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ED524 Childrens Literature

Integrated Lesson: Social Studies, Science, and Math


Spring 2015
Mcllwain

Citation:

Paulsen, G. (2010). Woods Runner. New York, NY: Ember.

Summary: Thirteen-year-old Samuel spends most of his days in the forest, hunting for food for
his family. Samuel has grown up on the frontier in a cabin that straddles the line between
civilization and the wilderness. Here Samuel and his family live a hard, but relatively quiet,
existence on the western edge of the British colony of Pennsylvania. Far from any town, or news
of the war against the King that American patriots have begun near Boston. But the war comes to
them. British Redcoats and the Iroquois Indians brutally arrack his settlement, and Samuels
parents are taken away, prisoners. Samuel follows their trial, hiding, drawing on his forest skills,
and moving silently, determined to find a way to rescue his parents. Along the way he hides from
enemy soldiers and witnesses the horrors of war. Yet, he also finds allies, men and women
working secretly on behalf of the patriot cause. Samuel learns that he must travel deep into
enemy territory, all the way to the British headquarters in New York City. He must dig deep and
find the strength not only to rescue his own family, but others who have suffered at the hands of
the enemy.

Theme: The main theme of this book is coming of age. Although Samuel acts like an adult in
many ways as the book opens, he undergoes a change over the course of his adventure that
significantly changes his outlook. Raised in the woods, Samuel is most comfortable on his own,
being self-sufficient and living independently. When the British take his parents, he is forced to
leave all that he knows and fight to keep his family together.

Target Grade Level: 7th


Subject: Social Studies and the Literacy

Common Core Standards:

CCSS ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.1
Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text
says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2
Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source;
provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or
opinions.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to use textual evidence and synthesize information from a
secondary source to expand their previous knowledge
Students will be able to become spies like those during the Revolutionary War and
create their own secret letters
Students will have a deeper understanding than they did about the methods and
techniques that spies used during the Revolutionary War
Students will be able to reflect on their knowledge as a result of their readings and
gain new perspectives and understanding of spies during the Revolutionary War
Resources/Material List:
K-W-L Worksheet (1 for each student)
Spy Information Packet (1 for each student)
White Card Stock Paper (1 for each student)
Pen (1 for each student)
Milk
White Vinegar
Lemon Juice
Salt Water
Teaspoon of Water

