Juvenile Court and Community Schools San Diego County Office of Education

JCCS Technology Plan
2010-2015

Office of the San Diego County Superintendent of Schools © 2010 Board of Education, San Diego County. All rights reserved.

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Technology Plan Contact Information Education Technology Plan Review System (ETPRS) Contact Information County & District Code: 37 - 10371 School Code (Direct funded charters only): 3710371 LEA Name: San Diego County Office of Education *Salutation: Dr. *First Name: Dennis *Last Name: Danielson *Job Title: Technology Coordinator *Address: 6401 Linda Vista Rd., SDCOE Rm. 216 *City: San Diego *Zip Code: 91910 *Telephone: (858) 571-7230 Fax: (858) 268-3176 *E-Mail: ddaniel@sdcoe.net Please provide backup contact information. 1st Backup Name: Mary Glover 1st Backup E-Mail: mglover@sdcoe.net

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Technology Plan Contact Information.........................................................................................................3

TABLE OF CONTENTS.........................................................................................4 APPENDIX I – EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY PLAN BENCHMARK REVIEW....5 1. PLAN DURATION ...........................................................................................12 2. STAKEHOLDERS ...........................................................................................13 3. CURRICULUM COMPONENT.........................................................................18
Students: ....................................................................................................................................................20

4. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMPONENT........................................42
4.a. Current skills of JCCS Teachers and Administrators.........................................................................42

5. INFRASTRUCTURE, HARDWARE, TECHNICAL SUPPORT, AND SOFTWARE COMPONENT.................................................................................51 6. FUNDING AND BUDGET COMPONENT........................................................65 7. MONITORING AND EVALUATION COMPONENT.........................................70 8. EFFECTIVE COLLABORATION STRATEGIES WITH ADULT LITERACY PROVIDERS.........................................................................................................74 9. EFFECTIVE, RESEARCH-BASED METHODS AND STRATEGIES..............75 APPENDIX A........................................................................................................88 NETS FOR TEACHERS.......................................................................................88 NETS FOR STUDENTS ......................................................................................90 NETS FOR ADMINISTRATORS..........................................................................91 THE ISTE NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS (NETS•A)..............................................................................................................91 AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR ADMINISTRATORS.......................91
Appendix C – Criteria for EETT Technology Plans ................................................................................93

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Appendix I – Education Technology Plan Benchmark Review For the grant period ending June 30, 2010 CDS # 37-10371 District Name: San Diego County Office of Education The No Child Left Behind Act requires that each EETT grant recipient measures the performance of their educational technology implementation plan. To adhere to these requirements, describe the progress towards the goals and benchmarks in your technology plan as specified below. The information provided will enable the technology plan reviewer better to evaluate the revised technology plan and will serve as a basis should the district be selected for a random EETT review. Include this completed document in your revised technology plan and send the signed hard copy to your regional California Technology Assistance Project (CTAP) office or the California Department of Education (CDE). 1. Juvenile Court and Community Schools (JCCS under the supervision of the San Diego County Office of Education) has made progress toward our Technology Plan goals from 2010-2015. We have worked to have all JCCS students achieve proficiency in the California content standards through integrating technology in all teaching and learning activities. Beginning with the development of our online student assessment test (Measures of Academic Progress-MAP), over 130,000 individual student tests have been recorded for diagnostic evaluation of individual performance and to provide prescriptive focus for shaping curriculum and instruction that is differentiated and meaningful. These MAP scores are contained in our locally produced FileMaker Pro database system that permits instant access for classroom teachers and other staff to utilize student MAP scores and other critical student data. Test scores are up for JCCS students as measured by Academic Performance Index (API), documenting impressive gains. District-wide scores rose nearly 100 points from 486 in 2005 to 585 for the most recent data from 2009. This increase is impressive when compared with the statewide 46 point growth rate over the same time frame. The coordination of technology tools and staff development to meet JCCS program goals, aligns with the JCCS Mission Statement. In 3 of 10 commendations of the JCCS program by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges WASC evaluation study, technology integration was cited as major strength. The use of data to inform instruction and to provide specific strategies to address student need was found to as strength. Use of the FileMaker database and PLATO online learning system are key components of that success. Improving mathematics instruction and student outcomes has been a primary focus of the JCCS program and the selection of the PLATO system has provided learning opportunities for students by specifically addressing individual student needs and aligns with the California math content standards. Additional technological tools integrated into the curriculum at all levels include Discovery Education (online video and multimedia resources), Smart Board systems (interactive whiteboards) and extensive online resources that are teacher discovered and utilized. Throughout the JCCS system, hardware, software, staff development and all related processes are directly aligned with JCCS academic goals to ensure proficiency of California content standards and to address the 5

unique learning situations for our students.

1. Describe your district’s progress in meeting the goals and specific implementation plan for providing professional development opportunities based on the needs assessment and the Curriculum Component goals, benchmarks and timeline as described in Section 4.b., Professional Development Component Criteria, of the EETT technology plan criteria described in Appendix C (Provide descriptive narrative in 1-3 paragraphs). JCCS recognizes the importance of staff development to ensure the success of our students. JCCS teachers have received technology training as part of staff development activities including our textbook adoptions and online assessment programs. Over 95% of our teachers have completed our JCCS Technology Integration staff development program that features training on using student data inform teaching and to integrate technology in differentiating instruction. Additionally, JCCS teachers are required to expand and monitor the use of technology-based instructional strategies, Advanced SDAIE (Specifically Designed Academic Instruction in English) strategies, CCRTL (Center for Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning), targeted CAHSEE (California High School Exit Exam) interventions and student assessment data to increase ELA and math achievement for all JCCS students including English Learners (EL) and Students with Disabilities (SWD), and Independent Study (IS) students. Ongoing local staff development sessions are coordinated and provided by JCCS Technology Resource Teachers in classrooms, in small groups and in full days staff development events. In all JCCS staff development trainings, technology is always ingrained whether the focus is math, English, social science, science, or elective curriculum. Our teachers complete the EdTechProfile surveys on a yearly basis and this data is used to refine plans for further training and to guide technological resource deployment. JCCS specialists such as Technology Resource Teachers (or JCCS classroom teachers who have mastered the particular technical resource) conduct many of our staff development programs to address curricular needs. This local expertise lends to the successful integration of technology programs that address California content standards and supports focus to address the many unique features of our programs (i.e. highly at-risk, high mobility, low average length of stay, previous lack of school success) and must be factored into our training. All JCCS staff development events are documented for attendance and follow-up support is provided through the trainers, JCCS Leadership Team members, the JCCS Technology Committee representatives and the JCCS Technology Support Team (TST).

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5000 Number Enrolled 4000 3000 2000 1000 0
15 16 30 19 17 32 1021 73 412

4045 4259 2973

1565

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Grade Level

JCCS Program Profile The county of San Diego covers 4,261 square miles and San Diego County Juvenile Court and Community Schools (JCCS) serves the entire county with programs in eight geographical regions. JCCS enrolled 14,476 students during the 2008-09 school year, with daily enrollments ranging from 2,800 to 3,400. Figure 2 presents the October 2009 JCCS enrollment by grade level. The majority of JCCS students are concentrated at the secondary level. Students come to JCCS with diverse life experiences, challenging concerns as well as a variety of unique characteristics including: • Significant gaps in school achievement, attendance, and grade level completion. • JCCS student survey data indicate that our students have attended, on average, two to three schools during the school year prior to JCCS enrollment. Figure 2 JCCS offers a variety of alternative education programs for students in grades K-12. Students are typically referred by the Probation Department, the Department of Social Services and/or the student's resident school district. School districts refer students for zero tolerance, expulsion, credit deficiency, and truancy. JCCS student racial demographics are displayed in the graph below and are reflective of the 2009 data. With over 77% of our students being of color, it is important that our program goals and focus works to the benefit of these “minorities”. Figure 4 below shows the ethnic makeup of our student population.

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Students come to JCCS with diverse life experiences, challenging concerns as well as a variety of unique characteristics. • Significant gaps in school achievement, attendance, and grade level completion. o JCCS student survey data indicate that our students have attended, on average, two to three schools during the school year prior to JCCS enrollment. Brief enrollments with JCCS, as illustrated in Figure 3. o JCCS students are enrolled an average of 47 school days (2008-09 enrollment data). These data demonstrate that 83% of our students are in our programs for less than 90 days of enrollment.

Special instructional needs. o Approximately 16% of JCCS students are in Special Education, with over 30% of these students diagnosed as Emotionally Disturbed. o Based on the California English Language Development Test (CELDT) data, approximately 33% of JCCS students are classified as English Language Learners (ELLs). Of our ELLs, 95% are Spanish speakers.

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JCCS is divided into 8 Regions: EAST, HOPE, MESA, METRO, MOUNTAIN, NORTH, San Pasqual Academy and SOUTH. In the METRO, SOUTH, EAST and NORTH Regions the majority of schools are community schools; which are self-contained, multi-grade multi-subject classrooms. They provide standards-based educational opportunities leading to graduation from high school or a GED certificate. In several locations, JCCS offers pregnant and parenting teen mother programs, which emphasize basic parenting skills, child development as well as the opportunity to earn a high school diploma or GED. Independent study programs are available as a mode of instruction if deemed appropriate for students. Special Education services are provided in each region through the JCCS Special Education Department. The MESA Region provides the educational program for incarcerated youth in the three Juvenile Hall facilities: Sierra Vista, Sarah Anthony, and East Mesa. The majority of the students in these facilities are in grades nine through 12. The faculty and staff are committed to ensuring that all students receive the opportunities necessary to strengthen academic competence, enhance selfesteem and to optimize the potential for success in a multicultural, global society. Students are placed in classrooms based on their living unit. All classrooms are multi-age and multi-grade and are staffed by teachers with either a multiple subject or single subject credential. All teachers have specific training in the area of literacy, based on improving reading, writing, speaking and listening. The MOUNTAIN Region consists of the following programs: Barrett High School, Rancho del Campo High School, and Phoenix Academy. All of the Mountain Region schools are residential programs operated in conjunction with either the San Diego County Probation Department or the Phoenix House Treatment Program. Barrett and Rancho del Campo serve only male students, while Phoenix Academy is co-educational. Students in the region are involved in a five-hour school program with the opportunity to earn a high school diploma. In addition, the GED can be taken at each of the one-site authorized testing facilities. JCCS also provides educational services to homeless youth in the HOPE Region that consists of the Monarch School. This program provides special students with additional opportunities targeted to break the cycles of poverty, homelessness and abuse. The program allows students to continue to pursue all of the requirements for graduation as well as providing career guidance, counseling, work experience and participation in a mentor program. Students also receive support in the areas of health, clothing, family assistance and other special support activities. High school students in the foster care system are served at San Pasqual Academy, is a residential high school campus for San Diego County foster youth. The high school at San Pasqual Academy is a public, four-year high school, administered under the direction of Juvenile Court and Community Schools and the San Diego County Office of Education. This highly successful school is a collaboration of public and private support to address the unique needs and challenges that teens in the foster care system face. College prep is a focus along with personal and work place readiness. Housing is provided on campus for all students. 9

Summary The San Diego County Juvenile Court and Community Schools serve a large, highly mobile student population who possess unique characteristics and educational needs. Educational outcome measures indicate that JCCS students perform in the first to second quartile on California standardized assessments (i.e., MAP and CAHSEE). Nevertheless, consistent with expected school-wide learning results emphasizing academic achievement, JCCS academic indicators have shown phenomenal improvement, as illustrated by the increase in CAHSEE passing rates (2001-2009). Growth for math was 722% and for ELA 300%. Improvement in CAHSEE Pass Rates 2001-2009
English Speaking first time test takers, all Ethnicities

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 0

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25

Math ELA

61 20 40 60

71 80

Percent Passing
Local assessments reveal improvement in academic skills, despite short enrollment periods. Indicators of student engagement and completion reveal that students attend school at an acceptable level and are productive in school. Student, staff, and community survey results reflect the positive attitudes held by students, parents, teachers, classified staff and partnering agency staffers toward JCCS. Overall the school and community data strongly indicate that JCCS has 10

progressed along a path of continuous school improvement through the ongoing Focus on Learning process to ensure the success of our students in attaining the expected school wide learning results.

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JCCS Technology Strategic Plan 2010-2015 1. PLAN DURATION Overview The Juvenile Court and Community Schools is embarking on an aggressive plan to address the diverse needs of our students. The Superintendent of Schools for the San Diego County Office of Education has challenged JCCS schools to accelerate JCCS student achievement and to create model classrooms at all JCCS sites. This plan is an ambitious undertaking and presents a projection of what will occur over the next five years from July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2015. The effective use of technology is an integral component of this plan, and requires careful preparation. Consequently, the JCCS Technology Committee and various stakeholders have worked to outline strategies that effectively implement technology that will improve student learning and address the JCCS mission. This document is the result of many hours of discussion, learning and collaboration among a representation of JCCS staff. The development of a strategic planning document for technology is challenging work. It requires commitment to a well-crafted planning process that will dramatically impact effective implementation. The five-year timeframe will facilitate our programs to keep pace with changes in technological resources and to move JCCS forward to meet the academic needs of students. This plan will also support the implementation of a new JCCS student information system that will offer a dynamic online student information management system to meet the attendance, assessment, and the vast informational needs of the JCCS. Principles: • • • • Technology is integrated to support the educational process and program goals. Broad-based involvement and support are essential for the plan’s success. The technology plan is needs driven, and based upon assessment criteria. The design of the planning process provides leadership, direction, defines common values and priorities, and builds capacity in planning teams. 12

This process is built around a common vision for learning and mission for technology integration into JCCS programs to ensure student learning and mastery of the California content standards. This plan supports the JCCS Mission statement. The Mission Statement for the JCCS states: As members of the Juvenile Court and Community Schools, we are committed to high expectations, social justice, and equality for all students. We value diversity and strive to eradicate institutionalized racism and discrimination in all forms. Our priority is to eliminate the achievement gap between students of color and white students. We accomplish this through the delivery of culturally and linguistically responsible standards-driven instruction, courageous and advocacy oriented leadership, and relevant professional development. All JCCS community members stand personally committed and professionally accountable for the achievement of this mission. 2. STAKEHOLDERS Dozens of people from within and outside of the organization have been involved in developing and supporting technology integration and specifically this planning process. Many persons have offered their formal input through surveys, discussions, worked in planning committees, read drafts and will be kept informed through the data collection and sharing of progress throughout the duration of the plan. Their efforts are greatly appreciated as we move forward with the implementation of our plan. They are to be commended for their efforts. Stakeholders in the process include, but are not limited to: • • • • • JCCS Teachers, the JCCS Technology Committee, JCCS Staff, JCCS Parent representatives, JCCS Parent Liaisons, JCCS Counselors and JCCS Administration, JCCS Student Representatives San Diego County Office of Education representatives (CTAP Regional coordinators, Network services, Computer Support services, Business services, Student Information services) San Diego county university and college leaders (California State University San Marcos & National University) Vendors (Northwest Education Association, Apple, Dell, PLATO, FileMaker, Smart Board, Discovery Streaming) San Diego county organizations and community leaders, (County Probation Department and the San Diego Juvenile Justice Team)

It is important to note that JCCS students have a stake in the process through feedback in formal meetings and through informal dialog with regional JCCS Technology Committee members. Their interest and commitment to the process and to the development of JCCS technology is invaluable. Students in the JCCS 13

Technology Academies, North Region Education Center, South Region Technology Center, San Pasqual Academy and others, serve as leaders in developing ideas, curriculum refinement and technological support to other JCCS programs.

