You are on page 1of 108

AC and DC Power and Ground

Wiring

Installation Manual
PN1:003
Revision B October 1995
D3P00661202

This manual supercedes the issue dated May 1995.


See CE Statement in Section 1
microPROVOX and PROVOX are marks of one or more of the Fisher-Rosemount group of companies.
All other marks are the property of their respective owners.

Fisher-Rosemount Systems, Inc. 1989, 1995. All rights reserved.


Printed in USA

The contents of this publication are presented for informational purposes only, and while every effort
has been made to ensure their accuracy, they are not to be construed as warranties or guarantees,
express or implied, regarding the products or services described herein or their use or applicability. We
reserve the right to modify or improve the designs or specifications of such products at any time without
notice.
Your Evaluation Please . . .

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Please indicate your evaluation of PN1:003 (Revision B October 1995). Attach extra sheets if needed.
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Please FAX or MAIL this form to: Fisher-Rosemount Systems, Inc.


Technical Documentation Editor
FAX Number: (512) 834-7200 8301 Cameron Road, MD#12
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FISHER-ROSEMOUNT USE ONLY forwarded to:
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Documentation Map

Documentation Map

AC and DC Power and Ground Wiring


This map shows manuals used to plan the installation of a PROVOXr Process
Management System. The number, title, and binder location are shown for each
document, identifying where specific information is located. See the descriptions
on the back of this map for more information.

YOU ARE HERE


Instrumentation
PROVOX

PN1:003
Installation AC and DC Power and Ground Wiring
Manual

PN1:002
Planning and Installation
PN1:004
Signal Wiring and Highway System
Guidelines
PN1:005
Preventing Electrostatic Discharge
PN1:006
Environmental Considerations for
Instrumentation systems
PN4:007
Lightning Protection Guidelines for
Instrumentation Systems
PN1:008
Site Evaluation

Revision B October 1995 iii


PN1:003
Documentation Map

PROVOX documentation supports each stage of system development.

System Development Stages Document Type & Contents

System Design Configuration Engineering Manuals


Configuration data-entry help for a
product, including theory of
operation for improved product
use.
Installation and User Manuals for
Configuration Products
Installation procedures, and
operating methods and procedures
for using the configuration
software.
Technical Reference Manuals
Advanced user information for
expanding the capability of the
PROVOX system.
System Managers Guide
Expert users information for
managing operating systems.

System Planning and Installation Manuals


Installation Site preparation, including the
environment, power, and
grounding. Also, product signal
wiring, cable connections, and
hardware installation.

System Startup and User Manuals


Operation Operating methods and
procedures for a product, and
software installation.
Tutorials
Structured training for operators.

Maintenance Maintenance Manuals


Preventative maintenance,
calibration, troubleshooting, and
repair procedures.

Ordering Information To order additional manuals, contact your local


sales representative, specifying the number, title, and quantity of each
document required.

iv Revision B October 1995


PN1:003
AC and DC Power and Ground Wiring

Contents
Section/Title Page

1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
1.1 Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
1.2 CE Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
1.3 Structure of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
1.4 Manual Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
1.5 Warnings, Cautions, and Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
1.6 Related Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
1.7 Reference Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
1.8 Excellence in Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5

2 AC Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1


2.1 AC Power Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
2.2 AC Source Voltage and Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
2.3 Recommended Wire Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3

3 AC Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1


3.1 System-Level Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
3.2 System Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
3.2.1 Using Type CP6101 and CP6102 Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . 3-12
3.2.2 Using Type CP6103 Power Supply Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
3.3 Consoles and Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
3.4 Peripheral Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20

4 DC Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1


4.1 DC Voltage Nomenclature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
4.2 DC Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
4.3 DC Power Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
4.4 DC Power Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
4.5 Field Transmitter Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4

5 Cabinet Alarm Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1


5.1 System Using Types CP6101 and CP6102 Power Supply Units 5-1
5.2 System using Type CP6103 Power Supply Units . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
5.3 Device Alarm Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2

Revision B October 1995 v


PN1:003
Contents

Section/Title Page

6 System Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1


6.1 Guidelines for Effective Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
6.2 Separating AC and DC Grounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
6.2.1 AC Ground System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
6.2.2 DC Ground System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
6.2.3 Cabinet Ground Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
6.3 Ground Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
6.3.1 Master and Local Ground Buses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
6.3.2 Single-Point Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
6.3.3 Power Supply Common (PSC) Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
6.3.4 Marking Grounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
6.3.5 Ground Impedance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
6.4 File and Shield Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
6.4.1 For PROVOX Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
6.4.2 For OEM Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
6.4.3 For Remote Termination Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
6.5 Intrinsic Safety Barrier Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
6.6 Consoles and Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
6.7 Peripheral Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14

7 Earth Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1


7.1 Designing an Earth Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
7.2 Testing an Earth Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7

8 Lightning Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1

Glossary

Index

Figures
3-1 AC Power Distribution System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
3-2 AC, DC and Signal Grounding System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
3-3 AC Distribution System Grounding (Continued).
DC Grounding also Shown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
3-4 Three Phase AC Power Input System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
3-5 Reverse Transfer Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)
with a Manual Transfer Switch (Three Phase) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
3-6 Single Phase AC Power Input System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
3-7 Reverse Transfer Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)
with a Manual Transfer Switch (Single Phase) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
3-8 Multiple Circuit Breaker Panel Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
3-9 Single Circuit Breaker Panel Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11

vi Revision B October 1995


PN1:003
Contents

Section/Title Page

3-10 System Cabinet AC Power Connections for


Type CP6101 and Type CP6102 Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
3-11 System Cabinet AC Power Connections for
Type CP6103 Power Supply Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
3-12 Console AC Power Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
3-13 Cabinet AC Power Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
3-14 Type CP9411 System Cabinet Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
3-15 DC9410-Series Control Room Furniture Power Distribution . . . 3-18
3-16 Electronics Enclosure Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
3-17 Custom Computer AC Power Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
3-18 Isolated Ground Receptacle Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20
4-1 Typical DC Power System CP6101/CP6102 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
4-2 Typical DC Power System and Ground Connections
for Cabinets with Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
4-3 Simplex DC Power Distribution with Redundant
Type CP6101 and Type CP6102 Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
4-4 Dual Simplex DC Power Distribution with a
Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
4-5 Redundant DC Power Distribution with a
Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
4-6 Fully Redundant DC Power Distribution with
Type CP6101 and Type CP6102 Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
4-7 Typical DC Power System and Ground Connections
for Cabinets with a Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit. . . . . . . . 4-9
4-8 DC Distribution Assembly and Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit. 4-10
4-9 Terminal Block Details for a Type CP6103 System
Power Supply Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
4-10 Control I/O Remote Termination Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
4-11 Control I/O Power Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
4-12 Control I/O Power Connections (Continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
4-13 Control I/O Power Connections (Continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
4-14 Highway Device Power Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
5-1 Types CP6101 and CP6102 Power Supply Alarm
Wiring Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
5-2 Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit Alarm Wring Example . . . . . . 5-4
5-3 Features of Control I/O Card File Alarm Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
5-4 Highway Device Alarm Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
5-5 Redundant Highway Device Alarm Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
6-1 AC and DC Multiple Cabinet Ground System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
6-2 Details of AC and DC Ground System with NEC/CSA
Code Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
6-3 Details of Local and Master Ground Buses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
6-4 DC/Cabinet Grounding System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
6-5 Multiple Cabinet System Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
6-6 Typical System Cabinet Ground Bus Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
6-7 Typical OWP Wall Frame Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8

Revision B October 1995 vii


PN1:003
Contents

Section/Title Page

6-8 Shield Ground Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11


6-9 Typical Ground Connections for Intrinsic Safety Barriers . . . . . . 6-12
6-10 Typical Ground Connections for Active , Galvanic Isolated,
Intrinsic Safety Barriers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
7-1 Example of Plant Ground Grid System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
7-2 Grounding Example (UFR Ground System) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
7-3 Grounding Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
7-4 Grounding Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
7-5 Grounding Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
7-6 Grounding Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
7-7 Grounding Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
7-8 Typical Test Setup and Connection for Testing an
Earth Ground System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7

Tables
2-1 Voltage and Frequency Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
2-2 Recommended Wire Sizes for 120 Volts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
2-3 Recommended Wire Sizes for 240 Volts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
2-4 Copper Conductor Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
2-5 Class 2 Stranded Conductors for Single-core and
Multi-core Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
6-1 Ground Wire Sizing Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8

viii Revision B October 1995


PN1:003
Section Tab Guide
Introduction 1
AC Power Requirements 2
AC Power Distribution 3
DC Power Distribution 4
Cabinet Alarm Wiring 5
System Grounding 6
Earth Grounding 7
Lightning Protection 8
Glossary 9
Glossary

Index 10
Index

Revision B October 1995 ix


PN1:003
This page intentionally left blank.

x Revision B October 1995


PN1:003
Introduction 1-1

Figure 1-Table 1

1
1 Introduction
This installation planning manual provides system-level
recommendations and guidelines for AC and DC power and ground
wiring of PROVOXr and microPROVOXt Process Management
Systems. Product-level instructions for power and ground wiring is
described in product installation manuals.

Note
Proper power and ground wiring are of prime
importance for operator safety, signal integrity,
and reliable operation of an instrumentation
system. Following the recommendations in this
installation planning manual to the maximum
extent possible can help you achieve these goals.

All power and ground wiring practices must conform to applicable local
codes and regulations. It is believed that the recommendations and
guidelines given in this installation planning manual meet or exceed the
codes and regulations.

The recommendations and wiring diagrams in this installation planning


manual are typical examples rather than specific requirements. Primary
emphasis is on safety and proper equipment operation.

While these recommendations and guidelines attempt to cover most


situations, there will no-doubt be peculiar installations that may deviate
from the norm. In these situations, contact your Fisher-Rosemount
Systems representative or sales office for assistance.

1.1 Intended Audience


This installation planning manual is intended for use by plant engineering
personnel who are planning and designing the power and ground
facilities for a PROVOX or microPROVOX system.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


1-2 Introduction

1.2 CE Statement
If you intend to have your PROVOX system certified for compliance to
1 appropriate European Union directives, the following CE statement is
extremely important to your ability to achieve that compliance.

This manual describes installation and


maintenance procedures for products
which have been tested to be in
compliance with appropriate CE
directives. To maintain compliance,
these products must be installed and
maintained according to the
procedures described in this manual.
Failure to follow the procedures may
compromise compliance.

1.3 Structure of this Manual


This manual contains the following sections:

Section 1 Introduction: includes an overview of this manual, the


intended audience, the stylistic and typographical conventions used, and
lists of documents where additional information is available.

Section 2 AC Power Requirements: describes the quality and the


specifications for the ac power required for the instrumentation system.

Section 3 AC Power Distribution: describes the required distribution


of ac power to system cabinets, operator consoles and other equipment.

Section 4 DC Power Distribution: describes the required distribution


of dc power in system cabinets used by the controllers, I/O systems, and
other cabinet-mounted equipment.

Section 5 Cabinet Alarm Wiring: describes cabinet alarm circuits used


to detect loss of power supply output, loss of battery backup, and cabinet
over-temperature.

Section 6 System Grounding: describes techniques used to assure


proper system grounding for optimum instrumentation system operation.

Section 7 Earth Grounds: describes how to design and test earth


ground systems.

Section 8 Lightning Protection: briefly describes lightning protection


principles and references for further reading.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Introduction 1-3

1.4 Manual Conventions


This manual uses the following conventions:
J Acronyms and Abbreviations Terms are spelled out the first time 1
they appear in text. Thereafter, only the acronym or abbreviation is
used. In addition, the glossary defines the acronyms and
abbreviations.
J Revision Control The title page lists the revision level and the
printing date of this manual. When the manual is revised, the revision
level and the printing date are changed.
J References References to other documents include the name
and catalog number for Fisher-Rosemount Systems manuals.

1.5 Warnings, Cautions, and Notes


Warnings, Cautions, and Notes attract attention to essential or critical
information in this manual. The types of information included in each are
explained in the following:

Warning
All warnings have this form and symbol.
Do not disregard warnings. They are
installation, operation, or maintenance
procedures, practices, conditions,
statements, and so forth, which if not
strictly observed, may result in personal
injury or loss of life.

Caution
All cautions have this form and symbol. Do
not disregard cautions. They are
installation, operation, or maintenance
procedures, practices, conditions,
statements, and so forth, which if not
strictly observed, may result in damage to,
or destruction of, equipment or may cause
a long term health hazard.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


1-4 Introduction

Note
1 Notes have this form and symbol. Notes contain
installation, operation, or maintenance
procedures, practices, conditions, statements,
and so forth, that alert you to important
information which may make your task easier or
increase your understanding.

1.6 Related Documents


The planning manuals listed below provide further information for system
installation planning:

J PN1:002, Planning the Installation

J PN1:004, Signal Wiring and Highway System Guidelines

J PN1:005, Preventing Electrostatic Damage

J PN1:006 Environmental Conditions for Instrumentation Systems

J PN4:007, Lightning Protection Guidelines for Instrumentation


Systems

J PN1:008, Site Evaluation

1.7 Reference Documents


The reference documents listed below are industry standard reference
material where further information about power and grounding can be
found:

1. Getting Down to Earth, 4th ed., Blue Bell, Pennsylvania; Biddle


Instruments. Copies of this publication are available from Biddle
Instruments, 510 Township Lane Road, Blue Bell, Pennsylvania,
19422, USA.

2. NFPA, NFPA-70 National Electrical Code, Boston; National Fire


Protection Association.

3. CSA, C22.1 Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, Rexdale, Ontario;


Canadian Standards Association.

4. ISA,RP60.08 Electrical Guide for Control Centers, Pittsburgh;


Instrument Society of America.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Introduction 1-5

5. API, RP-550 Installation of Refinery Instruments and Control


Systems, 3rd ed., Washington DC; American Petroleum Institute.

1.8 Excellence in Documentation 1


Our goal is to provide documents that meet your needs. Through
surveys and interviews, we continually evaluate our documents as part
of the broad Fisher-Rosemount Systems customer-support program.
Various manuals are produced for different purposes and for readers
with varying backgrounds and experience.

Please assist us in the evaluation of this manual by completing the


reader evaluation form located at the front of the document. In addition, if
you have any suggestions for specific pages, return a marked-up copy
along with your survey.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


1-6 Introduction

This page intentionally left blank.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Requirements 2-1

Figure 2-Table 2

2 AC Power Requirements
Commercial ac power utilities normally provide power that meets the 2
voltage and frequency requirements of the instrumentation system.
However, plant distribution networks may drop 5 percent or more of the
input ac power between the service entrance point to the plant and the
final power connection to the various portions of the instrumentation
system. Furthermore, starting transients from large motors and other
loads connected to the distribution system can cause additional
momentary line-voltage reductions as well as possible waveshape
distortions. Therefore, accessing ac power requirements and then
designing a plant ac distribution system that meets them is critical to
reliable, efficient control system operation. This section describes
considerations to help you design a good plant ac distribution system.

2.1 AC Power Quality


To maintain good ac power quality, such problems as power loss,
intermittent noise, low voltage, or transients and surges on power lines
must be controlled or designed around. To suppress electrical noise, a
dedicated feeder between the main distribution panel and the
instrumentation system branch panel is recommended. If low voltage
from the commercial power source or objectionable transients and
surges exist, or if noise is a problem even with a dedicated feeder, a
device such as a noise filter or voltage regulating power source which
reduces input power noise may be required.
Devices which can be used include:
J Isolation transformer
J Noise filters
J Line conditioner
J Voltage regulating power source
J Motor-generator set
J uninterruptible power supply (UPS)

Note
It is strongly recommended that isolation
transformers be used because they inherently
provide good line regulation and transient filtering.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


2-2 AC Power Requirements

If loss of power from a commercial power source is a probability, a


backup power source such as an uninterruptible power supply for critical
portions of the control system is recommended.

The instrumentation system should have an ac power source that is


isolated from lighting and all other power loads, and each building or site
2 containing instrumentation should have a separate power source or
backup power source. These conditions are particularly important for the
instrumentation system control center, which generally contains the
console or computer and associated equipment.

When an isolation transformer is used, the primary power source should


be supplied from the highest line voltage available from the commercial
source, and then through a step-down transformer to the required lower
voltage for the instrumentation system. Only the instrumentation system
should be connected to this step-down transformer; no other ac loads
should be connected. The reason for using the highest voltage is to take
advantage of the natural noise attenuation which occurs when the
voltage and any noise is stepped down.

