fee 1%
CAFE INC. - total costs $650,000 to $950,000
DRUXYS INC.
- royalty fee 4%
202 Grand River Ave.
- advertising fee 2% YOGURTYS
- royalty fee 6% YOGURTYS YOGURT INC.
Services Brantford, ON N3T 4X9
- advertising/marketing 519-752-4850 Services 210 Shields Ct.
- design CEO: Rainer Mueller - advertising/marketing Markham, ON L3R 8V2
- lease negotiation - design 905-479-8762
History, Plans President: Aaron Serruya
- management - lease negotiation
- established in 1993 in Stratford, Ont.
- purchasing - purchasing History, Plans
- 29 units in Canada (27 franchised)
- site location - site location - established in 1987 in Toronto
- staff training Franchise Costs - staff training - 60 units in Canada; two outside of
- supplies - information available upon request Canada (55 franchised)
Services
YEH! WORLDWIDE - plans to expand across Canada, the
WENDYS RESTAURANTS - information available upon request
210 Shields Ct. Philippines and the U.A.E. via traditional
OF CANADA INC. Markham, ON L3R 8V2 and non-traditional locations
5515 North Service Road, Ste. 201 905-479-8762
WIMPYS DINER INC. President: Aaron Serruya
Franchise Costs
Burlington, ON L7L 6G4 - initial franchise fee $25,000
WIMPYS DINER INC.
905-331-0341 History, Plans - equipment/site cost $153,000
160 Konrad Crest., Unit 1
Manager, Franchise & Strategic - established in 2008 in Quebec to $483,000
Markham, ON L3R 9T9
Planning: Jane Dann - 20 units in Canada (all franchised) - total costs $178,000 to $508,000
888-594-6797
History, Plans GM: Jim Daikos - plans to expand across Canada - advertising fee 3%
- established in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio; - royalty fee 6%
History, Plans Franchise Costs
established in 1975 in Hamilton, Ont. - initial franchise cost $35,000 Services
- founded in 1961
- 359 units in Canada (all franchised) - equipment/site cost $190,000 - advertising/marketing
- 51 units in Canada
Franchise Costs to $397,000 - design
Franchise Costs - total costs $250,000 to $350,000 - lease negotiation
- application fee for new franchises
- initial franchise fee $30,000 - advertising fee 1% of net sales - management
$5,000
- advertising fee 2% - royalty fee 6% of net sales - purchasing
- initial franchise fee $40,000
- royalty fee 4% - site location
- advertising fee 4% Services
- royalty fee 4% Services - staff training
- advertising/marketing
- information available upon request - supplies
Services - design
- advertising/marketing - lease negotiation
- design WOK BOX FRESH - management
- lease negotiation ASIAN KITCHEN - purchasing
- management 19074 22nd Ave., Unit 102 - site location
- purchasing Surrey, BC V3S 3S6 - staff training
- site development/location 778-545-0233 - supplies
- staff training Director, Franchising: Lawrence Eade
- supplies
History, Plans
YOGEN FRZ
YOGEN FRZ CANADA INC.
- established in 2004 in Edmonton
WHITE SPOT RESTAURANT - expand in Western Canada during the
210 Shields Ct.
WHITE SPOT LIMITED Markham, ON L3R 8V2
next two years; growth in Ontario and
1126 S.E. Marine Dr. 905-479-8762
Eastern Canada
Vancouver, BC V5X 2V7 President: Aaron Serruya
604-321-6631 Franchise Costs
History, Plans
Business Development Manager: - initial franchise fee $25,000
- established in 1986 in Thornhill, Ont.
Karen Dosen - total cost $179,700 to $426,200
- 173 units in Canada; 850 international
- advertising fee 3%
History, Plans (1,010 franchised)
- royalty fee 6%
- founded in 1928 in Vancouver - plans to expand across Canada, the

