THE  HORTICULTURAL  CORRESPONDENCE  COLLEGE 

Ground Floor, Fiveways House,  Westwells Road, Hawthorn,  Corsham, Wiltshire, SN13 9RG 
Tel: 01225 816700  Fax: 01225 816708  E­mail: info@hccollege.co.uk  Web site: www.hccollege.co.uk 

RHS Level 2 Certificate in Horticulture  Study Notes – Lesson Three  Plant Propagation 

Seedlings of Begonia sp. grown in module tray

NOTES TO THE READER 

THE COURSE OBJECTIVE 
To  enable  the  college  member  completing  the  course  to  have  a  thorough  understanding of general horticulture and to be successful in the Royal Horticultural  Society Level 2 Certificate in Horticulture.  Previously this certificate was called the  RHS General Certificate in Horticulture.  An HCC Certificate of course completion is issued to all who successfully complete  the course.  A course completion certificate can be issued to those who decide to  do  part  of  the  course  or  pick  and  mix  the  lessons  from  other  courses.    The  HCC  certificate would state which lessons had been studied, the level of work achieved  would  also  be  described  –  this  would  be  from  satisfactory  course  completion  through  to  good  credit  and  distinction.    These  are  our  assessments  and  our  procedures.  They are not part of a national scheme of awards. 

ABOUT THE HCC 
The  Horticultural  Correspondence  College  offers  its  members  the full  tutorial  care  package  which  includes  the  marking  of  scripts  and  general  care  according  to  the  details set out in the HCC's prospectus.  Where  the  HCC  lesson  texts are  purchased  as material only or  supplied  by other  colleges  in  support  of  their  own  courses,  the  care  package  from  the  HCC  is  not  generally available without additional fees being paid to the HCC.  The HCC has as its 'reason to be' a desire to be helpful.   If the reader is not yet a  member  of  the  college  and  would  like  to  join  the  roll  of  HCC  members,  then  do  please  give  the  office a  ring and  ascertain  what the  marking and  tutorial  care fee  would be.   If you already have a current prospectus, the rate is 50% of the course  fee.  You  can  obtain  a  copy  of  our  prospectus  by  ringing  our  Freephone  number  0800  378918.    For  a  more  conversational  approach  our  office  line  is  01225 816700.  Our fax number is 01225 816708.  You may also find our web site, http://www.hccollege.co.uk/, to be a useful source  of information about our course offerings.  We may be reached via email at  info@hccollege.co.uk

DISCLAIMER 
Every  effort  is  made  to  ensure  that  the  information  in  this  text  is  complete  and  correct at the time of going to print but the HCC do not accept liability for any error  or omission in the context or for any loss, damage or other accident arising from the  use of the techniques or products outlined herein.  Not withstanding the above, it is our intention and wish to provide information and  text material to a standard of excellence. 

COPYRIGHT MATERIAL 
The material in our lessons and specimen answers is copyright and at the advice of  the  Copyright  Licensing  Agency  Ltd  we  are  making  this  clear.  For  a  licence  to  copy our materials please contact the HCC.

CONTENTS 
ILLUSTRATIONS...................................................................................................... 5  INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................... 7  TWO LONGER QUESTIONS.................................................................................... 8  EIGHT SHORT ANSWER QUESTIONS ................................................................... 9  1  PROPAGATION METHODS ............................................................................... 10  Definitions of Propagation.................................................................................... 10  Seed Propagation ................................................................................................ 11  When to Propagate By Seed ............................................................................ 12  Properties of Seed­Propagated Plants ............................................................. 13  Benefits of Seed Propagation........................................................................... 13  Limitations of Seed Propagation....................................................................... 14  Vegetative Propagation........................................................................................ 16  When to Propagate Vegetatively ...................................................................... 16  Properties of Vegetatively­Propagated Plants .................................................. 17  Benefits of Vegetative Propagation .................................................................. 17  Limitations of Vegetative Propagation .............................................................. 18  Micropropagation ................................................................................................. 19  Genetically Modified Crops .................................................................................. 20  Seed Versus Vegetative Propagation .................................................................. 21  Example: Drumstick Primrose .......................................................................... 21  Example: Chinese Wisteria .............................................................................. 22  Example: Rhubarb ........................................................................................... 23  Example: Petunia ............................................................................................. 23  Example: Annual Sunflower ............................................................................. 24  2  SEED PROPAGATION ....................................................................................... 26  Introduction.......................................................................................................... 26  Seed Dormancy................................................................................................... 26  Innate Dormancy.............................................................................................. 28  Induced Dormancy ........................................................................................... 28  Enforced Dormancy.......................................................................................... 28  Dormancy Mechanisms.................................................................................... 29  Exogenous Dormancy................................................................................... 29  Physical Dormancy.................................................................................... 29  Chemical Dormancy.................................................................................. 30  Mechanical Dormancy............................................................................... 30  Endogenous Dormancy ................................................................................ 30  Physiological Dormancy ............................................................................ 31  Morphological Dormancy........................................................................... 31  Morphophysiological Dormancy................................................................. 32  Double and Multiple Dormancy ..................................................................... 32  Treatments to Overcome Dormancy .................................................................... 33  Scarification ..................................................................................................... 33