2.2 AC Source Voltage and Frequency


The ac power source should have sufficient capacity to handle
equipment inrush overcurrents or surge currents (lasting about ten
cycles), and still regulate its output voltage within the nominally rated
voltage tolerances for the equipment. This tolerance is measured at the
power input to the equipment when the equipment is energized.
Table 2-1 lists the voltage and frequency requirements for the dc power
supplies which provide dc power to cabinet-mounted PROVOXr
instruments, such as SR90 and SRx controllers and the Control I/O
subsystem.

Table 2-1 Voltage and Frequency Requirements


Type CP6101 Type CP6102 Type CP6103
Nominal Range Hz Nominal Range Hz Nominal Range Hz
100 86--113 58--62 110/115 97--127 48--52 120/240 85--264 47--63
117 102--132 58--62 120/127 107--140 48--52
200 172--226 58--62 220 187--242 48--52
230/240 204--264 58--62 230/240 204--264 48--52

Power requirements for PROVOX operator consoles and peripheral


equipment are listed in their product bulletins. For other equipment using
switching power supplies, use only low impedance output power
sources. Then use normal transformer load recommendations.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Requirements 2-3

2.3 Recommended Wire Sizes


Wiring from the power source to equipment should be large enough to
maintain the voltage at the equipment input terminals within the specified
tolerances when all equipment is energized. The wiring must, at a
minimum, conform to applicable local, state, and federal codes to ensure
that it can conduct the current load safely without overheating. 2
Recommended wire sizes for various load currents and run lengths are
listed in Table 2-2 for 120 volts input power and Table 2-3 for 240 volts
input power. Figures in the tables represent one-way distances. Each run
length indicates the maximum distance in feet (meters) which each wire
size can be to carry the current (listed in the left column) with no more
than a 2% voltage drop. If a 4% drop is acceptable, double the distances
shown. For a 5% drop, multiply all distances by 2.5.
Table 2-4 presents properties and data for various wire sizes. For
countries incorporating metric standards, use the equivalent or larger
standard metric wire size from Table 2-5.

Table 2-2 Recommended Wire Sizes for 120 Volts


Wire size AWG (mm2)
Load Power 12 10 8 6 4 2 1/0 2/0 3/0
Current (Watts) (3.31) (5.28) (8.37) (13.30) (21.15) (33.63) (53.46) (67.44) (85.02)
(A)
Run Length Feet (Meters)
1 120 622 992 1570 2444 3896 6185
(189.6 (302.4) (478.5) (744.9) (1187.5) (1885.2
) )
2 240 311 496 785 1222 1948 3093
(94.8) (151.2) (239.3) (372.5) (593.7) (942.7)
3 360 207 330 523 814 1299 2062 3278
(63.1) (100.6) (159.4) (248.1) (395.9) (682.5) (999.1)
5 600 124 198 314 489 779 1237 1967 2482
(37.8) (60.3) (95.7) (149.0) (237.4) (377.0) (599.5) (756.5)
10 1200 62 99 157 244 389 618 983 1240 1566
(18.9) (30.2) (47.8) (74.4) (118.6) (188.4) (299.6) (377.9) (477.3)
15 1800 41 66 105 163 260 412 656 827 1044
(12.5) (20.1) (32.0) (49.7) (79.2) (125.6) (199.9) (252.1) (318.2)
20 2400 31 49 78 122 195 309 492 620 783
(9.4) (14.9) (23.8) (37.2) (59.4) (94.2) (149.9) (189.0) (238.7)
25 3000 25 39 63 98 156 247 393 496 626
(7.6) (11.9) (19.2) (29.9) (47.5) (75.3) (119.8) (151.2) (190.8)
30 3600 21 33 52 81 130 206 328 413 522
(6.4) (10.1) (15.8) (24.7) (39.6) (62.8) (100.0) (125.9) (159.1)
35 4200 18 28 45 70 111 177 281 354 447
(5.5) (8.5) (13.7) (21.3) (33.8) (53.9) (85.6) (107.9) (136.2)
40 4800 15 25 39 61 97 154 246 310 391
(4.6) (7.6) (11.9) (18.6) (29.6) (46.9) (75.0) (94.5) (119.2)

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


2-4 AC Power Requirements

Table 2-2 Recommended Wire Sizes for 120 Volts


Wire size AWG (mm2)
Load Power 12 10 8 6 4 2 1/0 2/0 3/0
Current (Watts) (3.31) (5.28) (8.37) (13.30) (21.15) (33.63) (53.46) (67.44) (85.02)
(A)
2 Run Length Feet (Meters)
45 5400 22 35 54 86 137 218 276 348
(6.7) (10.7) (16.5) (26.2) (41.8) (66.4) (84.1) (106.1)
50 6000 20 31 49 78 124 197 248 313
(6.1) (9.4) (14.9) (23.8) (37.8) (60.0) (75.6) (95.4)

Table 2-3 Recommended Wire Sizes for 240 Volts


Wire Size AWG (mm2)
Load Power 12 10 8 6 4 2 1/0 2/0 3/0
Current (Watts) (3.31) (5.28) (8.37) (13.30) (21.15) (33.63) (53.46) (67.44) (85.02)
(A)
Run Length Feet (Meters)
1 240 1243 1983 3141 4888 7792
(378.9) (604.4) (957.4) (1489.9) (2375.0)
2 480 622 992 1570 2444 3896 6185
(189.6) (302.4) (478.5) (744.9) (1187.5) (1885.2)
3 720 414 661 1047 1629 2597 4124 6557
(126.2) (201.5) (319.1) (496.5) (791.6) (1257.0) (1998.6)
4 960 311 496 785 1222 1948 3093 4918 6205
(94.8) (151.2) (239.3) (372.5) (593.7) (942.7) (1499.0) (1891.3)
5 1200 249 396 628 977 1558 2474 3934 4964 6266
(75.9) (120.7) (191.4) (297.8) (474.9) (754.1) (1199.1) (1513.0) (1909.8)
10 2400 124 198 314 489 779 1237 1976 2482 3133
(37.8) (60.3) (95.7) (149.0) (237.4) (377.0) (599.5) (756.5) (954.9)
15 3600 83 132 209 326 519 825 1311 1654 2089
(25.3) (40.2) (63.7) (99.4) (158.2) (251.5) (399.6) (504.1) (636.7)
20 4800 62 99 157 244 389 618 983 1240 1566
(18.9) (30.2) (47.8) (74.4) (118.6) (188.4) (299.6) (377.9) (477.3)
25 6000 50 79 125 195 311 495 787 993 1253
(15.2) (24.1) (38.1) (59.4) (94.8) (150.9) (239.9) (302.7) (381.9)
30 7200 41 66 105 163 260 412 656 827 1044
(12.5) (20.1) (32.0) (49.7) (79.2) (125.6) (199.9) (252.1) (318.2)
35 8400 35 56 90 139 222 353 562 709 895
(10.7) (17.1) (27.4) (42.4) (67.7) (107.6) (171.3) (216.1) (272.8)
40 9600 31 49 78 122 195 309 492 620 783
(9.4) (14.9) (23.8) (37.2) (59.4) (94.2) (149.9) (189.0) (238.7)
45 10,800 44 70 108 173 275 437 551 696
(13.4) (21.3) (32.9) (52.7) (83.8) (133.2) (167.9) (212.1)
50 12,000 39 63 98 156 247 393 496 626
(11.9) (19.2) (29.9) (47.5) (75.3) (119.8) (151.2) (190.8)

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Requirements 2-5

Table 2-3 Recommended Wire Sizes for 240 Volts


Wire Size AWG (mm2)
Load Power 12 10 8 6 4 2 1/0 2/0 3/0
Current (Watts) (3.31) (5.28) (8.37) (13.30) (21.15) (33.63) (53.46) (67.44) (85.02)
(A)
Run Length Feet (Meters) 2
60 14,400 52 81 130 206 328 413 522
(15.8) (24.7) (39.6) (62.8) (100.0) (125.9) (159.1)
70 16,800 45 70 111 177 281 354 447
(13.7) (21.3) (33.8) (53.9) (85.6) (107.9) (136.2)
80 19,200 61 97 154 246 310 391
(18.6) (29.6) (46.9) (74.9) (94.5) (119.2)
90 21,600 54 86 137 218 276 348
(16.5) (26.2) (41.8) (66.4) (84.1) (106.1)
100 24,000 49 78 124 197 248 313
(14.9) (23.8) (37.8) (60.0) (75.6) (95.4)
125 30,000 62 99 157 198 250
(18.9) (30.2) (47.8) (60.3) (76.2)
150 36,000 52 82 131 165 209
(18.1) (25.0) (39.9) (50.3) (63.7)
200 48,000 39 62 98 124 156
(11.9) (18.9) (29.9) (37.8) (47.5)

Table 2-4 Copper Conductor Properties


Size Area *Area Conductors DC Resistance at 75 C, 167 F
AWG/ Cir mm2 Stranding Overall Ohms/kFT
MCM Mils Qty Dia. In. Dia. In. Area In.2 Uncoated Coated
18 1620 0.82 1 0.040 0.001 7.77 8.08
18 1620 7 0.015 0.046 0.002 7.95 8.45
16 2580 1.31 1 0.051 0.002 4.89 5.08
16 2580 7 0.019 0.058 0.003 4.99 5.29
14 4110 2.08 1 0.064 0.003 3.07 3.19
14 4110 7 0.024 0.073 0.004 3.14 3.26
12 6530 3.30 1 0.081 0.005 1.93 2.01
12 6530 7 0.030 0.092 0.006 1.98 2.05
10 10380 5.27 1 0.102 0.008 1.21 1.26
10 10380 7 0.038 0.116 0.011 1.24 1.29
8 16510 8.35 1 0.128 0.013 0.764 0.786
8 16510 8.35 7 0.049 0.146 0.017 0.778 0.809
6 26240 13.27 7 0.061 0.184 0.027 0.491 0.510
4 41740 21.15 7 0.077 0.232 0.042 0.308 0.321

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


2-6 AC Power Requirements

Table 2-4 Copper Conductor Properties (Continued)


Size Area *Area Conductors DC Resistance at 75 C, 167 F
AWG/ Cir mm2 Stranding Overall Ohms/kFT
MCM Mils Qty Dia. In. Dia. In. Area In.2 Uncoated Coated

2 3 52620 26.69 7 0.087 0.260 0.053 0.245 0.254


2 66360 33.59 7 0.097 0.292 0.067 0.194 0.201
1 83690 42.43 19 0.066 0.332 0.087 0.154 0.160
1/0 105600 53.46 19 0.074 0.373 0.109 0.122 0.127
2/0 133100 67.49 19 0.084 0.419 0.138 0.967 0.101
3/0 167800 84.95 19 0.094 0.470 0.173 0.0766 0.0797
4/0 211600 107.16 19 0.106 0.528 0.219 0.0608 0.0626
250 37 0.082 0.575 0.260 0.0515 0.0535
300 37 0.090 0.630 0.312 0.0429 0.0446
350 37 0.097 0.681 0.364 0.0367 0.0382
400 37 0.104 0.728 0.416 0.0321 0.0331
500 37 0.116 0.813 0.519 0.0258 0.0265
600 61 0.992 0.893 0.626 0.0214 0.0223
700 61 0.107 0.964 0.730 0.0184 0.0189
750 61 0.111 0.998 0.782 0.0171 0.0176
800 61 0.114 1.03 0.834 0.0161 0.0166
900 61 0.122 1.09 0.940 0.0143 0.0147
1000 61 0.128 1.15 1.04 0.0129 0.0132
1250 91 0.117 1.29 1.30 0.0103 0.0106
1500 91 0.128 1.41 1.57 0.00858 0.00883
1750 127 0.117 1.52 1.83 0.00735 0.00756
2000 127 0.126 1.63 2.09 0.00643 0.00662
Note: These resistance values are valid only for the parameters as given. Using conductors having coated strands,
different strand types, and especially different temperatures will change the resistance.
Note: The formula for the temperature change is: R2 -- R1 (1 + a (T1 -- 20) acu = 0.00393
Note: Class B stranding is listed as well as solid for some sizes. Its overall diameter and area is that of its circumscribing
circle. The construction information is per NEMA Standard WC8--1976 (Rev 5--1980). The resistance is calculated
per National Bureau of Standards Handbook 100, dated 1966 and Handbook 109, dated 1972.
Note: Conductors with compact and compressed stranding have about 9 percent and 3 percent, respectively, smaller bare
conductor diameters than those shown.
Note: The IACS conductivities used bare copper = 100%.
Note: Reprinted with permission of NFPA 70-1984, National Electrical Code, Copyright 1984, National Fire Protection
Association, Quincy, MA 02269. This reprinted material is not the complete and official position of the NFPA on the
referenced subject.
* This column has been added and is not part of the table in the National Electrical Code.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Requirements 2-7

Table 2-5 Class 2 Stranded Conductors for Single-core and Multi-core Cables
Nominal Minimum Number of Wires In Copper Maximum resistance of
Cross Section Conductor Annealed Copper Conductor at
Area (mm2) 20C (Ohms/km)
Circular Compacted Shaped Plain Wires Metal-Coated
Conductor Conductor Conductor Wires 2
0.5 7 36.0 36.7
0.75 7 24.5 24.8
1 7 18.1 18.2
1.5 7 6 12.1 12.2
2.5 7 6 7.41 7.56
4 7 6 4.61 4.70
6 7 6 3.08 3.11
10 7 6 1.83 1.84
16 7 6 1.15 1.16
25 7 6 6 0.727 0.734
35 7 6 6 0.524 0.529
50 19 6 6 0.387 0.391
70 19 12 12 0.268 0.270
95 19 15 15 0.193 0.195
120 37 18 18 0.153 0.154
150 37 18 18 0.124 0.126
185 37 30 30 0.0991 0.100
240 61 34 34 0.0754 0.0762
300 61 34 34 0.0601 0.0607
400 61 53 53 0.0470 0.0475
500 61 53 53 0.0366 0.0369
630 91 53 53 0.0283 0.0286
800 91 53 0.0221 0.0224
960 (4x240) Number of wires not specified 0.0189
1000 91 53 0.0176 0.0177
1200 Number of wires 0.0151
1600 not specified 0.0113
2000 0.0090
Note: Extracts from BS63601981 are reproduced by permission of the British Standards Institution. Copies may be
obtained from BSIat Linford Wood, Milton Keyes ,MK146LE.
Note: To obtain the maximum resistance of hard-drawn conductors, the values in columns 5 and 6 should be divided by
0.97.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


2-8 AC Power Requirements

This page intentionally left blank.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-1

Figure 3-Table 3

3 AC Power Distribution
The ac power supplied to a PROVOXr Process Management System
should be taken from an ac power distribution system which is isolated 3
from the power supplied to all other functions in a process control
system. In addition, a separate distribution system is recommended for
each building containing control system equipment. This isolation can be
provided by either an isolation transformer or by an uninterruptible power
supply.

Note
To maintain ac power quality, isolation of power
supplied to the instrumentation from power
supplied to all other functions and the importance
of using a different distribution system for each
building containing instrumentation cannot be
overemphasized,

PROVOX system cabinets and consoles require single-phase power.


Commercial computer systems usually require a 120/240 volt circuit, two
120 volt circuits, a 208Y/120 volt circuit, or European 230/240 Vac 50 Hz
single phase circuit, depending on computer configuration. If a
three-phase distribution system is used, exercise care to balance the
load between phases at each power panel, minimizing any voltage
differentials between the ac neutral and the grounding conductors.

3.1 System-Level Power Distribution


Figure 3-1 shows a typical system-level power distribution system.
Figure 3-2 and Figure 3-3 shows further details of typical ac power
distribution and a plant ground system. Input ac power is supplied
through an isolation transformer or UPS, with the ac ground point for the
instrumentation system established at or near the transformer or UPS.

The ac circuit conductors are routed through the main distribution panel
(containing the main disconnect switch) into the circuit breaker panel or
panels. This system meets or exceeds the requirements of Article 250 of
the National Electrical Code. The isolated grounding system is used for
signal reference.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3-2 AC Power Distribution

Figure 3-4 provides additional detail for three-phase wiring between an


isolation transformer and the main distribution panel.

Figure 3-5 shows an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) used in a


three-phase system with an isolation transformer.

Figure 3-6 provides additional detail for single-phase wiring between an


isolation transformer and the main distribution panel.

3 Figure 3-7 shows an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) used in a


single-phase system with an isolation transformer.