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Special thanks go to Daryl Stermon and Dr. Cynthia Candler for their guidance and support to have this plan evolve and become a real-world product that serves students and staff. The following people have contributed to the process and have served on the JCCS Technology Committee. Their work and commitment have made this plan and technology integration into JCCS programs possible. Mary Glover Dennis Danielson Wendell Callahan Ron Major Alex Long Joel Garcia Greg Severson Jeff Heil Mark Starr Mark Rounds Penny McNeil Angela Gigliotti Marcqk Anderson Steven Keiley William McGrath Cris Silva Sheri Chappell Chris Myers Jim Leblanc Becky Fino Vong Sopha Andrew Bartkiewicz Mike Lloyd Pete Padilla Executive Director Coordinator, JCCS Instruction Assessment Coordinator, JCCS Principal – San Pasqual Academy Juvenile Hall, MESA Region Assistant Principal– HOPE Region Technology Resource Teacher Technology Resource Teacher Technology Resource Teacher Technology Resource Teacher Teacher – Independent Study- METRO Region Teacher – SOUTH Region Teacher – MESA Region Teacher – HOPE Region Teacher – NORTH Region Teacher – Technology Academy, SOUTH Administrative Assistant – Mountain Region Teacher - MOUNTAIN Region Computer Support Services Supervisor Office Systems Tech II Office Systems Tech II Network Analyst Office Systems Tech I Office Systems Tech I 15

Vision JCCS envisions that JCCS students will be proficient users of technology and JCCS teachers will fully integrate technology into the curriculum at all grade levels. Recognizing the global impact of emerging technologies, JCCS will support the use of technology to promote learning throughout all aspects of the JCCS community. Students, teachers, and staff in the JCCS will have the technological skills and resources needed to empower and enrich their lives and the lives of those around them. The integration of technology will facilitate effective teaching and learning, increase productivity, and promote higher levels of achievement. It will open a world of lifelong learning to those who use it, and JCCS students will be able to create and embrace technology to help them to reach their educational goals. SDCOE Mission SDCOE has embarked on an aggressive strategic plan to better serve the educational needs of the San Diego county students. The mission of the San Diego County Office of Education, as a world-class educational leader and trusted partner, is to transform public education and guarantee high levels of student achievement. In partnership with local school districts and the global learning community, we will research and apply innovative 21st century practices; leverage resources; develop strategic alliances; inspire powerful leadership; and provide exemplary customized services to districts, communities and our students in all county office-operated programs. Central to this mission are four targeted strategies. They are: I. We will lead, develop, and implement digital literacy initiatives among staff and students across the county. II. We will nurture, support, and develop leaders and leadership at all levels countywide. III. We will transform our use of resources and create partnerships to accelerate learning for all students and eliminate the achievement gap. IV. We will develop and implement means to ensure global workplace readiness for all students.

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JCCS Technology Focus The technology mission of the Juvenile Court and Community Schools is to incorporate current and emerging technologies into the educational process to support student learning. We seek to motivate students to actively use technology to meet their academic and career goals. Aligned with the JCCS and Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) Plan, the following expectations hold for all JCCS students and staff: • Provide protocols and models for students to demonstrate their proficiency in National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS) by grade level spans. Address Internet safety issues through teacher-led classroom activities and discussions and by utilizing online resources that address CyberBullying and other online safety issues. Allow students to use a variety of technologies to gather, analyze, organize, share and present information. Provide appropriate access for all JCCS students, teachers, parents/legal guardians and staff to technology resources. Prepare students for their future roles in a technologically advanced society. Provide opportunities for students to research, create and publish using a variety of technological tools in all curricular areas Develop technical and basic literacy skills. Enrich and extend the educational experience for all JCCS students. Provide training and support for teachers to utilize technology for instruction and classroom management. Promote student-centered learning with the teacher acting as a facilitator and manager.

• • • • • • • •

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3. CURRICULUM COMPONENT 3.a Teachers’ and students’ current access to technology tools The continued goal of technology access in JCCS classrooms is to support the curriculum and promote quality teaching and learning while covering state standards. Access to technology for teachers and students has been a focus in JCCS programs. Due to the nature of JCCS programs in general, some JCCS sites are not open or accessible prior to or after school hours. Circumstances such as probation and agency policy require controlled student movement and thus restricts corresponding access to technology. While most teachers in JCCS programs make individual accommodations to provide access to students during the school day and outside of school hours, it must be in collaboration with these agencies. Some JCCS sites, such as San Pasqual Academy, provide access to computers and the Internet to students in their living quarters for access outside of school hours. JCCS teachers strongly encourage students to make individual appointments to meet with teachers to use technology before or after school hours in JCCS classrooms or to use local library/neighborhood resources. In the eight JCCS regions there are currently 1031 computers in JCCS classrooms and labs for student use. Each classroom has a minimum of three student use computers. In most classrooms, the number of student computers is greater than 5 (the “typical” JCCS classroom has 15-20 students) and the total ratio of students-to-computers is 2.71 to 1. (See sections 5b for further information on existing hardware). Access to computer labs or mobile laptop carts are available in all JCCS regions, and are accessible to all students via teacher reservations. In the past three years, the integration of technology tools at JCCS has grown at an accelerated rate. Curriculum integrated projects have included many aspects of technology: Internet-based research projects, online lessons, video production, electronic portfolios, online student testing, videoconferencing, database resources of student and program information, podcasts, projection systems, interactive whiteboards, docu-cameras, Wikis, Web logs (blogs), 18

and more are in use in JCCS classrooms. At all JCCS sites, it is the continued goal to integrate technology into the curriculum and to support the outcome based learning objectives and the California state content standards. Teacher Access: All JCCS teachers have access to technology at their work location, including “teacher-only” designated desktop and laptop computers. Teachers also have access to computer laptop carts for whole group instruction and other technology tools both during the school day and outside of school hours to accomplish the mission of JCCS and to support teaching and learning. Teachers in all grade levels and subject areas use newer technologies including desktop projection systems, interactive whiteboards with student responders, docu-cameras, video production and editing equipment, online resources such as online standards based lessons (PLATO), video-ondemand resources (Discovery Education) and other tools to promote dynamic teaching to address curricular goals and academic content standards. Our locally developed student case-management system utilizes the FileMaker Pro database system and provides critical, real-time information such as assessment data, school placement history, credit status, home contact information and many other demographic and academic data. Additionally, our state adopted textbooks include CD/DVD-ROM resources for teacher utilization in all grade level and subject areas. All teachers have access to laptops for checkout and numerous teachers have been allocated laptops for their use in our Independent Study program. Student Access: JCCS students have equal access to technology without discrimination. (Under certain conditions, some students may not have Internet access per Juvenile Justice mandates). All students are instructed in use of computers, Internet, and courseware. The current ratio of 2.71 students per computer is impressive, but not always sufficient. The diverse nature of our programs, create challenging technological scenarios. While student access in all grade levels and subject areas is manageable through planned rotations and on an “as-needed” basis, there are locations that require more resources. Our current standard classroom allocation of computers is five modern computers with Internet connectivity and a laser printer on a local/wide area network with 19

high bandwidth Internet connectivity. Additionally, there are several lab settings throughout the JCCS programs, including computer labs and mobile laptop carts that contain class sets of laptops with wireless connectivity, that support curricular goals and are used to meet flexible scheduling needs of multi-classroom sites. Students in JCCS classrooms create media-rich products such as graduation projects and electronic portfolios that align with curricular goals and address state standards. Student use of newer technologies include desktop projection systems, interactive whiteboards, student responders, docu-cameras, video production and editing equipment and online resources such as online lessons (PLATO*), Rosetta Stone (English language development program), Atomic Learning, video-on-demand resources (Discovery Education), digital cameras and other tools to enhance student learning. Many JCCS programs offer access to technology both before and after school hours with teacher supervision. Library media centers are in place in several JCCS regions and are accessible to students beyond regular school hours. Also, technology equipment is available for checkout to students with special project needs such as video camcorders, digital cameras and laptop computers. *PLATO is an online, integrated learning system— inclusive of all state standards down to the learning objective level with fixed benchmark assessments for grades 2-12. It provides online instruction and reporting. The management system automates data analysis and assignment creation to instantaneously provide each student with a targeted and personalized prescription to instruction. 3.b Current use of hardware and software to support teaching and learning Students: All students entering JCCS’ programs complete an assessment test via the computer-based Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) test that is “adaptive” as it is used to create individualized learning prescriptions. Throughout the school year, this electronic measurement tool is also used to conduct additional, pre and post-tests. This method of conducting benchmark tests with the students not only gives students feedback on where their strengths and weaknesses lay, but also accurately reflects the instructional level of each student. This data is available to teachers on their desktop 20

computers on a real-time basis. On a daily basis, JCCS students use technology across the curriculum and in all subject areas. Current daily uses include: English: Each student has access to classroom computers and ageappropriate software as well as the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, PowerPoint and Excel) as well as keyboarding programs. All JCCS students in English classes create works of writing that are saved in electronic files that can be transferred via the Internet to shared locations. Students use word processing and desktop publishing programs routinely to create short stories, essays, newsletters, brochures, and other original writing samples that align with state standards and reflect strong emphasis on academic language. For non-English speakers and students deficient in English language skills, teachers prescribe the online program, Rosetta Stone (a media-rich language instruction and reinforcement program) is used to support students who are designated as non-proficient in English language as determined by the California English Language Development Test (CELDT). Currently, twentyfive percent of JCCS students are designated as English Language Learners (ELL). In Social Science classes, students have access to classroom computers and to the Internet to search for and retrieve information to construct presentations on current and/or historical issues. Using multimedia tools such as such as PowerPoint and video production products, students build presentations incorporating text, pictures, audio, movies, music and graphics. Students can start with a link on Nettrekker (DI) accessing a specialized browser that has pre-selected web content that is sorted by grade level and further differentiates by reading level so students find useful information that they are comfortable with and can use to construct their own learning outcomes. During Science classes, students have access to computers and regularly use Internet resources and electronic encyclopedias or CD/DVD-ROMs to find and use information about scientific issues. Some science students are using online computers to conduct virtual dissections in classrooms that do not have access to scientific laboratories. Many classrooms are using Smart 21

Boards and Discovery Education video-on-demand technologies to make science lessons rich with virtual field trips, simulations and graphical displays for evaluation. In Math classes, students use classroom computers and Internet resources such as CAHSEE preparation web sites, desktop projectors and graphic calculators to demonstrate knowledge of mathematical concepts. Students use Atomic Learning tutorials and MS Office software (Excel) to construct spreadsheets in order to build scenarios for budgets or to calculate real world scenarios that address the California state content standards. In Elective classes students create original works of art with paint and graphic programs such as Adobe Photoshop. Students work in cooperative groups and use digital cameras and scanners to create Web pages that display school information and examples of student work. Senior or semester projects integrate many of the learning constructs including high school exit portfolios. Included are video productions submitted to local and national award panels. Staff: To support the learning environment, teachers regularly construct lessons that integrate technology and address state standards. On a daily basis, JCCS teachers use desktop and laptop computers in a variety of ways: 1) to manage information regarding student attendance, 2) report grades, 3) access placement histories, 4) list credits, 5) communicate and collaborate via email, blogs and Wikis and 6) manage other electronic information to help support teaching and learning. All JCCS teachers use the FileMaker software program (developed in-house by JCCS staff) to access student records, find program information, record grades, and print report cards and to track student academic performance. This locally developed student case-management system database system provides critical, real-time information such as assessment data, school placement history, credit status, home contact information and many other demographic and academic data throughout the district. On a daily basis, JCCS staff utilize emerging technologies such as Smart 22

Boards, Discovery Streaming video resources, PLATO online lessons, video production, textbook aligned CD/DVD ROMS, academic Internet websites, podcasts, blogs, wikis and other technologies that enhance the curriculum and address state standards. In all of the curricular areas, JCCS teachers are leaders in the utilization of technology to facilitate the learning process. For example, in JCCS English classes, teachers use reading remediation software programs such as Rosetta Stone for English language learning students to provide computer-based audio-phonic activities for students deficient in this area. JCCS Social Science teachers support students by providing Internet research projects that start with Nettrekker (DI) and other web based activities for scaffolded learning activities aligned with state standards. Teachers use Smart Boards and desktop projectors to present lessons to the whole class and build computer-generated rubrics for evaluation of student presentations. In addition, JCCS was selected as a “Best Practice” by The Educational Options Best Practices Demonstration Project (a coordinated effort jointly underway with the California Department of Education) for its creation of our “Math 2 Success” program that provides video demonstration Algebra lessons conducted by JCCS students and are archived and available via our website. JCCS has leveraged its managed PLATO online program to provide focused Mathematic lessons that are individualized and tracked to permit analysis and anywhere/anytime access. These lessons address individual learning needs as identified in students’ online diagnostic test in the MAP. The PLATO math software addresses remedial needs on an individualized basis and allows for differentiated instruction. Students may progress through the standards-based lessons at their individual pace. 3.c Summary of the district’s curricular goals that are supported by this technology plan Overview All JCCS curriculum adheres to the California State Content Standards for Mathematics, English, Language Arts, Science, and History Social-Science. Curriculum goals are established by the JCCS Leadership Team and are reviewed in bi-monthly planning sessions with curriculum planning committees in all content areas. Classroom resources, including technology resources, are reviewed, selected and thus adopted to support instruction by 23

the curriculum committees. JCCS programs work with a highly mobile and challenging student population (see section “JCCS Program Profile”) and are supervised by the San Diego County Office of Education (LEA). Data collection for these students is often difficult as over 80% of our students are with us 90 days or less. Alternative assessment models that are state approved have been developed to measure student performance and document academic growth. The ASAM (Alternative Schools Assessment Model) is used to document JCCS success and provides school-level accountability for alternative schools serving highly mobile and at-risk students. All JCCS programs are fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and received a full, 6-year accreditation in 2007. All JCCS educational programs provide curriculum that is aligned to state of California content standards and frameworks. JCCS complies with all state testing requirements including the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) and reports outcomes via the Alternatives Schools Assessment Model (ASAM). STAR testing is conducted on a yearly basis for all JCCS students during the spring testing window. Continual academic proficiency testing is done via computer-based adaptive tests utilizing the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) program and provides pre/post test measurements of student academic abilities to document growth and target instruction. The JCCS Assessment & Accountability department's primary mission is the coordination and implementation of state-mandated testing programs and the collection and analysis of student performance data to inform instructional decision-making and support student achievement. The department also prepares annual accountability reports for the San Diego County Board of Education and the California State Board of Education. These testing and accountability programs include: • • • • • • • Academic Performance Index (API) Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM) Annual Report to County Board of Education California Achievement Test (CAT6) California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA) California English Language Development Test (CELDT) 24

• • • • •

California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) California Standards Tests (CST) Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) Local evaluation of SB1095 educational programs for Transitioning High Risk Youth. Standardized Testing & Reporting Program (STAR)

The Assessment & Accountability department is actively involved in ongoing training and capacity building for JCCS teachers, administrators, and support staff in the area of testing and assessment. Department staff present at professional conferences and also participate in county and state level workgroups and committees dealing with Alternative Schools Accountability Model (ASAM) development and implementation, California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE), and SB1095 program evaluation. Department staff provides daily updates of academic and student performance data to instructional and teacher leaders for program improvement, preparation of grant proposals and other reports. The curriculum committees regularly evaluate software and integrated learning programs for system wide adoption. Examples of this are the implementation of the PLATO online curriculum and adoption of the Rosetta Stone language curriculum to meet the learning needs of JCCS students who are identified as English Language Learners. Curriculum goals and objectives are at the core of improving the JCCS ability to accelerate learning for all students. The San Diego County’s Strategic Plan (2009-2014) cites as a core strategy to “lead, develop, and implement digital literacy initiatives among staff and students across the county”. In JCCS, we have been working to achieve all of our students to a proficient level and will use technology as a tool to accelerate the learning of all students. The SDCOE Superintendent has a major goal to provide service to districts through a focus on using technology tools to serve the needs of learning and teaching. To support these goals, the LEA (SDCOE) has developed the San Diego County Office of Education Technology Use Plan. Included in this plan are the following goal areas: Improve Student Learning, Access for All, Online Professional Development, Videoconferencing, Instructional Television, and Learning Resources. The JCCS Technology Plan has been aligned with the SDCOE Technology Use Plan and was used as a guide to construct the 25

Acceptable Use Plan AR No. 6163 (amended July, 2009). The JCCS Technology Plan is also aligned with the SDCOE’s Learning Resources and Educational Technology Division. This division has published the following priorities: • ENGAGE and support high priority, low performing schools.

• SUPPORT districts in standards-based instruction, planning, and implementation. • • • ASSIST with assessment of learning to drive decisions for learning. SUPPORT development of professional educators. PROVIDE opportunities for sharing and learning among districts.

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3.d Using technology to support district curricular goals and academic content standards Overview In order to address and focus on state content standards, JCCS teachers work with curriculum leaders to create unique lessons that engage and challenge students. By creating lessons aligned with the State of California Content Standards to support district curricular goals and academic content standards, students are presented a comprehensive and rigorous educational experience. The goals, objectives, and benchmarks below are developed to ensure student success and to maximize learning by providing differentiated academic content. JCCS teachers face unique challenges in educating our highly at risk students. Our programs offer the best alternative educational programs for students not served in their traditional settings. In this environment, our teachers reach students on a personal level and work tirelessly to help students to succeed, both educationally and as citizens. Technology can be a tool to provide a better life for our students. Emerging careers are dependent on technological skills and JCCS teachers will use every resource to help their students to succeed. They need to reach those students who need a safe environment and a classroom that respects the students’ values, culture, history and unique abilities. They need a place to express themselves and to be connected to the community. Our teachers create this environment on a daily basis. They use technology tools to enrich and enhance learning. Most lessons incorporate writing across the curriculum and the integration of technology “basics” such as word processing, Power Point presentations, and desktop publishing. Enhanced lessons incorporate emerging technologies and utilize Internet resources to create student work that is meaningful and lasting. On the following pages, we present our goals and specific implementation plan for using technology to improve teaching and learning.