Procedure:
- Focus & Review: Yesterday we finished reading chapter 14 in Woods Runner. Can
anyone tell me what we learned at the end of the chapter about Abner? (Students
should answer: he is a spy that goes back and forth with news about things that are
happening that people are interested in knowing). Yes, Abner is spy and as we learned
that he is too old to fight against the enemy redcoats, so he helps out those who are
against the redcoats and need to know what is happening in the war. We have been
learning about all the different roles that people played during the war. Does anyone
remember what some of these roles were? (Students should answer: soldiers,
womens role, Native Americans, and the role that children played) Today we will
continue to learn about the roles that people played during the Revolutionary War by
learning about spies and how they communicated in todays activity.
- Introduction: Today we are going to become spies and communicate through covert
communication tactics that were used during the Revolutionary War in order to see
how Abner might have secretly delivered his messages (hook). In todays class you
will be working with a partner to understand some of spy techniques used in the
Revolutionary War by filling out a K-W-L worksheet (students will have already
worked with filling out these types of worksheets previously. K stands for what you
know about spies. W stands for what you want to know and the L stands for what you
learned). In order to complete your K-W-L worksheet you will also receive
information from about methods and techniques used by spies during the
Revolutionary War. After completing the K-W-L worksheet with your partner, and
gaining an understanding of how what spies did during this time, it will now be your
turn to work independently, and create a secret message that can only be read using
spy techniques.
- Modeling: I will pre-pick partners students will be working with to complete their K-
W-L worksheet. Each group will need one K-W-L worksheet as well as one
information packet on spy methods and techniques. Sitting with your partner you will
completely fill out your worksheet. When filling out your worksheet, each column
should have at least three different examples of what you know, what you want to
know, and what you learned. The first thing that you are going to do is start by filling
out the K on your worksheet, which is what you already know about spies. You will
then move to the W and then to filling out the L on your worksheet. In order to fill out
the L column about what you learned you must write down facts that you learned
from the information packet that you received on spy methods and techniques. At this
point, I will model step-by-step how I would complete this worksheet with my partner
and give students an example of what I would put for each column. (K-People might
become spies to help in the war efforts if they cant fight as a solider, like Abner. W-I
want to learn about the different methods used to keep letters a secret and I want to
know if being a spy more dangerous than being a solider in the war. L- I have learned
that invisible ink was used and special codes to encrypt secret messages)
- Cooperative Practice: Students will work in pairs to complete a K-W-L worksheet on
spies and what they learned from the information packet. Students will use a
worksheet to guide them through the process. After the students complete the
worksheet, we will go over their answers as a class. I will ask students several
questions as well to see if students understood what they read.(What sort of
information did the spy letters contain? How did the spy letters exchange hands? Why
was it so dangerous to deliver a letter?) If any students have further questions or
didnt understand something that was discussed in the information packet, students
may ask questions. At the end of class discussion and answers, I will collect their
worksheet so I can see that each student completed their own worksheet and has
come away with a greater understanding of spy methods and techniques used during
the American Revolutionary War.
- Modeling: Now that you have gained a deeper understanding of the different
methods and techniques used by spies during the Revolutionary War, it is now your
turn to make your own secret letter by using invisible ink. Remember at the end of
chapter 14, how we learned that both the American and the British military forces
disguised their communications so that messages could not be easily read if captured
by their enemies? It is also your goal to not have your message read, unless the other
person knows how to decode your message. The next activity you will be doing
independently, and your task is to answer a secret message that I have sent you. But
before you read my secret message, you must learn how to create your own secret
message (I will now walk through the process of creating a secret message step-by-
step and make a final product just as they will do independently). To create the special
ink that you will use I will combine lemon juice, some milk, salt water, white vinegar,
and a teaspoon of water. You will also need to write your message on heavy white oak
tag paper. In order to write your secret message you must dip your pen into the ink
that has been provided for you. Remember, that this ink will dry quickly and you
wont be able to see what you just wrote, so I would suggest holding your finger at
the end of your last word to mark your place (I will demonstrate this when I write my
message). You are only replying to the message that I have sent you and nothing else
(I will demonstrate dipping my pen into the ink and writing my secret message, which
students are to respond to. My secret question is: Describe one method used by spies
to conceal their communication during the Revolutionary War? You will now see the
message that I wrote when I hold the letter up towards the light. What does my
message say? (Students should answer: Describe one method used by spies to
conceal their communication during the Revolutionary War?). Very good, now it is
your turn to respond to this question independently by using the resources that are
available to you such as your information packer and chapter 14 of Woods Runner.
After you are finished, you may bring it to me and see if I can read your secret
message.
- Independent Practice The students will work independently at their desk with the
tools that are provide for them to write their secret letter and respond to the question
that was asked of them. Students should use the resources that are available to them
including their information packet and chapter 14 of Woods Runner to respond to my
question. After writing their response, students must turn in their message to me and
see if I can read their response.
- Closure/Assessment We will wrap up the days activity by me asking, What did we
learn today? Did you learn anything new? Was their any spy tactic or method what
you think would work better than others? Why? I will know that students have met the
standards if they were able to take information from their packet on methods that
spies used to communicate and gave several examples on their K-W-L worksheet. I
will also know if students knowledge expanded by being able to see what they
previously knew to what they know now after learning about spy methods.
Furthermore, students will be able to understand the techniques used by making their
own message and demonstrating that on their own they can describe a spy
communication method used during the Revolutionary War.
Whats Next?

After this lesson, we will move from spy tactics and communication methods used during the
Revolutionary War, to communication methods and spy tactics used in the 21st century.

ED524 Childrens Literature


Integrated Lesson: Social Studies, Science, and Math
Spring 2015
Mcllwain

Citation:
Paulsen, G. (2010). Woods Runner. New York, NY: Ember.

