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Professional Competency

Areas for Student Affairs


Educators
Professional Competencies Task Force

Dr. Berenecea Johnson Eanes (Co-chair) Dr. Quincy Martin, III


Vice President for Student Affairs Associate Vice President, Student Affairs
California State University-Fullerton Triton College

Dr. Patricia A. Perillo (Co-chair) Dr. Laura Osteen


Vice President for Student Affairs and Director, Center for Leadership and Social
Assistant Professor of Higher Education Change
Virginia Tech Florida State University

Dr. Tricia Fechter Dr. Jason B. Pina


Deputy Executive Director Vice President for Student Affairs
ACPA-College Student Educators Bridgewater State University
International
Will Simpkins
Stephanie A. Gordon Director, Center for Career & Professional
Vice President for Professional Development Development
NASPA- Student Affairs Administrators in CUNY John Jay College Criminal Justice
Higher Education
Vu T. Tran
Dr. Shaun Harper 1
Graduate Research Associate
Executive Director Ohio State University-Columbus
University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Bridget Turner Kelly
Dr. Pamela Havice Associate Professor
Professor Loyola University-Chicago
Clemson University
Dr. Case Willoughby
Dr. John L. Hoffman Vice President for Student Services &
Chair, Department of Educational Enrollment Management
Leadership Butler County Community College
California State University, Fullerton

1
Dr. Harper had to withdraw from the task force after participating in preliminary meetings.

2 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


Table of Contents

Background Information and Changes 4


The Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators 7
Intersection of Competencies 9
Implications and Applications 10
Overview of the Competency Areas 12
Comprehensive Presentation of the Competency Areas 16
Personal and Ethical Foundations (PPF) 16
Values, Philosophy, and History (VPH) 18
Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (AER) 20
Law, Policy, and Governance (LPG) 22
Organizational and Human Resource (OHR) 24
Leadership (LEAD) 27
Social Justice and Inclusion (SJI) 30
Student Learning and Development (SLD) 32
Technology (TECH) 33
Advising and Supporting (A/S) 36
References 38

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 3
Background Information and Changes
In 2009, ACPACollege Student Educators to distribute the proposed changes to the full
International and NASPAStudent Affairs membership of the two associations for review
Administrators in Higher Education collaborated and feedback. We compiled and analyzed this
to establish a common set of professional feedback in May 2015, made final revisions to our
competency areas for student affairs educators. proposed changes, and presented them to the
The Joint Task Force on Professional boards of ACPA and NASPA for formal adoption in
Competencies and Standards, which consisted of July 2015.
representatives from both associations, analyzed
19 core documents produced by ACPA, NASPA, Summary of Changes
and the Council for the Advancement of Standards
Whereas we made several significant
in Higher Education (CAS), and then proposed a
changes, we intentionally preserved most
framework that included 10 competency areas.
of the work of the 2010 Joint Task Force on
The memberships of the two associations were
invited to comment on preliminary drafts of the
Professional Competencies and Standards in
this document. We did not eliminate any of
proposed document in spring 2010, and then
the original 10 competency areas, though we
the boards of ACPA and NASPA adopted the
renamed two competency areas, introduced one
competency document in a joint meeting in July
new competency areas, and combined two areas.
2010. Among the recommendations included in
What follows is a summary of the most significant
the final document was a call for periodic review
and updates to the professional competencies. changes.
In August 2014, ACPA and NASPA formed the Social justice and inclusion. Our
Professional Competencies Task Force to review most substantial change was in relation to the
the professional competencies and recommend Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion competency
changes as needed. Beginning in October 2014, from the 2010 document, which we renamed
wethe members of this task forcebegan Social Justice and Inclusion. When reviewing
to study the original document and to review the literature, we found studies published since
scholarly works published over the previous 10 2010 referred to similar knowledge and skill sets
years that aimed to identify areas of professional as incorporating diversity into curricular and
competence in student affairs (Burkard, Cole, co-curricular experiences (Weiner et al., 2011,
Ott, & Stoflet, 2005; Hickmott & Bresciani, 2010; p. 88), diversity and social justice (Hoffman &
Hoffman & Bresciani, 2012; Weiner, Bresciani, Bresciani, 2012, p. 31), or dedication to social
Oyler, & Felix, 2011). Central to this work was justice (Hickmott & Bresciani, 2010, p. 10) and
consideration of applications of the competencies understanding diversity (p. 8). Each of these
to practice, professional development, and suggests a shift from awareness of diversity, as
the preparation of new professionals through implicit in prior competency literature (e.g. Lovell
graduate study. Additionally, we considered & Kosten, 2000) to a more active orientation.
recommendations from ACPAs Digital Task Force In changing the name to Social Justice and
and a formal proposal from NASPAs Technology Inclusion, we aimed to align this competency
Knowledge Community (Valliere, Endersby, & with research, practice, and a commonly utilized
Brinton, 2013) to add a competency addressing definition of social justice as a process and a
the use of technology in student affairs work. goal where the goal is full and equal participation
Through several months of bi-weekly, web- of all groups in a society that is mutually shaped
based meetings and a single in-person meeting, to meet their needs (Bell, 2013, p. 21). Though
we generated a preliminary draft of proposed an important concept, diversity can imply a
changes. We presented these changes for static, non-participatory orientation where the
consideration and feedback to ACPA and NASPA term diverse is associated with members of
at their annual meetings in March 2015. Later non-dominant groups. In contrast, we aimed to
in April 2015, we reached out to several specific frame inclusiveness in a manner that does not
constituency groups and utilized ACPAs and norm dominant cultures but that recognizes all
NASPAs websites and membership rosters groups and populations are diverse as related to

4 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


all other groups and populations. Bells (2013) dynamic and must use a variety of tools to engage
definition of social justice further necessitates that students in learning.
social justice include a vision of society in which Personal and ethical foundations.
the distribution of resources is equitable and all The 2010 ACPA and NASPA Professional
members are physically and psychologically safe Competencies document included Ethical
and secure (p. 21). This definition subsumes Professional Practice and Personal Foundations
the construct of equity as more than a goal, but a as separate competency areas. In our review
precondition of a larger good. In sum, our intent of scholarly literature, personal foundations
was to integrate the concepts of equity, diversity, only emerged as a distinct competency area
and inclusion within the active framework of social in Hickmott and Brescianis (2010) analysis
justice. of graduate preparation program outcomes.
Technology. In 2010, technology was Further, Sriram (2014) questioned the validity of
included as a thread or an essential element of Personal Foundations as its own competency
each competency area (ACPA & NASPA, 2010, area. Perhaps of greater importance to us
p. 5). However, an unintended consequence was was the conceptual convergence and apparent
that technology was often omitted from practical interdependence of these two areas. Believing
applications of the competencies. Responding that these two areas are stronger together, we
to similar observations, ACPAs Digital Task combined them into a single competency area,
Force and NASPAs Technology Knowledge Personal and Ethical Foundations.
Community each submitted recommendations to Advising and supporting. In
add technology as a distinct competency area. changing the name of this competency area from
We also observed that technology emerged Advising and Helping to Advising and Supporting,
as a distinct competency in three of the four a primary objective was to use language that
empirical studies published within the past 10 emphasizes the agency of college students in
years that have aimed to identify professional their development of self-authorship. The new
competencies (Burkard, et al., 2005; Hickmott name distances student affairs educators from
& Bresciani, 2010; Hoffman & Bresciani, 2012). roles that are directive or service-oriented in a
The only study that did not identify technology narrow sense, and it underscores the importance
as a separate competency (Wiener et al., 2011) of the relational and facilitative nature of student
was based more narrowly on an analysis of affairs advising work. We also intended to better
professional association documents. Additionally, distinguish the role of student affairs educators
several recent professional works have noted from those of counselors, psychologists, nurse
the importance of integrating technology into the practitioners, among others. We acknowledge
educational work of student affairs educators this line is not easy to draw as many student
(e.g. Ahlquist, 2014; Brown, 2013; Junco, 2015; affairs educators earn masters degrees in
Sabado, 2015). counseling or have titles that include the word
When gathering feedback on a proposed counselor. Yet, even in student affairs roles
technology competency, two themes became that require a degree in counseling (e.g. many
apparent. First, in order for technology to community college educational counseling
be a student affairs competency area, we positions), individuals within those roles do not
needed to keep its focus on applications to the provide therapeutic or formal helping services.
holistic, developmental work of student affairs For this reason, we believe the new name better
educators. Student learning and success spans clarifies the competency as it applies regardless
environments that are both physical and virtual; of area of specialization or professional role within
thus, student affairs educators must proactively the field (ACPA & NASPA, 2010, p. 3).
engage students within these settings. Second,
Language. We introduced three
common connotations of technology construe it
noteworthy changes in language related to the
largely in terms of hardware, software, and other
competency areas. In 2010, ACPA and NASPA
digital tools. Our focus is broader and inclusive
referred to competencies as encompassing
of innovation, meaning that student affairs work is