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

Stratification ..................................................................................................... 35  Examples of Seed Treatment to Overcome Dormancy..................................... 37  External Environmental Factors Affecting Germination ........................................ 39  Water ............................................................................................................... 39  Gases............................................................................................................... 40  Temperature..................................................................................................... 41  Light ................................................................................................................. 41  Seed Harvesting and Collection........................................................................... 42  Seeds of Woody Perennials ............................................................................. 42  Seeds of Herbaceous Perennials, Biennials and Annuals ................................ 43  Case Study of Primula japonica .................................................................... 44  Seed Storage....................................................................................................... 47  Treatments .......................................................................................................... 48  Seed Priming.................................................................................................... 48  Pelleting Seed.................................................................................................. 49  Seed Dusting and Coating................................................................................ 50  Other Seed Treatments.................................................................................... 50  Damping­off ......................................................................................................... 51  Symptoms of Damping­off ................................................................................ 52  Control of Damping­off Diseases...................................................................... 52  Successful Seed Germination in a Protected Environment .................................. 53  Seed­Starting Media......................................................................................... 53  Composts ..................................................................................................... 54  Loam Composts ........................................................................................ 55  Loamless Compost.................................................................................... 56  Peatless Composts ................................................................................... 56  Seed Starting Pellets .................................................................................... 57  Containers for Seed Sowing............................................................................. 57  Sowing and Aftercare of Seeds Sown In Containers............................................ 59  When to Sow.................................................................................................... 59  How to Sow Seeds........................................................................................... 60  Sowing Seeds of Hardy Plants...................................................................... 62  Pricking Out and Potting Up ............................................................................. 63  Potting Composts ......................................................................................... 63  Pricking Out and Potting Up Procedure ........................................................ 64  Hardening Off ............................................................................................... 66  Germinating Seeds in the Open........................................................................... 67  Broadcast Seeding........................................................................................... 68  Sowing Seed in Drills ....................................................................................... 68  Thinning Seedlings........................................................................................... 70  3  FACTORS INFLUENCING PROPAGATION BY CUTTINGS.............................. 72  Introduction.......................................................................................................... 72  The Physiology of Propagation by Cuttings.......................................................... 73  Cutting Anatomy............................................................................................... 73  Callus............................................................................................................... 74  Physiology of Root Initiation ............................................................................. 75  Auxin ............................................................................................................ 76  Cytokinin....................................................................................................... 77  Gibberellins................................................................................................... 78