Summary: Thirteen-year-old Samuel spends most of his days in the forest, hunting for food for
his family. Samuel has grown up on the frontier in a cabin that straddles the line between
civilization and the wilderness. Here Samuel and his family live a hard, but relatively quiet,
existence on the western edge of the British colony of Pennsylvania. Far from any town, or news
of the war against the King that American patriots have begun near Boston. But the war comes to
them. British Redcoats and the Iroquois Indians brutally arrack his settlement, and Samuels
parents are taken away, prisoners. Samuel follows their trial, hiding, drawing on his forest skills,
and moving silently, determined to find a way to rescue his parents. Along the way he hides from
enemy soldiers and witnesses the horrors of war. Yet, he also finds allies, men and women
working secretly on behalf of the patriot cause. Samuel learns that he must travel deep into
enemy territory, all the way to the British headquarters in New York City. He must dig deep and
find the strength not only to rescue his own family, but others who have suffered at the hands of
the enemy.

Theme: The main theme of this book is coming of age. Although Samuel acts like an adult in
many ways as the book opens, he undergoes a change over the course of his adventure that
significantly changes his outlook. Raised in the woods, Samuel is most comfortable on his own,
being self-sufficient and living independently. When the British take his parents, he is forced to
leave all that he knows and fight to keep his family together.

Target Grade Level: 7th

Subject: Science and Literacy

Common Core Standards:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.A
Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly
draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and
reflect on ideas under discussion.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.6-8.2
Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the
text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will learn to research a topic such as plants and herbs that were used during the
Revolutionary War to cure illnesses and injuries in order to gain an understanding of how
these resources can be used medically.
Students will be able to read a text, gather information and answer questions during a
discussion with the class
Students will be able to effectively communicate their research to the class and refer to
their research as evidence
Students will learn how to collaborate with other students and accomplish a task
Students will be able to conduct their own research and find an appropriate source that
will help them to answer their research question
Students will be able to determine the main ideas of a text and concisely communicate
the text in their own words
Resources/Material List:

Herb Fact Sheet (one for each student)


Map of Plant Locations and Descriptions (one for each student)
Oak Tag Paper (one for each student)
Glue
Computer Lab

Procedure:

- Focus & Review: Yesterday in Science we learned about the various types of medical
tools that were used during the Revolutionary War to help treat soldiers injuries.
Who can remind me what some of those medical tools were? (Students should
answer: saw, cloth for bandages, knives, and needles). Great answers; these were all
tools used to try and mend and heal soldiers who were injured. In todays lesson we
are going to continue to learn about treatment methods that were available during the
Revolutionary War, but today we are going to focus on herbs and plants that were
used for various medical purposes during the Revolutionary War as well.

- Introduction: Today you are going to work in pairs to research herbs that would have
been used during the Revolutionary War as well as go on a nature walk to collect your
own sample of plants used as medicine (hook). You will work with your partner to
research in the computer lab (students already know how to research information on
their own) your assigned herb that can be used for medical purposes and complete an
herb fact sheet. After working with your partner, you will briefly explain to the class
what diseases or illness the herb can treat. At the end of the lesson, we will go on a
nature walk and you will locate your assigned plant. Once you have found your
assigned plant, we will head back into the computer lab so you can glue your plant on
oak tag and use the computers to research and then describe what medical purposes
your plant can be used for.