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 5
knowledge, skills, and in some cases, attitudes The lists of foundational outcomes for each
expected of student affairs professions (p. competency area represent reasonable
3). We chose to replace the term attitudes expectations for professionals entering the field
with dispositions because the latter term (a) of student affairs and provide groundwork for
is consistent with the language used in the future development to intermediate and advanced
education discipline and by multiple accrediting levels of proficiency. Conceptually, no matter the
agencies, (b) is more consistent with the language professional level of an individual, the foundational
used in recent empirical studies (e.g. Hickmott competency outcomes allow for a starting point
& Bresciani, 2010; Hoffman & Bresciani, 2012), within a competency area from which to build and
and (c) is a broader and more inclusive term. progress in a particular area of student affairs.
Regarding this final point, NCATE (2008) referred Audience. The intended audience for this
to dispositions as encompassing attitudes, document reflects the voices that contributed to
values, and beliefs (p. 80), and Thornton (2006) its content and development. These voices reflect
further defined dispositions as habits of the the significant diversity of ACPA and NASPA in
minds. . . that filter ones knowledge, skills, terms of age, gender identity and expression,
and beliefs and impact the action one takes in ethnicity, sexual orientation, years of experience in
professional settings (p. 62). the field, functional areas of expertise, institutional
Second, the authors of the original ACPA type (e.g. public, private, and faith-based; two-
and NASPA competency document introduced year and four-year), and geographic region.
the concept of threads and defined them as Additionally, the task force consisted of student
components that are woven into most of the affairs educators serving a range of students
competency areas (ACPA & NASPA, 2010, p. including those in noncredit courses, career and
5). We extended this concept suggesting there technical programs, and transfer programs as
is significant overlap of most of the competency well as those pursuing associate, bachelors, and
areas that are also woven into other competency graduate degrees in various disciplines.
areas. For example, there are significant aspects In 2010, ACPA and NASPA identified their
of leadership embedded within each of the other primary audience as student affairs professionals
nine competency areas. We elected to shift in the United States while inviting international
from the language of threads to intersections colleagues to apply the competencies as
in order to stress the integrative character of all applicable. Though we largely continued with this
10 competency areas as well as connections to approach, we recognize that it reflects a form of
multiple points of emphasis (formerly threads) that privilege held by U.S. institutions within a broader
include globalism, sustainability, and collaboration. global context, and that failure to consider student
The addition of collaboration as a point of affairs work from an international perspective is a
emphasis was informed by recent competency- liability that we can no longer afford. We aimed
related research (Cho & Sriram, in press; Sriram, to broaden our audience as much as possible,
2014) and the prevalence of collaboration- while acknowledging that all the members of our
related outcomes spanning the majority of the task force are from the United States and work
competency areas. at U.S. colleges and universities. We recognize
Lastly, when referring to the three levels within that this effort reflects the very orientation toward
each competency area, we replaced the term inclusivity that we intended to deconstruct in
basic with foundational. Our primary rationale our revision of the social justice and inclusion
was to emphasize the idea from the original competency area. We recommend that future
document that all student affairs professionals reviews and revisions of the competency areas
should be able to demonstrate their ability to meet be conducted in a manner that does not norm the
the basic [foundational] list of outcomes under work of student affairs in the U.S., but considers
each competency area regardless of how they student affairs work from an international
entered the profession (ACPA & NASPA, 2010, perspective.
p. 3). Additionally, we received feedback that Higher education is a dynamic enterprise
the term basic carries connotations of being facing unprecedented change. Among
underdeveloped or lacking in sophistication. the associated opportunities are increased

6 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


demand for access to higher education, greater business savvy while failing to understand the
demographic diversity, technological innovations core educational values of the profession.
leading to new educational pedagogies and The 10 professional competency areas
delivery systems, and a growing number of presented in this document lay out essential
global interactions, exchanges, and educational knowledge, skills, and dispositions expected
experiences for students. Among the most of all student affairs educators, regardless of
significant challenges are the mounting costs functional area or specialization within the field.
of higher education, increased expectations by Whereas effective student affairs practice requires
employers, and heightened calls for accountability proficiency in many areas such as critical thinking,
from a range of constituencies. Within this creativity, and oral and written communication, the
context, there is a danger of exchanging holistic competency areas presented here are intended to
educational practices for narrowly crafted define students affairs work and lay out directions
content outcomes in order to simplify metrics for the future development of student affairs
and minimally comply with regulations. Further, educators both individually and as a profession.
student affairs work, which is heavily dependent For example, student affairs educators must be
upon human resources, will remain a target able think critically in order to be successful, but
for budget cuts aimed at reducing the cost the nature of their critical thinking skills are in
of education. This document is intended to effect the same as those required of faculty and
set out the scope and content of professional other educators. In contrast, whereas both faculty
competencies required of student affairs and counselors (among others) engage in a range
educators in order for them to succeed within the of advising and supporting activities, the nature of
current higher educational environment as well student affairs advising and supporting is distinct
as projected future environments. The full range and that distinctiveness helps to define the nature
of these competencies is especially important as of the student affairs profession. What follows is
student affairs educators cannot afford to engage an elaboration on several important characteristics
in advocacy efforts without an understanding of of the competency areas presented in this
how students learn and develop or to demonstrate document.

The Professional Competency Areas for


Student Affairs Educators
Higher education is a dynamic enterprise for budget cuts aimed at reducing the cost
facing unprecedented change. Among of education. This document is intended to
the associated opportunities are increased set out the scope and content of professional
demand for access to higher education, greater competencies required of student affairs
demographic diversity, technological innovations educators in order for them to succeed within the
leading to new educational pedagogies and current higher educational environment as well
delivery systems, and a growing number of as projected future environments. The full range
global interactions, exchanges, and educational of these competencies is especially important as
experiences for students. Among the most student affairs educators cannot afford to engage
significant challenges are the mounting costs in advocacy efforts without an understanding of
of higher education, increased expectations by how students learn and develop or to demonstrate
employers, and heightened calls for accountability business savvy while failing to understand the
from a range of constituencies. Within this core educational values of the profession.
context, there is a danger of exchanging holistic The 10 professional competency areas
educational practices for narrowly crafted presented in this document lay out essential
content outcomes in order to simplify metrics knowledge, skills, and dispositions expected
and minimally comply with regulations. Further, of all student affairs educators, regardless of
student affairs work, which is heavily dependent functional area or specialization within the field.
upon human resources, will remain a target Whereas effective student affairs practice requires

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 7
proficiency in many areas such as critical thinking, systems of oppression, privilege, and power (a
creativity, and oral and written communication, the foundational-level outcome) in terms of race or
competency areas presented here are intended to gender identity or sexual orientation and attraction.
define students affairs work and lay out directions To further complicate the process of assessing
for the future development of student affairs ones proficiency within a competency area, one
educators both individually and as a profession. must recognized that most outcomes are dynamic
For example, student affairs educators must be and expected to evolve over time. Thus, ongoing
able think critically in order to be successful, but professional development is necessary to maintain
the nature of their critical thinking skills are in proficiency within a competency area as well as to
effect the same as those required of faculty and advance within it.
other educators. In contrast, whereas both faculty Understanding the nature of the three levels
and counselors (among others) engage in a range of outcomes is vital to their application in practice.
of advising and supporting activities, the nature of Foundational outcomes are intended to be
student affairs advising and supporting is distinct precisely what their name impliesa requisite
and that distinctiveness helps to define the nature foundation upon which intermediate and advanced
of the student affairs profession. What follows is proficiencies in a competency area are built.
an elaboration on several important characteristics Whereas it is reasonable to assume that some
of the competency areas presented in this student affairs educators may enter the field prior
document. to demonstrating foundational level proficiency in
each of the 10 competency areas, mastering the
Competency Levels and Profes- foundational outcomes for all of the competency
areas should be a professional development
sional Development priority. Further, whereas some student affairs
For each of the 10 competency areas, educators who are still developing foundational
descriptions are provided along with a set proficiency in a competency area may meet
of discrete outcome statements categorized some intermediate or even advanced outcomes
as foundational, intermediate, or advanced. within that area, this should not be confused with
Assessing ones level of proficiency for a given intermediate or advanced-level capability. The
competency area using these three levels is a outcomes should not be viewed as checklists, but
complex process. To begin with, the outcome as sets of indicators mapping development in and
statements are intended to be representative of around each of the competency areas. Viewed
the scope of the competency area, but they are this way, progressive development builds on the
not exhaustive. Individuals who have met the work of prior levels and moves from foundational
full breadth of outcomes within a level for a given knowledge to increased capacity for critique and
competency area should be reasonably confident synthesis, from introductory skills to application
that this demonstrates proficiency at that level. and leadership within larger venues and multiple
For each outcome, however, it is important to arenas, and from attitudes to values and habits of
distinguish between meeting the outcome in a the mind.
singular setting and mastering that outcome in Competency development that draws on the
multiple contexts and situations. Furthermore, it is three levels of outcomes introduces an important
likely that an individual may begin work on several paradox. On the one hand, advancement from
intermediate or advance-level outcomes before foundational to intermediate and then advanced
demonstrating full foundational-level proficiency proficiency within a competency area should
for that competency area. For example, a student not be equated with either years of experience
affairs educator may develop the capacity to or positional role or title. It is feasible that some
assess the effectiveness of the institution in entry-level student affairs educators may approach
removing barriers to addressing issues of social advanced proficiency in one or two competency
justice and inclusion (an advanced-level social areas relatively early in their careers, while some
justice and inclusion outcome) especially as highly experienced senior-level administrators may
related to socioeconomic issues. This same have largely foundational proficiency in one or two
educator may not yet fully understand how one competency areas. Advancement in rank is not
is affected by and participates in maintaining a guarantee of higher-order proficiency. On the

8 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


other hand, some aspects of mastering outcomes advanced proficiency require human development
are associated with human as well as professional that is associated with age-dependent aspects
development. Other aspects are difficult to learn of maturation, and some outcomes are difficult to
without direct experience. In other words, some master without certain experiences associated with
elements of the progression from foundational to positions of leadership and responsibility.