DONT
- 64 units in Canada (39 franchised) Services U.S. and internationally
- focusing on growth in Western Canada - advertising/marketing
Franchise Costs
- design
Franchise Costs - initial franchise fee $25,000

GET
- lease negotiation
- initial franchise fee $75,000 - equipment/site cost $100,000
- management
- equipment/site cost $1,800,000 to $319,000
- purchasing
- total cost $1,875,000 - other costs $40,000
- site location

LEFT
- advertising fee 2.5% - total costs $165,000 to $384,000
- staff training
- royalty fee 5% - advertising fee 3%
- supplies
- other fees 0.05% - royalty fee 6%

THE WORKS

OUT!
Services Services
- advertising/marketing 149 Lakeshore Rd. E. - advertising/marketing
- design Oakville, ON L6J 1H3 - design
- lease negotiation 855-799-6757 - lease negotiation
- purchasing President and CEO: Bruce Miller - management
- purchasing Email your updated franchising info
- site locationa
History, Plans - site location to dschalk@kostuchmedia.com to be
- staff training
- established in 2001 in Ottawa included in our 2018 Franchise Report
- 27 units in Canada (23 franchised)

72 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


SHOW PREVIEW

A NATION
UNLEASHED
Celebrating 150 Years
of Canadiana
BY ERIC ALISTER

T
his year, Restaurants foodservice industry over food,
Canada (RC) will be drinks and entertainment.
celebrating 150 years of For the first time, the RC Show
innovation, leadership will be held at more than one
and culinary excellence venue including an elaborate
at its Canada Unleashed-themed dinner party at the historic Casa
tradeshow in Toronto named Loma. Dubbed Nations Feast,
in recognition of the nations the exclusive event will feature
150th birthday. the countrys best culinary cre-
The event promises a myriad ations, with chefs from each UNLEASHING KNOWLEDGE This years Restaurants Canada Show will once again bring
opportunities for networking, province creating their signature together industry experts to share their knowlede of food, equipment and trends
impacting Canadas foodservice landscape
socializing and learning. The RC dishes. The dinner is open to
opening-night reception kicks off owners, operators and show
Feb. 26, at 5 p.m. at the Enercare sponsors, with all proceeds going
Centres Galleria. Attendees can to Community Food Centres
connect with exhibitors, sponsors Canada to help low-income fami- Centre of Excellence will growth and creating strategies for
and other leading figures in the lies across the country grow and offer insights on the imminent business success.
cook healthy food. challenges facing the Canadian On the main stage this year,
Tuesday morn- foodservice industry and how to chef Susur Lee will demonstrate
ings Breakfast with manage consumers increasingly how to make his world-famous
Champions which complex expectations. slaw, while chef Jagger Gordon
will run from 7:30 Bricker CEO of Ipsos will collaborate with Loblaws
a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Public Affairs and author of best- to show guests how to make the
at the Exhibition selling books such as The Big Shift most of the food they buy, as he
Places Liberty Grand will share how Canadians are prepares meals with ingredients
offers guests an changing, what to expect from diverted from landfills.
opportunity to learn future Canadians and what they Pavilion themes will include
more about issues will want from the restaurant and beer, wine, spirits and cock-
impacting the future foodservice industry. tails as well as a bartending
of hospitality. Industry insiders The RC Show 2017 offers both competition; coffee and tea,
Sara Monnett and Darrell Bricker independent operator sessions with ongoing sessions on pair-
will address todays most pressing (from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on ing coffee and tea cocktails with
issues and present the 2017 RC Feb. 26) and multi-unit operator desserts; locally grown meats and
Leadership Award. sessions (from 9 a.m. to 12:30 produce from Ontario, Quebec,
Monnett VP of Research p.m. on Feb. 27), moderated by Manitoba and P.E.I.; culinary fla-
Insights at Technomic Inc., who television and radio personal- vours and products from around
oversees the companys consumer ity, Tony Chapman. All sessions the globe; and the latest apps,
and market research division as will provide valuable ideas and gadgets and gear for the foodser-
well as its Data and Analytics inspiration for driving business vice industry. FH