- Modeling: I will pre-pick the partners that students will be working in. Each
partnership will be assigned to a computer in the computer lab and will be given on a
flashcard their assigned herb as well as the herb fact sheet that needs to be
completed by each student. Sitting with your partner, you will begin to research your
herb by going to the website that I have written on the whiteboard at the front of the
room. I will also use my own computer and project it on the over-head so that
students can see where I want them to go and what I want them to do. Once, on the
website you will use the herb chart and find your herb. Then click on your herb and
all sorts of information will appear about your herb including its medical uses, a
description, and its history. You need to use this information to complete your own
herb fact sheet with the help of your partner. After going through directions, I will
model step-by-step how to find the herb that I am researching as well as my
completed fact sheet. Make sure to complete your fact sheet accurately and be able to
discuss how your herb is used for medical purposes. I will have my completed
worksheet projected though the computer as a reference for students while they are
working.
- Cooperative Practice: Students will work in pairs to research their herb as well as
complete the accompanying fact sheet. Students will use the questions on their
worksheet to guide them through the process and determine what information they
need to gather and be ready to explain to the class how their herb is used for medical
purposes. After all students have completed their research on their assigned herb, I
will call on each group of partners to explain to the class how their herb can be used
medically to treat illnesses. Once each group had shared, I will also ask if anyone has
any questions on the worksheet or would like to share any interesting facts that they
found when they conducted their research. I will then collect each students worksheet
so I can see that each student did his or her own work and found the proper
information.
- Modeling: As a class we are now going to go outside and go on a nature walk
through the trail that is located behind the school as well as on a walk through the
garden in the courtyard to find all of the plants that we need. (I will provide students
with a map of where they can find their plant as well as a description of what the
plant looks like). Who can remember why we are going outside to gather different
kinds of plants? (Student should answer: we are going outside to collect a variety of
different plants so that we can research on our own what these plants can be used for
medically to heal wounds or illnesses). That is correct, we want to gain a better
understanding of how some plants that might have been in the wilderness or area that
Samuel lived in and explored were used even during the Revolutionary War to treat
illnesses of soldiers and civilians. Before we go outside and locate each plant that you
have been assigned, I want to show you what you will be doing (I will show students
my example of a Dandelion that I found in the woods. I will then show students how I
glued it on to the oak tag paper and then underneath of it explained what it can be
used for medically. After I glued my plant on the oak tag I used my computer to
research dandelions and what they can be used for medically. I then wrote what I
learned under my dandelion. Dandelions are flowers that can make yellow dye. A
tea from the leaves is used as a tonic and to promote bowel regularity. Juice is also
used to relieve stiff joints. The plant can be found throughout North America.) Make
sure to also include an APA citation of where you found your information (Students
already know how to cite properly). When you are writing your description of how it
can be used medically it should be only 2-4 sentences. After you finish gluing and
describing how your plant can be used medically, you will turn it in.
- Independent Practice: The students will now go outside and locate their plant using
the map that I provided them. Once students have located their plant they will head
back inside to the computer lab and glue their plant onto the oak tag that was
provided for them. They will then be responsible for finding a credible source that
describes how their plant can be used medically to cure illnesses. Students should
also describe where the plant could be found, so that they can gain an understating of
whether or not Samuel might have passed such a plant in his travels. Students will
then write down their description under their plant as well as cite their source using
an APA citation.
- Closure/Assessment: The activity will come to a close once all students have
completed their plant description page and turned them in. I will then call on several
students to share how their plant can be used medically and if they think Samuel
might have passed it in his travels. I will know students have met the standards if they
were able to discuss the material that they researched with their partner as well as
the information that they included on their herb fact sheet. I will also know if students
can determine the meaning of key terms through their research and their ability to
research their technical use in the medical and scientific field.

Whats Next?

After this lesson, we will move on to planting our own herbs in the classroom and collecting data
on our herb garden through this use of charts, taking weekly records of the amount of water,
fertilizer, and sun the plants receive, as well as charting the growth of the herbs.

ED524 Childrens Literature


Integrated Lesson: Social Studies, Science, and Math
Spring 2015
Mcllwain

Citation:

Paulsen, G. (2010). Woods Runner. New York, NY: Ember.


Summary: Thirteen-year-old Samuel spends most of his days in the forest, hunting for food for
his family. Samuel has grown up on the frontier in a cabin that straddles the line between
civilization and the wilderness. Here Samuel and his family live a hard, but relatively quiet,
existence on the western edge of the British colony of Pennsylvania. Far from any town, or news
of the war against the King that American patriots have begun near Boston. But the war comes to
them. British Redcoats and the Iroquois Indians brutally arrack his settlement, and Samuels
parents are taken away, prisoners. Samuel follows their trial, hiding, drawing on his forest skills,
and moving silently, determined to find a way to rescue his parents. Along the way he hides from
enemy soldiers and witnesses the horrors of war. Yet, he also finds allies, men and women
working secretly on behalf of the patriot cause. Samuel learns that he must travel deep into
enemy territory, all the way to the British headquarters in New York City. He must dig deep and
find the strength not only to rescue his own family, but others who have suffered at the hands of
the enemy.