Intersection of Competencies
For each of the 10 competency areas, there suggests that professional development work in
is a distinct central idea that differentiates it from any one competency area is related to work in
the other nine areas. That said, there is also multiple other areas. Further, as one moves from
significant overlap or intersection among the foundational to advanced, each subsequent level
outcomes associated with the various competency includes an increased number of outcomes that
areas. Though each outcome is aligned primarily intersect with other competency areas, reflecting
with just one competency, well over half of the higher order synthesis and complexity. (See
outcomes also intersect with other areas. This Figure 1)

Figure 1. Visual Representation of the Intersection of the 10 Competency Areas

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 9
In addition to intersections with other Environmental sustainability efforts are also
competencies, most outcomes intersect, whether changing student affairs. Many sustainability
directly or indirectly, with three points of emphasis efforts begin as student-initiated activities,
identified for the competencies: globalism, and all have implications for ongoing resource
sustainability, and collaboration. None of these allocations. This is especially pertinent to student
three points of emphasis stands on its own as a affairs given its vulnerability in periods of budget
distinct competency area because development reallocations and cutbacks. Thus, student affairs
in these areas does not necessarily serve to educators must consider the sustainability of
define the distinctive nature of student affairs their practices both in terms of the impact on
work. However, each of the points of emphasis institutional resources and the environments
does inform student affairs work in significant in which students learn. Lastly, student affairs
ways. Essentially, they contribute to a mindset work is largely a collaborative endeavor. In the
or disposition that permeates each of the absence of student affairs educators, classroom
competency areas and informs various knowledge learning suffers in substantial ways. However, in
and skill outcomes. Higher education is becoming the absence of faculty and classroom learning,
an increasingly global enterprise. Not only student affairs ceases to exist. For this reason,
are a growing number of students from many student affairs educators should serve as leaders
countries engaging in study abroad experiences in forging mutual partnerships with faculty to
and completing degrees in international settings, co-create seamless learning experiences for
recent growth in distance education provides students. Further, among best practices of the
access to global experiences for all students. student affairs profession are partnerships that
The implications of this trend extend beyond the engage communities and constituencies that
classroom and present noteworthy challenges extend beyond and blur campus boundaries.
and opportunities for student affairs work.

Implications and Applications


Of central importance to any discussion of the as well as frameworks for performance
competencies are implications for policy, practice, evaluations. To ensure success and
and the scholarship of student affairs. That being continuous improvement, divisions of student
said, applications must be mindful of the unique affairs should utilize the competencies
missions, contexts, and needs of various colleges, when designing orientation and onboarding
universities, and professional associations. Thus, experiences for newly hired professionals
the work of applying the competencies in practice and planning ongoing, cross-departmental
will likely consist more of varied best practices professional development experiences. The
than of standardized approaches, and these competencies may also have utility when
practices will likely evolve over time reflecting conducting divisional performance reviews or
the dynamic nature of the competencies. The when justifying resources for ongoing talent
following are examples of areas where the development efforts.
competencies may have particular utility to Graduate preparation programs at the
practice: certificate, masters, and doctoral level should
Individual student affairs educators are utilize the competencies as a means of
encouraged to use the competency areas reviewing program- and course-level learning
and their associated outcomes for self- outcomes as well as setting expectations
assessing their current levels of proficiency for cocurricular learning experiences. In
and for setting goals and tracking professional particular, the lists of foundational outcomes
development work toward the attainment of should inform minimum expectations for
those goals. masters level graduates. Faculty members
Working in partnership with human resource may also wish to use the competencies to
professionals, the competencies should aid inform the content of research agendas as well
student affairs administrators when creating as their ongoing professional development
job postings and position descriptions work.

10 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


Student affairs professional associations Lastly, the competencies should prove
should utilize the competency areas as an valuable in supporting the work of all student
educational framework for local, regional, affairs educators to promote and advocate
international, and virtual conferences for the profession. Among the examples of
along with certificate offerings and member this are outreach, recruitment, and career
portfolios. Examples of such applications development efforts aimed at individuals
might include the content of conference interested in careers in student affairs;
themes, the review and selection of educating institutional constituencies regarding
educational and research proposals, and the the purpose and function of student affairs
assessment and evaluation of educational work; and advocacy for the importance of
sessions. holistic student learning, development, and
success within larger policy arenas.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 11
Overview of the Competency Areas
Competency Area Description Professional Development
Involves the knowledge, skills,
and dispositions to develop
and maintain integrity in ones
Foundational outcomes emphasize
life and work; this includes
awareness and understanding of
thoughtful development, critique,
ones values and beliefs, especially
and adherence to a holistic and
as related to professional codes
comprehensive standard of ethics
of ethics and principles for
Personal and Ethical and commitment to ones own
personal wellness. Professional
Foundations wellness and growth. Personal
development to advanced-level
(PEF) and ethical foundations are aligned
proficiency involves higher order
because integrity has an internal
critique and self-awareness,
locus informed by a combination
applications to healthy living
of external ethical guidelines, an
and professional practice,
internal voice of care, and our own
and modeling, mentoring, and
lived experiences. Our personal
facilitating the same among others.
and ethical foundations grow
through a process of curiosity,
reflection, and self-authorship.
Involves knowledge, skills, and
dispositions that connect the
history, philosophy, and values
of the student affairs profession
Progression from foundational
to ones current professional
to advanced level proficiency
practice. This competency area
for this competency area largely
Values, Philosophy, embodies the foundations of the
involves movement from basic
and History profession from which current and
understanding of VPH to a more
(VPH) future research, scholarship, and
critical understanding of VPH as
practice will change and grow. The
applied in practice and then to the
commitment to demonstrating this
use and critical application of VPH
competency area ensures that our
in practice.
present and future practices are
informed by an understanding of
the professions history, philosophy,
and values.
Professional growth in this
Focuses on the ability to design, competency area is broadly
conduct, critique, and use various marked by shifts from
Assessment, AER methodologies and the results understanding to application,
Evaluation, and obtained from them, to utilize and then from smaller scale
Research AER processes and their results applications focused on singular
(AER) to inform practice, and to shape programs or studies to larger
the political and ethical climate scale applications that cut across
surrounding AER processes and departments or divisions. Many
uses in higher education. advanced level outcomes involve
the leadership of AER efforts.

12 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


Overview of the Competency Areas
Competency Area Description Professional Development
Includes the knowledge, skills,
Progression from foundational to
and dispositions relating to policy
advanced level proficiency reflects
development processes used in
Law, Policy, and shifts from understanding to critical
various contexts, the application of
Governance applications enacted primarily
legal constructs, compliance/policy
(LPG) at the departmental level to
issues, and the understanding of
institutional level applications that
governance structures and their
are mindful of regional, national,
impact on ones professional
and international contexts.
practice.
Includes knowledge, skills,
and dispositions used in the
management of institutional human
capital, financial, and physical
resources. This competency area
recognizes that student affairs
professionals bring personal
strengths and grow as managers In addition to the shift from
through challenging themselves understanding to application,
Organizational and
to build new skills in the selection, professional development within
Human Resources
supervision, motivation, and formal this competency reflects shifts in
(OHR)
evaluation of staff; resolution the scale, scope, and interactivity
of conflict; management of the of the human and organizational
politics of organizational discourse; resources with which one works.
and the effective application
of strategies and techniques
associated with financial resources,
facilities management, fundraising,
technology, crisis management,
risk management and sustainable
resources.
Addresses the knowledge, skills,
and dispositions required of a
leader, with or without positional
authority. Leadership involves
both the individual role of a leader Professional growth within
and the leadership process of this competency area reflects
Leadership
individuals working together to shifts from knowledge to critical
(LEAD)
envision, plan, and affect change application and then to fostering
in organizations and respond to the development of leadership
broad-based constituencies and within and among others.
issues. This can include working
with students, student affairs
colleagues, faculty, and community
members.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 13
Overview of the Competency Areas
Competency Area Description Professional Development
While there are many conceptions
of social justice and inclusion
in various contexts, for the
purposes of this competency
area, it is defined here as both
a process and a goal which
includes the knowledge, skills,
and dispositions needed to create
learning environments that foster Professional development within
equitable participation of all this competency areas assumed
groups while seeking to address that student affairs educators
and acknowledge issues of need to understand oppression,
Social Justice and
oppression, privilege, and power. privilege, and power before they
Inclusion
This competency involves student can understand social justice.
(SJI)
affairs educators who have a sense Intermediate and advanced level
of their own agency and social outcomes reflect social justice
responsibility that includes others, oriented applications in practice
their community, and the larger and then interconnections between
global context. Student affairs leadership and advocacy.
educators may incorporate social
justice and inclusion competencies
into their practice through seeking
to meet the needs of all groups,
equitably distributing resources,
raising social consciousness, and
repairing past and current harms
on campus communities.
At the foundational level, SLD
involves a critical understanding of
Addresses the concepts and learning and development theories
Student Learning principles of student development and their use in constructing
and Development and learning theory. This includes learning outcomes. Intermediate
(SLD) the ability to apply theory to and advanced proficiency involves
improve and inform student affairs greater application in utilizing
and teaching practice. various forms of programs and
applications within increasingly
large and complex venues.