For large systems, multiple circuit breaker panels should be used.


Separate panels are dedicated to system cabinets and to consoles and
computers, as shown in Figure 3-1.

Figure 3-8 provides wiring details for a multiple circuit breaker panel
installation.

Figure 3-9 provides wiring details for a small system to a single circuit
breaker panel.

Both Figure 3-8 and Figure 3-9 show the neutral and ground conductors
bonded to separate bus bars inside the circuit breaker panel. The bus
bars are electrically isolated from the panel and from each other.
Throughout the system, all ac circuit conductors (line, neutral, and
ground) are electrically isolated from their conduits and circuit breaker
panels.

This conductor isolation is maintained from the isolation transformer or


UPS to the point of final connection at the instrumentation equipment.
The only connection between neutral, isolated ground, and earth ground
is at the main bonding jumper. The insulated grounding conductor should
be the same size or larger than the phase and neutral conductors.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-3

Console &
System Cabinet Computer Main
Breaker Panel Breaker Panel Distribution Plant
Panel Power
Grid

Insolation
Transformer
3
DC6961
Logging
System Unit
Cabinet
#1
Computer
Logging
System Console Unit
Cabinet Bay #1
#2

Computer
System Console Console
Cabinet Bay #2 Bay #1
#3
Computer
System Console Console
Cabinet Bay #3 Bay #2
#4

System Console
Cabinet Bay #4
#5
Console Computer
System Bay #5 Cabinet
Cabinet Computer #1
#6 Logging
Unit Computer
System Cabinet
Cabinet Logging #2
#7 Unit

System
Cabinet
#8

System System System


Cabinet Cabinet Cabinet
#9 #10 #11

Legend
-- Utility box for cabinet power connections
-- Utility box for isolated ground receptacles
1 -- a single breaker panel may be used for small systems.

Figure 3-1 AC Power Distribution System

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3
3-4
Branch Circuit
Distribution Bond Conduit Both Ends Isolate N and G
terminals from box

PN1:003
L Power
Single Phase
Distribution
Shown Main N
Distribution

Figure 3-2
G
Panel
Transfer
Switch
Power Cord
A OWP Wall Unit
B
Power Cord
C
AC Power Distribution

AC
Supply Computer HOST
Isolated Gnd COMPUTER
N Twist Lock Power Cord
Receptical PROVUE

Alternate
AC Supply
4/0 AWG
Insulated
Cable

AC, DC and Signal Grounding System


DO NOT ENCLOSE Grounding For Multi--Cabinet Grouping, Refer to Figure 3-3.
PROVOX
Conductors in Metalic Conduit.
Instrumentation
Ground (PIG)

Grounded DC/Cab GND


Steel
Column
per Code

Existing Building
Plant Ground GND

Figure 3-2 AC Distribution System Grounding

Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-5

L Single
N Circuit for each Cabinet
2
G Cabinet Supply
Notes:
1 Cabinets are grouped in a maximum of eight so a
cabinet ground and local ground bus (LGB)
connection will come to the master ground bus
(MGB) for each group
2 Typical ac input for a dc power supply

PSC CP6103

2
3
Cab GND

To PROVOX instrumentation Ground (PIG)

Example of Multiple Cabinets and Power Supplies

PSC CP6103 PSC PSC CP6103 PSC PSC CP6103 PSC PSC CP6103 PSC

LGB

DC GND Cab GND


Cab GND
MGB Tie
To PROVOX instrumentation Ground (PIG) 1
To Additional
Cabinet Grounds
To Additional
LGBs

PSC PSC PSC PSC

-- --

LGB

To MGB

Figure 3-3 AC Distribution System Grounding (Continued). DC Grounding also Shown

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3-6 AC Power Distribution

AC Input from Isolation Transformer Main


Commercial Distribution
Power Source 2 Panel 2

A
3 1
C
A
C A A
B
B B
B C
3 C N
GND

4
To Circuit
Breaker
Panel(s)

Grounded
Steel Column DC/CAB GND

PROVOXr Instrumentation Ground (PIG)

Dedicated Plant Ground Grid Point

Notes:
1 Circuit breaker, as required by local codes and 3 The isolation transformer secondary can be a
regulations 208Y/120 Volt, 120 Volt, 120/240 Volt output or
European 230/240 Volt.
2 Conduit provides a safety ground connection 4 The conductor between the neutral and ground
for individual panels. leads and the dedicated AC ground should be as
short as physically possible.

Figure 3-4 Three Phase AC Power Input System

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-7

AC Input Isolation Transformer


from
Commercial Main Transfer Switch
Power
Source A
A C
C A A

B B To Circuit
B
B C Breaker
C Panel(s)
N
G

Backup
Input 3

Rectifier Inverter

1
AC Input A
from B
Commercial
Power C
Source
N
Static
2 Switch

Battery
Bank
DC/CAB GND

Grounded PROVOXr Instrumentation Ground


Steel Column
Notes:
1 Dedicated Plant Ground Grid Point
Conduit provides a safety ground connection
for individual panels.
2 The conductor between the neutral and ground
leads and the dedicated AC ground should be as
short as physically possible.

Figure 3-5 Reverse Transfer Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) with a Manual
Transfer Switch (Three Phase)

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3-8 AC Power Distribution

AC Input from Isolation Transformer Main Main Disconnect


Commercial Distribution Switch
Power Source Panel
2
2

Lin Lin
e e
1

Neut Neut

3 GND

Backup
Input To Circuit
Breaker
Grounded Panel(s)
Steel Column DC/CAB GND

PROVOXr Instrumentation Ground

Dedicated Plant Ground Grid Point


Notes:
1 Circuit breaker, as required by national codes and regulations
2 Conduit provides a safety ground connection for individual panels.
3 The conductor between the neutral and ground leads and the dedi-
cated AC ground should be as short as physically possible.

Figure 3-6 Single Phase AC Power Input System

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-9

AC Input Isolation Transformer


from
Commercial Main Transfer Switch
Power 2
Source
L L

To Circuit
Breaker
N N Panel(s)

Backup
Input 3

Rectifier Inverter

1
AC Input L
from
Commercial
Power
Source N

Static
3 Switch

Battery DC/CAB GND


Bank

Grounded PROVOXr Instrumentation Ground


Steel Column

Notes: Dedicated Plant Ground Grid Point


1 Conduit provides a safety ground connection 3 The conductor between the neutral and ground
for individual panels. leads and the dedicated AC ground should be as
2 This output can be substituted for the isolation short as physically possible.
transformer in Figure 3-1.

Figure 3-7 Reverse Transfer Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) with a Manual
Transfer Switch (Single Phase)

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3
3-10

From Main Power

PN1:003
G Distribution Panel
N A B C

Emergency Disconnect Switch

Figure 3-8
Main Power Circuit
Breaker Panel
A
B
C
AC Power Distribution

N
2
G

A
B
C
N
2 G Circuit Breaker
A B C
G 1 2 Panel
N
Neutral Bus (Isolated
N Circuit Breaker Console
from Breaker Panel) G A B C
2 Panel Power
N
Ground Bus (Isolated System
G
from Breaker Panel)
Cabinet
Console

Multiple Circuit Breaker Panel Wiring


Power
Power

System
Notes: Cabinet Computer
Power Power
1 Conduit provides a safety ground connection
for individual panels.
System
2 Circuit breaker as required by national codes Cabinet
and regulations. Power

System
Cabinet Isolated
Neutral Bus (Isolated Ground
Power from Breaker Panel)
Neutral Bus (Isolated Receptical
from Breaker Panel) N
N
Ground Bus (Isolated
from Breaker Panel)
Ground Bus (Isolated
from Breaker Panel) G
G

Figure 3-8. Multiple Circuit Breaker Panel Wiring

Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-11

From Main
Distribution Panel
A C
N B

Circuit Breaker Panel


B C
2
1 3
Twist Lock,
PROVUE

PROVUE
and OWP
3

CP6103
Power
Supply

2
OWP

Isolated
Ground
Neutral Bus (Isolated Receptacle
from Breaker Panel)
N

Ground Bus (Isolated


from Breaker Panel)

Notes:
1 Conduit provides a safety ground connection for individual panels.
2 Circuit breaker as required by national codes and regulations.
3 Second phase required if console has dual circuit power utility strip.

Figure 3-9 Single Circuit Breaker Panel Wiring

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3-12 AC Power Distribution

3.2 System Cabinets


All ac power for the system cabinets is routed from a circuit breaker
panel, as shown in Figure 3-8 and Figure 3-9, and is connected to the
Type CP7101 Power Distribution Panel assembly located in a system
cabinet when Type CP6101 or CP6102 Power Supplies are used, or
directly to the power supply when a Type CP6103 Power Supply is used.

3
3.2.1 Using Type CP6101 and CP6102 Power Supplies
Each Type CP7101 Power Distribution Panel assembly contains one or
two separate ac circuits. as shown in Figure 3-10. These circuits supply
power to the two twistlock receptacles and the duplex receptacle in the
panel. One twistlock receptacle is dedicated to the primary power. The
second twistlock receptacle is dedicated to the backup power supply, if
supply redundancy is selected. The duplex receptacle, with its own
circuit breaker, is used for the cooling fans within the cabinet.

Each twistlock receptacle in power distribution panels used in nominal


100 or 120 volt ac systems must be supplied from a separate 20 ampere
circuit breaker. Each twistlock receptacle in nominal 200, 220, or 240 volt
ac systems must be supplied from a 15 ampere circuit breaker. The
duplex receptacle is connected in parallel with the primary twistlock
receptacle through a 15 ampere (120 Vac) or 7.5 ampere (240 Vac)
circuit breaker internal to the power distribution panel.

All ac power cords between the conduit utility box and the power
distribution panel should be connected to the utility box as shown in
Figure 3-10. All ac power supplied to a single cabinet grouping must be
tied to the same ground system at the power source neutral to ground
point.

3.2.2 Using Type CP6103 Power Supply Units


Each Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit contains one or two power
supplies, as shown in Figure 3-11. Terminal blocks are provided for two
ac input sources which allows each power supply to be connected to a
separate ac source. Separate dc output terminals are provided on the
front of the housing for each power supply. The chassis of the power
supply unit is internally bonded to the ground terminal of each ac input
terminal block.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-13

Cable
Utility Box Clamp System Cabinet Assembly 4

A
1
N To Primary
Power Input N 5 Power
from Circuit A Supply
Breaker
Panel Top View
2

3
To
Primary
Power
Cabinet
Fans
3
Cable 6

Front View
N N
B To Back-up
A = Phase A A
5 Power
B = Phase B Supply
N = Neutral (if Selected)
= Ground Top View

Secondary Ground Stud on


Power Cable Distribution Panel
Notes:
1 Connections inside of utility box may be to a terminal block or wire nut connections.
2 Conduit provides a safety ground connection for the utility box.
3 Pushbutton reset circuit breaker rated at 7.5 (240 Vdc) or 15 (120 Vdc) Amperes.
4 Power cable connections to the power distribution panel are factory wired.
5 Example shows NEMA L5--20R receptacle.
6 Example shows NEMA 5--15R receptacles.

Figure 3-10 System Cabinet AC Power Connections for Type CP6101 and Type
CP6102 Power Supplies

Inputs from each terminal block are routed through a 1 pole 15 ampere
circuit breaker to an auxiliary terminal block for use by auxiliary
equipment. The type of equipment normally connected to the auxiliary
terminals are cabinet fans, modems, and other light loads. Since the
terminal block is tied to the power supply source, you do not want any
power problems in the auxiliary to cause the main breaker to trip.
Therefore, use a 20 A breaker for 600 W power supply and a 30 A
breaker for a 1200 W power supply. In no case, use higher than a 30 A
breaker per branch circuit.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3-14 AC Power Distribution

3 AC Input 1
L
N

+
26Vdc (PS1 Output)
-- 1

AUX
2 Output 1
3
AUX
Output 2

+
26Vdc (PS2 Output)
-- L
N

Type CP6103 System Power Supply Unit


Notes: 3 AC Input 2
1 Rocker ON/OFF switch/circuit breaker for auxiliary ac outputs
2 Two wires can be connected to each terminal
3 Input 1 and Input 2 shall be supplied from separate dedicated circuit breakers

Figure 3-11 System Cabinet AC Power Connections for Type CP6103 Power Supply
Units

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-15

3.3 Consoles and Computers


All ac power for the console or computer equipment is routed from a
circuit breaker panel (this can be the same panel as the cabinet
equipment), as shown in Figure 3-8 and Figure 3-9. The ac power
requirements for the console or computer must be provided at the point
of connection to the console or computer equipment. For voltage and
frequency requirements, refer to the product bulletin for the equipment. 3
Power for console components is supplied from a utility power strip
located inside each console bay unit or auxiliary console bay assembly
as shown in Figure 3-12. All utility power strips in a console grouping
must receive power from the same circuit breaker panel. Consoles with a
single-circuit utility power strip are supplied single-phase power from
separate circuit breakers. A 15 ampere breaker is used for nominal 120
volt ac systems, and a 10 ampere breaker is used for 220 or 240 volt ac
systems.

Power for components installed in Type CP9411 System Cabinets and


DC9410-Series Control Room Furniture (OWP wall units) is supplied
from utility strips (located inside the cabinet or wall unit) as shown in
Figure 3-13, Figure 3-14, and Figure 3-15. Figure 3-16 shows the power
distribution in the electronics enclosures available for wall units.

For the system cabinets, input power from a breaker is connected to a


terminal block inside the cabinet. For wall units, connection to the utility
power strip is provided by an IEC input power cord (country specific). All
utility power strips in a cabinet grouping must receive power from the
same circuit breaker panel. Wall units with single circuit utility power
strips are supplied power from separate circuit breakers.

As shown in Figure 3-17, computer cabinets are normally supplied power


from a utility box through power cords to a power distribution unit inside
the cabinet. For a 120 volt ac, 60 hertz single bay computer, the
computer power distribution unit must be supplied either from two
single-phase 120 volt power circuits with neutrals connected together, or
from a 120/240 volt ac circuit. For a multibay computer, the computer
power distribution unit can be supplied from three-phase 208Y/120 volt
ac power circuits. Each phase conductor can be supplied through a
separate 20 A circuit breaker which is part of a ganged circuit breaker.

For a 220 or 240 volt, 60 hertz, single bay computer, the computer power
distribution unit must be supplied from a 20 A circuit breaker, 220 or 240
volt, single-phase branch circuit. For a multibay computer, the computer
power distribution unit must be supplied from a 30 A circuit breaker, 220
or 240 volt, single-phase branch circuit.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3-16 AC Power Distribution

Console Bay Unit or Auxiliary Console Bay Assembly

Utility Box 1
Utility Power Strip 4

Power
Input from
N N
Circuit
Breaker
Panel G
G
2

3 Top View

Ground
Stud

N = Neutral
G = Ground To Console
Components
(as required)
Notes:

1 AC power cable and plug connections to


the utility strip are factory wired.
2 For installations which include an isolated
ground receptacle, a three-wire, isolated
ground receptacle, is supplied with
consoles that have a single-circuit utility
strip. Installations that do not include an
isolated ground receptacle should be
connected as shown in Figure 3-18.
Example shows NEMA L5--15R
receptacle.