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3.d Use technological tools to support JCCS academic goals Technological tools such at PLATO Learning Environment (PLE), offers individualized learning modules that address unique student needs and are aligned to state of California standards. The PLATO electronic management system tracks performance growth and to document student achievement. Additionally, the PLATO curriculum is completely aligned to state standards and is delivered via the Internet so that unique student assignments are available from any Internet-ready computer, thus addressing the need for continuity of service for all students, wherever they may move within the program or out of classroom situations. Goal 3.d.1 JCCS teachers and students will use technology to improve academic proficiency by supporting district curricular goals and mastering academic content standards. Objective 3.d.1 By June 2015, over 85% of JCCS students will use the PLATO Learning Environment (PLE) lessons to master at least 12 modules as selected by their teacher. (Modules are online distinct learning activities that address a targeted learning objective and include a tutorial, application and mastery test) Benchmarks for 3.d.1
By June of 2011, 60% of all JCCS high school students will utilize PLATO (PLE) lessons to master at least 4 modules as selected by teacher. By June of 2012, 70% of all JCCS high school students will utilize PLATO (PLE) lessons to master at least 6 modules as selected by teacher. By June of 2013, 75% of all JCCS high school students will utilize PLATO (PLE) lessons to master at least 8 modules as selected by teacher. By June of 2014, 80% of all JCCS high school students will utilize PLATO (PLE) lessons to master at least 10 modules as selected by teacher. By June of 2015, over 85% of all JCCS high school students will utilize PLATO (PLE) lessons to master at least12 modules as selected by teacher.

Implementation and monitoring for 3.d.1
Benchmark 3.d.1 Implementation Plan and Activities Review and revise PLATO staff dev. plan Refine data collection process for JCCS/PLATO measurement criteria for program evaluation Responsible Person Tech Coordinator Time Line Monitoring and Evaluation Activities

3.d.1

Tech Coordinator Assessment Coordinator Leadership Team

May 20, JCCS/PLATO staff 2010 development plan meeting is held and program focus is identified and documented. June 30, Measures of Academic 2010 Performance (MAP)/CAHSEE/ PLATO success criteria are devised

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Implementation and monitoring for 3.d.1 (cont.)
Benchmark 3.d.1 Implementation Plan and Activities Coordinate with SDCOE Network Services to increase network capacity in all JCCS classrooms JCCS Technology Resource Teachers will refine and implement the staff development plan to include small group and individual PLATO integration strategies Collection and synthesis of MAP/ CAHSEE/ PLATO student indicators Responsible Person Tech Coordinator SDCOE Network Director Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers Leadership Team Time Line Ongoing through June, 2015 May 1, 2010 through June 30, 2015 Monitoring and Evaluation Activities Network speed increased to established goal (T-1 and above) to all JCCS sites. 1. Record /logs of teacher staff development events 2. Records of student use of on PLATO in both PLATO management systems and FileMaker Database systems. MAP /CAHSEE/ PLATO success criteria, including module completion rate, is documented and shared with JCCS Leadership Team at quarterly meetings

3.d.1

3.d.1

Assessment Coordinator Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers

Biannually through 2015

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3.d. 2 Objective: JCCS programs will use technology as a tool to accelerate the learning of all students and to address curricular goals. The expectations are that JCCS teachers and students will utilize emerging technologies to accelerate learning, close the achievement gap and for all students to reach proficiency. Objective By June 2015, over 85% of JCCS sites will use emerging 3.d.2 technologies in teaching and learning. (Resources such as: video-on-demand (Discovery Education), interactive
whiteboards (Smart Boards), blogs, Wikis, and cloud computing resources will be used to address state academic content standards in JCCS sites.)

Benchmarks for 3.d.2
By June of 2011, emerging technologies will be integrated into the core curriculum in a minimum of 60% of JCCS sites. By June of 2012, emerging technologies will be integrated into the core curriculum in a minimum of 70% of JCCS sites. By June of 2013, emerging technologies will be integrated into the core curriculum in 75% of JCCS sites. By June of 2014, emerging technologies will be integrated into the core curriculum in 80% of JCCS sites. By June of 2015, emerging technologies will be integrated into the core curriculum in over 85% of JCCS sites.

Implementation and monitoring for 3.d.2
Benchmark 3.d.2 Implementation Plan and Activities Document current baseline of use of emerging technologies among JCCS staff Responsible Person Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers Program Director Timeline June, 20010 through August 2010 Monitoring Survey instrument created. Detailed staff summary of usage presented to Program Dir. Record /logs of teacher attendance in emerging technologies training Emerging technologies success criteria are defined, shared quarterly at Leadership Survey results of emerging technologies success criteria is published and presented to Program Dir.

3.d.2

Hold professional development workshops to train JCCS teachers on integration strategies for emerging tech Document and measure emerging tech usage in JCCS FileMaker Pro database system

Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers

Ongoing through 2015

3.d.2

Tech Coordinator JCCS Assessment Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers Assessment Coordinator Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers

Completed June 30, 2011 then ongoing on bi-annual basis Bi-annually Starting Oct 2010, through June, 2015

3.d.2

Collection and synthesis of emerging technologies student indicators via locally developed survey

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Goal 3.e JCCS students will acquire technology and information literacy skills To meet the needs of our students in the rapidly changing technological world, Information Literacy skills, Technological Proficiency skills, and Digital Citizenship skills are critical. The National Educational Technology Standards – NETS – (See Appendix A) target key competencies for student acquisition of skills in these six major areas: 1. Creativity and Innovation, 2. Communication and Collaboration 3. Research and Information Fluency 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making 5. Digital Citizenship 6. Technology Operations and Concepts JCCS will use the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) National Education Technology Standards (NETS-S standards) as a key framework to address these 21st century skills. These standards will be covered in JCCS classrooms by teachers as part of daily lessons, in JCCS computer lab settings as part of a computer course and as part of curriculum provided via electronic resources in collaboration with the JCCS Technology Committee and JCCS Technology Resource Teachers.
Objective 3.e.1 By June 2015, over 85% of JCCS students will be introduced to and demonstrate competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S) through embedded activities in all curricular areas. By June of 2011, 60% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S). By June of 2012, 70% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S). By June of 2013, 75% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S). By June of 2014, 80% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S). By June of 2015, over 85% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S).

Benchmarks for 3.e.1

Implementation and monitoring for 3.e.1
Benchmark Implementation Plan and Activities Responsible Person Time Line Monitoring and Evaluation

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Implementation and monitoring for 3.e.1 cont.
Benchmark 3.e.1 Implementation Plan and Activities Devise JCCS database component to document student competence of NETS-S Presentation and implementation of plan in staff development events – small group and local training Students demonstrate competence in NETS-S through JCCS Tech Nets survey. Develop and implement online CyberSafery curriculum for teacher and student awareness Students demonstrate competence in NETS-S Responsible Person Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers Time Line Oct 2010 Monitoring and Evaluation Presented to Executive Dir

3.e.1

4 Resource Teachers JCCS Technology Committee reps Teachers 4 Resource Teachers Technology Students Tech Coordinator 4 Tech Resource Teachers

Nov 2010June 2015

Logs of staff development events recorded I JCCS Filemaker database Student JCCS NETS survey

3.e.1

3.e.1

BiAnnually and then ongoing through 2015 Introduced Jan 2010 Ongoing through 2015 Introduced Jan 2010 Ongoing through 2015

Teacher logs and FileMaker data entry

3.e.1

Teachers 4 Resource Teachers Students

Teacher logs and FileMaker data entry

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Goal 3.f JCCS students will learn about the ethical use of informationtechnology including: copyright, fair use, plagiarism and the implications of illegal file sharing and downloading. To meet the needs of our students, JCCS technology resource teachers and JCCS technology Committee members have constructed online curriculum to address the issues of ethical and fair use of online information including plagiarism and illegal file sharing/downloading. This “Cyber Safety/Ethical” curriculum is imbedded in English core course assignments that are addressed uniformly in all JCCS classrooms on a monthly basis. This course utilizes the latest information from such sources as the California Technology Assistance Project (CTAP – Region 4), ISTE, CyberSmart and other leading student centered ethical organizations.
Objective 3.f.1 By June 2015, over 85% JCCS students will be introduced to and demonstrate understanding of the ethical use of information technology including: copyright, fair use, plagiarism and the implications of illegal file sharing and downloading. By June of 2011, 60% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety/Ethical curriculum. By June of 2012, 70% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety/Ethical curriculum By June of 2013, 75% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety/Ethical curriculum By June of 2014, 80% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety/Ethical curriculum By June of 2015, over 85% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety/Ethical curriculum

Benchmarks for 3.f.1

Implementation and monitoring for 3f.1
Benchmark 3.f.1 Implementation Plan and Activities Devise JCCS database component to document student proficiency in the ethical use of information Develop JCCS “Ethical Use of Information” program – for online or stand-alone computer-based training Presentation and implementation of program in staff development events Responsible Person Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers Time Line Oct 2010 Monitoring and Evaluation Presented to Executive Dir

3.f.1

4 Resource Teachers JCCS Technology Committee reps 4 Resource Teachers JCCS Technology

Nov 2010-

Program developed and presented to Leadership Team

3.f.1

Nov 2010June 2015

Logs of staff development events recorded I JCCS Filemaker

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3.f.1

– small group and locally held staff development events Students demonstrate competence in ethical use of information through “JCCS Tech Ethical survey”.

Committee reps Teachers 4 Resource Teachers Technology and Students BiAnnually and then ongoing through 2015

database Student “JCCS Tech Ethical Survey” conducted and presented to Leadership Team

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Goal 3.g JCCS students will be introduced to Internet safety curriculum including strategies on protecting one’s privacy, dealing with Cyber Bullying and avoiding online predators. To meet the needs of our students, JCCS technology resource teachers and JCCS technology Committee members have constructed online curriculum to address the issues of Internet safety including strategies to protect one’s privacy and to avoid online predators. This “Cyber Safety/Ethical” curriculum is imbedded in English core course assignments that are addressed uniformly in all JCCS classrooms on a monthly basis. This course utilizes the latest information from such sources as the California Technology Assistance Project (CTAP – Region 4), ISTE, San Diego Anti-Defamation League, CyberSmart and other leading student centered safety organizations.
Objective 3.g.1 By June 2015, over 85% of JCCS students will be introduced to and demonstrate understanding of Internet safety including strategies to protect one’s privacy and to avoid online predators. By June of 2011, 60% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding online modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety curriculum. By June of 2012, 70% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding online modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety curriculum By June of 2013, 75% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding online modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety curriculum By June of 2014, 80% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding online modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety curriculum By June of 2015, over 85% of JCCS students will have been introduced to and show competence in the corresponding online modules of the JCCS Cyber Safety curriculum

Benchmarks for 3.g.1

Implementation and monitoring for 3.g.1
Benchmark 3.g.1 3.g.1 Implementation Plan and Activities Devise JCCS Cyber Safety curriculum Develop JCCS “Ethical Use of Information” program – for online or stand-alone computer-based training Presentation and implementation of program in staff development events – small group and locally held staff development events Responsible Person Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers 4 Resource Teachers JCCS Technology Committee reps 4 Resource Teachers JCCS Technology Committee reps Nov 2010June 2015 Time Line Oct 2010 Nov 2010Monitoring and Evaluation Presented to Executive Dir Program developed and presented to Leadership Team

3.g.1

Logs of staff development events recorded I JCCS Filemaker database

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Goal 3.h JCCS students will have equitable access to technology. JCCS policies and practices ensure appropriate and equitable access to computers and technology for all of our students. (Under certain cases, legal restrictions may apply as mandated by the court.) Access to technology includes English Language Learners, Special Day Class students, gifted and talented students, and 504 designated students. To meet the needs of all JCCS students in the rapidly changing technological world, computer use must occur on a daily basis to promote higher-level thinking, facilitate communication, promote skill mastery, and to solve problems. JCCS programs reflect staff commitment to high expectations, social justice, and equality for all students. Equal access to technology for our students matches this agenda item of the JCCS Mission statement. Objective Increase the students-to-computers ratio to better than 2 to 1 by 3.h.1 June of 2015. Benchmarks for 3.h.1
By June of 2011, the students to computers ratio for JCCS will be 2.7 to 1. By June of 2012, the students to computers ratio for JCCS will be 2.5 to 1 By June of 2013, the students to computers ratio for JCCS will be 2.3 to 1 By June of 2014, the students to computers ratio for JCCS will be 2 to 1 By June of 2015, the students to computers ratio for JCCS will be better than 2 to 1.

Implementation and monitoring for 3.h.1 Benchmark Implementation Responsible Plan and Person Activities
3.h.1 Review and develop 5 year Regional Distribution Plans, computer refresh including purchase/lease guidelines Implement distribution plan within JCCS Regions to reach target goals Tech Coordinator Principals Technology Tech Committee

Time Line
Sept. 2010

Monitoring and Evaluation Activities
Plan documentation submitted to Executive Director and database inventory records. Summary distribution records provided to Executive Dir.

3.h.1

Tech Coordinator Tech Team Regional Principals

Jan 2011, Biannually through 2015

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Goal 3.i. Ensure that technology is used to support student record keeping and assessment efforts. Currently, SDCOE (the LEA for JCCS) provides support for student record keeping and assessment data through the current Student Information System (SIS). In conjunction with the SDCOE, JCCS has pursued a new student information system to replace the SIS system and improve processes and services. The selection and deployment of this new online product is scheduled for September, 2010. Additionally, the JCCS Technology Team utilizes our locally developed case management system to supplement the student information system. This FileMaker Pro database is JCCS specific and assists with student record keeping and assessment information. This tool has been installed on all teacher computers and staff training is continuous to improve utilization to help drive instruction and promote informed decision making regarding student needs. Objective 3.i.1 By June 2015, all Juvenile Court and Community Schools teachers, administrators and designated support staff will have computer access to current student records and assessment information. Benchmarks for 3.i.1
By June of 2011, 75% of JCCS teachers and administrators will have computer access to current student records and assessment information. By June of 2012, 80% of JCCS teachers and administrators will have computer access to current student records and assessment information. By June of 2013, 90% of JCCS teachers and administrators will have computer access to current student records and assessment information. By June of 2014, 95% of JCCS teachers and administrators will have computer access to current student records and assessment information. By June of 2015, 100% of JCCS teachers and administrators will have computer access to current student records and assessment information.

Implementation and monitoring for 3.i.1 Benchmark Implementation Responsible Plan and Person Activities
3.i.1 Coordinate with Student Information Manager to devise professional development plan for JCCS teachers/admin. in accessing student records and assessment data Implem. professional development plan for JCCS teachers, admin and support staff in accessing student records and Student Information Manager Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers

Time Line Monitoring and Evaluation Activities
July 2010Sept 2010 Then ongoing quarterly staff dev Professional development plan is created and submitted to Executive Director

3.i.1

Student Information Manager Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers

Quarterly and asneeded through 2015

Record of attendance in prof. develop. Records of teacher/admin access of

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assessment info.

student data.