14 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


Overview of the Competency Areas
Competency Area Description Professional Development
Focuses on the use of digital tools,
resources, and technologies for the
Professional growth in this
advancement of student learning,
competency area is marked
development, and success as
by shifts from understanding
well as the improved performance
to application as well as from
of student affairs professionals.
Technology application to facilitation and
Included within this area are
(TECH) leadership. Intermediate and
knowledge, skills, and dispositions
advanced level outcomes also
that lead to the generation of digital
involve a higher degree of
literacy and digital citizenship
innovativeness in the use of
within communities of students,
technology to engage students and
student affairs professionals,
others in learning processes.
faculty members, and colleges and
universities as a whole.
Addresses the knowledge,
skills, and dispositions related to
providing advising and support to
Progression from foundational to
individuals and groups through
advanced level proficiency involves
direction, feedback, critique,
Advising and the development of higher order
referral, and guidance. Through
Supporting capacities for listening, addressing
developing advising and supporting
(A/S) group dynamics, managing
strategies that take into account
conflict and crisis situations, and
self-knowledge and the needs of
partnering with other professionals,
others, we play critical roles in
departments, and agencies.
advancing the holistic wellness of
ourselves, our students, and our
colleagues.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 15
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Comprehensive Presentation of the Com-


petency Areas
This final section consists of comprehensive manner that reflects both a theoretical alignment
presentations of descriptions for each and observed intersections of competency
competency area followed by lists of outcomes outcomes. The sequence does not imply either
for student affairs educators organized at the the importance of the various competency
foundational, intermediate, and advanced areas or any form of an intended developmental
level. The competencies are presented in a progression.

Personal and Ethical Foundations (PPF)


The Personal and Ethical Foundations Utilize institutional and professional resources
competency area involves the knowledge, skills, to assist with ethical issues (e.g., consultation
and dispositions to develop and maintain integrity with appropriate mentors, supervisors and/or
in ones life and work; this includes thoughtful colleagues, consultation with an associations
development, critique, and adherence to a ethics committee).
holistic and comprehensive standard of ethics Articulate awareness and understanding of ones
and commitment to ones own wellness and attitudes, values, beliefs, assumptions, biases,
growth. Personal and ethical foundations are and identity how they affect ones integrity and
aligned because integrity has an internal locus work with others.
informed by a combination of external ethical
guidelines, an internal voice of care, and our Take responsibility to broaden perspectives by
own lived experiences. Our personal and ethical participating in activities that challenge ones
foundations grow through a process of curiosity, beliefs.
reflection, and self-authorship. Identify the challenges associated with balancing
personal and professional responsibilities, and
Foundational Outcomes recognize the intersection of ones personal and
Articulate key elements of ones set of personal professional life.
beliefs and commitments (e.g., values, morals, Identify ones primary work responsibilities
goals, desires, self-definitions), as well as the and, with appropriate, ongoing feedback, craft
source of each (e.g., self, peers, family, or one or a realistic, summative self-appraisal of ones
more larger communities). strengths and limitations.
Articulate ones personal code of ethics for Articulate an understanding that wellness is a
student affairs practice, informed by the ethical broad concept comprised of emotional, physical,
statements of professional student affairs social, environmental, relational, spiritual, moral,
associations and their foundational ethical and intellectual elements.
principles.
Recognize and articulate healthy habits for
Describe the ethical statements and their better living.
foundational principles of any professional
Identify positive and negative impacts on
associations directly relevant to ones working
wellness and, as appropriate, seek assistance
context.
from available resources.
Identify ethical issues in the course of ones job.
Identify and describe personal and professional
Explain how ones behavior reflects the ethical responsibilities inherent to excellence in practice.
statements of the profession and address lapses
Recognize the importance of reflection in
in ones own ethical behavior.
personal, professional, and ethical development.
Appropriately question institutional actions which
are not consistent with ethical standards.

16 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Intermediate Outcomes Advanced Outcomes


Identify the present and future meaningfulness Evolve personal beliefs and commitments in
of key elements in ones set of personal beliefs a way that is true to ones internal voice while
and commitments. recognizing the contributions of important
Articulate and implement a personal protocol others (e.g., self, peers, family, or one or more
for ethical decision-making. larger communities).
Explain how ones professional practice aligns Engage in effective consultation and
with both ones personal code of ethics and provide advice regarding ethical issues with
ethical statements of professional student colleagues and students.
affairs associations. Model for colleagues and others adherence
Identify and manage areas of incongruence to identified ethical guidelines and serve as
between personal, institutional, and mediator to resolve disparities.
professional ethical standards. Actively engage in dialogue with others
Distinguish the legal and moral influences on concerning the ethical statements of
varying codes of ethics. professional associations.
Identify and articulate the influence of culture in Actively support the ethical development
the interpretation of ethical standards. of other professionals by developing and
supporting an ethical organizational culture
Identify and address lapses in ethical behavior within the workplace.
among self, colleagues, and students.
Serve as a role model for integrity through
Seek environments and collaborations that sharing personal experiences and nurturing
provide adequate challenge such that personal others competency in this area.
development is promoted, and provide
sufficient support such that development is Attend to areas of growth relating to ones
possible. anticipated career trajectory.
Identify sources of dissonance and fulfillment Exercise mutuality within relationships and
in ones life and take appropriate steps in interconnectedness in work/life presence.
response. Create and implement an individualized plan
Develop and implement plans to manage for healthy living.
competing priorities between ones professional Demonstrate awareness of the wellness of
and personal lives. others in the workplace, and seek to engage
Bolster ones resiliency, including participating with colleagues in a way that supports such
in stress-management activities, engaging in wellness.
personal or spiritual exploration, and building Serve as model and mentor for others in their
healthier relationships inside and outside of the search for excellence, taking measures to
workplace. encourage and inspire exceptional work in self
Explain the process for executing and others.
responsibilities dutifully and deliberatively. Design naturally occurring reflection processes
Analyze the impact ones health and wellness within ones everyday work.
has on others, as well as our collective roles in Transfer thoughtful reflection into positive
creating mutual, positive relationships. future action.
Define excellence for ones self and evaluate
how ones sense of excellence impacts self and
others.
Analyze personal experiences for potential
deeper learning and growth, and engage with
others in reflective discussions.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 17
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Values, Philosophy, and History (VPH)


The Values, Philosophy, and History
competency area involves knowledge, skills, and
dispositions that connect the history, philosophy,
and values of the student affairs profession
to ones current professional practice. This
competency area embodies the foundations of
the profession from which current and future
research, scholarship, and practice will change
and grow. The commitment to demonstrating
this competency area ensures that our
present and future practices are informed by
an understanding of the professions history,
philosophy, and values.

Foundational Outcomes
Describe the foundational philosophies, Explain the role and responsibilities of student
disciplines, and values of the profession. affairs professional associations.
Articulate the historical contexts of institutional Explain the purpose and use of publications
types and functional areas within higher that incorporate the philosophy and values of
education and student affairs. the profession.
Describe the various research, philosophies, Explain the public role and societal benefits
and scholars that defined the profession. of students affairs in particular and of higher
Demonstrate responsible campus citizenship education in general.
and participation in the campus community . Articulate an understanding of the ongoing
Describe the roles of faculty, academic affairs, nature of the history of higher education and
and student affairs educators in the institution. ones role in shaping it.
Explain the importance of service to the Be able to model the principles of the
institution and to student affairs professional profession and expect the same from
associations. colleagues and supervisees.
Learn and articulate the principles of Explain how the values of the profession
professional practice. contribute to sustainable practices.
Articulate the history of the inclusion and Articulate the changing nature of the
exclusion of people with a variety of identities global student affairs profession and
in higher education. communicate the need to provide a contextual
understanding of higher education.