3 Power cable connections to the utility power strip are factory wired.

Figure 3-12 Console AC Power Connections

Circuit Green
Power Strip Breaker
Black White

L G N
To Ground Power Input From Circuit
Breaker Panel

Figure 3-13 Cabinet AC Power Connections

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-17

Cabinet
Power Strip 1
Breaker 1 10 AMP

HUB Group 1 1 1 AMP

HDL Group 1 1 1 AMP

WS Group 1 1 6.2 AMP

3 Total: 8.2 AMPS Cabinet 3


4 Bus Bar

Power Strip 2 HUB Group 2 1 1 AMP


Breaker 2 10 AMP
HDL Group 2 1 1 AMP
Circuit Breaker Box

WS Group 2 1 6.2 AMP

Fan Fan 2 0.4 AMP


Total: 8.6 AMPS
3 4

Power Strip 3 HUB Group 3 1 1 AMP


Breaker 3 10 AMP
HDL Group 3 1 1 AMP To
Chassis
WS Group 3 1 6.2 AMP

Fan Fan 2
0.4 AMP
Local
Ground
VT Terminal 1 AMP (External)
3 4

Total: 9.6 AMPS


Notes:
1 Auto ranging input voltage
2 Fixed 115 or 230 input voltage
3 Customer supplied breaker and power cord
4 Terminal block (inside cabinet)

Figure 3-14 Type CP9411 System Cabinet Power Distribution

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3-18 AC Power Distribution

Power Strip 4 AIU 1 0.2 AMP


Breaker 4 10 AMP

Wall Unit
Logic Module 1 2.5 AMP
3

Monitor 1 2.4 AMP


5
Monitor 1 2.4 AMP
3 Total: 7.50 AMPS

Breaker 5

Breaker 6
Power Strip 7 AIU 1 0.2 AMP
Breaker 7 10 AMP
Wall Unit

Logic Module 1 2.5 AMP

Monitor 1 2.4 AMP


5
Monitor 1 2.4 AMP
Total: 7.03 AMPS

Power Strip 8 Color Printer 4 3.2 AMP


Circuit Breaker Box

Breaker 8 10 AMP
Adapter 1 0.32 AMP
Wall Unit

Logging Printer 6 1.6 AMP

Total: 5.12 AMPS


2

Note:
1 Auto ranging input voltage
2 Removable IEC input cord (country specific)
3 Customer supplied breaker
4 Switch select voltage
5 Receptacle
6 Fixed 120, 220 or 240 input voltage

Figure 3-15 DC9410-Series Control Room Furniture Power Distribution

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


AC Power Distribution 3-19

Electronics
Enclosure Rack

Electronics
Enclosure Power Strip HUB Group 1 1 AMP
10 AMP
HDL Group 1 1 AMP

WS Group 1 6.2 AMP

Fan 2 0.4 AMP 3


Total: 8.6 AMPS
Black
Green
3
White

Notes:
1 Auto ranging input voltage
2 Fixed 115 or 230 input voltage
3
To external ac input

Figure 3-16 Electronics Enclosure Power Distribution

Computer Cabinet
Power Cord
C
Utility Box 4
Power Strip
2 3
B
1
C C
A
Power B B
Input from A A Neutral
Circuit N N
Breaker Chassis
Panel Ground

Cable
A = Phase A
B = Phase B
Clamp
C = Phase B
N = Neutral
= Ground
Notes:
1 For 3 operation remove jumper and add third phase as shown.
2 Conduit provides a safety ground connection for the utility box.
3 Wire nut connections inside of utility box.
4 An isolated ground receptacle and twist lock connector can also be used.
5. Connections shown are applicable to Hewlett-Packard system only.
Consult DEC manual for power input connections diagram.

Figure 3-17 Custom Computer AC Power Connections

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


3-20 AC Power Distribution

3.4 Peripheral Equipment


All peripheral equipment used with consoles and computers is powered
either from the utility power strips inside the console or computer cabinet,
or from remote isolated ground receptacles. These receptacles are
shown in Figure 3-8 and Figure 3-9 and detailed in Figure 3-18. Isolated
ground receptacles must be constructed and installed in such a way that
the ground terminal is electrically isolated from the conduit and the box in
3 which the receptacle is mounted.

If non-isolated communications or signal wiring is used, each peripheral


unit must receive ac power from the same circuit breaker panel as the
electronics unit or computer with which it interfaces. The load imposed
on the utility power strips by the peripherals and the electronics units
should be balanced between the utility power strips as much as possible.
However, if possible, connect the power cable for a console printer unit
or a console disk unit (hard) to a utility strip which is not supplying power
to a console electronics unit or a video display unit.

Line

Power Input Neutral


from Circuit
Breaker Panel Ground

Note:
1 Isolated ground receptacle for console and
computer remote peripherals is a 15 Amp, 120
Volt, 2-pole, 3-wire duplex receptacle, NEMA
type 5-15R, Orange in color or with orange
triangle.

Figure 3-18 Isolated Ground Receptacle Details

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


DC Power Distribution 4-1

Figure 4-Table 4

4 DC Power Distribution
All controller, I/O, multiplexer, or communications devices contained in a
system cabinet are powered by a nominal 24 volt dc power distribution
system. The system cabinets are available with a laminated bus bar
which distributes dc power to the devices in the cabinet. Power to this 4
bus bar can be obtained from system power supply units or from a
user-supplied dc source within the processing plant.

4.1 DC Voltage Nomenclature


As you look at PROVOXr equipment dc voltage markings and read the
PROVOX manuals, you will find small variations in the dc voltage
nomenclature. These variations follow the PROVOX system marking
conventions.

The system nominal dc voltage is +24 volts, and cabinet bus bars are
marked for the nominal voltage. The dc power supplies produce a range
of 24 to 26 Vdc, and the power supplies are marked for their nominal
output voltage. For example, the output terminals on the Type CP6103
System Power Supply Unit are marked as +26 Vdc and --26 Vdc. These
variations fall within the operating range of dc-powered PROVOX
equipment, which is 21 to 29 Vdc.

In this manual and other PROVOX manuals, dc voltages are indicated as


24 Vdc nominal where no particular device is referenced. If, however, a
specific device, such as a power supply, is being considered, then the
voltage indicated will be the voltage of the device.

4.2 DC Power Supplies


Type CP6101 and CP6102 System Power Supply units mount on EIA
rails at the bottom of a PROVOX system cabinet and are provided with
ac power through a Type CP7107 Power Distribution Panel. A second
power supply unit can be used for backup with both units connected
through the power distribution panel. Details for wiring the power supply
units are found in the appropriate power supply and power distribution
panel installation planning notes. For additional backup and power
outage protection, a user-supplied dc power source (either batteries or
dc power supplies) can be connected to the power distribution panel.

The Type CP6103 System Power Supply Unit mounts on EIA rails at the
bottom of a cabinet and are provided with ac power directly to the ac

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


4-2 DC Power Distribution

input terminal blocks on the power supply unit housing. The unit can
house two power supplies, one of which can be used to backup the
other. Details for wiring the power supply units are found in Installing and
Maintaining Type CP6103 System Power Supply Unit Manual,
PN2.1:CP6103.
In a multi-cabinet distribution using Type CP6103 System Power Supply
Units, a DC Distribution Assembly should be mounted in the central
cabinet and used for distributing dc power to the cabinets. The power
supply units should be mounted in the central cabinet with the DC
Distribution Assembly.
4 The voltage at the bus bars mounted in the cabinets is nominally 24 volts
dc. However, the different voltages available from backup batteries and
power supplies, plus the varying voltage drops that occur in the
connecting wiring, can cause the voltage at each device to be higher or
lower. Be sure that the voltage at the device terminal connections is
within the tolerance specified for each individual product (see the
appropriate product bulletin for these specifications).

4.3 DC Power Recommendations


When designing the dc power distribution system, the overall process
strategy needs to be reviewed to make sure that the system can provide
the reliability to the process management system as required by the
process.

Note
Process management system availability can be
an overlooked aspect of dc power distribution
system design. Availability is more than simply
redundant controllers, I/O cards, and
communications. It may also require redundant dc
power distribution.

A good review reveals what level of redundancy is needed. Redundancy


can mean simple backup of power supplies, or can mean two separate
dc power systems supplying power to separate, but redundant, I/O and
controller files in separate cabinets.

Figure 4-1 shows the typical terminations for the Type CP6101 and Type
CP6102 System Power Supply units, the Type CP7101 Power
Distribution Panel (PDP), and bus bars in system cabinets. Cabinets 1
through 3 show a typical system with three cabinets, three primary
supplies, and one backup supply. The backup supply is normally load

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


DC Power Distribution 4-3

sharing with the three primary supplies, so all four supplies are in use.
Therefore, should one of the primary supplies or the backup supply fail,
there is no power loss at the load.

The backup supply must be connected to the same Local Ground Bus
(LGB) as the associated primary supplies. A backup supply can back up
a primary supply in a separate cabinet if the total length of multistrand,
8-AWG (8.35 mm2), wire between the backup supply, primary supply,
and the local ground bus (LGB) does not exceed 21 feet (6.4m). The
length is from the supply to the PDP to the bus bar and back to the
power supply common (PSC).
4
An alternate redundant bus method is also shown in Figure 4-1 at
cabinets 4 and 5. This method can be used when two or three adjacent
cabinets require a total input current of less than 35 amperes. The bus
bars can be connected together and receive power from the redundant
power supply unit.

Figure 4-3 illustrates simplex dc power distribution with redundant Type


CP6101 and Type CP6102 power supplies and Figure 4-6 illustrates fully
redundant dc power distribution with Type CP6101 and Type CP6102
power supplies.

Figure 4-2 shows the typical termination for the Type CP6103 System
Power Supply Units and bus bars in system cabinets. Cabinets 1 through
3 show a typical system with three cabinets, three primary supplies, and
three secondary supplies. The secondary power supplies are normally
load sharing with the primary supplies. If either the primary or secondary
supply fails, there is no power loss at the load.

An alternate method is also shown in Figure 4-2 at cabinets 4 and 5.


This method can be used when two adjacent cabinets require a total
input power of less than one 600 Watt (23 A) or 1200 Watt (46 A) power
supply. Both sets of bus bars can be connected to one power supply
unit. The bus bars can be installed in separate cabinets or in a front and
rear access cabinet.

Figure 4-4 illustrates a dual simplex dc power distribution configuration,


with two power supplies in a single Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit.

Figure 4-5 illustrates a redundant dc power distribution configuration with


two power supplies in a single Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit.

Figure 4-7 illustrates an alternate dc power distribution with two power


supplies in a single Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit, providing power for
three cabinets. The terminal blocks (TR1 +/-- and TR2 +/--) are installed
on a DC Distribution Assembly, and are used to organize and simplify
connections. Use No. 8 AWG insulated wire: red for all +24 V wiring and
black for all --24 V wiring.

Figure 4-8 shows the general wiring to a DC Distribution Assembly. The


terminations on the assembly are arranged similarly to those on a Type

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


4-4 DC Power Distribution

CP6103 Power Supply Unit. The assembly is capable of supplying eight


bus bars. It should be mounted below the power supply unit for easy
access and organization of dc power wiring.

Figure 4-9 shows the details of the power and alarm connection terminal
block on a Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit.

4.4 DC Power Connections


All dc power to the devices located in the system cabinets is obtained
4 from the cabinet laminated bus bar. Terminations of typical products are
shown in Figure 4-12 through Figure 4-14 and are detailed in the
installation planning manual for each product. Each product requires
nominal +24 Vdc and power supply common (PSC) connections. The
terminations are made to the laminated bus bar by using stranded wire
with a minimum size of 12 AWG (3.30 mm2). Use red wire for +24 Vdc
and black for PSC (--24 Vdc).

Connect the PSC circuits at a common point beyond which no additional


power supply return currents flow. The connection point can be at the
local ground bus (LGB) or master ground bus (MGB) for systems using
Type CP6101 and Type CP6102 Power Supplies, at the local ground bus
(LGB) for systems using Type CP6103 Power Supply Units.

If dc power for remotely located Control I/O termination panels is


obtained from the same source as the Control I/O card files, as shown in
Figure 4-10, there must be less than 1 volt drop across the power leads
to the termination panels. The distance between the card files and the
remote termination panels must not exceed 200 cable feet (61 m). If dc
power is applied from a separate source, the ground and returns must be
referenced to the same point. Also, ac power must be obtained from the
same ac power distribution system.

4.5 Field Transmitter Power


DC power for field transmitters should not be obtained directly from the
24V bus bar, but should be obtained from the fused terminations on the
individual card files or termination panels that are designed exclusively
for powering the transmitters. AC Power for ac-powered field devices
(such as relays, solenoids, and transmitters) must not be the same ac
power used to power the process management system. The two ac
power sources must be isolated to prevent ground loops.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


System Cabinet 1 System Cabinet 2 System Cabinet 3 System Cabinet 4 System Cabinet 5
Cabinet Optional Power Distribution
Bus 7 Rear Panel 1
Bar Bus Bar PWR
System Power
Supply BTRY
PSC PS 1

Figure 4-1
PS 2
COM PRI
+24 System Power
+24V SEC Supply

Revision B October 1995


Power Distribution +24 COM
Panel 1
Power Distribution Power Distribution +24V
PWR
Panel 1 Panel 1
BTRY
PS 1 PWR Power Distribution
PWR Panel
PS 2 BTRY BTRY 1
PS 1 PS 1 PWR
PS 2 PS 2 BTRY
System Power PS 1
Supply PS 2
System Power System Power
COM Supply PSC Supply PSC System Power
PSC Supply
PSC +24V COM COM
PSC PSC PSC COM
+24V +24V
+24V
PRI PRI PRI PRI PRI
+24 +24 +24 +24 +24
SEC SEC SEC SEC SEC
+24 +24 +24 +24 +24

6
2 Master
PSC Ground Local
Legend: Bus Ground
PSC = Power Supply Common Bus
+24V = Normal 24 Volts 5

4 4 4
Cab Gnd

Typical DC Power System CP6101/CP6102


3 Notes:
Isolation
Transformer 5 Wiring from local ground bus to master ground bus
1 Breaker for +24V should be at least No. 1/0 AWG (53.46 mm2)
2 Master ground should be located in center cabinet or area of grouping. insulated wire.
Grounded 3 Wiring from master ground bus to single-point DC ground should be at 6 Wiring to local ground bus should be at least No.
Steel Column least No. 4/0 AWG (107.16 mm 2) insulated wire. 8 AWG (8.35 mm2) insulated wire.
Dedicated Plant Ground PIG 7 Optional rear bus bar (typical)
4 Cabinet ground should be at least 0.5 in. (12.7 mm) braid wire.
Grid Point

Figure 4-1. Typical DC Power System and Ground Connections for System Cabinets
with Type CP6101 and CP6102 Power Supplies
DC Power Distribution

PN1:003
4-5

4
4
4-6

System Cabinet 1 System Cabinet 2 System Cabinet 3 System Cabinet 4 System Cabinet 5

PN1:003
Cabinet Optional
Bus 6 Rear
Bar Bus Bar
Top
PSC PSC

Figure 4-2
PRI PRI
+24 +24
SEC SEC
+24 +24

Supplies
DC Power Distribution

System Power
System Power Supply Unit
Supply Unit System Power System
+ Supply Unit Power
+ -- 26V (PS1) Supply
-- 26V (PS1) + 26V (PS2) Unit
+ -- PSC +
PSC PSC PSC
+ 26V (PS1)
-- -- 26V (PS1)
-- 26V (PS2) PSC
+ 26V (PS2) +
-- -- 26V (PS2)
PRI PRI PRI PRI
PRI +24 +24
+24 +24
+24
SEC SEC SEC SEC
SEC
+24 +24 +24 +24
+24

1 5
Master
Local 2 Ground
Bus Local
Ground Ground
Legend: Bus
4 Bus
PSC = Power Supply Common
+24V = Normal 24 volts
3 3 3 3
Cab Gnd
2
Isolation Notes:
Transformer 4 Wiring from local ground bus to master ground bus
1 Master ground should be located in center cabinet or area of grouping. should be at least No. 1/0 AWG (53.46 mm 2)
insulated wire.
2 Wiring from master ground bus to single-point dc ground should be at
Grounded least No. 4/0 AWG (107.16 mm 2) insulated wire. 5 Wiring to local ground bus should be at least
Steel Column No. 8 AWG (8.35mm2) insulated wire.
Dedicated Plant Ground PIG 3 Cabinet ground should be at least 0.5 in. (12.7 mm) braided wire. 6 Optional rear bus bar (typical)
Grid Point

Figure 4-2. Typical DC Power System and Ground Connections for Cabinets with Type CP6103 Power Supply Units

Typical DC Power System and Ground Connections for Cabinets with Power

Revision B October 1995


DC Power Distribution 4-7

Optional Cabinet
Rear Bus Bar Bus Bar COM
Optional Backup
PSC
PSC +24V System Power Supply
PRI +24 PRI +24

SEC+24 SEC+24

+24V Breaker
PWR Out Power Distribution
BTRY Backup Panel
PS 1
PS 2 PSC
PSC

PSC PSC 4
COM
PRI +24 PRI +24 System Power Supply
+24V
SEC+24 SEC+24

+ --
Optional
Battery Backup Local Ground Bus

Figure 4-3 Simplex DC Power Distribution with Redundant Type CP6101 and
Type CP6102 Power Supplies

Optional Cabinet Optional Cabinet


Rear Bus Bar Bus Bar Rear Bus Bar Bus Bar
Connections Connections
at Top of Bar at Top of Bar
PSC PSC PSC PSC

PRI +24 PRI +24 PRI +24 PRI +24

SEC+24 SEC+24 SEC+24 SEC+24

Cab #1 Cab #2

+
PSC PSC PSC PSC 26V (PS1)
-- System Power
+
26V (PS2)
Supply Unit
PRI +24 PRI +24 PRI +24 PRI +24 --

SEC+24 SEC+24 SEC+24 SEC+24

Note: One power supply housing can


handle two power supplies in a sim-
plex or redundant mode of operation.
The power supply is mounted in the
central cabinet of a three or more
Local Ground Bus cabinet system

Figure 4-4 Dual Simplex DC Power Distribution with a Type CP6103 Power Supply
Unit

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


4-8 DC Power Distribution

Optional Cabinet
Rear Bus Bar Bus Bar
Connections
at Top of Bar
PSC PSC

PRI +24 PRI +24

SEC+24 SEC+24

Note: One power supply housing can han-


dle two power supplies in a simplex or re-
dundant mode of operation.