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Goal 3.j. Utilize technology to make teachers and administrators more accessible to parents and legal guardians. The deployment of a new student information system, will begin for JCCS in the fall of 2010. This information system will have a portal to make teachers and administrators more accessible to parents. This electronic resource will permit parents and legal guardians controlled access to student academic information such as attendance records, grades, school operational issues, current assignments and other pertinent information. Additionally, the program has email features that permit parents and legal guardians access to two-way communication between the home/agency and school. Parental communication has been improved through the work of JCCS Parent Liaisons. These Parent Liaisons coordinate workshops for parents, facilitate parent-to-school communication and develop other tools to assist parents/guardians to work with JCCS staff to ensure student academic success. All of these Parent Liaisons have email accounts as well as telephone messaging systems to promote accessibility to parents/legal guardians. The same is true for principals and other JCCS Leadership Team members.
Objective 3.j.1 By June 2015, over 90% of JCCS teachers, administrators and parent liaisons will use technological resources such as the new student information system, online portals, web-pages, email, and telephone messaging to improve communication between school staff, parents and other legal designates. Benchmarks for 3.j.1 By June 2011, 70% of JCCS teachers, administrators and parent liaisons will use technological resources such as online portals, web-pages, email, and telephone messaging to improve communication between school staff, parents and other legal designates. By June 2012, 80% of JCCS teachers, administrators and parent liaisons will use technological resources such as online portals, web-pages, email, and telephone messaging to improve communication between school staff, parents and other legal designates. By June 2013, 85% of JCCS teachers, administrators and parent liaisons will use technological resources such as online portals, web-pages, email, and telephone messaging to improve communication between school staff, parents and other legal designates. By June 2014, 90% of JCCS teachers, administrators and parent liaisons will use technological resources such as online portals, web-pages, email, and telephone messaging to improve communication between school staff, parents and other legal designates. By June 2015, over 90% of JCCS teachers, administrators and parent liaisons will use technological resources such online portals, web-pages, email, and telephone messaging to improve communication between school staff, parents and other legal designates.

Implementation and monitoring for 3.j.1
Benchmark Implementation Plan and Activities 3.j.1 Devise professional development plan for JCCS to use online resources to improve Responsible Person Student Information Manager Tech Coordinator Time Line July 2010Sept 2010 Then Monitoring and Eval Professional development plan is created

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3.j.1

two-way comm. between school staff, parents and other legal designates. Implement prof. dev. plan for JCCS teachers, admin and parent liaisons to improve two-way comm. Document use of two-way communication devices via locally developed survey instrument

3.j.1

Leadership Team Tech Resource Teachers, Parent Liaisons Student Information Manager Tech Coordinator Leadership Team Tech Resource Teachers, Parent Liaisons Student Information Manager Tech Coordinator Leadership Team Tech Resource Teachers, Parent Liaisons

ongoing quarterly staff dev Ongoing through 2015 Records of teacher and admin use of tech resources to Exec. Dir.

Each June through 2015

Survey Records of teacher and admin use of tech resources to Exec. Dir.

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3.k BENCHMARKS, TIMELINES, MONITORING AND EVALUATION Benchmarks, timelines, monitoring and evaluation components are clearly stated within each of the required goals and objectives listed in sections 3.d through 3.j. A timeline including the event, date, and who is responsible for the event over the three-year plan is also contained within each goal and objective. The general process for monitoring and evaluating the plan can be found in component 7. Summary of responsible persons and duties: Title Executive Director Summary of duties Provide program leadership, monitoring of major goal accomplishment and implementation of the JCCS Tech Plan Provide program leadership, monitoring of specific goal accomplishment and implementation of the JCCS Tech Plan Work directly with the Technology Coordinator to implement the specific steps in the goals and objectives of the JCCS Tech Plan Work at the district and regional levels to implement support and monitor the JCCS Tech Plan Provide assessment/measurement criteria and other resources/ leadership to monitor the successful implementation of the JCCS Tech Plan Provide parent/guardians contact and information sharing, leadership in communicating regarding school issues Network support, design, planning, project management to implement the specific steps in the goals and objectives of the JCCS Tech Plan Provide system-wide support for the successful technical implementation of the JCCS Tech Plan

Technology Coordinator

Technology Resource Teachers

JCCS Leadership Team (Principals, Director of Curriculum, Director of Operations, Special Ed Coordinator, Student Information Manager) Assessment Director

JCCS Parent Liaisons SDCOE Network Director and SDCOE Network Project Manager JCCS Technology Support Team

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4. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMPONENT 4.a. Current skills of JCCS Teachers and Administrators As of June, 2009, 70% of JCCS teachers and 80% of JCCS administrators have taken the EdTechProfile survey of technological proficiency. Continued assessment of teachers and administrators will be conducted as part of ongoing staff development planned for regional programs with the support of JCCS Technology Committee members and the Technology Resource Teachers. San Diego County Office of Education District has 179 credentialed teachers. This chart represents the assessment summary for 124 (70%) of teachers surveyed in a selfreported evaluation of technical skills as reported in the EdTechProfile from 2009. Current technical survey results for teachers and administrators indicate the following. JCCS Teachers:

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JCCS Teachers:

Need For Professional Development - Teachers From analysis of the “Main Summary Chart”, 100 % of JCCS teachers 43

completing the survey have achieved the intermediate level in the areas of computer knowledge and skills, using technology in the classroom and using technology to support student learning. However, these survey data results indicate that JCCS teachers will continue to need staff development to improve skill level and develop integration strategies to the proficient range to better serve JCCS students. From analysis of the more detailed “Category Chart”, 100% of JCCS teachers completing the survey are proficient in General computer knowledge and skills, Email skills, and Word processing skills. Based on this survey data and in alignment with the curricular goals presented in section 3 (Curriculum Goal and Objectives 3.d through 3.j, JCCS teachers will need additional staff development opportunities to increase all of the remaining four sub-categories of skills (Internet, Presentation software, Spreadsheet software, and Database). From a survey of JCCS teachers, computer usage by the JCCS teachers is relatively high. Of the staff surveyed, 100% of the teachers had an SDCOE email account and used the computer on a daily/weekly basis for such tasks as: creating instructional materials (75%) and gather information for planning lessons. An area of focus should be strategies and methods to improve communication with colleagues and to manage and use data to inform instruction as this area was the lowest of the measured categories. Additionally, teachers will need introduction to and methods focus on areas of Internet safety and ethical use of information. Introduction to the Chavez Bill (AB 307) that states: This bill charges districts to “educate pupils and teachers on the appropriate and ethical use of information technology in the classroom, Internet safety, avoiding plagiarism, the concept, purpose, and significance of a copyright so that pupils can distinguish between lawful and unlawful online downloading, and the implications of illegal peer-to-peer network file sharing.” While pockets of excellence exist in JCCS teacher utilization of technology, many JCCS teachers need support in practical steps to improve teaching and learning by maximizing technology resources to address state of California content standards. New technical program introductions must receive ongoing staff development. Programs such as PLATO, Rosetta Stone, Smart Board, Discovery Education, Internet research skills, wikis and others will present 44

high demand for training to be fully implemented and successfully maintained. Need for Professional Development - Administration From analysis of the “Main Summary Chart”, 100 % of JCCS administrators completing the survey have rated themselves as at least in the intermediate levels in the areas of computer usage in skills, classroom use and to support student learning.

Administration

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1. Computer Knowledge and Skills (Includes 14 in calculation) 2. CCTC Program Standard 9: Using Technology in the Classroom 3. CCTC Program Standard 16: Using Technology to Support Student Learning The chart “Administration Category Chart” below, displays the information that 100% of JCCS administrators rate themselves as being at the proficient level of computer knowledge and skills all of the 8 subcategories. These survey data results indicate that JCCS administrators may still need development to improve use of database skills. New technical program introductions must receive ongoing staff development and administrators must also master these programs for successful integration into their administrative regions. Programs such as PLATO, SmartBoard, Discovery Education and others will present high demand for training to be fully implemented and successfully maintained and properly evaluated by administration so it is aligned with curricular goals to promote student accelerated learning.

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Administration

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QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

General computer knowledge and skills (Includes 13 in calculation) Internet skills (Includes 12 in calculation) Email skills (Includes 12 in calculation) Word processing skills (Includes 12 in calculation) Presentation software skills (Includes 12 in calculation) Spreadsheet software skills (Includes 12 in calculation) Database software skills (Includes 12 in calculation)

An area of focus for administrators should be methods to improve database management to inform instruction, as this area was the lowest of the measured categories. Additionally, administrators will need introduction to and methods to support teachers in the focus areas of Internet safety and ethical use of information. Introduction to the Chavez Bill (AB 307) that states: This bill charges districts to “educate pupils and teachers on the appropriate and ethical use of information technology in the classroom, Internet safety, avoiding plagiarism, the concept, purpose, and significance of a copyright so that pupils can distinguish between lawful and unlawful online downloading, and the implications of illegal peer-topeer network file sharing.”

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Survey results regarding professional development indicate computer and Internet training is occurring for JCCS teachers with nearly 75% of respondents stating that they have participated in over 8 hours of computer and Internet based staff development activities. The chart below details the hours, needs and preferences for staff development according to survey data collected in June of 2009. JCCS Staff Development Survey Results
Question 1: Hours of formal professional developm ent. During the last 3 years I participated in the use of computers and the Internet staff development including online classes, workshops, coaching and technology conferences 0 hours 1- 8 hours 9 - 20 hours 21 - 40 hours More than 40 hours Question 2: Needs and preferences regarding technology train ing at your school. I need opportunities to participate in educational technology staff development focused on: Basic computer/technology skills. Integrating technology into the curriculum. Question 3: Needs and preferences regarding technology training at your school. The training format I prefer is: One-on-one informal technology training. Small group technology training. Online web-based technology training. Question 4: Indicate your needs and preferences r egarding technology training at your school. I prefer technology training to be offered: During the school day. After school. In the evening. On the weekend. During the summer/off track. # of Respondent s %

2 34 34 30 39 # of Respondent s

1% 24% 24% 22% 28% %

40 125 # of Respondent s

24% 76% %

41 99 42 # of Respondent s 101 55 19 13 15

23% 54% 23% %

50% 27% 9% 6% 7%

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4. b Technology Staff Development Opportunities Staff development opportunities will be provided to JCCS teachers and administrators to meet the goals and objectives of the JCCS Technology Plan. Enhancing Education through Technology (EETT) funds allocate 25% to be used for professional development. JCCS has a strong history of providing staff development opportunities through district-sponsored trainings, during school day as well as after-school day staff development opportunities. Federal stimulus funds will be allocated to continued staff development events that target technology integration for teaching and learning. JCCS teachers, staff and administrators will continue to receive training in the National Education Technology Standards (NETS-T), PLATO program, Rosetta Stone, Smart Board, wikis, emerging technology components, Internet skill development, Discovery Education video resources, student data systems and other technologies to successfully implement the goals and objectives of this JCCS Technology Plan. Goal 4.b. JCCS teachers and administrators will increase technology and information literacy skills to accelerate student academic achievement. Objective 4.b.1 By June 2015, over 85% of JCCS classroom teachers and administrators will show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers and Administrators (NETS-T and NETS-A). The standards include specific skills addressing the social, legal,
ethical, and human issues in educational technology (i.e. copyright, fair use, internet safety, plagiarism.)

Benchmarks for 4.b.1
By June of 2011, 60% of JCCS classroom teachers/admin will show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T). By June of 2012, 70% of JCCS classroom teachers/admin will show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T). By June of 2013, 75% of JCCS classroom teachers/admin will show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T). By June of 2014, 80% of JCCS classroom teachers/admin will show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T). By June of 2015, over 85% of JCCS classroom teachers/admin will show competence in the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T).

Implementation and monitoring for 4.b.1 Benchmark Implementation Responsible Plan and Person Activities
4.b.1 Plan prof. develop. Seminars and events to introduce NETS-T and NETSA requisite skills to classroom teachers and administrators. Develop evidence of Tech Coordinator Resource Teachers Technology

Time Line Monitoring and Evaluation
Ongoing through 2010 Exit Assessment and checklist developed

4.b.1

Tech Coordinator

Reviewed

Teachers work

48

4.b.1

competence in NETS-T and NETSA through staff development events and site visitations Conduct ongoing staff development training in local, classroom and facilitated workshops

Technology Principals Teachers Tech Coordinator Technology And various vendors

quarterly and thru. 2010 Presented ongoing in classrooms and quarterly trainings

reviewed by Principals

Checklist and survey conducted annually

Objective 4.b.2

By June 2015, over 85% of JCCS classroom teachers and administrators will complete at least four days of staff development in the implementation of PLATO, Smart Boards, Discovery Streaming, SIS/CALPADS and other emerging technologies. Benchmarks for 4.b.2
By June of 2011, 55% of JCCS classroom teachers and administrators will receive four full days of staff development in the implementation of PLATO, SmartBoards, Discovery Streaming, SIS/CALPADS and other emerging technologies. By June of 2012, 65% of JCCS classroom teachers and administrators will receive four full days of staff development in the implementation of PLATO, Smart Boards, Discovery Streaming, SIS/CALPADS and other emerging technologies. By June of 2013, 70% of JCCS classroom teachers and administrators will receive four full days of staff development in the implementation of PLATO, Smart Boards, Discovery Streaming SIS/CALPADS, and other emerging technologies. By June of 2014, 75% of JCCS classroom teachers and administrators will receive four full days of staff development in the implementation of PLATO, Smart Boards, Discovery Streaming, SIS/CALPADS and other emerging technologies. By June of 2015, over 85% of JCCS classroom teachers and administrators will receive four full days of staff development in the implementation of PLATO, Smart Boards, Discovery Streaming, SIS/CALPADS and other emerging technologies.

Implementation and monitoring for 4b.2 Benchmark Implementation Responsible Plan and Activities Person
4.b.2 Develop training program to implement four full days of staff development in the implementation of PLATO, Smart Boards, Discovery Streaming and other emerging technologies. Implement staff development program Tech Coordinator Curriculum Director Resource Teachers Assessment Coor. Tech Coordinator Curriculum

Time Line
August through Sept 2010

Monitoring and Evaluation Activities
Program developed and presented to Exec. Director including evaluation criteria

4.b.2

Reviewed quarterly and

Evaluation criteria presented to Executive

49

Director Resource Teachers

ongoing through 2015

Director

4c BENCHMARKS, TIMELINES, MONITORING AND EVALUATION Benchmarks, timelines, monitoring and evaluation components are clearly stated within each of the required goals and objectives listed in sections 4.a through 4.b. A timeline including the event, date, and who is responsible for the event over the three-year plan is also contained within each goal and objective. The general process for monitoring and evaluating the plan can be found in component 7.

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5. INFRASTRUCTURE, HARDWARE, TECHNICAL SUPPORT, AND SOFTWARE COMPONENT 5.a Existing hardware, Internet access, electronic learning resources, and technical support already in use that will support the Curriculum and Professional Development Components. Existing Hardware All existing computer equipment is inventoried and documented on the JCCS FileMaker database according to JCCS classroom/site allocation. As part of the technology planning cycle the JCCS Technology Support Team (JCCS TST) developed and implemented a number of data gathering efforts. These included site check, database search and one-on-one interviews and reference materials from the State of California “Tech Survey”. In December, 2009 this research identified the total number of in-use computers within JCCS instructional areas. The JCCS TST documented a total of 1,548 computers (1076 desktops and 472 laptops) in the JCCS classrooms and labs for student use (and another 30 servers are in daily operation to support testing and classroom management to serve teachers). The age distribution of these computers is: Age of computers JCCS District: % New-3 Yea rs 39 % 4 -5 Years 8% 5 -7 Years 41% >7 Years 12%

Of these computers, 273 computers are in-use by teachers and other JCCS administrative and support staff. There are also 353 high-speed laser printers, 132 desktop projection systems, 78 Smart Boards, 80 docu-cameras, 35 digital camcorders and over 150 digital cameras in use district wide.

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Current Internet access Currently, 100% of JCCS classroom programs have high-speed (DSL or greater) connectivity. The Juvenile Court & Community Schools (JCCS) sites connect directly to San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE) via broadband (DSL, Frame Relay, ATM, OptiMan and Metro Ethernet based data circuits). SDCOE provides free access to the Internet using four different major carrier services (AT&T Internet, Cox Communications, Time Warner Telecommunications and Digital California Project [DCP]). The JCCS plan for networking is often being re-designed due to ongoing upgrades, bandwidth availability, relocations or program closings. Four major project network challenges have been completed at Camp Barrett, East Mesa, Mira Mesa, and Phoenix Academy. Additionally, our San Pasqual High School campus is being upgraded for wireless connectivity along with 14 community school sites that have been upgraded to wireless connectivity. JCCS specific networking hardware includes: 25 Dell servers 25 High end routers (Cisco 3845, 2821, 2801) 15 Mid range routers (Cisco 1841) 23 DSL Routers (Cisco 877) 16 1601 Cisco Routers 11 60 3750 Cisco Switch 2960 Cisco Switch

12 2950 Cisco Switch 53 wireless access nodes (Cisco 1242AG) Security data boxes have been installed at 25 JCCS sites to protect and secure networking equipment and have improved stability at sites that may have experienced previous connection disruptions. Additionally, a major networking project has delivered segmented Internet or virtual local area network (V-lan) access to differentiate staff from student Internet accessibility. Especially at our institutional programs, this feature has enabled student access to Internet resources that are approved by Probation and restrict all other non-approved content.