18 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Intermediate Outcomes Advanced Outcomes


Through critical examination, explain how Participate in developing new philosophical
todays practice is informed by historical approaches and responsive values of the
context. profession.
Explore new philosophical contexts and Partner with faculty for teaching, research, and
approaches. scholarship regarding the profession.
Participate in opportunities to identify and Expand personal and professional
incorporate emerging values of the profession opportunities for civic and global engagement.
into ones professional practice. Actively engage and lead in service and
Engage in service to the profession and to leadership within the profession and in student
student affairs professional associations. affairs professional associations.
Articulate the similarities and differences of Model, encourage, and promote community
varying and emerging global student affairs by reinforcing the long-standing values of the
philosophies. profession.
Teach the principles of the student affairs Contribute to the research, scholarship, and
profession to staff while incorporating the expansion of knowledge within the profession.
equity, diversity, and inclusion of varying Draw upon ones knowledge of history to
identities and global perspectives. inform analysis of trends in order to anticipate
Be able to explain to staff the public and plan for the future.
responsibilities of a student affairs professional Engage staff in critically examining history for
and the resulting benefits to society. contemporary meaning.
Identify enduring questions, issues, and Demonstrate visionary- and forward-thinking in
trends from the history of higher education the work of the student affairs profession.
and discuss their relevance to current and
emergent professional practice. Identify other countries history and
development of student affairs practice.
Acknowledge, critically question, and bring
together diverging philosophies of student
affairs practice.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 19
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (AER)


The Assessment, Evaluation, and Research Design program and learning outcomes
competency area focuses on the ability to that are appropriately clear, specific, and
design, conduct, critique, and use various AER measureable, that are informed by theoretical
methodologies and the results obtained from frameworks and that align with organizational
them, to utilize AER processes and their results outcomes, goals, and values.
to inform practice, and to shape the political and Explain to students and colleagues the
ethical climate surrounding AER processes and relationship of AER processes to learning
uses in higher education. outcomes and goals.

Foundational Outcomes Intermediate Outcomes


Differentiate among assessment, program Design ongoing and periodic data collection
review, evaluation, planning, and research as efforts such that they are sustainable,
well as the methods appropriate to each. rigorous, as unobtrusive as possible, and
Select AER methods, methodologies, designs, technologically current.
and tools that fit with research and evaluation Effectively manage, align, and guide the
questions and with assessment and review utilization of AER reports and studies.
purposes.
Educate stakeholders in the institution
Facilitate appropriate data collection for about the relationship of departmental AER
system/department-wide assessment and processes to learning outcomes and goals
evaluation efforts using current technology and at the student, department, division, and
methods. institutional level.
Effectively articulate, interpret, and apply Discern and discuss the appropriate design(s)
results of AER reports and studies, including to use in AER efforts based on critical
professional literature. questions, necessary data, and intended
Assess the legitimacy, trustworthiness, and/ audience(s).
or validity of studies of various methods and Use culturally relevant and culturally
methodological designs (e.g. qualitative appropriate terminology and methods to
vs. quantitative, theoretical perspective, conduct and report AER findings.
epistemological approach).
Actively contribute to the development of
Consider rudimentary strengths and limitations a culture of evidence at the department
of various methodological AER approaches in level wherein assessment, program review,
the application of findings to practice in diverse evaluation, and research are central to the
institutional settings and with diverse student departments work and ensure that training
populations. and skill development in these areas is valued,
Explain the necessity to follow institutional budgeted for, and fully embedded in day-to-
and divisional procedures and policies (e.g., day procedures.
IRB approval, informed consent) with regard Apply the concepts and procedures of
to ethical assessment, evaluation, and other qualitative research, evaluation, and
research activities. assessment including creating appropriate
Ensure all communications of AER results are sampling designs and interview protocols with
accurate, responsible, and effective. consultation, participating in analysis teams,
contributing to audit trails, participating in peer
Identify the political and educational sensitivity
debrief, and using other techniques to ensure
of raw and partially processed data and
trustworthiness of qualitative designs.
AER results, handling them with appropriate
confidentiality and deference to organizational Participate in the design and analysis
hierarchies.

20 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Intermediate Outcomes (cont.) learning outcomes and goals at the student,


department, division, and institution level.
of quantitative AER studies including
understanding statistical reporting that may Lead the design and writing of varied and
include complex statistical methods such diverse communications (e.g. reports,
as multivariate techniques, and articulating publications, presentations, social media, etc.)
the limitations of findings imposed by of assessment, program review, evaluation,
the differences in practical and statistical and other research activities that include
significance, validity, and reliability. translation of data analyses into goals and
action.
Demonstrate a working knowledge of
additional methodological approaches to AER Lead the strategic use and prioritization of
(e.g. mixed methods, historical or literary budgetary and personnel resources to support
analysis, or comparative study) including high-quality program evaluation, assessment
elements of design, data collection, analysis, efforts, research, and planning.
and reporting as well as strategies for ensuring Lead, supervise, and/or collaborate with others
the quality. to design and analyze assessment, program
Communicate and display data through review, evaluation, and research activities
a variety of means (publications, reports, that span multiple methodological approaches
presentations, social media, etc.) in a manner (qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods,
that is accurate; transparent regarding the among others) including writing and
strengths, limitations, and context of the data; disseminating results in a manner that critically
and sensitive to political coalitions and realities considers the strengths and limitations of
associated with data as a scarce resource. implications for practice, policy, theory, and/or
future study in a sophisticated way.
Manage and/or adhere to the implementation
of institutional and professional standards for Anticipate and proactively address challenges
ethical AER activities. related to individual and institutional politics,
competing constituencies and interests, and
Utilize formal student learning and
divergent values especially as related to
development theories as well as scholarly
communications, reporting, and utilization of
literature to inform the content and design of
data to inform practice. Create a culture of
individual and program level outcomes as well
evidence in which the institution, division, or
as assessment tools such as rubrics.
unit expects AER to be central to professional
Prioritize program and learning outcomes with practice and ensures that training/skill
organization goals and values. development happens across the organization.
Advanced Outcomes Ensure institutional, divisional, or unit
compliance with professional standards
Effectively lead the conceptualization and concerning ethical AER activities.
design of ongoing, systematic, high-quality,
Facilitate the prioritization of decisions and
data-based strategies at the institutional,
resources to implement those decisions that
divisional, and/or unit-wide level to evaluate
are informed by AER activities.
and assess learning, programs, services, and
personnel.
Effectively use assessment and evaluation
results in determining the institutions, the
divisions, or the units accomplishment of its
missions/goals, re-allocation of resources, and
advocacy for more resources.
Lead a comprehensive communication
process to the campus community of the
relationship of institutional AER processes to

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 21
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Law, Policy, and Governance (LPG)


The Law, Policy, and Governance
competency area includes the knowledge, skills,
and dispositions relating to policy development
processes used in various contexts, the
application of legal constructs, compliance/policy
issues, and the understanding of governance
structures and their impact on ones professional
practice.
Foundational Outcomes
Describe the systems used to govern public, and students.
private, and for-profit institutions of all types Describe how policy is developed and
(two-year, four-year, graduate, professional, implemented in ones department and
vocational, etc.) in ones state/province and institution, as well as the local, state/province,
nation. and national levels of government.
Explain the differences between public, Know when and how to consult with ones
private, and for-profit higher education with immediate supervisor and institutional legal
respect to the legal system and what they may counsel regarding matters that may have legal
mean for respective students, faculty, and ramifications.
student affairs professionals.
Explain concepts of risk management,
Describe how national and state/provincial reasonable accommodation, and enact liability
constitutions and laws influence the rights reduction strategies .
of students, faculty, and staff on all types of
college campuses. Demonstrate awareness of inequitable and
oppressive ways that laws and policies are
Describe evolving laws, policies, and judicial enacted on vulnerable student populations
rulings that influence the student-institutional at national, state/provincial, local, and
relationship and how they affect professional institutional levels.
practice.
Describe the student conduct process at the
Act in accordance with national, state/ institutional level and demonstrate concern
provincial, and local laws and with institutional for the legal, social, moral, educational, and
policies regarding non-discrimination. ethical expectations of the community.
Identify major internal and external Encourage and advocate participation
stakeholders, policymakers, and special in national, state/provincial, local, and
interest groups who influence policy at institutional electoral processes as applicable.
the national, state/provincial, local, and
institutional levels.
Describe the governance systems at ones
institution including the governance structures
for faculty, student affairs professionals, staff,

22 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Intermediate Outcomes Advanced Outcomes


Identify emerging law and policy trends Develop institutional policies and practices
and discuss how they affect current case consistent with national, state/province, and
precedent. local laws related to institutional and personal
Explain parameters established by relevant tort liability; contracts; the exercise and limits
external and internal governing systems as of free speech by faculty, student affairs
related to ones professional practice. professionals, and students; and civil rights,
desegregation, and affirmative action.
Explain legal theories related to tort liability,
negligence, the exercise and limits of free Provide appropriate and ethical influence with
speech, discrimination, and contract law the governing bodies to which ones institution
and how these theories affect professional reports. Challenge biased laws and policies
practice. and advocate for the design and advocate for
their equitable use on campuses.
Implement policies developed by ones
department and institution, as well as the Participate effectively in the governance
local, state/provincial, and national levels of system of ones institution when appropriate.
government. Influence policy making at the local, state/
Critically examine laws and policies to ensure province and federal levels of government
their equitable and fair use on campus. when appropriate.
Implement best practices of the profession Critically examine policy compliance and
to advance ones institution with respect development efforts related to programs,
to access, affordability, accountability, and practices, and services to ensure that they are
quality. socially justice, equitable, and inclusive.
Incorporate best practices of the profession
when managing institutional and personal tort
liability.
Appropriately consult with students and/or
represent the student voice in departmental,
divisional, and institutional policy development
efforts.
Develop, implement, and assess the rules,
procedures, and standards for student conduct
processes and ensure that policies and
procedures meet the legal, compliance, and
policy mandates for the institution.
Ensure departmental programs, services, and
facilities are compliant with any applicable
legal, compliance, environmental policies and/
or mandates from governing bodies.
Use data appropriately to guide the analysis
and creation of policy.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 23
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Organizational and Human Resources (OHR)