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 73


SHOW PRODUCT PREVIEW

INNOVATION SHOWCASE
The Restaurants Canada show returns to Toronto Feb. 26 to 28
to showcase new food-and-beverage products, equipment
and technology. Here is sneak peek at some of the items that
will be on display:

Prime Cuts
Sterling Silver Premium Meats represents Cargills highest-
quality beef for both consistency and perfection in cut
helping operators create memorable culinary experiences for
Impressive Power
guests. Because Cargill is committed to enhancing customers
See the Official Blender of the
dining experience, by choosing Sterling Silver Premium Meats,
Restaurants Canada Show 2017 in
operators also gain access to materials to increase brand
action. Featuring a powerful 3.5
awareness, educational offerings to energize wait staff and culi-
peak HP motor, combined with a
nary collaborative support. VISIT BOOTH 2350
3mm-thick patented asymmetric
Talon blade, the KitchenAid KSBC1B0
Commercial Series Countertop
Blender is capable of blending a mar-
garita in just 22 seconds. The 60-oz
(1774mL) BPA-free jar is engineered to
optimize performance, with beveled
corners for clean pouring from three
sides, and the die-cast metal motor
base stands up to rough kitchen and
bar conditions. The motor base is also
covered by a three-year hassle-free,
commercial replacement warranty.
TRY SIRIUSXM
MUSIC FOR BUSINESS VISIT BOOTH 1205

FREE
FOR 30 DAYS.

Show and Tell


THE PERFECT SOUND FOR
YOUR BUSINESS Chesher Equipment Ltd. a national whole-
Get over 90 commercial-free music channels in every sale distributor of foodservice equipment and
genre for $35.99/mo*. Visit siriusxm.ca/businesstrial parts will present a variety of live cooking
and enter code: FOODSERVICE or call 1-877-249-9143 demonstrations at its booth, featuring its
to learn more. extensive roster of brands. Some of Cheshers
brands include ACP, Inc., Antunes, APW Wyott,
Bakers Pride, Cres Cor, LAINOX Naboo, Sunkist,
Vitamix and Wood Stone. Cheshers sales
team of accredited chefs is dedicated to
*Taxes and a one-time Activation Fee of $29.99 apply. Additional radios require additional subscriptions
of $35.99 per month per location. Offer and service is based on a SiriusXM Internet Music for Business providing customers with culinary equipment
subscription. Dedicated business channels without DJ chatter and 90+ channels of commercial-free music
available only when you choose SiriusXM Internet Music for Business. 2016 Sirius XM Canada Inc. solutions, as well as exceptional service and
SiriusXM, the SiriusXM logo, channel names and logos are trademarks of Sirius XM Radio Inc. and
are used under license. support to the foodservice industry.
VISIT BOOTH 1121

74 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY


6-0912_FoodService_Ad_v2_FINAL.indd 1 FEBRUARY 2017 11/8/16 5:59 PM FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM
ADVERTORIAL