Current Electronic Learning Resources JCCS utilizes electronic learning resources to address state standards and to 52

meet the learning goals and objectives of the JCCS academic program. Adopted textbooks in JCCS programs include CD-ROM and Internet-based resources to supplement the text and help to reinforce the standards that support differentiated instruction. JCCS classrooms have many electronic learning resources including Internet connected computers, SmartBoards, desktop projection systems, remote responders, GradeCams, televisions, camcorders, docucams, digital cameras, and various other electronic tools for teaching and learning. JCCS classroom computers are equipped with age-appropriate software. Key electronic learning resources include PLATO PLE (Web-based integrated learning system), Discovery Education (video and other multimedia on demand via Internet) and MAP (Measures of Academic Progress - online assessment of student academic performance). A complete list of JCCS electronic resources and software follows. JCCS Software Programs Program wide MAP (NWEA) PLATO PLE (High School) PLATO (Elementary) FileMaker Pro Rosetta Stone Cyber Safety Wiki Microsoft Office Microsoft Outlook Microsoft Entourage Internet Explorer Safari Adobe Acrobat Adobe Suite Discovery Quick description Installation Usage

Online student assessments Online student curriculum Online student curriculum Database of JCCS information English Language development online Online JCCS developed Internet safety curriculum for 8-12 grade Desktop productivity Desktop email Desktop email Internet browser Internet browser Creates and reads PDF Photoshop, Acrobat, Illustrator Video on 53

20+ testing sites All JCCS schools 1 site All teachers/support staff 81 teachers/classroom s All staff All computers All staff All staff All computers All Apple computers All staff 75 teachers and staff Avail to all teachers

135,000 tests to date daily (avail 24/7) daily (avail 24/7) daily use projected Daily use In development daily daily daily daily daily daily as needed daily

Education Final Cut Pro EasyGrade Pro Hist./Soc Studies CDs Net Trekker Atomic Learning SMARTNotebook Inspiration

demand/resources Digital video editing Computer-based grading Textbook aligned support Student web portal Online tutorials for multiple software applications SMARTBoard companion software Visual learning tool

75 staff/student All teachers All Hist/SS teachers Avail all teachers Avail all staff 81 current staff and assigned students All computers

as needed daily /report card period daily as needed daily as needed daily as needed Daily as needed Daily as needed

54

JCCS Software Programs Algebra/Math CDs Mavis Beacon Typing Kidspiration CHOICES Worldbook Operating systems Windows XP, 2000, 2003 Windows Server 2000, 2003 Mac 9.2 --- 10.4

Quick description Textbook aligned support Student typing program Student/teacher concept maps Online career assessment Encyclopedia Operating systems Operating systems Operating systems

Installation All Math teachers All student computers Elementary computers Regional locations All student computers All PC computers MAP Servers All Mac computers 200+ users 4 sites 12 sites 10 sites

Usage daily as needed daily use in most classrooms as needed per Student Support Specialist as needed daily daily daily daily as needed daily for spec ed students daily for spec ed students

Support Staff/Designated Users SIS Student information system Alexandria Library database Special Education READ 180 FastMath ESL Rosetta Stone Online Sp. Ed. reading software Stand Alone Special Ed.

Language development

81 teachers and daily for ESL corresponding sites students 8 sites 3 sites 10 computers Institutional programs – laptop carts daily as needed as needed Daily as needed

Workforce Partnership GED Prep GED Prep iSafe Internet safety Driver's Ed Student driver's education Counselor-led Access to a College Online college coursesEducational Spectrum Cuyamaca/Grossmont (ACES)

Current Technology Support Current full time staff for the JCCS TST (Technology Support Team) includes 6 55

classified positions and 4 certificated positions: (1) Computer Support Services Supervisor (1) Network Analyst I (2) Office Systems Technician II (2) Office Systems Technician I (4) Technology Resource Teachers Current Tech Support Process The Technology Support Team (TST) is supervised by the Technology Coordinator. Daily service and support requests are handled via call center recording, email, fax and face-to-face communication. All service requests are routed through FileMaker Pro database entry (developed by the Technology Resource Teacher) and are processed each morning by the Computer Support Services Supervisor. Service requests are prioritized to address the most critical needs (such as Internet access not available). The JCCS online service request database system in FileMaker Pro is fully operational and to date over 5,000 staff requests have been tracked and corresponding service has been provided. The process addresses the results of the JCCS Program Improvement survey data targeting a priority to ensure support of staff technology. A survey of JCCS teachers, documented most service requests (74%) are handled within 5 days or less. The critical need for computer and other technology tools to be one hundred percent operational has raised the level of expectations for the team and created management decisions that will need to maximize resources and to find creative ways of supporting the goal of the JCCS Technology Plan. All JCCS staff and students receive computer support from the JCCS TST. Technology Support Team (TST). The team is responsible for supporting over 60 sites throughout San Diego County (with 10 sites more than 50 miles distant from the JCCS technology center). Support and service is not limited to computers. The TST supports and maintains: the Wide Area Network (WAN); Local Area Networks (LANs); computer labs; printers; Smart Boards; desktop projectors; software installation and upgrades; email; software virus control; introductory computer/software training; JCCS FileMaker Pro database integration, installation and training; MAP online assessment testing; student information system connectivity; video production and inventory of technology assets. Our 56

demand for technology support has grown at an exponential rate over the past five years. Allocation of resources, in terms of more full time positions, has not kept pace with this increased workload demand. It is proposed in this plan to increase this staff to achieve the successful implementation of the JCCS Technology Plan. Technology Resource Teachers As a result of the planning and commitment to improving the service to classroom instruction to maximize the integration of technology, JCCS has committed to the assignment of 4 full-time Technology Resource Teachers (TRT). These 4 teacher leaders have undertaken the multiple roles of staff developers, software support specialists, technology trouble-shooter, coach, mentor, guide, leader and countless other tasks that help teachers, students and staff succeed. To date, this team has taken the lead to develop in-house solutions to critical data needs for the entire organization and provided expert training to all staff and students. Key components of this training include: FileMaker Pro (a “case-management” database that is customized to address all of JCCS’s specific data needs, PLATO, Rosetta Stone, Measures of Academic Progress (MAP), SMARTBoard integration, wiki and blog development and numerous individual software application. Without these TRT leaders, JCCS would not function at it highest level to best serve our students. 5.b Description of technology resources required to support the activities in the Curriculum and Professional Development component of the plan In order to achieve the goals and objectives detailed in the Curriculum and Professional development sections of the JCCS Technology Plan, a set of goals and objectives to provide for the enhancement of the JCCS network infrastructure must be achieved. The following is a set of goals and objectives for the improvement of the networking infrastructure, physical plant, hardware and software, and technical support components. Focus on improvement to the JCCS network is occurring in collaboration with SDCOE network specialists and funding sources such as ERate, Ed Tech Voucher, Categorical Funds, EETT and other grants are in place or being developed. Ongoing hardware and software purchases continue to be provided for in the current JCCS “White Budget” under the JCCS Technology 57

Budget and Microsoft Settlement funds. A series of charts will be presented for each goal, 5b 1, through 5b 4 These include the objective, the benchmark, the timeline for expected attainment/completion, responsible party(ies), and the monitor(s) responsible for the outcomes.

58

Goal 5b. Enhance JCCS network infrastructure to provide high quality WAN and Internet access to all JCCS classrooms. Objective 5b.1 By June 2015, all JCCS classrooms will have reliable and highspeed bandwidth to accommodate all current and emerging technologies. Benchmarks for 5b.1
By June of 2011, 90% of JCCS classrooms will have reliable and highspeed bandwidth to accommodate all current and emerging technologies. By June of 2013, 95% of JCCS classrooms will have reliable and highspeed bandwidth to accommodate all current and emerging technologies. By June of 2015, 100% of JCCS classrooms will have reliable and highspeed bandwidth to accommodate all current and emerging technologies.

Implementation and monitoring for 5b.1 Benchmark Implementation Responsible Plan and Person Activities 5b.1 Develop JCCS Tech classroom network Coordinator standard with SDCOE SDCOE Net. Network Director Director 5b.1 Build impl. plan Tech with SDCOE Net Coordinator Manager to target SDCOE site improvement Network plan and Manager implement 5b.1 Implement JCCS Tech Network upgrade Coordinator plan to designated SDCOE sites Network Manager SDCOE Net. Dir.

Time Line July 2011

Monitoring and Evaluation Standard submitted to Exec. Dir. Plan and timeline submitted to Exec. Dir. Status report submitted to Exec. Dir.

August 2011

90% June 2011, 95% June 2013, 100% June 2015

59

Goal 5b.2. Improve the physical plant (including electrical power upgrades) at all JCCS classrooms. Objective 5b.2. By June 2015, all JCCS classrooms will have reliable and sufficient electrical power to accommodate any additional technical resources deployed in the classroom. Benchmarks for 5a.2
By June of 2011, 80% of JCCS classrooms will have reliable and sufficient electrical power to accommodate any additional technical resources deployed in the classroom. By June of 2013, 90% of JCCS classrooms will have reliable and sufficient electrical power to accommodate any additional technical resources deployed in the classroom. By June of 2015, 100% of JCCS classrooms will have reliable and sufficient electrical power to accommodate any additional technical resources deployed in the classroom.

Implementation and monitoring for 5b.2 Benchmark Implementation Responsible Plan and Person Activities
5b.2 Develop JCCS classroom physical plant upgrade needs analysis JCCS M&O Director SDCOE M&O Director Tech Coordinator SDCOE Network Director JCCS M&O Director Tech Coordinator SDCOE Network Director Tech Coordinator JCCS M&O Director Tech Coordinator SDCOE Network Director Tech Coordinator

Time Line Monitoring and Evaluation Activities
Sept 2011 Standard submitted to Exec. Dir.

5b.2

Coordinate implementation plan to targeted classrooms to upgrade physical plant Implement JCCS Physical Plant upgrade plan to designated sites

October 2015

Plan and timeline submitted to Exec. Dir.

5b.2

80% completed June 2011, 90% completed June 2013, 100% completed June 2015

Status report submitted to Exec. Dir.

60

Goal 5c.1. Provide modern hardware and software to all JCCS classrooms to support the curricular and staff development goals Objective 5c.1. By June 2015, all JCCS classrooms will have modern hardware and software to implement the curricular and staff development goals. Benchmarks for 5c.1
By June of 2011, 70% JCCS classrooms will have modern hardware and software to implement the curricular and staff development goals. By June of 2013, 80% of JCCS classrooms will have modern hardware and software to implement the curricular and staff development goals. By June of 2015, 90% of JCCS classrooms will have modern hardware and software to implement the curricular and staff development goals.

Implementation and monitoring for 5c.1 Benchmark Implementation Responsible Plan and Person Activities
5c.1 Conduct needs analysis of hardware and software Coordinate implementation plan to targeted classrooms to upgrade hardware and software Implement JCCS Hardware and Software upgrade plan to designated sites Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers Principals Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers Principals Tech Coordinator 4 Resource Teachers Principals

Time Line Monitoring and Evaluation Activities
Sept 2010 Online survey of teachers and principals Plan and timeline submitted to Exec. Dir. Status report submitted to Exec. Dir.

5c.1

Sept 2010 through June 2011

5c.1

70% completed June 2011, 80% completed June 2013, 90% completed June 2015

61

Goal 5c.2. Provide quality technical support and service to all JCCS classrooms to support the curriculum and staff development goals of the plan. Objective By June 2015, 95 % JCCS staff will rate their level of support as 5c.2. excellent as measured by a survey. Benchmarks for 5c.2 By June of 2011, 80% of JCCS staff will rate their level of support as
excellent as measured by a survey. By June of 2013, 90% of JCCS staff will rate their level of support as excellent as measured by a survey. By June of 2015, 95% JCCS staff will rate their level of support as excellent as measured by a survey.

Implementation and monitoring for 5c.2 Benchmark Implementation Responsible Plan and Person Activities
5c.2 5c.2 Create survey of customer (staff) satisfaction Administer survey to all JCCS staff Implement JCCS Technical and Service Support improvement strategies to address any areas for improvement from survey results Tech Coordinator Tech Coordinator Technology Resource Teachers Tech Coordinator JCCS TST

Time Line

Monitoring and Evaluation Activities
Survey created and published on website Results posted online and submitted to Exec. Dir. Status report submitted to Exec. Dir.

By July 2010 Each September through 2015 80% completed June 2011, 90% completed June 2013, 95% completed June 2015

5c.2

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5.c and 5.d List of benchmarks and timelines for obtaining hardware, infrastructure, learning resources, and technical support required to support the other plan components and 5.d – the process that will monitor the benchmarks and activities including roles and responsibilities The goals and objectives listed above (5b.1 through 5c.2) will be met by June 2015. Benchmarks and timelines are contained and stated within each of the required goals above. The tables for the goals and objectives include the event, date and responsible person(s) over the life of the plan. The general process for monitoring and evaluating the JCCS Technology Plan can be found in section 7 of the plan. Below is the timeline for obtaining hardware, infrastructure, learning resources and technical support. Hardware, software, technical support and infrastructure timeline: Item(s) Student computers
140 computers (each year) and 3 mobile carts (3 carts x 20 laptops per = 60 laptops) 200 per year @ $1,100 and N-computing devices (30 kits per year

Quantity Total 1,000

Date acquired by June 30, 2015

Person responsible Tech. Coordinator and Computer Support Services Supervisor (CSSS)

Computers staff –
40 desktop computers (each year) 20 laptops (each year) 60 per year @ $1,200

300

June 30, 2015

Tech. Coordinator and CSSS Tech. Coordinator and CSSS Tech. Coordinator Network Analyst Tech. Coordinator and CSSS continued

N-computing devices
(virtual desktop - 30 kits per year)

150 5 80 100

June 30, 2015 June 30, 2015 June, 30, 2015 June 30, 2015

District servers
(5 per year) @ $4,300

Desktop Projectors
(16 per year @ $800)

Network printer
20 per year @ $550

63

Item(s) Smart Boards
(10 per year at $2978)

Quantity Total 50

Date acquired by June 30, 2015

Person responsible Tech. Coordinator and CSSS Tech. Coordinator and CSSS

Computer furniture desks and chairs
90 per year @ $200 (chair & desk set)

450

June 30, 2015

Network security cabinets
(20 total @ $475)

20

June 30, 2015

Tech. Coordinator Network Analyst Tech. Coordinator, Tech Resource Teachers and CSSS Tech. Coordinator and Director of Assessment Tech. Coordinator Tech. Coordinator

PLATO licenses (minimum of 120 concurrent) MAP licenses Discovery Education licenses Consultant services (MAP, Discovery, PLATO, Rosetta Stone, SIS replacement Rosetta Stone licenses (add 20 per year) Infrastructure – wireless upgrades (5 sites per year) Electrical capacity upgrades (20 sites per year)

To expand as Each year thought needed June 2015 3200 4 network licenses 20 days of staff development 100 additional licenses 25 sites 60 sites Each year through June 2015 Each year though June 2015 June 30, 2015

June 30, 2015 June 30, 2015 June 30, 2010

English Language Coordinator Tech Coordinator Network Planning Mgr. and Network Analyst Tech Coordinator Network Planning Mgr.

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6. FUNDING AND BUDGET COMPONENT 6.a. List of established and potential funding sources and cost savings, present and future. There are several types of funding sources within the district. JCCS pursues funding form state, federal and local resources regularly, including grants such as Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT), K-12 EdTech Vouchers, Title I, and other various technical support funds. JCCS collaborates with the CTAP Region IX program to keep current on funding sources made available for program integration. The SDCOE and JCCS also collaborate with the DELL Corporation to acquire funding and technical support for model technology integration projects. In addition, JCCS has received funding under the California Education Technology K-12 Voucher Program. The settlement will provide vouchers to JCCS for $159,471 to be utilized for General Purpose Vouchers (50%) and Specific Category Software Vouchers (50%). The funds are being expended currently and paid vouchers are submitted to the Claims Administrator from the SDCOE business office. Current Resources: General fund. This is the program’s unrestricted state and local funding. General funds are used to cover the majority of the program’s ongoing operations, including books, supplies, employee salaries and benefits, instructional programs and professional development. Categorical funds. Categorical funds are state and federal funds that are restricted in their use to specific purposes and programs. In general, their intent is to provide direct instructional support to students beyond the educational program provided by the district. Categorical funding programs include: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), Title I/Part A, Part D – Basic Program, part of the No Child Left Behind Act, provides federal funding to support economically disadvantaged and delinquent students. Grant funds and donations. The program receives grants from the state/federal government through the Enhancing Education through Technology (EETT) Formula Grant. The program also receives donations of equipment and services from companies and organizations.