Theme: The main theme of this book is coming of age. Although Samuel acts like an adult in
many ways as the book opens, he undergoes a change over the course of his adventure that
significantly changes his outlook. Raised in the woods, Samuel is most comfortable on his own,
being self-sufficient and living independently. When the British take his parents, he is forced to
leave all that he knows and fight to keep his family together.

Target Grade Level: 5th

Subject: Math and Literacy

Common Core Standards:

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.MD.A.1
Convert among different-sized standard measurement units within a given measurement
system (e.g., convert 5 cm to 0.05 m), and use these conversions in solving multi-step,
real world problems.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.2
Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how
characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects
upon a topic; summarize the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and
teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas
and expressing their own clearly.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to show proficiency using a ruler as a tool of measurement


Students will gain an understanding of how to covert between different units of
measurement
Students will be able to effectively collaborate and work with a partner to complete a task
and to communicate their thoughts
Students will be understand how a character in a story responded to a challenge and how
they can use the same strategies to solve real-life problems
Students will be able to accurately take measurements and use estimation
Resources/Material List:

Map of Pennsylvania and New York (one for each pair of students)
Map of New Hampshire (one for each student)
Map Worksheet for Pennsylvania and New York (one for each student)
Map Worksheet for New Hampshire (one for each student)
12in Rulers (one for each student)
Calculator (one for each student)
Flashcards with assigned starting locations in Pennsylvania (one for each pair of students)
Procedure:

- Focus & Review: In yesterdays lesson, we learned about how to do basic conversions
from numerous different measurement systems. Can anyone tell me what type of
measurement conversions that they learned? (Students should answer: centimeters to
meters, inches to meters, millimeters to inches, and centimeters to inches). This is
correct. During class we worked on converting different units of measurement and
also did a real life problem by learning how to convert kilometers to miles in order to
track my mom along her run in the Boston Marathon. We will continue to learn about
how to convert like measurement units within a given measurement system by
figuring out how fast Samuel has to travel to catch up to the Red-Coats and hopefully
his parents. Now does anyone remember how Samuel figured out how far he could
possibly be from his parents? (Students should answer: Samuel used estimation and
approximated how fast the soldiers might have been traveling with prisoners on foot
and estimated that the attach on his village was 24 to 22 hours ago and how long
they might have rested for. Samuel then estimated that they were 24 to 28 miles ahead
of him, pg.38). We will also be doing this in todays lesson and learning from how
Samuel responded to not knowing where his parents were and figuring out how fast
he would need to travel to reach his parents.
- Introduction: Today, you will have the opportunity to work with a partner to
determine how fast Samuel will need to travel to catch up to the Red-Coats as well as
how far he must travel to reach them on a map (Hook). You will also work
independently to answer a question about how far it would take to walk from your
hometown of Litchfield, New Hampshire to Boston, Massachusetts. First you will
work with your partner to measure how far one location on a map is from another
using a ruler and a map that will be provided to you (students will already know how
to use a ruler and measure distances). With your partner you will also be expected to
do some conversions. You will then divide the distance between the locations by how
fast Samuel is walking (students already know how to do this calculation from a
previous lesson on calculating how long it would take to travel across the U.S.) to
calculate the speed Samuel must travel to catch up to the Red-Coats. Finally, using
your understanding of how to measure distance from locations, you will calculate
how long it will take to travel from Litchfield, New Hampshire to Lincoln, New
Hampshire.
- Modeling: I will pre-choose partners that students will be working in. Each
partnership will be given the same materials, which includes a map of Pennsylvania
and New York as well as a ruler and calculator. Each group will also be given a
flashcard with the location that they need to start in Pennsylvania. All students will
measure from their assigned location to New York City where Samuels family was.
For this assignment you will be rounding each of your measurements to the nearest
inch. Also, each inch that you measure will represent three miles. Remember, that you
are only measuring with your partner from your assigned location in Pennsylvania to
New York City on your map. After all the directions have been given, I will model
step by step how I did my measurements and filled out the worksheet. First, I looked
at my flashcard, which instructed me that I was starting in Germantown, Pennsylvania
and measuring to New York City. I also looked at my worksheet, which told me to
round to the nearest inch and it told me that each inch that I measured was equal to
three miles. When I did this I measured a distance of 6 inches. I then figured out that
by taking my 6 and multiplying it by 3 (1 inch is 3 miles) I got a distance of 18 miles.
With your partner start by measuring the distance between the two locations and
finding how many miles they are apart. Once all students have completed this part
and filled out their worksheet, I will move on to modeling for students how fast
Samuel must travel to reach the Red-Coats. Now we are ready to calculate how fast
Samuel must travel to save his parents. How many miles in an hour can someone
walking travel on average? (Students should answer: between 2-4 miles per hour).
Simply for demonstrating purposes, you can go with any speed from 2-4 miles per
hour, but I will go with 3 miles per hour. I will then divide my answer of 18miles by
the speed that Samuel is traveling which is three miles per hour. This gives me my
answer of 6 and this tell us that it will take 6 hours for Samuel to reach his parents
from where he started in Germantown. Now that you have finished your calculations,
with your partner you must do several other calculations and conversions on your
worksheet. (Students will be expected to use their ruler to find the distance from their
location in Pennsylvania to New York City in inches to centimeters, as well as inches
to millimeters, and then inches to meters. I will model this as well). I know that I
measured 6inches so if I am converting this to meters I would do 6 x .0254 to get my
answer which is =.1524 meters. I would then take my inches which is 6 x 2.54 to get
my distance in centimeters which is = 15.24 centimeters. Finally to find inches to
millimeters I would do my calculation of 6 x 25.4 which is = 152.4. Does anyone see
the pattern or what is happening to our answers? (Students should answer: there is a
pattern from centimeters to millimeters in our answer you would just multiply by 10
because we know 10 millimeters are in a one centimeter).
- Cooperative Practice: Students will work with their assigned partner to complete
the worksheet together, take all measurements and calculations. The worksheet and
map will guide students through this part of the lesson. Students should begin by
finding out the distance to New York City from their location in inches and then
calculate how long it will take Samuel to get there depending on how quickly Samuel
is walking. Students will answer several conversion questions as well as a question
that asks them to find a pattern. After everyone is finished I will call on different
groups of partners to share their results with the class as well as ask if anyone had
any trouble on this assignment. We will then go over what students should have
answered on the last part of their worksheet about the pattern. I will then collect the
worksheets so that I can see that each student understands how to complete the
lesson.
- Modeling: Now that you have worked with a partner to complete several conversions
and found out how long it will take Samuel to reach his parents in New York City
from several different locations in Pennsylvania, you will now work independently to
work on calculating how long it would take to walk from your hometown of
Litchfield, NH to Lincoln, New Hampshire if you are walking at a pace of four miles
per hour? To answer this question measure in inches and this time each inch will be
equal to 10 miles. (All of these directions are on their independent worksheet). You
will then convert your answer that they got in inches to millimeters, centimeters, and
meters. (Students will have the math skills required to complete this math problem).

- Independent Practice: The students will work independently to complete the


question that is posed on their worksheet and to complete several conversion
questions. They will be responsible for answering the question completely, accurately,
and to the best of their abilities. After answering the main questions, students should
work through the conversion questions as well to see if they understand how to do
conversions on their own. I collect each students worksheet when they are done.
- Closure/Assessment: We will wrap up the lesson by asking, What did we learn
today about foot travel and how long it took Samuel? Did you learn anything new
about conversions? Why do you think it is important to understand conversions? I
will know if students understand and met the standards of the lesson if they are able
to accurately measure, estimate correctly with their partner, use a ruler correctly, and
articulate their answers to the class. I will also be able to tell if students understand
how to convert between different units of measurement as well as use information to
answer a real-word problem or question.

Whats Next?

In tomorrows lesson we will move on to a new unit of study on representing and interpreting
data. Students will learn how to make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in
fractions of a unit.