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

Abscissic Acid (ABA) .................................................................................... 78  Ethylene........................................................................................................ 78  Selection of Cutting Material ................................................................................ 78  Genetic Potential.............................................................................................. 79  Juvenility .......................................................................................................... 80  Nutritional Status of Cutting.............................................................................. 80  Health of Cutting Material................................................................................. 81  Timing .............................................................................................................. 81  Etioliation ......................................................................................................... 82  Temperature Manipulation of Stock Plant......................................................... 83  Treatment of Cutting Material............................................................................... 83  Environmental Factors Which Affect Rooting of Cuttings ..................................... 85  Temperature..................................................................................................... 85  Moisture ........................................................................................................... 86  Light ................................................................................................................. 87  Fertilisation....................................................................................................... 88  Establishment of a New Plant........................................................................... 89  4  VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION TECHNIQUES .................................................. 90  Introduction.......................................................................................................... 90  Cuttings ............................................................................................................... 90  Advantages of Propagation By Cuttings ........................................................... 91  Disadvantages of Propagation By Cuttings ...................................................... 91  Stem Cuttings................................................................................................... 92  Softwood Cuttings......................................................................................... 94  Greenwood Cuttings ..................................................................................... 98  Semi­Ripe Wood Cuttings ......................................................................... 98  Hardwood Cuttings ..................................................................................... 100  Deciduous Hardwoods ............................................................................ 101  Evergreen Hardwoods............................................................................. 105  Leaf Cuttings.................................................................................................. 106  Root Cuttings ................................................................................................. 109  Equipment for Propagation by Cuttings .......................................................... 111  Heated Propagation Units........................................................................... 111  Mist............................................................................................................. 113  Rooting Media............................................................................................. 114  Aftercare For Plants Produced By Cuttings .................................................... 114  Layering............................................................................................................. 114  Tip Layering ................................................................................................... 116  Simple Layering ............................................................................................. 117  Serpentine or Compound Layering................................................................. 119  Stooling or Mound Layering............................................................................ 119  Air Layering.................................................................................................... 121  Plant Division..................................................................................................... 122  Division of Offsets .......................................................................................... 123  Case Study of Offset Division: Primula auricula .......................................... 124  Division of Crowns.......................................................................................... 127  Division of Suckers......................................................................................... 127  Division of Bulbs, Rhizomes and Tuberous Roots .......................................... 128  Budding and Grafting......................................................................................... 130

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

5  BUDDING AND GRAFTING ............................................................................. 131  Introduction........................................................................................................ 131  Scion.............................................................................................................. 131  Stock or Rootstock ......................................................................................... 131  Grafting and Budding ..................................................................................... 132  Why Graft and Bud? .......................................................................................... 132  The Limitations of Grafting and Budding ............................................................ 135  Graft Incompatibility ........................................................................................... 135  Tools and Materials ........................................................................................... 136  Formation of the Graft Union.............................................................................. 138  How Graft Unions Form.................................................................................. 138  How T­Budding Unions Form ......................................................................... 139  Essential Conditions For Successful Graft Unions.......................................... 139  Grafting Techniques .......................................................................................... 140  Whip and Tongue Graft .................................................................................. 140  Budding.......................................................................................................... 142  Care of Grafted Plants ....................................................................................... 145  6  SAFE, HEALTHY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES.. 146  Health and Safety .............................................................................................. 146  Environmentally Sustainable Practices .............................................................. 147  DEVELOPMENT OF A PROJECT FOLDER ........................................................ 148