65

The SDCOE also participates in a number of programs to reduce its costs for telecommunications and for the purchase of computers. These programs include: • E-Rate Program. This federal program subsidizes a broad range of telecommunications services across the district. SDCOE receives approximately $2.3 million in E-rate discounts each year. JCCS utilizes these funds to complete ongoing upgrades to network infrastructure and will do so for the life of this plan. • CALNET Contract. SDCS participates in statewide contracts competitively bid and negotiated by the California Department of Governmental Services, which results in savings on telecommunications charges. • The California Teleconnect Fund, operated by the California Public Utilities Commission, and which provides 50% discounts of most ongoing costs for telecommunications services provided by common carriers. • Western States Contracting Alliance, cooperative multi-state contracting developed on behalf of public entities by the state purchasing directors from 15 western states, and which provides competitive prices on computers and peripheral products. • The California Multiple Awards Schedule (CMAS), which provides contract terms and negotiated discounts on equipment and services through the California Department of Governmental Services. Additional funds will be sought from private sources through partnerships, collaborations and other donations. Through the partnership with San Diego county business and government partnerships have developed to achieve the goals of the SDCOE and local school districts. Potential cost savings are expected through participation in statewide and national group purchase agreements, volume discounts, negotiated and bid processes. We also conduct monthly Technology Committee meetings in collaboration with SDCOE leaders to discuss resources and ideas to share costs, reduce expenses and to find alternatives that may lead to further expense reductions. Additional funding sources are in development with DELL and AT&T. These partnerships are currently underway and will result in donations of products and services directly to JCCS. 6. b. Estimate implementation costs for the term of the plan (2010-2015). The table below provides an estimate of the full implementation costs for each of 66

the five years of the JCCS Technology Plan. The table includes technology acquired through the full range of budget resources available to the district. The cost estimates are reasonable and estimate the total cost of ownership. Full costs for some planned applications (such as business applications) have not yet been fully developed, and therefore are not yet detailed in the table. For the length of this plan it is important to note the Total Cost of Ownership. As technology prices trend down over time, those expenses may be reduced through the five-year timeframe. However, ongoing expenses such as repair and replacement costs will be incurred along with the cost of personnel to service the plan, provide staff development and monitor its successful implementation.
Category Year 1 2011 Year 2 2012 Year 3 2013 Year 4 2014 Year 5 2015

1000: Certificated Salaries
4 Tech Resource Teachers and Technology Coordinator

424,350

436,187

450,235

465,246

478,287

1100: Substitute 61,600 teachers
Subs for 140 teachers released 4 days per year @ $110

63,448

65,351

66,127

68,345

2000: Classified Salaries
6 Computer Support Personnel

339,258 229,082

346,328 234,754

357,014 242,174

368,663 250,172

379,205 257,247

3000: Benefits
Benefit total for all Tech Support Team

4300: Materials and Supplies
Software, electronic learning resources, instructional applications

178,650

190,553

211,444

219,759

224,327

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continued 4400: Equip Inventory
Computers students 140 computers (each year) and 3 mobile carts (3 carts x 20 laptops per = 60 laptops) 200 per year @ $1,100 and N-computing devices (30 kits per year Computers staff – 40 desktop computers (each year) 20 laptops (each year) 60 per year @ $1,200 Computers servers (5 new each year) @ $4,300 Printers - 20 per year @ $550 Smart Boards (10 per year at $2978 Desktop projectors (16 per year @ $800)

240,000

263,250

274,210

286,086

298,467

72,000

73,400

75,458

77,674

81,846

21,500 11,000 29,780 12,800

22,483 12,000 29,780 12,800

23,887 13,000 29,780 12,800

24,127 14,000 29,780 12,800

25,778 15,000 29,789 12,800

4400-010: Equipment-non Inventory
Computer furniture (classrooms) 90 per year @ $200 (chair & desk set Network Security Cabinets 20 total @ $475

180,000 4,750

180,000 4,750

180,000 0

180,000 0

180,000 0

5800: Contracted services
Professional development services and consultants (PLATO, MAP, Discovery Streaming, Smart Board) Networking Cloud Computing solutions (2000 licenses @ $10 each) Licenses for online subscriptions (PLATO, Rosetta Stone, MAP, FileMaker Pro, Discovery Education, misc others)

12,000

14,000

16,000

18,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

20,000

305,000

325,000

345,000

365,000

390,000

6000: Capital Outlay
Infrastructure upgrades, including electrical to classroom sites and centers (estimate E-Rate TBD)

55,400

60,150

64,357

67,228

71, 344

TOTAL

$2.19 M

$2.28 M

$2.38 M

$2.46 M

$2.48 M

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6.c. Replacement policy for obsolete equipment The JCCS Technology Coordinator supervises the process of replacing obsolete equipment and adheres to the guidelines of the SDCOE for proper disposal and inventory tracking. The goal for all JCCS computer equipment plans for the replacement 20% of its computer and other high value electronic stock in a given year, contingent upon available resources and as determined by system requirements and software. This approach will be continuous and thus replace computers on a five-year cycle. This cycle supports the goals and objectives of the Curriculum and Professional Development Component of this technology plan. Standard hardware configurations have been developed to assist in the purchase, support, planning and operation of the school sites. Under the direction of the JCCS Technology Coordinator and Computer Supervisor, replacement procedures are documented according to SDCOE policy and procedures with records of all equipment retired and purchased each year. 6.d Description of the process to monitor Ed Tech funding, implementation costs and new funding opportunities and to adjust the budget as necessary The feedback loop regarding funding and budget in JCCS is designed with checks and balances to support teaching and learning. Budget planning is controlled and monitored by the JCCS Executive Director and JCCS Program Business Specialist III. These two work closely with the JCCS Technology Coordinator to monitor progress and update funding and budget decisions. Additionally, the San Diego County Office of Education’s Financial Information System (FIS) and new CLARITY systems act as checks on all budget processes and must be approved by the elected SDCOE Board of Trustees. The general process for monitoring and evaluating the JCCS Technology Plan can be found in component 7 of this document. New funding opportunities that arise are communicated from various sources including federal, state and local sources. Business partnerships and grant programs are constantly pursued. Several successful funding sources have been secured over the years and continue to be developed with business partners, local non-profit organizations, colleges and universities and other entities.

7. MONITORING AND EVALUATION COMPONENT 7.a Description of how technology’s impact will be evaluated The process of utilizing goals and benchmarks to evaluate student learning as aligned with curricular goals and objectives is detailed in section 3 - Curriculum, section 4 - Professional Development, section 5 – Infrastructure, and section 6 – Funding and Budget. Within each section, specific goals and objectives are stated and include breakdowns of the Implementation Plan and Activities, Responsible Persons, Time Line and Monitoring and Evaluation Activities. 7.b Process for evaluating the plan’s overall progress and impact on teaching and learning To evaluate the progress and impact of the JCCS Technology Plan on teaching and learning, a timeline of checkpoints is presented below. In each of the goals within the 3 major components of the plan (Curriculum, Professional Development, and Infrastructure/Hardware/TechSupport/Software, criteria is established for measurement and is provided within each goal and objective. These checkpoint criteria will be reported to the Executive Director at the assigned intervals. Additionally, the Technology Resource Teachers, JCCS Technology Committee and the JCCS Assessment Coordinator will meet regularly to evaluate the plan and to make adjustments as needed and report to the Executive Director to ensure the ongoing successful implementation of the plan. The goals and objectives are scheduled to occur at varying intervals from July 2010 through June 2015. Detailed timelines are included in each of the goals and objectives included in the sections of the JCCS Technology Plan. A table of the overview of the goals, event, person responsible, data collected and reporting mechanism is provided below.

Date

Event
3d.1 PLATO modules mastered 3d.2 Emerging technologies in classrooms 3e.1 NETS- S students competence 3f.1 Ethical use of information JCCS “Cyber Safety /Ethical Use” 3g.1 Internet Safety – JCCS “Cyber Safety” program 3h.1 Equitable access to technology 3i.1 Student record keeping and assessment

Person responsible
Tech Coordinator / Resource Teachers Tech Coordinator / Resource Teachers Tech Coordinator and Resource Teachers Tech Coordinator and Resource Teachers Tech Coordinator and Resource Teachers Tech Coordinator and Resource Teachers Tech Coordinator, Support Services Mgr and Assessment Director

Data collected
PLATO modules mastered Staff survey

Reporting mechanism PLATO reports Publication of survey results Publication survey results Survey / Summary report publication Survey / Summary report publication Summary report publication Summary report publication

June 30, for each year June 30, for each year June 30 for each year

NETS- S criteria survey data checklists Teacher logs / grades

June 30 for each year

June 30 for each year

Teacher logs / grades

Inventory reports

June 30 for each year

June 30 for each year

Access records login information

Date

Event
3j.1 Utilize tech to make teachers and administrators more accessible to parents and legal guardians 4b.1 Increase teachers and admin tech and information literacy skills 4b.2 JCCS teachers /admin complete 4 days staff development (PLATO, Smart Board, Discovery Ed and SIS/CALPADS) 5b.1 Upgrade all classrooms to reliable high speed bandwidth 5b.2 Improve the physical plan including electrical power 5c.1 Provide modern hardware and software 5c.2 Provide quality technical support and service to all JCCSclassroom

Person responsible
Tech Coordinator, Support Services Mgr and Assessment Director Tech Coordinator and Tech Resource Teachers Tech Coordinator Curriculum Director Resource Teachers Assessment Coor and Support Mgr Tech Coordinator, Network Analyst and SDCOE Network Mgr JCCS M&O Director , Network Analyst, Tech Coordinator Network Dir. Tech Coordinator Resource Teachers Principals Tech Coordinator JCCS Computer Support Supervisor

Data collected
Survey of parents and legal guardians

Reporting mechanism
Summary report publication of survey results

June 30 for each year

June 30 for each year

NETS –T data survey

Summary data published

June 30 for each year

Staff development attendance and program utilization

Summary data published

June 30 for each year

Sites upgraded summary sheet

Summary data published

June 30 for each year

Sites upgraded summary sheet

Summary data published

June 30 for each year

Survey and inventory records Database records / Staff survey

Summary data published Summary data / survey data published

June 30 for each year

7.c Description of how the information obtained through the monitoring and evaluation will be used Information obtained through the monitoring and evaluation will be used to adjust and improve the implementation of the JCCS Technology Plan to address the curricular goals of the JCCS program. Stakeholders will informed of the JCCS Technology Plan and progress through regional meetings, electronic reports, and other published documents from the Technology Coordinator, Technology Committee and Executive Director. The schedule for evaluating the effect of the plan will be conducted on a quarterly in conjunction with regularly scheduled JCCS Technology Committee meetings, chaired by the JCCS Technology Coordinator. Monthly, biannually, and at the annual data collection and reporting event (by June 30th each year) deadlines will be monitored by the JCCS Executive Director, Assessment Coordinator, the Technology Coordinator and by the Technology Resource Teachers. The monitoring and evaluation results will be presented in JCCS Technology Committee meetings and to the JCCS Leadership Team. Adjustments and modifications to the plan will be at the discretion of the Executive Director.

8. EFFECTIVE COLLABORATION STRATEGIES WITH ADULT LITERACY PROVIDERS 8.a Collaboration with adult literacy providers Due to the nature of the JCCS operation, the program does not work actively with adult education providers. However, JCCS works closely with parents in our communities to establish open communication and provide services. Ongoing community outreach activities include JCCS Parent conferences, workshops for introduction to Internet presentations, creation of email account support, English language support services, scholarship support and college/work orientations. The nature of the JCCS program does not lend itself to participation by adult literacy providers in general. JCCS counselors do work with parents and other community members to provide assistance for educational services. By way of outreach and possible partnering, the JCCS program does coordinate and collaborate with the San Diego County Office of Education to share access to technology resources available at the Joe Rindone Regional Technology Center (JRRTC) before and after school hours for student, parent and staff development. Additionally, individual JCCS programs collaborate with the local junior colleges and universities (adult literacy providers) to provide technological resources to parents. These institutions provide adult literacy programs on their campuses. Additionally, JCCS programs have worked to coordinate and collaborate with neighborhood libraries to support literacy and provide technological access to JCCS students and their families. JCCS programs continue to support adult learners in our Career and Counseling centers in JCCS regional offices. Any adult who is affiliated with JCCS students may use the resources at the centers including Internet connected computers, application software, career interest inventories and resume writing software programs.

9. EFFECTIVE, RESEARCH-BASED METHODS AND STRATEGIES 9. a Introduction to Relevant Research The Executive Summary of this JCCS Technology Plan (2010-2015) states that JCCS will use technology to accelerate student achievement for all students. As cited earlier, JCCS conducts its own research and uses data to guide program decisions that impact teaching and learning. Utilizing state and local test instruments we have documented that test scores are up for JCCS students as measured by Academic Performance Index (API) and we are documenting impressive gains. District-wide scores rose nearly 100 points from 486 in 2005 to 585 for the most recent data from 2009. This increase is impressive when compared with the statewide 46 point growth rate over the same time frame. The coordination of technology tools and staff development to meet JCCS program goals and aligns with the JCCS Mission Statement. Technology integration was cited as a strength in 3 of 10 commendations of the JCCS program by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) evaluation study. Overall, the use of data to inform instruction and to provide specific strategies to address student needs was found to be a strength. We believe the development and use of the FileMaker database and PLATO online learning systems are key components of that success. This plan for the delivery and integration of technology into the district curriculum and into the district’s staff development program and is based on the District’s educational vision and coordinates with the current JCCS WASC plan (awarded a renewed 6-year accreditation in 2007 and being reviewed at the midyear point currently). Cradler (1996) states that part of the overall school-improvement process is that schools that effectively use technology have a carefully designed technology plan. A technology plan that is not integral to the overall improvement plan is likely to be short-lived. It should be noted that the goals and strategies articulated in the Curriculum and Professional Development sections of the Plan are organized around effective, research-based strategies. These goals focus on student achievement through the use of technology and data driven decision-

making. Implementation of the plan will ensure that all students have the foundation in math, language arts, science and social science to master the State of California Content Standards. The purpose of this section of the Educational Technology Plan is to link the goals and strategies included in the district’s Technology Plan to relevant research and effective practices. The newest educational technology planning draft from the Office of Educational Technology, U.S. Department of Education, “National Educational Technology Plan” NETP 2010), calls for a 21st Century Model of Learning Powered by Technology. From the Executive Summary, “The NETP presents a model of 21st century learning powered by technology, with goals and recommendations in five essential areas: learning, assessment, teaching, infrastructure, and productivity. The challenging and rapidly changing demands of our global economy tell us what people need to know and who needs to learn. Advances in learning sciences show us how people learn. Technology makes it possible for us to act on this knowledge and understanding.” Education reform has been on the national agenda for decades. Still, we no longer have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world and we have a system that too often fails our students. According to current data, • Twenty-four percent of young people in the United States drop out of high school (OECD, 2007). That number jumps to almost 50% of Latino and African American students (Orfield, Losen, Wald, & Swanson, 2004). • Some 5,000 schools persistently fail year after year, and about 2,000 high schools produce about half the nation’s dropouts and three-quarters of minority dropouts (Balfanz & Letgers, 2004; Tucci, 2009). • For students who do graduate from high school, one third are unprepared for postsecondary education, forcing community colleges and four-year colleges and universities to devote precious time and resources to remedial work for incoming students (National Center for Education Statistics, 2003).