The Organizational and Human Resources Explain the application of introductory
competency area includes knowledge, skills, and motivational techniques with students, staff,
dispositions used in the management of institutional and others.
human capital, financial, and physical resources. Describe the basic premises that underlie
This competency area recognizes that student conflict in and the constructs utilized for
affairs professionals bring personal strengths facilitating conflict resolution.
and grow as managers through challenging
themselves to build new skills in the selection, Develop and utilize appropriate meeting
supervision, motivation, and formal evaluation of materials (e.g. facilitation skills, agenda, notes/
staff; resolution of conflict; management of the minutes).
politics of organizational discourse; and the effective Communicate with others using effective
application of strategies and techniques associated verbal and non-verbal strategies appropriate
with financial resources, facilities management, to the situation in ways that the person(s) with
fundraising, technology, crisis management, risk whom you are engaged prefers.
management and sustainable resources. Recognize how networks in organizations play
Foundational Outcomes a role in how work gets accomplished.
Demonstrate effective stewardship/use of Understand the relational roles partners, allies,
resources (i.e., financial, human, material) and adversaries play in the completion of
Describe campus protocols for responding to goals and work assignments.
significant incidents and campus crises. Explain the basic tenets of personal or
Describe environmentally sensitive issues organizational risk and liability as they relate to
and explain how ones work can incorporate ones work.
elements of sustainability. Provide constructive feedback in a timely
Use technological resources with respect to manner.
maximizing the efficiency and effectiveness of Advocate for equitable hiring practices.
ones work.
Articulate basic institutional accounting
Describe ethical hiring techniques and techniques for budgeting as well as monitoring
institutional hiring policies, procedures, and and processing revenue and expenditures.
processes.
Effectively and appropriately use facilities
Demonstrate familiarity in basic tenets of management procedures as related to
supervision and possible application of these operating a facility or program in a facility.
supervision techniques.
Demonstrate an understanding of how
Explain how job descriptions are designed and physical space impacts the institutions
support overall staffing patterns in ones work educational mission.
setting.
Understand the basic concepts of facilities
Design a professional development plan management and institutional policies
that assesses ones current strengths and related to energy usage and environmental
weaknesses, and establishes action items for sustainability.
fostering an appropriate pace of growth.

24 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Intermediate Outcomes Effectively manage and lead meetings through


the use of agenda management strategies.
Effectively develop and manage human
resources, facilities, policies, procedures, Adapt to situation-appropriate communication
processes, and materials. strategies that effectively communicate with
various groups.
Construct units operation to function in a
sustainable fashion. Communicate with others using effective
verbal and non-verbal strategies appropriate
Explain the interaction and integration of
to the situation.
campus crisis intervention systems (e.g.
National Incident Management System, Determine if messages (verbal and written)
behavioral intervention teams, critical incident communicated are congruent with the desired
response teams). outcome with the intended recipient or
audience.
Engage in policy and procedure development,
implementation and decision-making Create and present materials for formal
that minimize risk to self, students, other presentations in the work setting and for
constituents, and the institution. professional associations.
Identify and allocate the technological needs Develop appropriate alliances with others
of the unit; maintain a level of technical as a means to efficiently and effectively
knowledge that allows one to effectively use complete work assignments; recognize how
existing technologies as well as to incorporate the formation of alliances can either enhance
new emerging technologies as they may or detract from ones professional credibility or
benefit ones work. the use of teams.
Implement strategies, interview protocols Advocate for advancement opportunities for
and decisions regarding staff selection that staff.
adheres to institutional policy and meets Implement advanced accounting techniques
organizational goals. that include forecasting, efficient use of fiscal
Develop recruitment and hiring strategies that resources, and interpretation of financial
increase individuals from under-represented reports.
groups to apply for positions. Describe how various fundraising strategies
Demonstrate applications of appropriate should be facilitated by student affairs
techniques (e.g. coaching, performance professionals.
accountability) for supervising a range of staff Assess the usage of various spaces to guide
performance levels. space-planning processes.
Identify the pros and cons of various staffing Advocate for the needs of diverse populations
patterns, supporting job descriptions and work through and regarding space management.
process configurations related to ones work
Implement and coordinate sustainability efforts
setting.
in a range of types of spaces.
Assist and/or direct individuals to create
professional development plans that are
appropriate for individual growth while also
serving the current and future needs of the unit
where they are employed.
Apply a range of strategies available for
motivating others.
Effectively resolve conflict within the unit and
among unit members and others in a timely
manner.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 25
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Organizational and Human Resources (OHR)


(cont.)
Advanced Outcomes
Assess resources (e.g. people, space, aspects of decline of morale.
financial, materials) in regard to institutional Manage and facilitate conflict at a level of
or divisional long-range planning and budget complexity where multiple entities are often in
processes. disagreement with each other and lead groups
Teach resource stewardship to others. to effective and fair resolutions.
Champion sustainability efforts within Discern the pace in which technological
unit and across the organization, and advances should appropriately be
facilitate institutional support for broadening incorporated into organizational life (with
sustainability efforts. students, staff and other constituents).
Participate in developing, implementing, and Assess the relationship between agenda
assessing the effectiveness of the campus management and the group dynamics that
crisis management program. occur in meetings and how this relationship
Effectively assess the level of individual and influences the realization of goals, the
institutional risk and liability associated with accomplishments of tasks, and any impacts on
programs and services offered; ensure that participants.
professionals are trained to deliver programs Effectively speak on behalf of the institution
and services at the lowest level of risk with internal and external stakeholders (e.g.,
possible. parents, prospective students, external
Ensure multiple identities are represented organizations).
on every level of staff at the institution, Assess the level of complexity of networks
especially those who are marginalized or established and use this information to
underrepresented. determine the strengths of these networks and
Effectively intervene with employees in regard how these networks may benefit or detract
to morale, behavioral expectations, conflict, from the mission and goals of the institution or
and performance issues. the division.
Evaluate the effectiveness of current staffing Assess the costs and benefits of current
patterns and supporting job descriptions in established political alliances, in particular,
regard to a units ability to effectively meet their relationships to fostering collaboration
institutional, divisional, and unit mission and and organizational transparency.
goals. Develop long-range budgets that creatively
Anticipate how future needs of students, the and ethically apply fiscal resources to the
unit, or the division may affect staffing levels or needs and priorities of the unit, division, or
structures and make proactive adjustments to organization.
meet those needs. Effectively implement fundraising initiatives
Develop or lead professional development that support divisional and institutional goals.
initiatives that regularly assess the strength Align evidence-based decision making
and weakness of professionals and provide strategies and planning with resource
them with purposeful opportunities to advance allocation and re-allocation.
their skills and knowledge. Lead cross-divisional teams engaged in
Implement strategies for motivating individuals facilities master planning processes spanning
and groups who are challenged with elements design, construction, and management of
of campus life disengagement, apathy, or various types of spaces.

26 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Leadership (LEAD)
The Leadership competency area addresses Identify basic fundamentals of teamwork
the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required and teambuilding in ones work setting and
of a leader, with or without positional authority. communities of practice.
Leadership involves both the individual role of a
Describe and apply the basic principles of
leader and the leadership process of individuals
community building.
working together to envision, plan, and affect
change in organizations and respond to broad- Development.
based constituencies and issues. This can Describe how ones personal values, beliefs,
include working with students, student affairs histories, and perspectives inform ones view
colleagues, faculty, and community members. of oneself as an effective leader with and
This section is organized by the leadership without roles of authority.
learning concepts of Education, construct Build mutually supportive relationships with
knowledge and articulation; Training, skill colleagues and students across similarities
identification and enhancement; Development, and differences
personal reflection and growth; and Engagement,
active participation and application. Engagement.
Understand campus cultures (e.g. academic,
Foundational Outcomes student, professorial, administrative) and apply
that understanding to ones work.
Education.
Articulate the vision and mission of the primary Use appropriate technology to support
work unit, the division, and the institution. leadership processes (e.g. seeking input or
feedback, sharing decisions, posting data that
Identify and understand individual-level
supports decisions, use group support website
constructs of leader and leadership.
tools).
Explain the values and processes that lead to
Think critically, creatively, and imagine
organizational improvement.
possibilities for solutions that do not currently
Explain the advantages and disadvantages of exist or are not apparent.
different types of decision-making processes
Identify and consult with key stakeholders and
(e.g. consensus, majority vote, and decision
individuals with differing perspectives to make
by authority).
informed decisions.
Identify institutional traditions, mores, and
Articulate the logic and impact of decisions on
organizational structures (e.g., hierarchy,
groups of people, institutional structures (e.g.
networks, governing groups, technological
divisions, departments), and implications for
resources, nature of power, policies, goals,
practice.
agendas and resource allocation processes)
and how they influence others to act in the Exhibit informed confidence in the capacity
organization. of individuals to organize and take action to
transform their communities and world.
Training.
Identify ones own strengths and challenges Within the scope of ones position and
as a leader and seek opportunities to develop expertise, lead others to contribute toward the
leadership skills. effectiveness and success of the organization.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 27
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Leadership (LEAD) (cont.)