4
26V (PS1)
-- System Power
PSC PSC +
26V (PS2) Supply Unit
--

PRI +24 PRI +24

SEC+24 SEC+24

Local Ground Bus

Figure 4-5 Redundant DC Power Distribution with a Type CP6103 Power Supply
Unit
Optional Cabinet
Rear Bus Bar Bus Bar +24V Breaker
Secondary Power
PWR Out
BTRY Backup Distribution Panel
PSC
PSC PS 1
PS 2 PSC
PRI +24
PRI +24
SEC+24
SEC+24
Connections
at Top of Bar

COM
Optional Backup
+24V System Power Supply

PSC PSC +24V Breaker


PWR Out Primary Power
PRI +24 PRI +24
BTRY Backup Distribution Panel
SEC+24 SEC+24 PS 1
PS 2 PSC

PSC PSC

COM
PRI +24 PRI +24 System Power Supply
+24V
SEC+24 SEC+24

+ --
Optional
Battery Backup Local Ground Bus

Figure 4-6 Fully Redundant DC Power Distribution with Type CP6101 and Type
CP6102 Power Supplies

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


DC Power Distribution 4-9

System Cabinet 1 System Cabinet 2 System Cabinet 3


Optional PRi SEC Optional
Cabinet 4 Rear Cabinet PS1 PS2 Cabinet Rear
Bus Bar Bus Bar Bus Bar Bus Bar Bus Bar

PSC PSC PSC PSC

PRI PRI
PRI PRI +24
B E L +24
+24 +24 H
5 SEC SEC
SEC SEC A D G K +24 Connections +24
+24 Connections +24 at Top of Bar
at Top of Bar

TR1 TR1 TR2 TR2


+ + 6

Type CP6103
Power Supply
Unit
4
K + L
PSC PSC
D -- 26V (PS1) PSC
E
5
+ 26V (PS2)
PRI --
PRI PRI
+24 A 5 B
+24 +24
SEC SEC 7 SEC
G H
+24 +24 +24

1
3 Local
2 Ground
Bus

Cab Gnd
2
Isolation Notes:
Transformer 1 Local ground and power supply must be located in center cabinet or area of grouping.
2 Wiring from master ground bus to single-point DC ground should be at least No. 4/0
AWG (107.16 mm2) insulated wire.
Grounded
Steel Column 3 Cabinet ground should be at least 0.5 in. (12.7 mm) braided wire.
PIG 4 Optional rear bus bar (typical)
Dedicated Plant Ground
Grid Point 5 Letters indicate wiring from the terminal blocks to the
corresponding letters on bus bars: i.e. A to A, B to B, etc.
6 Terminal blocks on the DC Distribution Assembly. The assembly should
be installed under the Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit.
7 The bus bar in the cabinet with the power supply must be connected
directly to the terminal block on the Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit.

Figure 4-7 Typical DC Power System and Ground Connections for Cabinets with
a Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


4-10 DC Power Distribution

+
-- 26V (PS1) Type CP6103 System
+ 26V (PS2) Power Supply Unit
--

DC Distribution Assembly
26 VDC PS2 (Sec) 26 VDC PS1 (PRI)
+ + + +

-- -- -- --
IN OUT IN OUT

Note: the DC Distribution Assembly should be installed under the power supply unit

4 Figure 4-8 DC Distribution Assembly and Type CP6103 Power


Supply Unit.

PS1
(RIGHT)

+
26 VDC
OUTPUT
--

dc output block
+
26 VDC
OUTPUT
--

PS2
(LEFT)

ALARM
INTL.

Alarm connections N.O.


COM.
N.C.
PS1
PS2

Figure 4-9 Terminal Block Details for a Type CP6103 System


Power Supply Unit

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


DC Power Distribution 4-11

I/O File Cabinet Remote Termination Panels

PSC PSC
Termination
PRI Control PRI
Panel
+24 I/O File +24
SEC SEC
+24 +24

PSC
PRI Control
+24 I/O File 200 Feet Maximum
SEC Wiring Distance
+24

PSC

PSC
Type CP6103
Power Supply Unit
+
PRI
+24
Termination
Panel 4
1 -- 26V (PS1) SEC
+ 26V (PS2) +24
PRI -- D
+24 PSC F
A C 1
SEC
D PRI C 5
5
+24 E +24
F B
4 SEC E
+24
To Termination
Cabinet Bus Bars

LGB/MGB TRI TR1 TR2 TR2


+ -- + --
2 Cabinet
To PIG To Power Ground 3
supply
Notes:
1 Wire must be sized such that the PRI to PSC voltage measured at bus B does not vary more than 1 volt maximum
from the PRI to PSC voltage measured at bu A (without the secondary power supply on.
2 For two or more termination cabinets per supply, use a DC Distribution Assembly arrangement in the central cabinet
for busing the power.
3 Cabinets grounds are tied together and brought back to the MGB or PIG. In the case were no MGB is used, only an
LGB is tied to the PIG.
4 C, D, E, and F power supply to remote termination bus.
5 The connection may be made from a DC Distribution Assembly instead of a power supply unit.

Figure 4-10 Control I/O Remote Termination Power

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


4-12 DC Power Distribution

Secondary Primary
+24V +24V PSC Simplex Power Connect

2 TB!

PSC

Pri +24V Control I/O


Sec +24V Card File

Redundant Power 1
Connection
Discrete I/O
Shield Cable Interface
Panel
4 Panel Mounting Screw

TB!
PSC
Redundant
Pri +24V
Discrete I/O
Sec +24V Termination
Simplex Power Shield
Panel
Connection
Redundant Power TB2
Connection
Panel Mounting Screw
TB!
PSC
Redundant
Pri +24V Pulse Count
Input
Sec +24V
Termination
Simplex Power Shield Panel
Connection
Redundant Power TB2
Connection
Panel Mounting Screw
TB!
PSC
Redundant
Pri +24V 5 Amp Relay
Output
Sec +24V
Termination
Simplex Power Shield Panel
Redundant Power Connection
TB2
Connection
Panel Mounting Screw

Notes:
1 Dashed lines indicate connection when using redundant power. When simplex power is used, jumper termination
primary +24V and secondary +24V together.
2 Wires from +24V and PSC buses to cardfiles should be insulated and stranded of size 12 AWG (3.3 mm2).

Figure 4-11 Control I/O Power Connections

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


DC Power Distribution 4-13

Secondary Primary
+24V +24V PSC
Analog Input
Shield Cable Interface
Panel
Panel Mounting Screw

2 TB!
PSC
Single-ended
Pri +24V Analog Input
Sec +24V Termination
Simplex Power Connection
Panel
Shield
Redundant Power
Connection
1 TB2
4
Panel Mounting Screw
TB!
PSC
Isolated
Pri +24V Analog Input
Sec +24V Termination
Simplex Power Connection Panel
Shield
Redundant Power TB2
Connection
Panel Mounting Screw
Analog Output
Shield Cable Interface
Panel

Panel Mounting Screws

Analog Output
Shield Termination
Panel

A Type CL6922
B Intelligent Device
RTN Interface and
Type CP7801 I/O
J13 Bus Interface

Type CL6923
Intelligent Device
Interface

Notes:
1 Dashed lines indicate connections when using redundant power. When simplex power is used, jumper termination
primary +24V and secondary +24V together
2 Wires from +24V and PSC buses to cardfiles should be insulated and stranded of size 12 AWG (3.3 mm2).

Figure 4-12 Control I/O Power Connections (Continued)

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


4-14 DC Power Distribution

Secondary Primary
+24V +24V PSC
Analog Input
Shield Cable Interface
Panel
Panel Mounting Screw

2 TB!
PSC
Redundant
Pri +24V Single-ended
Analog Input
Sec +24V
Termination
1
Shield Panel

4 Panel Mounting Screw


TB2

TB!
PSC
Redundant
Pri +24V Isolated
Analog Input
Sec +24V
Termination
Shield Panel
TB2
Panel Mounting Screw

Analog Output
Shield Cable Interface
Panel

Panel Mounting Screw


TB!
PSC
Redundant
Pri +24V Analog Output
Termination
Sec +24V
Panel
Shield

Panel Mounting Screw TB2

Notes:
1 When redundant terminations are needed, the use of redundant power is recommended.
2 Wires from +24V and PSC buses to cardfiles should be insulated and stranded of size 12 AWG (3.3 mm2).

Figure 4-13 Control I/O Power Connections (Continued)

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


DC Power Distribution 4-15

Primary Secondary PSC


+24V +24V
SRx Controller

(20 Series)
UOC/IFC
TB3
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
PSC +24V PSC

4
+24V PRI
+24V SEC
1 FAN SR90 Controller
PSC

To +-terminal
on fan Tray
+ --
Highway II Bridge

+ --
Highway II Fiber
Optic Extender

Local Traffic Director,


PSC Network Traffic
PSC Director, Highway
+24V Interface Unit

PSC Serial Interface


PSC Unit
+24V

PSC Virtual I/O Coupler


PSC Card File
+24V

Programmable
PSC Controller
PSC Interface Unit
+24V

Notes:
1 Wires from +24V and PSC buses to cardfiles should be insulated and stranded of size 12 AWG (3.3 mm2).

Figure 4-14 Highway Device Power Connections

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


4-16 DC Power Distribution

This page intentionally left blank.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Cabinet Alarm Wiring 5-1

Figure 5-Table 5

5 Cabinet Alarm Wiring


PROVOXr system cabinets can be equipped with alarm circuits to detect
loss of output from a power supply unit, loss of battery backup, cabinet
over-temperature, and loss of power to an installed PROVOX device. As
shown in Figure 5-1, Figure 5-2, and Figure 5-4, the outputs of the
device alarm circuits are connected in series to operate an alarm relay.

When you use Types CP6101 and CP6102 System Power Supplies, the
alarm relay is included in the Type CP7101 Power Distribution Panel
5
(PDP). When you use Type CP6103 System Power Supply Unit, the
alarm relay is included in the unit.

The alarm relay provides a dry contact closure to a user-supplied


external alarm annunciator. If a controller card file, a local traffic director,
or a network traffic director has two power converter cards installed in a
single card file, the two alarm circuit outputs are connected in series to
indicate a low voltage or loss of output from either power converter card.

The alarm circuits are flexible for any application. Although the alarm
circuits for a single cabinet are typically connected in series to provide a
single cabinet alarm, as shown in Figure 5-1, Figure 5-2, and Figure 5-4,
each individual circuit or any combination of circuits in a device can be
connected to produce individual alarm indications.

5.1 System Using Types CP6101 and CP6102


Power Supply Units
Figure 5-1 shows the alarm connections for a system using a Type
CP6101 or Type CP6102 Power Supply Unit, using one or two Type
CP7101 Power Distribution Panels (PDP). A fuse pigtail is connected to
the PRI 24 Vdc connection at the top of the power bus. This fuse is then
connected to the cabinet thermal switch. From the switch, the alarm
wiring is routed to any file alarm connections, as shown in Figure 5-4
through Figure 5-3, and to the controller alarm outputs as included in the
alarm configuration.

One system alarm can be used, or several, depending on the alarm


configuration and the number of PDPs in the system. Alarm wiring can
go from cabinet to cabinet in a serial link. As you go from one cabinet to
another, you will need to put the thermal switch in the link. The PDP
must get 24 V into the alarm input terminals (INTLK) on the PDP. The
PSC terminal must be connected to the bus bar. Refer to Figure 5-1 for
an illustration of redundant power source alarming.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


5-2 Cabinet Alarm Wiring

5.2 System using Type CP6103 Power Supply


Units
Figure 5-2 shows the alarm connections for the Type CP6103 System
Power Supply Unit. The type CP6103 Power Supply Unit provides a
26 Vdc power source and protection for the alarm circuit. Connect to the
cabinet thermal switch from the power supply, then route through the file
and alarm circuits back to the supply.

The power supply unit contains separate alarm connections for each
power supply. The alarm and interlock terminal blocks connect to alarm
relay contacts and interlocks in the power supplies. The alarm terminal
5 blocks do not require wire terminating lugs.

To cause either power supply relay to function as a combined alarm


relay, connect any number of external alarm contacts that are closed
during normal equipment operation in series and wire them across the
interlock terminal connection of the power supply. If the interlock
connections of an installed power supply are not connected to external
alarm contacts, jumper the connections to enable the power supply
alarm relay to operate properly.

To use only one combined alarm for a cabinet, wire the output alarm
contacts for one power supply into the interlock circuit of the other power
supply. The alarm chain starts and ends at the power supply alarm
interlock (INTLK) connections. Use PS1 and route to the cabinet thermal
switch, then to chain, and back to PS1 interlock. This completes the
serial alarm chain. If you are not using an alarm chain, jumper the
interlock connections. For example, for a redundant system, the PS2
interlock (INTLK) should be jumpered. For two simplex systems which
are not using the alarm chain, both interlock circuits would be jumpered.

5.3 Device Alarm Wiring


Figure 5-4 through Figure 5-3 illustrate typical alarm wiring to PROVOX
devices installed in a PROVOX system cabinet. All devices being
powered from a Type CP6101, CP6102, or CP6103 power supply unit
must be referenced to the same LGB or MGB. Devices connected only
by a Control I/O bus or PROVOX highway cable do not require the same
ground reference since both communication systems provide isolation
between the devices.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Cabinet Alarm Wiring 5-3

Cabinet Thermal Switch


PSC
PRI TB! Control I/O
+24 Card File
SEC 4 A Fuse PSC
+24
Pri +24V
Sec +24V
Alarm Contact 1
Power Bus Alarm Contact 2 1
Bar Alarm Common

TB! Control I/O


Card File
PSC

Pri +24V
Sec +24V

5
Alarm Contact 1
Alarm Contact 2
Alarm Common

SR90 Controller
Alarm
2
Contact(s)

PSC
PRI
+24
SEC
+24
N.C. Power Distribution
COM Alarm Out Panel
N.O.
INTLK (Alarm In)
Power Bus PSC
Bar

Alarm Wiring

N.C. Power Distribution


COM Alarm Out Panel (PRI)
N.O.
3 INTLK (Alarm In)
PSC PSC
Details of Redundant
PDP Alarm Wiring
N.C. Power Distribution
COM Alarm Out Panel (SEC)
N.O.
SEC INTLK (Alarm In)
+24
PSC PSC

1 For simplex operation, use the common terminal and connect to the Alarm 1 terminal. Install the
Power/Communications card in Slot 1.
2 For SR90 controller, connect alarm wiring in series to the alarm contacts for each controller in the file.
3 For a single alarm output, make the dotted line connection.

Figure 5-1 Types CP6101 and CP6102 Power Supply Alarm Wiring Example

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


5-4 Cabinet Alarm Wiring

To Files From Files TB! Control I/O


Card File
PSC

Alarm Pri +24V


Intl. Sec +24V
Alarm Contact 1
Alarm Contact 2 1
Alarm Common
N.O.
External COM
Alarms N.C.
TB! Control I/O
Card File
PSC
PS1
PS2 Pri +24V
Wiring Detail for One External Sec +24V
Alarm Relay Output Alarm Contact 1
Alarm Contact 2

5 To Files From Files


Alarm Common

SR90 Controller
Alarm
Alarm 2
Contacts
Intl.