• By 2016 – just six years from now – 4 out of every 10 new jobs will require some advanced education or training (Dohm & Shnipe, 2007). Fifteen of the thirty fastest growing fields will require a minimum of a bachelor’s degree (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2008). • Today, just 39% of young people earn a two-year or four-year college degree (National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2008). Enrollment rates are unequal: 69% of qualified White high school graduates enter four-year colleges compared with just 58% of comparable Latino graduates and 56% of African American graduates (National Center for Education Statistics, 2007).As Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has said, the current state of our education system is “economically unsustainable and morally unacceptable.” Learning The model of 21st century learning described in this plan calls for engaging and empowering learning experiences for all learners. The model asks that we focus what and how we teach to match what people need to know, how they learn, where and when they will learn, and who needs to learn. It brings state-of-the art technology into learning to enable, motivate, and inspire all students, regardless of background, languages, or disabilities, to achieve. It leverages the power of technology to provide personalized learning instead of a one-size-fits-all curriculum, pace of teaching, and instructional practices. Many students’ lives today are filled with technology that gives them mobile access to information and resources 24/7, enables them to create multimedia content and share it with the world, and allows them to participate in online social networks where people from all over the world share ideas, collaborate, and learn new things. Outside school, students are free to pursue their passions in their own way and at their own pace. The opportunities are limitless, borderless, and instantaneous. According to a national survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation, 8- to 18-year-olds today devote an average of 7 hours, 38 minutes to using entertainment media in a typical day – more than 53 hours a week (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2009). The opportunities, access, and information are limitless, borderless, and instantaneous. The challenge for our education system is to leverage the learning sciences and modern technology to create engaging, relevant, and personalized learning

experiences for all learners that mirror students’ daily lives and the reality of their futures. In contrast to traditional classroom instruction, this requires that we put students at the center and empower them to take control of their own learning by providing flexibility on several dimensions. A core set of standards-based concepts and competencies should form the basis of what all students should learn, but beyond that students and educators should have options for engaging in learning: large groups, small groups, and work tailored to individual goals, needs, interests, and prior experience of each learner. By supporting student learning in areas that are of real concern or particular interest to them, personalized learning adds to its relevance, inspiring higher levels of motivation and achievement. In addition, technology provides access to more learning resources than are available in classrooms and connections to a wider set of “educators,” including teachers, parents, experts, and mentors outside the classroom. On-demand learning is now within reach, supporting learning that is life-long and life-wide (Bransfor et al., 2006). Assessment The NETP calls for better ways to measure what matters, diagnose strengths and weaknesses in the course of learning when there is still time to improve student performance, and involve multiple stakeholders in the process of designing, conducting, and using assessment. In all these activities, technologybased assessments can provide data to drive decisions on the basis of what is best for each and every student and that in aggregate will lead to continuous improvement across our entire education system. When combined with learning systems, technology-based assessments can be used formatively to diagnose and modify the conditions of learning and instructional practices while at the same time determining what students have learned for grading and accountability purposes. Both uses are important, but the former can improve student learning in the moment (Black & William, 1998; Black et al., 2004). A fundamental goal of the JCCS Technology Plan is to accelerate JCCS student achievement and create model classrooms at all JCCS sites.

Goal 3d.1 of this plan states: JCCS teachers and students will use technology to improve academic proficiency by supporting district curricular goals and mastering academic content standards. One of the key components of the JCCS Technology Plan is the integration of a managed, online educational curriculum that is available to all students from any Internet-ready computer. The use of our PLATO online curriculum has bee a success in raising student achievement and is supported by scientific research. Scientific research to support the choice of this strategy and tool is derived from a meta-analysis study of literature by Kulik from the University of Michigan (Kulik, 2003). The summary findings are: The evidence reviewed in the report by Kulik, for example, provides strong support for the effectiveness of PLATO learning products. PLATO has been evaluated in at least 18 quantitative studies since 1983. Nearly half of the studies were controlled evaluations carried out by third-party evaluators. Most of these third-party controlled studies found positive and educationally meaningful results from PLATO instruction. The average effect size in the studies not only puts PLATO into a select group of reform models with strong evidence of effectiveness, but it also puts PLATO at the top of this list. In an early study from 1994 Kulik cited findings from 12 meta-analyses and described results from hundreds of independent studies carried out in elementary schools, high schools, colleges and universities, and adult education institutions. The meta-analyses showed the following: (a) students usually learn more in classes in which they receive help from instructional technology; (b) students learn their lessons in less time in such classes; (c) students prefer these classes to classes taught without technology; and (d) students develop more positive attitudes toward computers when they receive help from them in school. PLATO learning tools are among the most influential and enduring of all technological tools used in education, and both developer-supported and third-party evaluators have examined its effectiveness. Research evidence for the Goal 3e.1 “JCCS will use the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) National Education Technology Standards (NETS-S standards) as a key framework to address these 21st century skills”.

These skills represent a nationwide partnership between architects of curriculum standards in English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. This document provides examples demonstrating how technology can facilitate implementation of standards-based curriculum while supporting technology literacy among students. This research calls upon educators to address core performance indicators for students in six key domains: Creativity and Innovation Communication and Collaboration Research and Fluency Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Digital Citizenship Technology Operations and Concepts (ISTE, 2007) Research and evaluation studies also show that technology can enable the development of critical thinking skills when students use technology presentation and communication tools to present, publish, and share results of projects. The CAST study also found that when students used the Internet to research topics, share information, and complete a final project within the context of a semistructured lesson, they became independent, critical thinkers (Coley, Cradler, & Engel, 1997). Additional research supporting the plan’s goals can be retrieved from a study by Kulik (1994). He used a research technique called meta-analysis to aggregate the findings from more than 500 individual research studies of computer-based instruction. His definition of computer-based instruction calls for individualizing the educational process to accommodate the needs, interests, proclivities, current knowledge, and learning styles of the student. He includes in his description of computer-based instruction any software that consists of tutorial, drill and practice, and more recently Integrated Learning Systems. Kulik drew several conclusions from his 1994 work: On average, students who used computer-based instruction scored at the 64th percentile on tests of achievement compared to students in the control conditions without computers who scored at the 50th percentile. Students learn more in less time when they receive computer-based instruction. Students like their classes more and develop more positive attitudes when their classes include computer-

based instruction. Another significant piece of research linked to the curricular goals is a landmark study analyzing a national database of student test scores; Wenglinsky (1998) determined that technology could have a positive effect on students’ mathematics scores. His study used data of fourth- and eighth-grade students who took the math section of the 1996 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). That NAEP included questions about how computers are used in mathematics instruction. After adjusting for class size, teacher qualifications, and socio-economics, Wenglinsky found that technology had more of an impact in middle schools than it did in elementary schools (Valdez et al., 1999). In eighth grade, where computers were used for simulations and applications to enhance higher-order thinking skills, the students performed better on the NAEP than did students whose teachers used the technology for drill and practice. “He found that fourth-grade students who used computers primarily for math/learning games’ scored higher than students who did not. Fourth graders did not show differences in test score gains for either simulations and applications or drill and practice” (Valdez et al. 1999, p. 24). One of the objectives of the plan is to expand access to technology for all students including those in Special Education, GATE, English Language Learners and others. This goal calls for access to technology by ALL students – including those with special needs. This objective includes providing appropriate technology to English Language Learners (ELL), and is supported by research that opens new possibilities for those who are trying to gain academic skills in English. For students with a home language other than English the computer is now being viewed more as an integral part of socio-collaborative learning activity and less as a means by which knowledge and skills are transferred to learners (Chiquito, Meskill & Renjilian-Burgy, 1996; Johnson, 1985; Meskill & Swan, 1996; Snyder & Palmer, 1986). One discipline in which these shifts in perception concerning the role of computers in the teaching and learning process have been particularly distinct is in the field of language learning. Once considered an ideally "patient partner" with which learners of another language could endlessly

drill and practice until mastery occurred, the computer is now more widely viewed as a tool through, and around which, socio-collaborative language learning can take place. This shift in thinking directly parallels shifts in our understandings about the best route to learning language in general, and empowering linguistic minorities in particular. Additionally, there is research that addresses special needs learners and calls for all special populations to have access to the technology that helps them meet their learning needs by continuing existing programs provides universal access and adaptive technology to support learning disabled students. The Center for Applied Special Technology, CAST, reports that beyond connectivity and equipment, an effective technology plan addresses the equitable access barriers of gender, poverty, race, ethnicity, and special needs. These barriers, whether subtle or overt, may impact "the students' ability to use it [technology] toward meaningful goals" (U.S. Department of Education, 2000) and are especially evident in schools that are low performing or that have high needs and few resources. One general strategy to address learner differences includes the application of universal design principles in order to improve usability for all students. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a new paradigm for teaching, learning and assessment, drawing on new brain research and new media technologies to respond to individual learner differences (CAST, 2000). UDL strategies include a range of assistive technologies that have emerged to address a variety of special needs, including learning disorders, vision and hearing impairments, and limited fine motor skills. The rapid development of new solutions has resulted in improved assistive technologies at affordable costs that make access possible for every student. Solutions include screen readers, sound amplifiers, and hardware modifications, among others. More approaches to specific barriers may include equal access and relevant content for males and females, culturally relevant resources, and adaptive technologies. Strategies for Teaching with Technology Whether technology should be used in schools is no longer the issue in

education. Instead, the current emphasis is ensuring that technology is used effectively to create new opportunities for learning and to promote student achievement. Educational technology is not, and never will be, transformative on its own, however. It requires the assistance of educators who integrate technology into the curriculum, align it with student learning goals, and use it for engaging learning projects. "Teacher quality is the factor that matters most for student learning," note Darling-Hammond and Berry (1998). In the professional development section of this plan there is an expectation that teachers, as well as students, will have access to technology as an informational resource for teaching, managing, and learning. Research supporting this goal is found in the work of Roschelle et al., (2000) who have conducted an extensive review of current literature examining effective educational applications of computer-based technology. Over 80 sources are cited in this study, referencing articles that examine the use of computer technology in a broad range of contexts. Cited evidence includes teacher surveys, standardized test performance, student self-reports, and meta-analytic reviews. The subjects of these studies range from pre-kindergarten to 12th grade students, and vary considerably on a wide range of other demographic characteristics. Studies examining the use of subject-specific educational software are prominently featured in the review. Overall findings indicate that computer-based technologies are potentially effective instructional tools that provide support along a number of dimensions that characterize effective educational environments. Additional research is included in the U.S Department of Education’s recently released National Educational Technology Plan. This study states unequivocally that “Universal access to the Internet will help end the isolation of teachers; exponentially expand the resources for teaching and learning in schools and class-rooms; provide more challenging, authentic and higher-order learning experiences for students; and make schools and teachers more accountable to parents and communities.”

Research and analyses of successful schools have established that good professional development is essential for teachers to make effective use of technology to enhance teaching and learning (Web-based Commission, 2000; Becker & Riel, 2001, enGauge, 2000). The widespread availability of computers and Internet access opens up a new means for providing professional development: online workshops and professional exchanges. This is a new field, just beginning to be explored, so the formal research is very limited. However, analyses of the potential in light of the principles of effective professional development point to some ways in which online approaches can significantly enhance professional development programs (NSDC, 2001). 9.b Using technology to extend or supplement the curriculum with rigorous academic courses and curricula, including distance-learning technologies. Distance learning opportunities From a final report of the U.S. Department of Education Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development Policy and Program Studies Service, “Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning: A Meta-Analysis and Review of Online Learning Studies” (U.S. Department of Education, 2009), online education was found that “on average students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.

A systematic search of the research literature from 1996 through July 2008 identified more than a thousand empirical studies of online learning. Analysts screened these studies to find those that (a) contrasted an online to a face-toface condition, (b) measured student-learning outcomes, (c) used a rigorous research design, and (d) provided adequate information to calculate an effect size. As a result of this screening, 51 independent effects were identified that could be subjected to meta-analysis. The meta-analysis found that, on average, the difference between student outcomes for online and face-to-face classes— measured as the difference between treatment and control means, divided by the

pooled standard deviation—was larger in those studies contrasting conditions that blended elements of online and face-to-face instruction with conditions taught entirely face-to-face. Analysts noted that these blended conditions often included additional learning time and instructional elements not received by students in control conditions. This finding suggests that the positive effects associated with blended learning should not be attributed to the media, per se. An unexpected finding was the small number of rigorous published studies contrasting online and face-to-face learning conditions for K–12 students. In light of this small corpus, caution is required in generalizing to the K–12 populations because the results are derived for the most part from studies in other settings (e.g., medical training, higher education).

JCCS and online education opportunity JCCS is currently developing online learning courses to deliver our coursework to all students regardless of their physical presence. This learning opportunity is being researched for implementation and will use course management systems such as Moodle systems that permit locally developed courses to be provided for JCCS students. Additionally, video conferencing to promote collaboration, to improve communication among JCCS staff and students and to provide additional rigorous academic courses for our students is in use via our staff development component and in collaboration with SDCOE staff developers and SDCOE Online Production Services. This practice can provide students and staff to access content area experts for improved teaching and learning and to reach our goals of accelerating student learning for all JCCS students. Additional benefits include reduced travel time and the corresponding expenses. With the remote nature of our programs substantial cost saving will be realized through further implementation of video conferencing. These tools will build capacity for our students to access courses, post work electronically and to increase their learning opportunities to non-classroom scenarios. Additionally, JCCS has used online courses for eligible students in our institutional programs to gain college credit and also through the University of California College Preparation (UCCP) learning program. This permits online content to be delivered to JCCS students who would

not have access otherwise. JCCS plans to expand this program throughout the life of the plan and make it available to all eligible JCCS students. Additionally, JCCS has utilized videoconferencing for teaching and learning and plans further integration with our new student information system, to be selected and implemented by fall 2010. Research supports the integration of Internet-based learning.

Summary In order to expand JCCS programs into innovative teaching and learning strategies, technological resources must be provided to all JCCS students. As we look at the potential future applications, it is important to plan for distance learning and other network resources yet to be developed. Many of our students will need access to foreign language, advanced mathematic and scientific curriculum that is currently limited or non available. JCCS will work to build the capacity and support services to bring these resources to all students in JCCS programs. Partnering with higher education and business enterprises will permit the students in our programs to have access to resources that will meet their unique needs, accelerated learning and ensure a future that is full of possibilities. The JCCS Technology Plan 2010-2015 has been designed as a strategic approach to enable JCCS students to be proficient users of technology and JCCS teachers to fully integrate technology into the curriculum at all grade levels. We will create model classrooms that exhibit best practices for using technology to accelerate achievement for all students. The plan’s 9 sections and 32 specific criteria will meet State of California and Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) grant criteria (as part of the No Child Left Behind Act) to be eligible for funding. The 9 major sections are: 1) Duration, 2) Stakeholders, 3) Curriculum, 4) Professional Development, 5) Infrastructure, 6) Funding and Budget, 7) Monitoring and Evaluation, 8) Adult Literacy and 9) Research. The primary principles of the process hold that technology is integrated to support the program’s educational goals and that broad-based involvement and support are essential for the plan’s success. The plan and process supports the JCCS Mission statement and is purposed to ensure mastery of the California content standards. The vision of the JCCS Technology Plan states that JCCS students will be proficient users of technology and JCCS teachers will fully integrate technology into the curriculum at all grade levels.

APPENDIX A NETS for Teachers The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)
National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•T) and Performance Indicators for Teachers Effective teachers model and apply the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS•S) as they design, implement, and assess learning experiences to engage students and improve learning; enrich professional practice; and provide positive models for students, colleagues, and the community. All teachers should meet the following standards and performance indicators. Teachers:

1. Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity

Teachers use their knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in both face-to-face and virtual environments. Teachers: a. promote, support, and model creative and innovative thinking and inventiveness b. engage students in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using digital tools and resources c. promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students’ conceptual understanding and thinking, planning, and creative processes d. model collaborative knowledge construction by engaging in learning with students, colleagues, and others in face-to-face and virtual environments

2. Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments

Teachers design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessments incorporating contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the NETS•S. Teachers: a. design or adapt relevant learning experiences that incorporate digital tools and resources to promote student learning and creativity b. develop technology-enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning, and assessing their own progress c. customize and personalize learning activities to address students’ diverse learning styles, working strategies, and abilities using digital tools and resources d. provide students with multiple and varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use resulting data to inform learning and teaching

3. Model Digital-Age Work and Learning

Teachers exhibit knowledge, skills, and work processes representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital society. Teachers: a. demonstrate fluency in technology systems and the transfer of current knowledge to new technologies and situations b. collaborate with students, peers, parents, and community members using digital tools and resources to support student success and innovation c. communicate relevant information and ideas effectively to students, parents, and peers using a variety of digital-age media and formats d. model and facilitate effective use of current and emerging digital tools to locate, analyze, evaluate, and use information resources to support research and learning

4. Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility

Teachers understand local and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal and ethical behavior in their professional practices. Teachers: a. advocate, model, and teach safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology, including respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate documentation of sources b. address the diverse needs of all learners by using learner-centered strategies and providing equitable access to appropriate digital tools and resources c. promote and model digital etiquette and responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information d. develop and model cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with colleagues and students of other cultures using digital-age communication and collaboration tools

5. Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership

Teachers continuously improve their professional practice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their school and professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools

and resources. Teachers: a. participate in local and global learning communities to explore creative applications of technology to improve student learning b. exhibit leadership by demonstrating a vision of technology infusion, participating in shared decision making and community building, and developing the leadership and technology skills of others c. evaluate and reflect on current research and professional practice on a regular basis to make effective use of existing and emerging digital tools and resources in support of student learning d. contribute to the effectiveness, vitality, and self-renewal of the teaching profession and of their school and community
Copyright © 2008, ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education), 1.800.336.5191 (U.S. & Canada) or 1.541.302.3777 (Int’l), iste@iste.org, www.iste.org. All rights reserv

NETS for Students The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•S) and Performance Indicators for Students
1. Creativity and Innovation Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students: a. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes. b. create original works as a means of personal or group expression. c. use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues. d. identify trends and forecast possibilities. 2. Communication and Collaboration Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students: a. interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media. b. communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats. c. develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures. d. contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems. 3. Research and Information Fluency Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students: a. plan strategies to guide inquiry. b. locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media. c. evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks. d. process data and report results. 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students: a. identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation. b. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project. c. collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions. d. use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions. 5. Digital Citizenship Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students: a. advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology. b. exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity. c. demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning. d. exhibit leadership for digital citizenship. 6. Technology Operations and Concepts Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. Students:

a. understand and use technology systems. b. select and use applications effectively and productively. c. troubleshoot systems and applications. d. transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies s.
© 2007 International Society for Technology in Education. ISTE® is a registered trademark of the International Society for Technology in Education.