Intermediate Outcomes
Education. Engagement.
Identify and understand systemic and Advocate for change that would remove
organizational constructs of leader and barriers to student and staff success.
leadership.
Share data used to inform key decisions in
Compare and contrast appropriate leadership transparent and accessible ways while using
models to create organizational improvement. appropriate technology.
Identify potential obstacles or points of Seek entrepreneurial and innovative
resistance when designing a change process. perspectives when planning for change.
Training. Facilitate consensus processes where wide
Seek out training and feedback opportunities support is needed.
to enhance ones leader and leadership
Ensure that decision making processes
knowledge and skill.
include the perspectives of various groups
Encourage colleagues and students to engage on campus, particularly those who are
in team and community building activities. underrepresented or marginalized, or who
may experience an unintended negative
Create environments that encourage others
consequence of the proposed change.
to view themselves as having the potential
to make meaningful contributions to their Convene appropriate personnel to identify and
communities and be civically engaged in their act on solutions to potential issues.
communities.
Inform other units about issues that may
Give appropriate feedback to colleagues and impact/influence their work.
students on skills they may seek to become
Willingly engage in campus governance in a
more effective leaders.
manner that exemplifies responsible campus
Serve as a mentor or role model for others. citizenry.
Development. Within ones department and areas of
Use reflection to constantly evolve and interest, lead others to contribute toward the
incorporate ones authentic self into ones effectiveness and success of the organization.
identity as a leader.
Recognize the interdependence of members
within organizational units and throughout the
institution.

28 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Advanced Outcomes
Education.
Seek out and develop new and emerging
constructs of leader and leadership.
Training.
Establish systems to provide opportunities
for staff to engage in leadership development
such as committees, task forces, internships,
and cross-functional teams.
Create a culture that advocates the
appropriate and effective use of feedback
systems (e.g., 360 feedback processes)
for improving individual leader and team
leadership performance.
Establish and sustain systems of mentoring
to ensure individuals receive the training and
support needed.
Development.
Display congruence between ones identity as
a leader and ones professional actions.
Facilitate reflective learning and relationship
building across campus, community, and the
profession.
Engagement.
Develop and promote a shared vision that
drives unit, divisional, and institutional short-
term and long-term planning and the ongoing
organizing of work.
Implement divisional strategies that account
for ongoing changes in the cultural landscape,
political landscape, global perspectives,
technology, and sustainability issues.
Promote, facilitate, and assess the
effectiveness of collaborative initiatives and
team building efforts, using technology as
appropriate to support such work.
Embrace responsibility for unit and divisional
decisions.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 29
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Social Justice and Inclusion (SJI)


For the purpose of the Social Justice and
Inclusion competency area, social justice is
defined as both a process and a goal that
includes the knowledge, skills, and dispositions
needed to create learning environments that
foster equitable participation of all groups
and seeks to address issues of oppression,
privilege, and power. This competency involves
student affairs educators who have a sense
of their own agency and social responsibility
that includes others, their community, and
the larger global context. Student affairs
educators may incorporate social justice and
inclusion competencies into their practice
through seeking to meet the needs of all groups,
equitably distributing resources, raising social
consciousness, and repairing past and current
harms on campus communities.

Foundational Outcomes
Identify systems of socialization that influence inclusion, oppression, privilege, and power into
ones multiple identities and sociopolitical ones practice.
perspectives and how they impact ones lived Connect and build meaningful relationships
experiences. with others while recognizing the multiple,
Understand how one is affected by and intersecting identities, perspectives, and
participates in maintaining systems of developmental differences people hold.
oppression, privilege, and power. Articulate a foundational understanding of
Engage in critical reflection in order to identify social justice and inclusion within the context
ones own prejudices and biases. of higher education.

Participate in activities that assess and Advocate on issues of social justice,


complicate ones understanding of inclusion, oppression, privilege, and power that impact
oppression, privilege, and power. people based on local, national, and global
interconnections.
Integrate knowledge of social justice,

30 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Intermediate Outcomes Advanced Outcomes


Design programs and events that are Ensure institutional policies, practices,
inclusive, promote social consciousness and facilities, structures, systems, and
challenge current institutional, national, global, technologies respect and represent the needs
and sociopolitical systems of oppression. of all people.
Effectively facilitate dialogue about issues of Assess the effectiveness of the institution in
social justice, inclusion, power, privilege, and removing barriers to addressing issues of
oppression in ones practice. social justice and inclusion.
Engage in hiring and promotion practices Take responsibility for the institutions role in
that are non-discriminatory and work toward perpetuating discrimination or oppression.
building inclusive teams. Advocate for social justice values in
Identify systemic barriers to social justice and institutional mission, goals, and programs.
inclusion and assess ones own departments Create ongoing strategic plans for the
role in addressing such barriers. continued development of inclusive initiatives
Advocate for the development of a more and practices throughout the institution.
inclusive and socially conscious department, Link individual and departmental performance
institution, and profession. indicators with demonstrated commitment to
Provide opportunities to reflect and social justice and inclusion.
evaluate on ones participation in systems Provide consultation to other units, divisions,
of oppression, privilege, and power without or institutions on strategies to dismantle
shaming others. systems of oppression, privilege, and power
Provide opportunities for inclusive and social on campus.
justice educational professional development. Foster and promote an institutional culture
Effectively address bias incidents impacting that supports the free and open expression
campus communities. of ideas, identities, and beliefs, and where
Implement appropriate measures to assess individuals have the capacity to negotiate
the campus climate for students, staff, and different standpoints.
faculty. Demonstrate institutional effectiveness in
addressing critical incidents of discrimination
that impact the institution.
Ensure campus resources are distributed
equitably and adequately meet the needs of all
campus communities.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 31
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Student Learning and Development (SLD)


The Student Learning and Development Identify and take advantage of opportunities
competency area addresses the concepts and for curriculum and program development to
principles of student development and learning encourage continual learning and developmental
theory. This includes the ability to apply theory to growth.
improve and inform student affairs and teaching Construct effective programs, lesson plans, and
practice. syllabi.
Foundational Outcomes Create and assess learning outcomes to
Articulate theories and models that describe evaluate progress toward fulfilling the mission of
the development of college students and the the department, the division, and the institution.
conditions and practices that facilitate holistic
Teach, train, and practice in such a way that
development (e.g. learning, psychosocial and
utilizes the assessment of learning outcomes to
identity development, cognitive-structural,
inform future practice.
typological, environmental, and moral).
Critique the dominant group perspective
Articulate how race, ethnicity, nationality, class,
present in some models of student learning and
gender, age, sexual orientation, gender identity,
development and modify for use in practice.
dis/ability, and religious belief can influence
development during the college years. Advanced Outcomes
Identify the strengths and limitations in applying Utilize theory to inform divisional and institutional
existing theories and models to varying student policy and practice.
demographic groups. Translate theory to diverse audiences (e.g.,
Articulate ones own developmental journey in colleagues, faculty, students, parents, policy-
relation to formal theories. makers) and use it effectively to enhance
understanding of the work of student affairs.
Identify ones own informal theories of student
development (theories in use) and how they Analyze and critique prevailing theory for
can be informed by formal theories to enhance improved unit, division, or campus practice.
work with students. Contribute to the development of theories.
Identify dominant perspectives present in some Identify staff members level of competency
models of student learning and development. regarding the ability to apply learning and
Construct learning outcomes for both daily development theory to practice, and create
practice as well as teaching and training professional development opportunities utilizing
activities. various learning concepts.
Assess teaching, learning, and training and Evaluate and assess the effectiveness of learning
incorporate the results into practice. and teaching opportunities at the divisional level
and communicate their effectiveness to the
Assess learning outcomes from programs and
larger campus community as well as explain
services and use theory to improve practice.
opportunities for collaboration and integrated
Intermediate Outcomes learning opportunities.
Build and support inclusive, socially-just, and
Design programs and services to promote
welcoming campus communities that promote
student learning and development that are
deep learning and foster student success.
based on current research on student learning
and development theories. Communicate the learning orientation of student
affairs to the campus community.
Utilize theory-to-practice models to inform
individual or unit practice. Provide alternative models that explore student
learning and development from an inclusive
Justify using learning theory to create learning
paradigm.
opportunities.

32 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Technology (TECH)
The Technology competency area focuses on
the use of digital tools, resources, and technologies
for the advancement of student learning,
development, and success as well as the improved
performance of student affairs professionals.
Included within this area are knowledge, skills, and
dispositions that lead to the generation of digital
literacy and digital citizenship within communities
of students, student affairs professionals, faculty
members, and colleges and universities.