N.O.
COM External
External Alarms Alarm Type CP6103
N.C. Intl. System Power
Alarms
Supply Unit
N.O.
PS1
PS2 COM
N.C.
Wiring Detail for Two External
Alarm Relay Outputs PS1
PS2

1 For simplex operation, use the common terminal and connect to the Alarm 1 terminal. Install the
Power/Communications card in slot 1.
2 For an SR90 controller, connect alarm wiring in series to the alarm contacts for each controller in the file.

Figure 5-2 Type CP6103 Power Supply Unit Alarm Wring Example

TB!
1
PSC Control I/O
Pri +24V Card File
Sec +24V
Alarm Contact 1
Alarm Contact 2 2
Alarm Common

Notes:
1 For systems using Types CP6101 and CP6102 System Power Supply Units for see
Figure 5-1 for connections. For systems using a Type CP6103 System Power Supply Unit,
see Figure 5-2 for connections.
2 Alarm contact 2 path used when secondary power converter card installed. Alarm
common path is used instead of alarm contact 2 path for single power converter card.

Figure 5-3 Features of Control I/O Card File Alarm Wiring

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Cabinet Alarm Wiring 5-5

Cabinet Thermal Switch

1
Alarm
SRx Controller

Alarm Wiring
TB1
N.O.
Common
N.C. UOC/IFC
(20 Series)

I/O Driver
Card SR90 Controller
Alarm
5

Alarm

Highway II Bridge

Alarm
Highway II Fiber
Optic Extender

Alarm
Highway Interface
PSC
Unit
PSC
+24V

Alarm
Serial Interface
PSC
Unit
PSC
+24V

Notes:
1 For systems using Types
CP6101 and CP6102 System Alarm
Virtual I/O Coupler
Power Supply Units for see PSC
Figure 5-1 for connections. For Card File
PSC
systems using a Type CP6103 +24V
System Power Supply Unit, see
Figure 5-2 for connections.
2. When redundant devices are
installed, you may wire their Alarm Programmable
alarm contacts in series with the Controller
primary units or you may wire PSC
them separately as shown in PSC Interface Unit
Figure 5-5. +24V

Figure 5-4 Highway Device Alarm Wiring

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


5-6 Cabinet Alarm Wiring

1 TB1
N.O.A UOC/IFC
Common (20 Series)
N.C.A [Redundant Unit]

PSC
PSC
PSC Redundant
PSC Manual
PSC Card File
+24V
Alarm Common
Alarm 1 N.O.

5 Alarm 2 N.O.

PSC
PSC
PSC Redundant
PSC
Controller
Pri +24V
Sec +24V
Card File
Alarm Common
Alarm 1 N.O.
Alarm 2 N.O.

Alarm
Highway Interface
PSC Unit
PSC [Redundant Unit]
+24V

Alarm Serial Interface


PSC Unit
PSC [Redundant Unit]
+24V

Alarm
Virtual I/O Coupler
PSC Card File
PSC [Redundant Unit]
+24V

Alarm Programmable
Controller
PSC
PSC
Interface Unit
+24V [Redundant Unit]

Notes:
1 For systems using Types CP6101 and CP6102 System Power Supply Units for
see Figure 5-1 for connections. For systems using a Type CP6103 System
Power Supply Unit, see Figure 5-2 for connections.

Figure 5-5 Redundant Highway Device Alarm Wiring

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


System Grounding 6-1

Figure 6-Table 6

6 System Grounding
The ground network for an instrumentation system is a very critical
consideration since this network affects the operation of the entire
control system. Thus, the extra time and effort spent in laying out a good
ground system will be rewarded by easier startup and more reliable
operation.

Poor or faulty grounds are among the most common causes of


instrumentation system problems. With the installation of a new
instrumentation system, an effective ground network can be installed at 6
the beginning. The expansion of an older system however, may use
grounding as it now exists. Depending upon the degree of expansion
and the types of ground network deficiencies in the older system, it may
be more cost effective to install a new ground network to ensure efficient
operation.

6.1 Guidelines for Effective Grounding


Following the guidelines listed below will provide effective grounding for
the instrumentation system. Explanations of the guidelines are included
in the following subsections.

J Provide a ground network dedicated to the instrumentation system.


Do not share a ground network with other plant systems.

J Design the ground network so that is is accessible for testing.

J Isolate console and computer electronics enclosures from metal


conduits and building steel. Enclosures should be grounded only by
the grounding conductor which is included in their ac power circuits.

J Connect all cabinets within a grouping to the same ground system.

J Provide a single-point ground for all cabinets interconnected by


non-isolated signals. Also, provide a single-point ground for all
cabinets sharing a backup power supply.

J Provide a low impedance, high integrity, ground path between all


instrumentation and the PROVOXr or microPROVOXt
instrumentation plant ground connection.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


6-2 System Grounding

6.2 Separating AC and DC Grounds


Two separate ground terminations are used for the instrumentation
system, as shown in Figure 6-1. One termination is used for the ac
ground system and one is used for the dc and cabinet ground system.
The systems shown provide a safety return path to earth for faults in the
system and provide noise isolation between ac and dc circuits.

6.2.1 AC Ground System


The single-point termination shown in Figure 6-2 and Figure 6-3 provides
the ac ground for ac-powered devices in the instrumentation system. The
ac ground must conform to all applicable local, state, and federal
6 electrical code requirements for a ground system.

6.2.2 DC Ground System


The single-point termination shown in Figure 6-4 and Figure 6-5,
provides the reference for all of the dc power and analog signals of the
system cabinet equipment. The dc ground serves as the final termination
point for all signal common and power supply common wiring. The power
supply common (PSC) is the power return for all 24 volt dc power
connections in the system.

6.2.3 Cabinet Ground Considerations


The cabinet ground must remain separate from all other dc ground
connections until it is terminated at the single dc and cabinet ground
point, as shown in Figure 6-4 and Figure 6-5. The cabinet ground is
connected to the same point as the system ac ground at the PROVOX
Instrumentation Ground (PIG).

The cabinet ground provides protection to both equipment and personnel


from accidental shock hazards. It also provides a direct drain line for any
electromagnetic interference (EMI) to which the components of the
cabinet may be subjected. This ground must meet all code requirements
for a ground system.

The cabinet ground is connected directly to the system cabinet, usually


at one of the four mounting studs on the bottom corners of the cabinet.
Cabinet grounds are always routed to the center cabinet in a group of
cabinets. The console bay unit and console bay assembly do not
connect to the cabinet ground. These units are grounded through the ac
power wiring.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


System Grounding 6-3

Isolation Plant Power Grid


Transformer
Console & Main
System Cabinet Computer Distribution Grounded Steel PIG
Breaker Panel Breaker Panel Panel Column

AC Ground
DC and Cabinet Ground 2
1 (MGB) 3

Logging
Unit
System
Cabinet
#1 1 1
Computer
Logging
System
Cabinet Console
Bay #1
Unit 6
#2

System Computer
Console Console
Cabinet Bay #2
#3 LGB Bay #1

Computer
System Console Console
Cabinet Bay #3 Bay #2
#4

System Console
Cabinet Bay #1
#5

Console Computer
System Cabinet
Cabinet Bay #2
#1
#6
Computer Computer
System Logging Cabinet
Cabinet Logging Unit #2
#7 LGB Unit

System
Cabinet
#8

System System System


Cabinet Cabinet Cabinet
#9 #10 #11

LGB

Notes:
1 Wiring from LGB to MGB should be No. 1/0 AWG (53.46mm2) to 4/0 AWG (107.16mm2) insulated wire.
2 Wiring from MGB to ground grid should be at least No. 4/0 AWG (107.16mm2) insulated wire.
3 DC grounds from cabinet LGBs should be connected on one side of the MGB and cabinet grounds to the other side.

Figure 6-1 AC and DC Multiple Cabinet Ground System

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


6-4 System Grounding

Isolation Equipment Cabinets Equipment Cabinets


Transformer

Line

Neutral
Ground
LGB LGB
1

Grounded
Steel Column AC Ground
2
2

PIG 4
MGB
2
DC and Cabinet Ground
Cab GND
Dedicated Plant

6
3
Ground Grid Point

Notes:
1 1/0 4/0 AWG cable. Conductor used to connect the grounding electrode to the neutral ground bond at the
source of a separately derived instrumentation power system. (per NEC 250.26 Parts a and b)(CSA C22.1
Section 10)
2 1/0 4/0 AWG cable. The conductors used to provide a low impedance ground reference for the DC power
system (Logic, Transmitter, Output) and/or a cabinet ground for EMI/RFI noise protection of the instrumentation
cabinets, file, and field wiring shields.
3 Supplemental conductor used to connect the grounding electrode for the source of a separately derived instru-
mentation power system directly to the plat ground grid system. This is used to provide low impedance ground
reference to EMI/RFI noise. (per NEC 250.81/250.83)(CSA C22.1 Section 10)
4 If the PIG is not tied to an electrical ground steel column, the grounded conductor must be a continuous wire
from the neutral-ground bond point to the ground grid point. The wire insulation must be stripped at the PIG and
the wire clamped to the PIG to maintain the continuous ground. If the column is grounded, then terminations
may be made at the PIG.

Figure 6-2 Details of AC and DC Ground System with NEC/CSA Code Reference

Note
Devices connected by only a PROVOX highway
system (Data Highway or Highway II) do not
require connection to the same ground system
because the system provides isolation between
devices. Systems so isolated may also have
separate power sources.

6.3 Ground Wiring


Proper connections, wire sizing, ground impedance, and so forth are
extremely important to effective grounding. The following subsections
describe these requirements for a PROVOX system.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


System Grounding 6-5

Instrumentation
Transformer
PSC Connections (16 Terminals)
Line

1
Neutral
Ground Local Ground Bus (LGB)

Grounded
Steel Column 1
PROVOXr Instrumentation
Ground (PIG)
Recommended DC Recommended Cabinet
Side (3 Terminals) Side (3 Terminals)

DC/Cab GND
1
Dedicated Plant
Ground Grid Point
Master Ground Bus (MGB) 6
Notes:
1 1/0 -- 4/0 AWG cable.

Figure 6-3 Details of Local and Master Ground Buses

6.3.1 Master and Local Ground Buses

Master ground bus (MGB) assemblies and local ground bus (LGB)
assemblies facilitate ground wiring and provide single-point terminations
within cabinets or cabinet groupings. The buses can be installed at the
factory or can be installed in the field after the instrumentation system is
delivered. Both assemblies mount on isolated brackets at either the
bottom or top front of the system cabinet. An LGB assembly provides a
central termination point for all power supply common (PSC) connections
within a cabinet group of eight bays or less. The cabinets can be in
either an in-line or back-to-back configuration.

The LGB assembly has one lug in the middle for connection to an MGB
assembly. This lug accepts wire sizes of AWG 1/0 to 4/0 (53.46 to
107.16 mm2). For a single grouping of cabinets, a connection can be
made directly from the LGB assembly to the instrumentation system dc
ground. For more than one cabinet grouping, an MGB assembly should
be used to connect the several cabinet groupings together before being
connected to the dc ground.

Figure 6-6 shows the details for mounting MGB and LGB assemblies in a
system cabinet, and the dimensions of the factory-supplied assemblies.
Figure 6-7 shows details for grounding wall frames in OWP consoles.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


6-6 System Grounding

Power Bus Single Optional Power Bus 2 to 8 Cabinet Grouping


Bar Cabinet Rear Power Bar
Bus Bar

Optional
Rear Power
Bus Bar

PSC

LGB

CAB GND
CAB GND DC GND
6 AC GND
MGB

PROVOXr Instrument Note:


Ground (PIG) 1 1 The PIG can also be sued as an MGB if it is located in the same room.

Figure 6-4 DC/Cabinet Grounding System

LGB LGB LGB LGB

DC MGB CAB. MGB


Notes:
A LGB will be required for each
cabinet grouping of 2--8. MGB

A cabinet ground will be required


To PIG
for each grouping of 8 or more or
one large MGB can be used.

Figure 6-5 Multiple Cabinet System Grounding

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


System Grounding 6-7

Ground Bus
Assembly
Mounting
Bracket (2)
Grommet (2) 1

Notes:
1 Isolate the assembly from
the mounting bracket.
2 Ground bus assemblies are

6
mounted in the bottom front
of PROVOXr cabinets.

Cabinet
Kick Plate
System 2
Cabinet

Typical Bus Assemblies

Local Ground Bus Assembly


INCH
(mm)
Battery Backup MGB Connection
Return Connection

Master Ground Bus Assembly

1.75
(44.5)

15 (380) 0.375
(9.53)

Figure 6-6 Typical System Cabinet Ground Bus Assembly

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


6-8 System Grounding

Ground strap through wall


connects to next wall

6 Ground connection
point
Wall frame ground should be at
least 0.5 in (12.7 mm) braided wire.

Figure 6-7 Typical OWP Wall Frame Grounding

Users can fabricate their own master ground bus, but should ensure that
the following conditions are met:

J Copper/copper clad steel or hard brass (B16)

J Minimum of 3/8 inch (9.5 mm) thick and 1-3/4 (44.5 mm) inch wide

J Holes for lugs

J Double bolted lugs

J Bus isolated from mounting bracket with standoffs.

Table 6-1 lists the wire sizes which should be used for LGB to MGB,
MGB to PIG, and PIG to plant ground wiring.

Table 6-1 Ground Wire Sizing Chart


Wire Length Wire Size
Up to 25 feet 1/0
Up to 50 feet 2/0
Up to 200 feet 4/0

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


System Grounding 6-9

6.3.2 Single-Point Grounding


In some situations, a single-point ground may not be practical or
feasible. For example, cabinets that are connected only by the data
highway need not be returned to the same single-point ground.
However, the same single-point ground should be used in the following
cases:
J Cabinets are located in the same local area.
J Cabinets are bolted together to form one continuous assembly or
unit.
J Cabinets share the same single-ended signal.
This case occurs if one field transmitter is connected to two points in
separate cabinets or if an output from a device is used as an input for 6
a device in another cabinet.
J Cabinets are located in separate buildings or in distant separate
areas, but the ac power to the cabinets is taken from the same power
source without transformer isolation.

6.3.3 Power Supply Common (PSC) Wiring


The power supply common (PSC) should be carried on separate wires
from each power supply unit or power distribution panel to their
respective cabinet power bus bar. One PSC ground reference is used
per power supply unit and is tied from one cabinet power bus bar to the
LGB or MGB, as shown in Section 4. The recommended wiring size for
these ground points is No. 8 AWG (8.35 mm2) multistrand, with the
lengths being as short as possible. PSC wiring should be insulated to
avoid unintentional ground loops that can occur if bare wires touch the
metal cabinet or each other.

6.3.4 Marking Grounds


Use insulated or jacketed copper wire cable (the use of welding cable is
recommended) for the dc ground, ac ground, and cabinet ground
connections. To aid in ground identification, identifiable insulation colors
(green or green with a yellow stripe) or some labeling method should be
used.
All system ground points should be labeled as follows:

FOR INSTRUMENTATION SYSTEM GROUND ONLY. DO


NOT USE FOR ELECTRIC ARC WELDER CONNECTION.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


6-10 System Grounding

6.3.5 Ground Impedance


A high quality instrumentation system ground should provide a ground
point that measures one ohm or less to true earth. In some cases, three
ohms may be acceptable. In an unfavorable area, it may be necessary to
select the best ground impedance available. There are several methods
that can be used to obtain a high quality earth ground system, and these
methods vary depending upon the soil type and moisture content at the
individual location. See section 7 for information about soils and earth
grounds.

6.4 File and Shield Grounding


6 Proper shield and file grounding ensures proper system operation by
reducing electromagnetic and radio frequency interference.

6.4.1 For PROVOX Cabinets


PROVOX cabinets supplied by Fisher-Rosemount Systems have welded
frames that provide good ground connections between frame members.
The EIA rails installed in the cabinets provide proper ground paths for
files installed in the cabinets.

To provide a positive ground path for field wiring shields, connect shield
wires to the cabinet frame or EIA rails. For large amounts of field wiring,
it is suggested that a cable tie panel be installed in the horizontal cable
trays. Then, connect the tie panel to the drilled and tapped holes in the
EIA rails or cabinet frame, using a short 0.5 inch (13 mm) wide copper
braid strap. Use external tooth lockwashers to ensure good
metal-to-metal contact. Field wiring and cable shields are described in
detail in the installation planning manual, Wiring and Data Highway
Guidelines, PN1:004.