Small but Mighty


HORECA REPRESENTATIVES
RATIONALs latest innovation the SelfCookingCenter is designed
to be the perfect centrepiece for any Canadian kitchen. This versatile FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD
piece of equipment can grill, roast, bake, steam, stew, blanch or poach
WILL MEET AT HOSTMILANO
IN OCTOBER
food, all within a space of less than 1 m (11 ft). RATIONAL will be host-
ing live cooking demonstrations so you can see the system in action
and learn how you can save money, time and energy while improving
the quality of the dishes you create. VISIT BOOTHS 1421 AND 1521 2017 has just begun, but the cogs of HostMilano have already been turning in
preparation for the 40th edition of the leading fair in the Ho.Re.Ca., foodservice,
small and large-scale retail, food and hotel industry, scheduled to take place in
Grains Milan from Oct. 20 to 24, 2017.
to Fuel
Your Day This will be an important anniversary for the event, reconfirming the central
role it plays in the international equipment, coffee and food panorama. It is
Chase Global Foods expected to be a great success, considering that 1,437 companies have
has launched already confirmed their participation, 41 per cent of these from 48 countries
Melanies Medleys outside Italy, including new entries Serbia, Liechtenstein, Egypt and South
Artisanal Grain Africa. There will be more than 1,500 hosted buyers, selected also thanks to
Blends. These the partnership with the ITA - Italian Trade Agency, while the media campaign,
breakfast creations entailing an investment of more than two million euro, will bring more than
are clean, natural 1,000 international journalists to Host 2017, including 100 correspondents who
grains blended fresh in small batches with fruit, nuts and other natural will also visit an extremely lively Milan and Italy, recognized worldwide as the
ingredients. They are a unique better-for-you breakfast option but are birthplace of good food.
also versatile enough to be used in exotic salads, snacks and desserts.
Melanies Medleys are available in foodservice and home-meal replace- ALL EYES ON CANADA
ment formats, can be served hot or cold and can be frozen to retain Canada is one of the three areas targeted by this edition, together with the U.S.
freshness. This ready-to-eat treat is available in four flavours: Chocolate and the Middle East. It has therefore been the focus of special attention in the
Coconut Almond, Caramel Apple Pecan, Cinnamon Walnut and Fruit & form of various activities designed to attract visitors from the country of the
Almond. Seven more varieties are set to launch in Canada in 2017. maple leaf, as well as through agreements with respected local associations.
VISIT BOOTH 705
HostMilano began its mission in Canada by winning over the segment of
restaurant owners and retailers with the support of Restaurants Canada, the
most important association of foodservice and restaurant operators with more
Combined Force than 30,000 members, OCSA - Ontario Convenience Stores Association and
WCSA - Western Canadas Convenience Store Association, two associations that
The combined entity of Russell Food Equipment and Hendrix Restaurant
collectively boast approximately 13,000 local shops. More recently, agreements
Equipment & Supplies is making its Restaurants Canada show debut as
designed to promote the exhibition and the exchange of visibility regarding the
Russell Hendrix Foodservice Equipment. The newly merged companies
event have also been established with the Baking Association of Canada (BAC),
kicked off the New Year operating under its new name and, over the course
and Interior Designers of Canada (IDC), covering the main sectors featured at
of the next several months, the company will be entering a transitional
HostMilano.
period, combining to create one brand. This union was driven by the natural
fit and substantial synergy opportunities between the two companies.
VISIT BOOTHS 1029 AND 1129

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM
www.host.fieramilano.it
POURING FOR PROFITS

GRAND OPENINGS
Canada is embracing the European aperitif trend
BY CAROL SNELL

EAST COAST and a twist of orange. It is more


FAVOURITES robust for colder weather. It has a
fruitcake kind of feel.
In Toronto, Marijke McLean is a
category manager for brown spir-
its at the Liquor Control Board of
Ontario (LCBO). She predicts great
things for the aperitif segment. In
the past few years, the trend has been
growing in Ontario. We are now tak-
ing that time after work or before

O n Canadas
Atlantic coast,
the Fogo Island Inn in
dinner. In Canada, we take advantage
of the warm weather to have a simple
aperitif such as an Aperol spritz. It
Newfoundland is also part doesnt go away completely in other
of the wave. A taste for months, but May through August