Foundational Outcomes
Demonstrate adaptability in the face of fast- Model and promote equitable and inclusive
paced technological change. practices by ensuring all participants in
Remain current on student and educator educational endeavors can access and utilize
adoption patterns of new technologies and the necessary tools for success.
familiarize oneself with the purpose and Appropriately utilize social media and other
functionality of those technologies. digital communication and collaboration tools
Troubleshoot basic software, hardware, and to market and promote advising, programming,
connectivity problems and refer more complex and other learning-focused interventions and
problems to an appropriate information to engage students in these activities.
technology administrator. Engage in personal and professional digital
Draw upon research, trend data, and learning communities and personal learning
environmental scanning to assess the networks at the local, national, and/or global
technological readiness and needs of level.
students, colleagues, and other educational Design, implement, and assess
stakeholders when infusing technology into technologically-rich learning experiences for
educational programs and interventions. students and other stakeholders that model
Critically assess the accuracy and quality effective use of visual and interactive media.
of information gathered via technology Ensure that ones educational work with and
and accurately cite electronic sources of service to students is inclusive of students
information respecting copyright law and fair participating in online and hybrid format
use. courses and programs.
Model and promote the legal, ethical, and Incorporate commonly utilized technological
transparent collection, use, and securing of tools and platforms including social medial and
electronic data. other digital communication and collaboration
Ensure compliance with accessible technology tools into ones work.
laws and policies.
Demonstrate awareness of ones digital
identity and engage students in learning
activities related to responsible digital
communications and virtual community
engagement as related to their digital
reputation and identity.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 33
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Technology (TECH) (cont.)


Intermediate Outcomes
Model and promote adaptability among Proactively cultivate a digital identity, presence,
students, colleagues, and educational and reputation for ones self and by students
stakeholders in the face of fast-paced that models appropriate online behavior and
technological change and demonstrate positive engagement with others in virtual
openness to the introduction of new digital tools communities.
by others. Demonstrate a willingness and capacity to
Anticipate potential problems with software, generate, critically examine, and change
hardware, and connectivity and prepare technology-related policies and practices that
multiple strategies to troubleshoot these privilege one group of students or educational
problems and/or prepare alternative means of stakeholders over another.
achieving learning and productivity outcomes. Design and assess outcomes that utilize social
Facilitate educational interventions that are media and other digital communication and
based upon research, trend data, and needs collaboration tools for promoting learning-
assessments of participants and that increase focused interventions and engaging students in
the technological competencies and digital these activities.
literacy of those participants. Utilize local, national, and global digital
Utilize multiple strategies for accessing and professional learning communities and personal
assessing information, critically considering the learning networks to enhance intra- and
sources of information as well as the purposes inter-institutional collaboration and ongoing
or agendas that led to the dissemination of the professional development in educational,
data as presented. customer service, marketing, and community
Teach and facilitate the legal and ethical use engagement efforts that reflect the mission and
of digital information in a manner that complies values of the organization.
with law and policy and that addresses the Generate a wide and varied array of digital
larger values and principles underlying these strategies for enhancing educational
laws and policies. interventions with multimedia, interactive tools,
Draw upon universal design principles to model and creativity-enhancing technologies.
and promote compliance with accessibility laws Initiate the development of holistic educational
and policies among students, colleagues, and interventions designed for students participating
educational partners. in courses and other educational experiences
delivered via hybrid and online formats.

34 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Advanced Outcomes
Anticipate technological change and allocate Engage in systematic practices aimed at
personal, departmental, and/or institutional ensuring students and professionals across all
resources to foster in others dispositions demographics have access to technological
of adaptability, flexibility, and openness to resources and are educated in their intelligent
technological innovation. use and implementation for solving problems
Provide leadership for the proactive creation, and enhancing learning.
use, and empirical evaluation of technological Provide leadership for the seamless
tools and digital spaces for students including integration of social media and other digital
those drawing on social medial and other digital communications with broader educational,
communication and collaboration tools. customer service, marketing, and community
Develop contingency plans for the continual engagement efforts that communicate and
operation of basic college and university develop dialogue and community around
functions in the event of software, hardware, or shared common institutional values.
connectivity failures as a result of routine issues Contribute to, partner with, and/or provide
or in response to crises and emergencies. leadership for local, state/provincial, national,
Contribute to the generation of research, trend and global digital professional learning
analyses, and needs assessments related communities and personal learning networks in
to digital technologies that inform efforts to promoting the use of technology for educational
meet the technological needs of students, purposes.
colleagues, and educational stakeholders. Provide training and instruction for the use,
Support, promote, and/or lead efforts to create adoption, and evaluation of digital strategies
a culture in which information is both valued for enhancing educational interventions with
and systematically scrutinized prior to its use to multimedia, interactive tools, and creativity-
inform educational practice. enhancing technologies by students,
colleagues, and other educational stakeholders.
Provide leadership that demands digital
information and technologies be used in a Collaborate with and support faculty by
manner that is ethical and in full compliance developing holistic educational and co-
with national and state/province laws as well as curricular opportunities for students in online
with institutional policies. and hybrid programs promoting the relevance
and vision of what student affairs practice in
Lead and demonstrate a commitment to new educational delivery formats.
universal design principles in technological
implementations that ensures the frictionless Provide leadership in the development of new
use and application of technology by all. means of leveraging technology for assessing,
certifying, and credentialing the holistic learning
Provide leadership and ongoing training to and development of students through co-
colleagues and students for the cultivation curricular learning endeavors.
of a genuine digital identity, presence, and
reputation that models appropriate online
behavior and enables open access and
engagement with virtual communities as
appropriate.

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 35
COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Advising and Supporting (A/S)


The Advising and Supporting competency area
addresses the knowledge, skills, and dispositions
related to providing advising and support to
individuals and groups through direction, feedback,
critique, referral, and guidance. Through developing
advising and supporting strategies that take into
account self-knowledge and the needs of others, we
play critical roles in advancing the holistic wellness
of ourselves, our students, and our colleagues.

Foundational Outcomes
Exhibit culturally inclusive active listening skills and exhibit referral skills in seeking expert
(e.g., appropriately establishing interpersonal assistance.
contact, paraphrasing, perception checking, Identify when and with whom to implement
summarizing, questioning, encouraging, avoid appropriate crisis management and
interrupting, clarifying). intervention responses.
Establish rapport with students, groups, Maintain an appropriate degree of
colleagues, and others that acknowledges confidentiality that follows applicable legal
differences in lived experiences. and licensing requirements, facilitates the
Recognize the strengths and limitations of development of trusting relationships, and
ones own worldview on communication with recognizes when confidentiality should be
others (e.g., how terminology could either broken to protect the student or others.
liberate or constrain others with different Seek opportunities to expand ones own
gender identities, sexual orientations, abilities, knowledge and skills in helping students
cultural backgrounds, etc.). with specific concerns (e.g., relationship
Facilitate reflection to make meaning from issues, navigating systems of oppression,
experiences with students, groups, colleagues, or suicidality) as well as interfacing with
and others. specific populations within the college student
Conscientiously use appropriate nonverbal environment (e.g., student veterans, low-
communication. income students, etc.).
Facilitate problem-solving. Utilize virtual resources and technology to
meet the advising and supporting needs of
Facilitate individual decision-making and goal- students.
setting.
Know and follow applicable laws, policies,
Appropriately challenge and support students and professional ethical guidelines relevant
and colleagues. to advising and supporting students
Know and use referral sources (e.g., other development.
offices, outside agencies, knowledge sources),

36 Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Educators


COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF THE COMPETENCY AREAS

Intermediate Outcomes
Perceive and analyze unspoken dynamics in a
Consult with mental health professionals as
group setting.
appropriate.
Facilitate or coach group decision-making, goal-
Provide and arrange for the necessary training
setting, and process.
and development for staff to enhance their
Assess the developmental needs of students advising and helping skills.
and organizational needs of student groups.
Develop virtual programs and initiatives to
Strategically and simultaneously pursue multiple meet the needs of students with limited access
objectives in conversations with students. to campus services (i.e. commuter, graduate,
Identify patterns of behavior that may signal evening, distance, online, among others).
mental health or other wellness concerns.
Manage interpersonal conflict between/among
individuals and groups. Advanced Outcomes
Mediate differences between/among individuals Engage in research and publication of holistic
or groups. student wellness issues.
Mentor students and staff. Assess responses to advising and supporting
interventions, including traditional campus-
Demonstrate culturally-inclusive advising,
based as well as virtual interventions.
supporting, coaching, and counseling strategies.
Coordinate and lead response processes as
Initiate and exercise appropriate institutional
they relate to crisis interventions.
crisis intervention responses and processes.
Collaborate with other campus departments
Develop and implement successful prevention/
and organizations as well as surrounding
outreach programs on campus, including
community agencies and other institutions
effective mental health publicity/marketing.
of higher education to address students
Utilize communication and learning technology holistic wellness needs in a comprehensive,
(e.g., websites, social networking, video clips, collaborative way.
podcasts) to address students holistic wellness
Provide mental health consultation to faculty,
issues.
staff, and campus behavioral assessment
Provide advocacy services to survivors of teams.
violence.
Provide effective post-traumatic response to
Develop and distribute accurate and helpful campus events/situations, collaborating with
mental health information for students, faculty, other appropriate campus departments.
and staff.
Develop liaisons with community providers
Develop avenues for student involvement in and support systems to ensure seamless
mental health promotion and de-stigmatization and coordinated holistic care (e.g., with
of mental illness (e.g., creating student advisory hospitalizations, transfer of care, public
councils, peer education programs, advising benefits, support groups, family/parent/
student mental health organizations). guardians, etc.).

ACPACollege Student Educators International & NASPAStudent Affairs Administrators in Higher Education 37
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August, 2015