6.4.2 For OEM Cabinets


For OEM cabinets, drill and tap the frame members and mounting rails to
ensure good metal-to-metal contact. Use 0.5 inch (13 mm) wide copper
braid to interconnect frame members and mounting rails. Make a 24 inch
(610 mm) ground strap for each file, using 12 AWG (3.31 mm2) stranded
copper wire. Attach a number 6 ring terminal to one end and a number
10 ring terminal to the other end of each strap. Connect the number 6
terminal to the back of the file using one of the number 6 screws,
securing the back plate to the file assembly. Connect the other end of
the strap to the mounting rail with a number 10 screw.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


System Grounding 6-11

Cabinet 1 Cabinet 2 Cabinet 3 Cabinet 4 Cabinet 5


2

EIA Rail Cable Tie


Panel

3
MGB

1 1 1 1

To AC Power System

Grounded
6
Steel Column Notes:
1 Cabinet ground should be at least
PROVOXr 0.5 in. (12.7mm) wide braided wire.
Instrumentation 2 Cable tie panel grounded to the cabinet
Ground (PIG) frame.
Dedicated Plant
Ground Grid Point 3 Shields grounded to EIA rails.

Figure 6-8 Shield Ground Wiring

For grounding shields in other enclosures, drill and tap the rail and
connect 0.5 inch (13 mm) wide copper braid between the mounting rail
and each cable tie panel. Make sure that the mounting rails are strapped
to the local ground bus with 0.5 inch (13 mm) copper braid. Use external
tooth lockwashers to ensure good metal-to-metal contact. See Figure 6-8
for an illustration of shield grounding.

6.4.3 For Remote Termination Panels


If Control I/O termination panels are remotely mounted on a wall or
similar mounting, the panels must be grounded to the PROVOX
Instrumentation Ground (PIG).

6.5 Intrinsic Safety Barrier Grounding


In some applications where hazardous gases are present, special
handling or special wiring practices must be used. Conformity with local
codes and regulations is essential. Several documents present the
requirements for hazardous area instrumentation use or code guidelines;
contact local authorities for copies of the applicable documents.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


6
6-12

Safe Area Hazardous Area

PN1:003
System Cabinet Intrinsic Safety

Figure 6-9
Barriers

Isolation 1 Breaker
Transformer Panel System Controller 4
Power Card File
System Grounding

2
Supply Multiplexer
O I/O File +24V +
O
+24V --
N N
MV
Neutral Bus PSC Transmitter
G G
Ground Bus SC CO

SC +
--
LGP
PIG

Grounded
Steel Column 3
5 I/P Transducer
or Positioner
Dedicated Plant Ground DC/Cab GND MGB 5
Grid Point

Notes:
1 Isolation transformer or UPS connected to main power. 4 Terminals shown are for controller I/O unit installation
planning note for I/O unit terminal designations.
2 Main power panel connections to circuit breaker panel; one phase
shown for clarity. 5 Optional connection direct to PIG.
3 Master ground bus (MGB), if required. If not, connect local ground

Typical Ground Connections for Intrinsic Safety Barriers


bus (LGB) directly to instrumentation system DC ground.

Figure 6-9 Typical Ground Connections for Passive Intrinsic Safety Barriers

Revision B October 1995


Safe Area Hazardous Area

5 Intrinsic Safety
System Cabinet
Barriers

Breaker Controller 4 +V
Isolation 1 Transmitter
Card File

Revision B October 1995


Transformer Panel System or Sensor
Multiplexer+24V +
2
Power I/O File AT
Supply +

Barriers
O MV
O -- + --
+24V mA
N N OV
SC SC
Neutral Bus
G G
Ground Bus CO
PSC
+V

SC +
AT
LGP

PIG
-- +
mA

Grounded
OV
Steel Column -- +
3
Dedicated Plant Ground DC/Cab GND MGB
Grid Point
I/P Transducer
or Positioner

Notes:
1 Isolation transformer or UPS connected to main power. 4 Terminals shown are for controller card file. Consult
appropriate multiplexer I/O unit installation planning note
2 Main power panel connections to circuit breaker panel; one phase for I/O terminal designations.
shown for clarity.
5 Fuse protects input/output circuits. Size large enough to
3 Master ground bus (MGB), if required. If not, connect local ground
bus (LGB) directly to instrumentation system DC ground. accommodate power consumption of barriers and load.

Figure 6-10 Typical Ground Connections for Active, Galvanic Isolated, Intrinsic Safety Barriers
System Grounding

Figure 6-10 Typical Ground Connections for Active , Galvanic Isolated, Intrinsic Safety

PN1:003
6-13

6
6-14 System Grounding

The ground for passive intrinsic safety barriers should be connected to


the same point as the system ground, as shown in Figure 6-9. Ground
connections for active, galvanic isolated, intrinsic safety barriers are
shown in Figure 6-10. For additional information on intrinsic safety
barriers supplied by Fisher-Rosemount Systems, refer to installation
manual, Installing CL6340 and CL6350-Series Intrinsic Safety Products,
PN2.1:CL6340.

6.6 Consoles and Computers


Consoles and computers are grounded only to the instrumentation
system ac ground, as shown in Figure 3-8, Figure 3-9, Figure 3-12 and
Figure 3-13. The conduit carrying the circuit conductors is electrically
isolated from the console or computer cabinets. The ac ground to the
consoles or computers should be the same size or a size larger than the
6 current-carrying conductors. For example, the line and neutral wires
should be No. 12 AWG (3.30 mm2) stranded wire, and the ac ground
should be No. 10 AWG (5.27 mm2) stranded wire. To minimize the effect
of noise, use wire made of a large number of small conductors for the ac
ground. For example, use No. 8 AWG (8.35 mm2) wire composed of 168
strands of No. 30 AWG (0.05 mm2).

6.7 Peripheral Devices


Peripheral devices and systems for the PROVOX and microPROVOX
instrumentation systems can include such equipment as a high-speed
printer, a mass software storage device such as a disk unit, a secondary
computer, or even a PROVOX or microPROVOX console. Although
physically separated, a common grounding system should exist.

For any area of the instrumentation system where more than one
grouping of equipment exists, the common grounding system must be
designed so that it does not create excessive current paths. Regardless
of the ground types used, the interconnecting wiring must be large
enough to safely and adequately handle the currents involved. When
other vendor equipment or other types of Fisher-Rosemount Systems
equipment are used with PROVOX or microPROVOX I/O or data links,
the other equipment should be powered from the same ac power
distribution system as the one that powers the PROVOX or
microPROVOX instrumentation system. Finally, all of the ground systems
need to be tied together.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Earth Grounding 7-1

Figure 7-Table 7

7 Earth Grounding
Proper earth grounding is extremely important to user safety and efficient
operation of an instrumentation system. A good earth ground safely
conducts electrical currents, caused by faults, to ground, and a good
earth ground can considerably reduce electrical noise. Such noise can
cause erroneous control signals in the system. The information in this
section provides guidelines for constructing a good earth ground. In all
cases, construction of and connection to earth grounds must be in
accordance with local, state, and federal codes.

7.1 Designing an Earth Ground 7


For digital switching circuits, several process instrument industry sources
recommend a ground system that ideally has a resistance of one ohm or
less between the instrumentation ground system and true earthwith a
maximum resistance of no more than three ohms. A resistance of one
ohm or less minimizes the phantom errors caused by voltage drops in
the ground system.
The ground system for the instrumentation system must be at least as
good as any ground associated with any other system. If a ground used
with a radio communication system has a one-ohm resistance to true
earth, then the ground system used with the instrumentation system
must also have one ohm or less resistance to true earth. Both ground
systems should be referenced to the plant grid.
For a plant grid, multiple ground rods provide the most effective ground
system because:

J The individual rod-to-earth contact resistances are effectively placed


in parallel. Adding rods to the system reduces the ground-system-
to-earth resistance.
J An element of safety is provided over the single rod system. All
ground contact does not depend upon a single rod.

The distance between rods in a multiple rod system must be greater than
the immersion depths of the rods. For more information on installing and
testing of ground systems, refer to the publication, Getting Down to Earth
from Biddle Instruments. See subsection 1.7, Reference Documents, for
more information.

Figure 7-1 shows an example of a plant grid system. If en existing plant


grid is accessible, and if the ground-grid-to-true-earth resistance meets

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


7-2 Earth Grounding

the requirements, the existing grid can be used for the instrumentation
system ground.

A dedicated point close to the instrumentation system (preferably a


ground rod location) is used for the system ground point. The ground rod
is connected to one of the plant ground grid rods with 4/0 AWG copper
wire. The ends of the wires are thermally welded to the rods. If either the
existing grid is not accessible or the resistance is not within
specifications, a new grid is required.

Figure 7-2 through Figure 7-7 illustrate various examples of grounding


that may be used.

Plant
Ground
Grid

7 Power
Substation
Ground

Plant Ground Grid Connection


1 Dedicated
Notes: Instrumentation
System Ground
= Ground Rod
All connecting lines should be at least No. 4/0 AWG (107 16 mm3)
copper wire thermal welded to the rods
1 Ground connection can be a single rod or one of the configurations
shown in the following figures.

Figure 7-1 Example of Plant Ground Grid System

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Earth Grounding 7-3

Weld nut to bolt and base


plate or use double nut.

H-Column Optional Pigtail to


PIG (4/0 AWG)
Column Base Plate
To PIG 4/0 AWG

Weld tie bar to rebar


and anchor bolt.

Rebar-Grade Bar

Pier or Pedestal
Grade Beam
Vertical Rebar
(4 or More)

3 to 12 Ft
or more
Spacer Loop 7

Spread
Footing Steel Wire Ties

Horizontal
Rebar

3 to 6 Ft.

Figure 7-2 Grounding Example (UFR Ground System)

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


7-4 Earth Grounding

Existing Ground Rods

AC PWR GND

DC/Cabinet Ground
from Master Ground
Bus
PROVOXr Instrumentation
Ground (PIG)

Dedicated Ground Point


for Instrumentation

7
Existing
New Rod
Rod

Figure 7-3 Grounding Example

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Earth Grounding 7-5

Existing Counterpoise System

AC PWR GND

DC/Cabinet Ground
from Master Ground
Bus
PROVOXr Instrumentation
Ground (PIG)

Existing Cable
Existing Buried
Copper Cable

7
New Rod Dedicated Ground Point
for Instrumentation

Figure 7-4 Grounding Example

Existing Ground Grid System

AC PWR GND

DC/Cabinet Ground
from Master Ground
Bus
PROVOXr Instrumentation
Ground (PIG)

Existing Cable
Existing Ground
Dedicated Ground Point Grid
for Instrumentation

Figure 7-5 Grounding Example

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


7-6 Earth Grounding

UFER Ground Connections

AC PWR GND

DC/Cabinet Ground
from Master Ground
Bus
PROVOXr Instrumentation
Ground (PIG)

Dedicated Ground Point


for Instrumentation

Refer to Figure 48 for UFER


Ground System

7 Figure 7-6 Grounding Example

Existing Grounding

AC PWR GND

DC/Cabinet Ground
from Master Ground
Bus
PROVOXr Instrumentation
Ground (PIG)

Dedicated Ground Point


for Instrumentation

Buried Steel Plate

Existing Minimum
5 x 5

Figure 7-7 Grounding Example

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Earth Grounding 7-7

7.2 Testing an Earth Ground


An earth ground tester, illustrated in Figure 7-8, is used for testing the
ground system. The tester measures the resistance between the ground
system and the earth. The tester consists of a voltage source, an
ammeter, and switches to select the resistance ranges.

Earth Ground Tester

C1 C2
A

V P2
Earth Ground P1
Under Test
1
Earth Electrode P C

60% D
Auxiliary
Electrodes
D 2
Notes:
1 Disconnect ground cable from system while test is being made.
2 Auxiliary electrodes must be placed in a straight line from the earth
ground under test.

Figure 7-8 Typical Test Setup and Connection for Testing an Earth
Ground System

The preferred test method is to gather sufficient data to plot the actual
curve of resistance versus distance. If plotting is impossible, a simplified
Fall-of-Potential Test may be used with a compromise on accuracy. Refer
to the publication, Getting Down to Earth from Biddle Instruments. See
subsection 1.7, Reference Documents, for more information. This book
also contains information about using a two-point method of testing for
verification.

As a preventive maintenance item, each connection on the grounding


system, from the PSC connections through the LGB, MGB, PIG and
earth ground connections, needs to be checked annually. This check will
ensure that connections are tight, that ground wires are in good
condition, and that no contamination exists which can otherwise
compromise ground integrity. During the check, the power system
connections from power supply units to cabinet bus bars should also be
checked.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


7-8 Earth Grounding

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7

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Lightning Protection 8-1

Figure 8-Table 8

8 Lightning Protection
In areas where damage from electrical storms may occur, a lightning
protection system should be installed to protect both equipment and
personnel. This protection should include protection for the building, the
power distribution system, the PROVOXr highway system, and any
cables that run outdoors to other locations. Refer to installation planning
manual, Lightning Protection Guidelines for Instrumentation Systems,
PN4:007, for detailed information.

The following documents also contain information and guidelines for


installing lightning protection.

J National Fire Protection Association Inc. (NFPA) Lightning Protection


Code NFPA-78

J IEEE Recommended Practices for Grounding of Industrial and


8
Commercial Power Systems IEEE Std. 142

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


8-2 Lightning Protection

This page intentionally left blank.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Glossary-1

Glossary
A/D American Wire Gauge (AWG)
Acronym: Analog-to-Digital, or Analog to The usual system of wire size
Digital Converter measurement in the United States. A
14 AWG wire has a cross-sectional area
of 2.08 mm; a 000 AWG wire has a
cross-sectional area of 85.02 mm. Note
AC or ac that the smaller the AWG value, the
Acronym: alternating current larger the wire.

analog
ACIA Continuously variable over a given range.
Acronym: Asynchronous A process control system senses a
Communications Interface Adapter physical variable such as voltage,
current, or resistance as an analog value.
Glossary

analog to digital converter (A/D or


ADC ADC)
Acronym: Analog to Digital Converter An integrated circuit device that converts
analog signals into a digital form. This
enables a digital computer to operate on
such signals.
AI
Acronym: Analog Input
assembly (ASSY)
In PROVOXr systems, a collection of
hardware and/or PWB modules, or a
AIO single PWB module that is built up from
Acronym: Analog Input/Output individual components.

ASSY
Abbreviation: Assembly
ALM
Abbreviation: Alarm attenuation
The reduction of signal strength as it
travels on a cable.
alternating current (AC or ac)
A flow of electricity which cycles to AWG
maximum in one direction, decreases to Acronym: American Wire Gauge
zero, then reverses itself and reaches
maximum in the opposite direction, then Baby N Connector
increases again to zero. Obsolete variation of BNC.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


Glossary-2

Bayonet Neil-Councelman carrier band


Connector A type of base-band network used in a
Obsolete variation of BNC. process control environment.

backplane CCITT
A printed circuit board at the rear of the Acronym: Comite Consultatif International
DC6460-Series Console Electronics Unit pour Telephonie et Telegraphie, or
which, by means of its attached International Consultative Committee for
connectors, mates with the modular Telephony and Telegraphy. [See
cards and assemblies installed in the International Consultative Committee for
card file. Telephony and Telegraphy]

BNC CHIP
An industry-standard term and acronym Acronym: Computer/Highway Interface
for a type of connector for coaxial cable Package
that is frequently used for a variety of
applications in PROVOX systems.
CIA
Acronym: Communications Interface
bridge Assembly
Glossary
1. A highway communications device
used to configure a network of devices by
linking together highways that require CIU
extensive intercommunications. Acronym: Computer Interface Unit
2. A device used to interconnect local
PROVOX Highway IIs and to separate
the traffic on them from the traffic on the CMOS
network PROVOX Highway II. Acronym: Complimentary Metal Oxide
Semiconductor

Bridge Highway II
A highway that is used to interconnect Communications Interface Assembly
bridges where there is a high volume of (CIA)
intercommunication. A printed circuit card that links files of
PROVOXr devices and the data
highway. The CIA provides the timing and
bus data conversion necessary for
A general term for a group of signal lines communications.
to be considered together, as in a data
bus or address bus. The data highway of
a PROVOXr system is such a bus. complimentary metal oxide
semiconductor (CMOS)
A family of digital integrated circuits that
cable tap use transistors operating in a push-pull
A device for connecting the highway mode to carry out logic functions. A
device to the highway cable. (Commonly CMOS usually is capable of low-powered
referred to as a tap.) operation.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Glossary-3

Computer/Highway Interface data highway


Package (CHIP) A data communications network for a
A PROVOXr software product that allows limited area that functions as a logical
user-written programs to interact with the token bus. In a PROVOX Highway II
PROVOX system. There are different communications system, there are three
CHIP versions, so that any of several types of highways: Network Highway II,
types of computers can be the host Bridge Highway II, and Local Highway II.
computer.
dB
Acronym: Decibel
console
Generic term for the terminal or device an
dBmV
operator uses to monitor and control a
Acronym: Decibel millivolt
process.

dc
control room instrumentation (CRI) Acronym: direct current
Process control equipment designed for
installation and operation in a control DC
room environment. Acronym: direct current

controller decibel
A PROVOXr Integrated Function The relative difference between two Glossary

Controller (IFC) or Unit Operations signal levels expressed logarithmically.