T
aperitifs is on the rise, sees a spike.
he French would call for an Is there a distinctly Canadian style says Melanie Coates, McLean says sales of true aperi-
aperitif and the Italians, of the oh-so-European pre-dinner director of Marketing and tifs were up 15 per cent this year

iSTOCK.COM/DAVINCIDIG [GLASS AT BAR], ALEX FRADKIN [FOGO ISLAND INN], iSTOCK.COM [GLASS ON THE BAR]
an aperitivo. The words drink? How do aperitifs compare in Business Development. over last. It is remarkable, she says,
come from the Latin popularity to cocktails? Cocktails They spark the appetite
to see that kind of growth in long-
aperire, meaning to open. are very hip, says chef Matt DeMille, established brands such as Campari,
and open up the palate.
Meant to open up the tastebuds in who used to work at the Drake Benedictine and Pastis.
She lists the very
readiness for a meal, aperitifs lean to Devonshire in Ontarios Prince In fact, the sales growth of several
Canadian-sounding
the dry and somewhat bitter and Edward County before striking out brands over the last three years has
Campari Caribou Soda as
aromatic side as sweetness will on his owan. Aperitifs [may be] seen producers struggling to meet
her favourite Fogo Island
discourage the appetite. next, he suggests, adding they have the demand. We havent yet seen the
Inn aperitif.
Europe is the home of the classic not been pushed to the same extent. true sales potential, says McLean.
aperitif when the ink was dry- If someone wants to promote aperi- A number of new brands will be
ing on the documents that created tifs, [success lies] in how you design hitting the LCBO shelves in time for
Canada 150 years ago, the Campari your menu and train your staff. They warmer weather, including Peychaud
Family in Italy was already toasting are for places that are serious about a new aperitivo that McLean sug-
the fifth birthday of the drink that the dining structure, because they are gests serving over ice with soda, bit-
bears its name. Campari remains classical and go with classical cuisine. ters and citrus and Capo Capo, a
a popular aperitivo, especially with While prices for cocktails are in Canadian aperitivo McLean predicts
soda and a twist of orange. Other the $16 to $18 range, aperitifs are will be a welcome variation on the
aperitifs with European pedigrees generally priced in the $8 to $12 traditional Negroni. People are
include vermouth; the anise-fla- range in DeMilles experience. looking for authenticity. They want
voured Pernod, Pastis and Ricard; As far as a distinctive Canadian pure aromas and flavours so we
Lillet and Dubonnet; and white style goes, he recommends the dark are seeing more craft distillers and
sparking wines including Prosecco. vermouth Antica with an ice cube experimentation, says McLean. FH

76 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


EQUIPMENT

BACK TO THE FUTURE


As restaurant kitchens go back in time,
customer service leaps into the realm of science fiction
BY ERIC ALISTER
iSTOCK.COM/SERGEYSAN1 [PIZZA DELIVERY], iSTOCK.COM/DAOLEDUC [SMARTPHONE PIZZA]

A
s restaurant kitchens go customer experiences. For many, PIZZA as good or very good at integrat-
back in time return- mobile is simply an extension of
CHAINS ing technology into the ordering
ing to simpler methods what theyre used to doing online, process, based on their most recent
and simple ingredients he explains.
ARE ordering experience.
sourced from a chef s Restaurant chains have not been
LEADING Despite similarities among the
proverbial backyard rather than shy to adopt mobile technology. Data
THE WAY top-rated chains, the pizza segment
a factory the front-of-house is from Chicago-based foodservice WITH stands out for other advancements.
jumping head-first into the future. consulting firm Technomic shows ONLINE For example, Panagos and Dominos
When it comes to restaurant pizza chains are leading the way with ORDERING mobile applications allow customers
operations and customer service, the online-ordering apps. In fact, among APPS to customize orders and create their
foodservice landscape is facing a time the 44 restaurant brands Technomic own pizzas. Dominos has integrated
of tremendous change. According tracks in Canada, pizza chains earn an order tracker into its online and
to Warren Price, EVP for New York three of the top five spots when it mobile platforms, which allows
Fries, mobile technology has become comes to this attribute. Panago Pizza, consumers to see when their order is
critical to delivering exceptional Pizza Delight and Dominos rank being made and sent out for delivery.

FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY 77


EQUIPMENT

While pizza chains generally earn


the highest praise from consumers
in this area, two other chains also
rank in the top five for their integra-
tion of technology Swiss Chalet
and Tim Hortons. Swiss Chalets
online-ordering platform is interac-
tive and makes it easy for consumers
to order and pay for their meal, while
Tim Hortons mobile application,
TimmyMe, allows customers to pay
and earn rewards by using their
smartphone.
When it comes to third-party
ordering apps, companies such as
Just Eat are bringing an unparalleled THE RISE OF MOBILE
Mobile technology
level of innovation to the market. In
has bcome a critical
the nearly two years since the suc- component of
cessful IPO of Just Eat and Seamless, customer service
nearly every month has seen
announcements of new competitors,
making the third-party ordering app
market the most competitive in the venience factor is going to be attrac- missed all without shouldering
foodservice sector. tive and offer viable relief, says Bill the added financial cost of liability,
Though skeptics may fear market Bender, FCSI consultant and founder risk and added payroll, says Adam
saturation, analysts still see plenty of of W.H. Bender & Associates, a res- Lamb, a U.S.-based restaurant con-
room in the market for healthy com- taurant and foodservice consulting sultant, coach and chef.
petition. With the slow growth in firm. Furthermore, On-demand Despite all that it promises,
the economy and job growth, many food-delivery platforms offer the online ordering does still have some
are forced to work two or more jobs. customer a wide variety of dining hurdles to cross. Common customer
With restaurant-delivery services or options while allowing restaurants complaints centre around extra fees,
delivery of prepared meals, the con- to reach a customer they might have long waits and a poor selection of
foods. Added third-party fees can
sometimes double the cost of an
order not to mention the added
cost of tipping the driver. On top
of costly fees, delivery services have
been known to struggle with their
delivery-time quotes. UberEats, for
example, attempted to offer 10-min-
ute delivery times in New York in
March but had to scrap the option in
April as it simply could not keep its
promise. Finally, the allure of end-
less delivery choices relies heavily on
THE SUBSCRIPTION-BASED APPROACH ROLLING WITH THE TIMES
Third-party delivery location; smaller cities with fewer
Amazon recently announced it would be partnering with more than 350 restaurants in New local participating restaurants make
companies are bringing
York City to deliver meals to its customers. Currently, the service is available in 10 cities in the
unparalled innovation to third-party ordering apps very lim-
U.S. Amazon is also bringing its familiar payment model to food delivery; instead of charging
the maket, including driv- ited in their offerings, often causing
customers added fees per order, it now includes delivery options free of charge to its Amazon
erless delivery vehicles
Prime members. This payment model is not a new concept in the tech industry; both Adobe users to abandon a delivery app.
and Microsoft have replaced their one-time product costs with subscription-based charges When balancing the pros and cons
that appeal more to customers on tighter budgets. The more affordable Amazon food-deliv- of the current state of online order-
ery system has just one caveat. It charges restaurants a whopping 27.5 per cent royalty on
ing apps, it can be difficult for those
each order, which is nearly double that of other third-party delivery services.
within the foodservice industry

78 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY JANUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


EQUIPMENT

which demonstrated its HoloLens


technology, which offers a more
visually immersive menu that helps
customers see a realistic representa-
tion of a menu item they havent
tried before.
Just Eat also revealed apps slated
iSTOCK.COM/DAVILES [ORDERING FOOD ONLINE], iSTOCK.COM/DAOLEDUC [SUSHI DELIVERY]