NETS for Administrators
The ISTE National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•A) and Performance Indicators for Administrators

1. Visionary Leadership. Educational Administrators inspire and lead
development and implementation of a shared vision for comprehensive integration of technology to promote excellence and support transformation throughout the organization. Educational Administrators:
a. inspire and facilitate among all stakeholders a shared vision of purposeful change that maximizes use of digital-age resources to meet and exceed learning goals, support effective instructional practice, and maximize performance of district and school leaders b. engage in an ongoing process to develop, implement, and communicate technologyinfused strategic plans aligned with a shared vision c. advocate on local, state, and national levels for policies, programs, and funding to support implementation of a technology-infused vision and strategic plan

2. Digital-Age Learning Culture. Educational Administrators create, promote,
and sustain a dynamic, digital-age learning culture that provides a rigorous, relevant, and engaging education for all students. Educational Administrators:
a. ensure instructional innovation focused on continuous improvement of digital-age learning b. model and promote the frequent and effective use of technology for learning c. provide learner-centered environments equipped with technology and learning resources to meet the individual, diverse needs of all learners d. ensure effective practice in the study of technology and its infusion across the curriculum e. promote and participate in local, national, and global learning communities that stimulate innovation, creativity, and digital-age collaboration

3. Excellence in Professional Practice. Educational Administrators promote
an environment of professional learning and innovation that empowers educators to enhance student learning through the infusion of contemporary technologies and digital resources. Educational Administrators:
a. allocate time, resources, and access to ensure ongoing professional growth in technology fluency and integration b. facilitate and participate in learning communities that stimulate, nurture, and support administrators, faculty, and staff in the study and use of technology c. promote and model effective communication and collaboration among stakeholders using digital-age tools d. stay abreast of educational research and emerging trends regarding effective use of technology and encourage evaluation of new technologies for their potential to improve student learning

4. Systemic Improvement. Educational Administrators provide digital-age

leadership and management to continuously improve the organization through the effective use of information and technology resources. Educational Administrators:
a. lead purposeful change to maximize the achievement of learning goals through the appropriate use of technology and media-rich resources b. collaborate to establish metrics, collect and analyze data, interpret results, and share findings to improve staff performance and student learning c. recruit and retain highly competent personnel who use technology creatively and proficiently to advance academic and operational goals d. establish and leverage strategic partnerships to support systemic improvement e. establish and maintain a robust infrastructure for technology including integrated, interoperable technology systems to support management, operations, teaching, and learning

5. Digital Citizenship. Educational Administrators model and facilitate

understanding of social, ethical, and legal issues and responsibilities related to an evolving digital culture. Educational Administrators:
a. ensure equitable access to appropriate digital tools and resources to meet the needs of all learners b. promote, model, and establish policies for safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and technology c. promote and model responsible social interactions related to the use of technology and information d. model and facilitate the development of a shared cultural understanding and involvement in global issues through the use of contemporary communication and collaboration tools
©2009, ISTE® (International Society for Technology in Education), 1.800.336.5191 (U.S. & Canada) or 1.541.302.3777 (Int’l), iste@iste.org,

Appendix C – Criteria for EETT Technology Plans
(Completed Appendix C is REQUIRED in a technology plan) A technology plan needs to “Adequately Address” each of the following criteria: EETT Requirements are listed on Appendix D - EETT Technology Plan Requirements Appendix C must be attached to the technology plan with “Page in District Plan” properly cross-referenced and completed.
1. PLAN DURATION

CRITERION The plan should guide the district’s use of education technology for the next three to five years. (For a new plan, can include technology plan development in the first year) 2. STAKEHOLDERS CRITERION Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 7 and 11 (Appendix D). Description of how a variety of stakeholders from within the school district and the community-at-large participated in the planning process.

Page in District Plan

Example of Adequately Addressed

10

The technology plan describes the LEA use of education technology for the next three to five years. (For new plan, description of technology plan development in the first year is acceptable). The plan must include a specific start and end date (7/1/xx to 6/30/xx).

Example of Not Adequately Addressed The plan is less than three years or more than five years in length.

11-12

The planning team consisted of representatives who will implement the plan. If a variety of stakeholders did not assist with the development of the plan, a description of why they were not involved is included.

Little evidence is included that shows the district actively sought participation from a variety of stakeholders.

3. CURRICULUM

COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 1, 2, 3, 8, 10, and 12 (Appendix D). a. Description of teachers’ and students’ current access to technology tools both during the school day and outside of school hours.

16-18

The plan describes the technology access available in the classrooms, library/media centers, or labs for all students and teachers.

b. Description of the district’s current use of hardware and software to support teaching and learning. c. Summary of the district’s curricular goals that are supported by this tech plan. d. List of clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan for using technology to improve teaching and

18-21

The plan describes the typical frequency and type of use (technology skills/information and literacy integrated into the curriculum). The plan summarizes the district’s curricular goals that are supported by the plan and referenced in district document(s). The plan delineates clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and a clear implementation plan for using technology to support the district’s curriculum goals and academic content

21-23

The plan explains technology access in terms of a student-to-computer ratio, but does not explain where access is available, who has access, and when various students and teachers can use the technology. The plan cites district policy regarding use of technology, but provides no information about its actual use. The plan does not summarize district curricular goals.

24-27

The plan suggests how technology will be used, but is not specific enough to know what action needs to be taken to accomplish

learning by supporting the district curricular goals. e. List of clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan detailing how and when students will acquire the technology skills and information literacy skills needed to succeed in the classroom and the workplace. f. List of goals and an implementation plan that describe how the district will address the appropriate and ethical use of information technology in the classroom so that students and teachers can distinguish lawful from unlawful uses of copyrighted works, including the following topics: the concept and purpose of both copyright and fair use; distinguishing lawful from unlawful downloading and peer-to-peer file sharing; and avoiding plagiarism g. List of goals and an implementation plan that describe how the district will address Internet safety, including how students and teachers will be trained to protect online privacy and avoid online predators.

28-29

standards to improve learning. The plan delineates clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan detailing how and when students will acquire technology skills and information literacy skills.

the goals. The plan suggests how students will acquire technology skills, but is not specific enough to determine what action needs to be taken to accomplish the goals.

30-31

The plan describes or delineates clear goals outlining how students and teachers will learn about the concept, purpose, and significance of the ethical use of information technology including copyright, fair use, plagiarism and the implications of illegal file sharing and/or downloading.

The plan suggests that students and teachers will be educated in the ethical use of the Internet, but is not specific enough to determine what actions will be taken to accomplish the goals.

32

The plan describes or delineates clear goals outlining how students and teachers will be educated about Internet safety.

The plan suggests Internet safety education but is not specific enough to determine what actions will be taken to accomplish the goals of educating students and teachers about

Internet safety.

h. Description of or goals about the district policy or practices that ensure equitable technology access for all students.

33

The plan describes the policy or delineates clear goals and measurable objectives about the policy or practices that ensure equitable technology access for all students. The policy or practices clearly support accomplishing the plan’s goals.

i. List of clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan to use technology to make student record keeping and assessment more efficient and supportive of teachers’ efforts to meet individual student academic needs. j. List of clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan to use technology to improve two-way communication between home and school. k. Describe the process that will be used to monitor the Curricular Component (Section 3d3j) goals, objectives, benchmarks, and planned

34

The plan delineates clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan for using technology to support the district’s student recordkeeping and assessment efforts.

The plan does not describe policies or goals that result in equitable technology access for all students. Suggests how technology will be used, but is not specific enough to know what action needs to be taken to accomplish the goals. The plan suggests how technology will be used, but is not specific enough to know what action needs to be taken to accomplish the goals.

35-36

37

The plan suggests how technology will be used, but is not specific enough to know what action needs to be taken to accomplish the goals. The monitoring process, roles, The monitoring and responsibilities are process either is described in sufficient detail. absent, or lacks detail regarding procedures, roles, and responsibilities.

The plan delineates clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan for using technology to improve two-way communication between home and school.

implementation activities including roles and responsibilities.

4. PROFESSIONAL

DEVELOPMENT COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 5 and 12 (Appendix D). a. Summary of the teachers’ and administrators’ current technology proficiency and integration skills and needs for professional development.

38-44

The plan provides a clear summary of the teachers’ and administrators’ current technology proficiency and integration skills and needs for professional development. The findings are summarized in the plan by discrete skills that include Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) Standard 9 and 16 proficiencies. The plan delineates clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan for providing teachers and administrators with sustained, ongoing professional development necessary to reach the Curriculum Component

b. List of clear goals, measurable objectives, annual benchmarks, and an implementation plan for providing professional development opportunities based on your district needs assessment data (4a) and the Curriculum

45-47

Description of current level of staff expertise is too general or relates only to a limited segment of the district’s teachers and administrators in the focus areas or does not relate to the focus areas, i.e., only the fourth grade teachers when grades four to eight are the focus grade levels. The plan speaks only generally of professional development and is not specific enough to ensure that teachers and administrators will have the necessary training to implement the Curriculum

Component objectives (Sections 3d - 3j) of the plan. c. Describe the process that will be used to monitor the Professional Development (Section 4b) goals, objectives, benchmarks, and planned implementation activities including roles and responsibilities.

objectives (sections 3d - 3j) of the plan. 47 The monitoring process, roles, and responsibilities are described in sufficient detail.

Component.

The monitoring process either is absent, or lacks detail regarding who is responsible and what is expected.

5. INFRASTRUCTURE,

HARDWARE, TECHNICAL SUPPORT, AND SOFTWARE COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 6 and 12 (Appendix D). a. Describe the existing hardware, Internet access, electronic learning resources, and technical support already in the district that will be used to support the Curriculum and Professional Development Components (Sections 3 & 4) of the plan.

48-54

The plan clearly summarizes the existing technology hardware, electronic learning resources, networking and telecommunication infrastructure, and technical support to support the implementation of the Curriculum and Professional Development Components.

b. Describe the technology hardware, electronic learning resources, networking and telecommunications infrastructure, physical plant modifications, and technical

54-57

The plan provides a clear summary and list of the technology hardware, electronic learning resources, networking and telecommunications

The inventory of equipment is so general that it is difficult to determine what must be acquired to implement the Curriculum and Professional Development Components. The summary of current technical support is missing or lacks sufficient detail. The plan includes a description or list of hardware, infrastructure, and other technology necessary to

support needed by the district’s teachers, students, and administrators to support the activities in the Curriculum and Professional Development components of the plan.

infrastructure, physical plant modifications, and technical support the district will need to support the implementation of the district’s Curriculum and Professional Development components.

implement the plan, but there doesn’t seem to be any real relationship between the activities in the Curriculum and Professional Development Components and the listed equipment. Future technical support needs have not been addressed or do not relate to the needs of the Curriculum and Professional Development Components. The annual benchmarks and timeline are either absent or so vague that it would be difficult to determine what needs to be acquired or repurposed, by whom, and when. The monitoring process either is absent, or lacks detail regarding who is responsible and what is expected.

c. List of clear annual benchmarks and a timeline for obtaining the hardware, infrastructure, learning resources and technical support required to support the other plan components identified in Section 5b.

58-59

The annual benchmarks and timeline are specific and realistic. Teachers and administrators implementing the plan can easily discern what needs to be acquired or repurposed, by whom, and when.

d. Describe the process that will be used to monitor Section 5b & the annual benchmarks and timeline of activities including roles and responsibilities.

60-61

The monitoring process, roles, and responsibilities are described in sufficient detail.

6. FUNDING AND

BUDGET COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 7 & 13, (Appendix D) a. List established and potential funding sources.

62-63

The plan clearly describes resources that are available or could be obtained to implement the plan.

b. Estimate annual

63-65

implementation costs for the term of the plan.

c. Describe the district’s

66

replacement policy for obsolete equipment.

d. Describe the process

66

that will be used to monitor Ed Tech funding, implementation costs and new funding opportunities and to adjust budgets as necessary.

Cost estimates are reasonable and address the total cost of ownership, including the costs to implement the curricular, professional development, infrastructure, hardware, technical support, and electronic learning resource needs identified in the plan. Plan recognizes that equipment will need to be replaced and outlines a realistic replacement plan that will support the Curriculum and Professional Development Components. The monitoring process, roles, and responsibilities are described in sufficient detail.

Resources to implement the plan are not clearly identified or are so general as to be useless. Cost estimates are unrealistic, lacking, or are not sufficiently detailed to determine if the total cost of ownership is addressed.

Replacement policy is either missing or vague. It is not clear that the replacement policy could be implemented. The monitoring process either is absent, or lacks detail regarding who is responsible and what is expected.

7. MONITORING AND

EVALUATION COMPONENT CRITERIA Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 11 (Appendix D). a. Describe the process for evaluating the plan’s overall progress and impact on teaching and learning.

67

The plan describes the process for evaluation using the goals and benchmarks of each component as the indicators of success.

b. Schedule for evaluating the effect of plan implementation.

67-69

Evaluation timeline is specific and realistic.

c. Describe the process and frequency of communicating evaluation results to tech plan stakeholders.

70

The plan describes the process and frequency of communicating evaluation results to tech plan stakeholders.

No provision for an evaluation is included in the plan. How success is determined is not defined. The evaluation is defined, but the process to conduct the evaluation is missing. The evaluation timeline is not included or indicates an expectation of unrealistic results that does not support the continued implementation of the plan. The plan does not provide a process for using the monitoring and evaluation results to improve the plan and/or disseminate the findings.

8. EFFECTIVE

COLLABORATIVE STRATEGIES WITH ADULT LITERACY PROVIDERS TO MAXIMIZE THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY CRITERION
Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 11 (Appendix D).

If the district has identified adult literacy providers, describe how the program will be developed in collaboration with them. (If no adult literacy providers are indicated, describe the process used to identify adult literacy providers or potential future outreach efforts.)

71

The plan explains how the program will be developed in collaboration with adult literacy providers. Planning included or will include consideration of collaborative strategies and other funding resources to maximize the use of technology. If no adult literacy providers are indicated, the plan describes the process used to identify adult literacy providers or potential future outreach efforts.

There is no evidence that the plan has been, or will be developed in collaboration with adult literacy service providers, to maximize the use of technology.

9. EFFECTIVE,

RESEARCHED-BASED METHODS, STRATEGIES, AND CRITERIA
Corresponding EETT Requirement(s): 4 and 9 (Appendix D).

a. Summarize the relevant research and describe how it supports the plan’s curricular and professional development goals. b. Describe the district’s plans to use technology to extend or supplement the district’s curriculum with rigorous academic courses

72-81

The plan describes the relevant research behind the plan’s design for strategies and/or methods selected.

81-83

The description of the research behind the plan’s design for strategies and/or methods selected is unclear or missing. The plan describes the There is no plan to use process the district will use to technology to extend extend or supplement the or supplement the district’s curric with rigorous district’s curriculum academic courses and offerings. curricula, including distance

and curricula, including distance-learning technologies.

learning opportunities (in areas that would not otherwise have access to such courses or curric due to geograp distances or insufficient resources).

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