Controller (UOC) or multiplexer controller
(MUX). decibel millivolt
A measure of signal strength that is
calculated by using the following formula:
current to pneumatic transducer (I/P) dBmV = 20 log (signal voltage1 millivolt)
An electro--mechanical device that
converts a DC signal (typically 4- to
20-milliamps) to a proportional pneumatic device
output signal. A piece of electronic hardware that
performs one or more prescribed
functions.
cyclic redundancy check (CRC)
A method of error detection in data DI
transmission and data storage. The Acronym: Discrete Input
check evaluates both the number of ones
and zeroes in a block (parity) and the digital to analog converter (DAC or
position of the values in the block. D/A)
An electronic circuit (usually an IC) that
D/A converts a digital signal ( digital data) into
Acronym: Digital to Analog, or Digital to an analog signal of corresponding value.
Analog Converter
digital volt meter (DVM)
A test instrument that measures voltage,
DAC current, or resistance, and gives
Acronym: Digital to Analog Converter numerical readings.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


Glossary-4

DIO electrostatic damage (ESD)


Acronym: Discrete Input/Output Deterioration of integrated circuits due to
high levels of static electricity. Symptoms
of ESD include degradation of
discrete performance, device malfunction, and
Having either of two states, for example, complete failure.
on or off, or 1 or 0.
EMI
Acronym: Electromagnetic Interference
discrete input/output (DIO) EMX
The reception and transmission of Acronym: Expanded MUX Controller
discrete signals. In PROVOXr systems,
DIO usually refers to a discrete full duplex communication
input/output card in a controller. Simultaneous transmission in both
directions over a communications
channel.
DO
Acronym: Discrete Output ground
1. A voltage reference point in a system
that has a zero voltage potential.
drop cable 2. A conducting connection between an
The cable that connects a highway electrical circuit or equipment and either
Glossary
device and the cable tap. the earth or some conducting body that
serves in place of the earth.

highway
DVM
See data highway.
Acronym: Digital Volt Meter
IDI
Acronym: Intelligent Device Interface
EIA
Acronym: Electronic Industries IEC
Association Acronym: International Electrotechnical
Commission

Electronic Industries Association IEEE


Acronym: Institute of Electrical and
(EIA)
Electronics Engineers
A group of electronic manufacturers that
creates industry standards for IFC
communication between electronic Acronym: Integrated Function Controller
devices. Among these standards are
RS-232 and RS-449. Input/Output (IO or I/O)
Signal reception and transmission, or
signal interfacing. Input, for a process
electromagnetic interference (EMI) control device, involves accepting and
The general category of electrical noise processing signals from field devices.
induced by radio frequency and Output, for a process control device,
magnetic, electrostatic, or capacitive involves converting commands into
coupling. electrical signals to field devices.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Glossary-5

Institute of Electrical and Electronic light-emitting diode (LED)


Engineers (IEEE) An electronic component that generates
An independent technical organization a small focused beam of light, in
that defines standards for the electrical, response to a current passing through.
electronic, and computer industries. LEDs are available in several colors,
depending on the type of crystal they
contain.
interface
An electronic circuit that governs the local device (LD)
connection between two devices and Any PROVOXr device that resides on a
helps them exchange data reliably. local highway and can communicate
directly with a local traffic director.
International Consultative
Committee for Telephony and local ground point (LGP)
Telegraphy (CCITT) A central termination point for all signal
A technical organization that develops common and power supply common
compatibility and other recommendations circuits within a cabinet group of eight or
for telecommunication, including data fewer bays.
communication. (The acronym comes
from the organizations French name.) Local Highway II
A highway that is used to connect as
many as 30 PROVOX devices together Glossary

International Electrotechnical into a logical token bus.


Commission (IEC)
An international group developing
standards and certification in electronics
local traffic director (LTD)
and electrical engineering. A communications device that controls
the data flow on a local data highway. As
many as 30 devices can be on the
highway. An LTD also stores and
IO or I/O
forwards messages to other local areas.
Acronym: Input/Output

logical ring
I/O channels See logical token ring.
Input/output channels: communications
paths from a device to a communications
logical token
link or other device.
A frame that is passed between highway
devices giving permission to
communicate on the highway.
jumper
An electrical connector used to select a
particular signal path and bypass logical token bus
alternates on a printed circuit board. The A communications protocol in which one
jumper contains a connecting wire, device on a highway transmits a frame
usually within a small plastic rectangle (logical token) while all other devices on
with two receptacles that can be pushed the highway receive the token
down on a pair of pins sticking up from sequentially, but only keep it if it is
the boards surface. addressed to them.

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


Glossary-6

logical token ring Network Highway II


1. A group of highway devices that pass A highway that is used to connect Local
a token to each other. Highway IIs and Bridge Highway IIs.
2. A communications protocol in which all
devices on a highway can transmit and network traffic director (NTD)
receive frames (logical tokens) A PROVOXr device that controls the
simultaneously in a data flow for the network data highway.
predecessor-successor arrangement. The NTD links network devices and local
data highways via the local traffic
directors.
LTD
Acronym: Local Traffic Director
NIU
Acronym: Network Interface Unit
master ground point (MGP)
A common termination point for as many
as six local ground point (LGP) noise
assemblies. Unwanted and typically random signal
components that obscure the genuine
signal information being sought.
MGP
Acronym: Master Ground Point
normally closed (NC)
Glossary Said of a contact pair closed (conducting)
microPROVOXt
when its device or relay coil is not
A mark of Fisher Controls International,
energized. Such a contact pair also is
Inc. Fisher-Rosemount Systems line of
called a break contact.
self-contained process control systems.

normally open (NO)


modem Said of a contact pair open (not
Modulator/demodulator: a device that
conducting) when its device or relay coil
allows a computer to transmit and receive
is not energized.
data via a telephone or other
communications network.
NTD
Acronym: Network Traffic Director
MUX
Abbreviation: Multiplexer
operational amplifier (OP AMP)
A high-gain, linear, DC amplifier, typically
network device (ND) an integrated circuit, used in a wide
A PROVOXr device that communicates variety of applications.
directly with a network traffic director. An
network device can be any device, but
usually is one that collects information optical isolation
from several local highways. Local traffic The technique of electrically isolating two
directors, consoles, multiplexers, circuits by converting an electrical signal
programmable controller interface units to an optical signal and back again.
(PCIUs), data concentrator units (DCUs), Optical isolators commonly consist of an
unit operations controllers (UOCs), and LED and a phototransistor mounted in
trend units are common network devices. a DIP.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Glossary-7

original equipment manufacturer printed circuit (PC)


(OEM) A conduction path of metal on a
The firm that makes a product sold by substrate material which is used to carry
another firm. For example, Hewlett signals between electronic components.
Packard is the OEM for some products
sold by Fisher-Rosemount Systems. printed wiring board (PWB)
A board containing printed circuits
(printed wiring) which serves as the
PCI mounting base for integrated circuits and
Acronym: Pulse Count Input other electronic components.

PCIU Programmable Controller (PC)


Acronym: Programmable Controller A control machine, built of computer
Interface Unit subsystems, that takes the place of
electro-mechanical relay panels.
Programmable controllers make use of
plant area solid-state digital logic.
The collection of equipment in a plant
that has common manufacturing programmable controller interface
strategies and alarm strategies. unit (PCIU)
A PROVOXr highway device that permits
programmable controllers to receive and
plant management area (PMA) respond to commands from other Glossary

A collection of plant process areas PROVOX devices such as consoles,


(PPAs). A PMA controls the console point trend units, and UOCs, via the data
reporting load, and indirectly, central highway.
processing unit (CPU) loading.
programmable logic controller (PLC)
plant process area (PPA) A microprocessor or mini-computer
Within a process-control system, a system able to perform simple analog
collection of equipment that uses a and discrete control. PLCs were
common alarm strategy. developed as replacements for relay
control panels, and are typically used for
motor control. The acronym PLC is
PMA trademarked by Allen-Bradley Company,
Acronym: Plant Management Area Inc.

PROVOXr
power supply common (PSC) A mark of Fisher Controls International,
The negative terminal of the 24- volt Inc. A Fisher-Rosemount Systems
system power supply: a reference for product line of distributed process control
digital signals. equipment.

power supply unit (PSU) PSC


In a PROVOXr system, a device or Acronym: Power Supply Common
component that converts standard
alternating current to the direct current PWB
voltage that other system devices need. Acronym: Printed Wiring Board

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


Glossary-8

PWR RS-232C
Abbreviation: Power An EIA standard for transmitting data
serially through a cable 50 feet or less in
length.
Radio, Electronic, and Television
Manufacturers Association (RETMA) RTD
Formerly, a group of electronic Acronym: Resistance Temperature
manufacturers who developed a standard Detector
for rack mounting of electronic
equipment. Replaced by EIA. rule inference
In fuzzy logic control, the process of
radio frequency interference (RFI) evaluating if-then rules based on fuzzy
Inadvertently transmitted energy that falls variables to determine the logical sum of
in the frequency band of radio signals. If the individual rules.
this energy is sufficiently strong, it can
influence the operation of electronic rule table
equipment. In fuzzy logic control, a matrix of output
membership function labels (control
actions) based on input membership
recipe management function labels (conditions).
A structured method used to develop,
store, retrieve, and maintain batch control RWM
recipes. Acronym: Read/Write Memory
Glossary

serial
recipe procedure
Sequential: said of data transmitted one
[See procedure.]
bit after another.

resistance temperature detector serial batch structure


(RTD) A number of sequential processes. The
A device or element that measures simplest batch structure.
process temperature very accurately.
RTDs sense temperature changes by serial interface
measuring the resistance of a coiled A data transmission device through which
metal wire, typically platinum. bits are sent sequentially.

serial interface unit


RETMA A device that lets a computer
Acronym: Radio, Electronic, and communicate with other devices of a
Television Manufacturers Association PROVOXr instrumentation system, via
the data highway.
return loss
The relative difference between the level SGP
of a signal on a cable and the signal Acronym: Shield Ground Point
reflected back from an impedance
mismatch.
shield ground point (SGP)
A copper bus bar that fits in horizontal
cable trays in a system cabinet. This bar
RFI is a convenient place to ground signal
Acronym: Radio Frequency Interference cable shields.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Glossary-9

signal common (SC) Transceiver Cable


A ground point that provides a reference Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 transceiver cable
for analog input and analog output provides the link between your system or
signals in a PROVOXr system. System server and the Ethernet Transceiver or
installers should reference all other DC DELNI.
wiring to power supply common (PSC).

synchronous data link uninterruptible power supply (UPS)


communication (SDLC) A backup device for the AC power
A protocol for communications between source. A UPS connects between the AC
synchronized devices. The protocol power source and computer equipment.
features bit-level message frames with Should there be a failure of or
error checking. interruption in the AC power source, the
UPS supplies continuous power to the
TCP/IP computer.
Acronym: transmission control
protocol/internet protocol
A two-part communications protocol Unit Operations Controller+ (UOC+)
(transmission control protocol and A unit operations controller (UOC) with
internet protocol) that provides reliable advanced control capability, including
and guaranteed transfer of data between function sequence table (FST) and logic
two computer programs or networks. control point (LCP) functionality, an Glossary

expanded database, and faster


terminal processing.
A point of connection for two or more
conductors in an electrical circuit.

Universal Asynchronous
token
See logical token.
Receiver/Transmitter (UART)
A device that connects a word-parallel
controller or data terminal to a bit-serial
token bus communications network.
A logically independent network of
devices that are physically linked
together through a specially shielded
coaxial trunk cable using cable taps, drop UOC
cables, and communication interfaces. Acronym: Unit Operations Controller

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


Glossary-10

VME Communications Interface voltage output (VO)


Assembly (VCIA) A terminal, available on a PROVOXr
An interface card and adapter assembly controller or multiplexer, that produces a
that connects the DC6460-Series 1- to 5-volt analog output signal.
Console Electronics Unit (VME-bus) to
the PROVOX data highway. The VCIA VRCIA II
card provides the timing and data Acronym: VME Redundant
conversion necessary for Communications Interface Assembly
communications. The VCIA adapter
assembly mounted on the backplane
connects two internal coaxial cables to
X.25
two BNC connectors on the data highway A CCITT protocol for connecting data
connection panel. terminal equipment to public packet
switched
VME Redundant Communications
Interface Assembly II (VRCIA II)
An interface adapter assembly that
connects the DC6460-Series Console
Electronics Unit (VME-bus) to the
PROVOX Highway II token passing bus.
The VRCIA II adapter provides the timing
and data conversion necessary for
communications. The VRCIA II has
Glossary
coaxial connectors for the primary and
secondary highway cables. Right-angle
adapters are required for the coaxial
connectors.

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Index-1

Index
A equipment voltage markings, 4-1

alarm relays
alternate connections, 5-1, 5-2 G
location, 5-1, 5-2 ground points
alarm wiring, purpose, 5-1 local, 4-4
master, 4-4
alarms, power supply, 5-2
ground rods, 7-1
ground system testing, 7-7
B grounds
braided wire size, 6-10
backup power, 4-1, 4-2 conformance to codes, 6-2
console, computer wire size, 6-14
earth, 7-1
C effective grounding, 6-4
faulty, 6-1
circuit breakers highway isolation, 6-4 Index
multiple, 3-2 intrinsic safety barriers, 6-11
panels, 3-1, 3-15 labeling, 6-9
ratings network, 6-1
consoles, computers, 3-15 power supply common (PSC)
peripheral equipment, 3-20 wire size, 6-9
Type CP6101, CP6102 proper impedance, 6-10
supplies, 3-12 PROVOX instrumentation ground
Type CP6103 supply, 3-13 (PIG), 6-2
common grounding, 6-14 termination point, 6-2
tying together, 6-14
compliance, European, 1-2 wire color coding, 6-9
wire shields, 6-10
wire sizing, 6-5
D
DCDA, (dc power distribution H
assembly), 4-1
highway isolation of grounds, 6-4

E I
earth grounds, maximum installation, power supplies, 4-1
resistance, 7-1
isolation
equipment dc voltage range, 4-1 bus bar, 3-2

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


Index-2

power, 3-1 problems, 2-1

L R
labeling ground points, 6-9 redundancy
local ground bus (LGB), 3-2, 4-4, alternate methods, 4-2, 4-4
6-5 need for power, 4-2

M S
master ground bus (MGB), 3-2, 4-4, shield grounding, 6-10
6-5
single phase power, 3-1
mutli-cabinet power distribution, 4-1

T
P
three phase power, 3-1
PDP, (power distribution panel), 4-1
PIG, (PROVOX instrumentation
ground), 6-2 U
plant grid, 7-1
uninterruptable power, 3-2
Index plotting earth ground resistance,
7-7
power, need for redundancy, 4-2 V
power distribution voltage markings, equipment, 4-1
assembly, 4-1
multi-cabinet, 4-1 voltage ranges, 2-2
power loss, 2-2 voltage ratings
consoles, computers, 3-15
power strips, utility, 3-15
dc power, 4-4
power supply common (PSC), wire system power supplies, 3-12
sizing, 6-9
power supply units, 3-12
power utilities, 2-1
W
PROVOX instrumentation ground wire braids for grounds, 6-10
(PIG), 6-2
wire sizing
PSC connections, 6-5 for load currents, 2-3
for voltage drop, 2-3
ground vs. phase and neutral
Q conductors, 3-2
grounds, 6-5
quality power supply common (PSC),
helpful devices, 2-1 6-9

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


Notes

Notes

Revision B October 1995 PN1:003


Notes

Notes

PN1:003 Revision B October 1995


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PN1:003