On-demand for the Apple TV and the Xbox One


in Dec. 2016 and Jan. 2017, respec-
food-delivery
tively, which will allow customers
platforms to order food from their televi-
offer the sion sets. These new apps along
customer a with the recent launch of Just Eats
wide variety dedicated customer-care chatbots
built for Microsoft systems and
of dining
to predict what the future holds. robots to deliver its orders, in Facebook Messenger are part
Luckily, a few companies have hopes of dramatically increasing its options while of the companys attempt to build
offered a small glimpse into whats ordering capacity. allowing ordering experiences into custom-
to come. In November, Just Eat held At the conference, the company restaurants ers everyday routines.
a press conference where it shared elaborated on how artificial intel- to reach a With so much happening at such
insight into a project the company ligence and emerging technologies breakneck speed, it can be difficult
customer to keep ones head from spinning
started in London, England in in virtual and augmented reality
September. Through a partnership have helped shape robotics in the they might when contemplating the online-
with Starship Technologies, Just future of food delivery. Also pre- have missed. food-delivery landscape of the
Eat has been piloting self-driving senting at the event was Microsoft, future. FH

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Photography: Ema Peter


CHEFS CORNER

HOME, SWEET HOME


Chef Alexandra Feswick brings her
home table to The Drake Hotel
BY ERIC ALISTER

her studies, however, Feswick had a realization. I found


myself cooking more than I was actually learning, she
says. So I finished up my degree and quickly enrolled at
George Brown College.
Feswick entered the culinary industry as an apprentice
under chef Jeff Crump at the historic Ancaster Mill restau-
rant in Ancaster, Ont., before moving on to build a name
for herself at acclaimed Toronto restaurants Auberge de
Pommier, the Wine Bar, Samuel J. Moore and Brockton
General. Since 2014, shes been chef de cuisine at The
Drake Hotel in Toronto.
She draws on her obsession with locally grown ingredi-
ents to create dishes that touch diners on a visceral level.
The best meal imaginable would be at a farm next to the
crops you are eating, she says. When I worked with Jeff
Crump, it was mandatory that we worked on a farm in the
summer, once a week. One of my favourite memories is
being on that farm and eating a harvest lunch of some of
the products we had grown that summer.
Feswick ardently argues that good food comes from
loving what you do. At The Drake Hotel, she brings that
love to everything she prepares, sourcing fresh Canadian
ingredients in simple dishes, which she keeps as scratch as
possible. I was really lucky that [my mom] made every-
BITS thing from scratch, so I started off with that experience,
& BITES she says.
With Feswick in the kitchen, its no coincidence The
Favourite
ingredient? Drake has become well-known for its cozy comfort foods
The skin of that match the seasons in which theyre served. For dinner,
vegetables. current popular entres include a 10-oz striploin with sea-

A
Why does everyone sonal vegetables, rosemary butter and jus ($40); rotisserie
ward-winning chef Alexandra Feswick has always want to chicken with Brussels sprouts, mushrooms and polenta
been working and honing her skills in the peel them off? ($27); the Drake dry-aged burger featuring a milk bun,
kitchen since she was 15 years old. Today, bacon, cheddar, Russian dressing and pickle, served with a
Guilty
her primary focus is on creating gourmet pleasure? side of fries ($19); and albacore crudo with avocado and
comfort foods that give guests the universally Pizza charred scallion ($13).
cherished sentiment of a home-cooked meal. I want my Feswick hopes to take homemade cooking to the next
RYAN SZULC [ALEXANDRA FESWICK]

food to hit the same comfort spot in people eating it as the Favourite level by making The Drakes fare even more local. We
nostalgia of being at home, she says. The same place you kitchen tool? are already doing this in many [ways]. However, I think
Spoons tast-
have to close your eyes to think about and that always puts we could do more, she says. Whats better than an apple
ing spoons, serving
a smile on your face. spoons, wooden and
freshly picked from the tree youre standing next to, or
Despite her early love affair with cooking, Feswick put metal spoons strawberries still warm from the plant? I would like to
her culinary aspirations on hold after high school to study offer this type of experience to our customers on a more
sociology at the University of Guelph. Towards the end of regular basis. FH

80 FOODSERVICE AND HOSPITALITY FEBRUARY 2017 FOODSERVICEANDHOSPITALITY.COM


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