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

ILLUSTRATIONS 
Figure 1  Small Domestic Glasshouse ­­ Packed With Plants.................................... 7  Figure 2  Selective Breeding Has Produced the Many Cultivars of Rose (Rosa) ..... 11  Figure 3  Commercial Production of Viola (Viola cornuta 'Sorbet Coconut Duet’) .... 14  Figure 4  Vegetative Propagation of Garlic (Allium sativum) via Bulblets ................. 16  Figure 5  Daylily ­­ Hemerocallis sp. ........................................................................ 18  Figure 6  Orchid Seedlings Germinated Using Micropropagation Techniques ......... 20  Figure 7  Orchid Seedlings Ready for Potting Up .................................................... 20  Figure 8  Wisteria sinensis Cultivar.......................................................................... 22  Figure 9  Seed­Propagated Petunia ........................................................................ 24  Figure 10  Fruits/Seeds of Annual Sunflower........................................................... 25  Figure 11  Paeonia Flowers..................................................................................... 27  Figure 12  Cranesbill (Geranium sp.)....................................................................... 30  Figure 13  Davidia involucrata Ready for Warm Storage ......................................... 32  Figure 14  Scarification of Seeds............................................................................. 34  Figure 15  Seed Stratification .................................................................................. 36  Figure 16  Seed Stratification for the Home Gardener ............................................. 37  Figure 17  Watering from Below .............................................................................. 40  Figure 18  Collecting Seed from Cotoneaster spp. .................................................. 42  Figure 19  Seed Capsule of Nigella damascena...................................................... 43  Figure 20  Seeds of Poppy (Papaver sp.)................................................................ 44  Figure 21  Primula japonica Flowers in May ............................................................ 44  Figure 22  Seed Pods of Primula japonica............................................................... 44  Figure 23  Collected Seed Pods of Primula japonica ............................................... 45  Figure 24  Seed Cleaning........................................................................................ 45  Figure 25  Glassine Seed Packets .......................................................................... 46  Figure 26  Refrigerated Seed Storage ..................................................................... 46  Figure 27  Chitted Seeds......................................................................................... 48  Figure 28  Pelleted Seed of Begonia sp. ................................................................. 49  Figure 29  Damping Off ........................................................................................... 52  Figure 30  A Small Sample of Perlite ....................................................................... 55  Figure 31  A Small Sample of Vermiculite................................................................ 55  Figure 32  Peat­Based Jiffy 7 .................................................................................. 57  Figure 33  Degradable Containers For Seed Starting .............................................. 58  Figure 34  Module Tray ........................................................................................... 58  Figure 35  Label Writing .......................................................................................... 61  Figure 36  Methods of Seed Sowing ­­ Sowing in Pans or Pots ............................... 61  Figure 37  Methods of Sowing – Hardy Perennial seed ........................................... 62  Figure 38  Seedlings of Primula reidii var. williamsii Grown in Modular Tray............ 63  Figure 39  Widgers and Dibbers .............................................................................. 65  Figure 40  Seedling Ready to Transplant ................................................................ 65  Figure 41  Drill For Sowing Seeds ........................................................................... 69  Figure 42  Cross Section of Young Deadnettle Stem............................................... 75  Figure 43  Rooting Hormone Visible on Bottom of Cutting....................................... 77  Figure 44  Spacing of Nodes ................................................................................... 79  Figure 45  Leaves Suitable for Leaf Cuttings ........................................................... 82  Figure 46  Wounding of Cuttings ............................................................................. 84  Figure 47  An Inexpensive Home Propagation Unit ................................................. 87  Figure 48  Lining Out of Rooted Cuttings or Layers ................................................. 89  Figure 49  Longitudinal Section of Nodal Cutting Base ............................................ 93  Figure 50  Internodal cutting of Hydrangea macrophylla.......................................... 94  Figure 51  Softwood Stem Cuttings (e.g. Weigela Bristol Ruby)................................ 95

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

Figure 52  A Rooted Greenwood Cutting of Daphne cneorum (Garland flower)....... 97  Figure 53  Leaf Bud Cutting (Ficus elastica) ............................................................ 99  Figure 54  A System for the Amateur..................................................................... 100  Figure 55  Stock Plants Used to Supply Cutting Material....................................... 101  Figure  56    The  Traditional  Deciduous  Hardwood  Stem  Cuttings  of  Ribus  nigrum,  Black Currant ................................................................................................. 102  Figure 57  Cutting for a Bush Grown on a "Leg" .................................................... 104  Figure 58  A Mallet Cutting of Berberis stenophylla ............................................... 104  Figure 59  Vine Eye Cutting................................................................................... 104  Figure 60  Professional Environment for Rooting Evergreen Hardwood Cuttings .. 105  Figure 61  Broadleaf Evergreen Hardwood Cutting ............................................... 106  Figure 62  African Violet Leaf Petiole Cutting ........................................................ 107  Figure 63  Cuttings That May be Taken From a Streptocarpus Leaf...................... 108  Figure 64  Scaling Lily Bulbs ................................................................................. 109  Figure 65  Root Cutting ......................................................................................... 111  Figure 66  A Heated Bench for Propagation of Cuttings ........................................ 112  Figure 67  Heated Propagation Unit ...................................................................... 112  Figure 68  A Modified Garner Bin .......................................................................... 113  Figure 69  Tip Layers ............................................................................................ 116  Figure 70  Simple Layering.................................................................................... 117  Figure 71  Cutting to Form a Tongue..................................................................... 118  Figure 72  Serpentine Layering ............................................................................. 119  Figure 73  Mound Layering.................................................................................... 120  Figure 74  Air Layering of Scindapsus aureus ....................................................... 122  Figure 75  Parent Auricula With Offsets................................................................. 124  Figure 76  Separated Offsets and Parent Plant ..................................................... 125  Figure 77  Potted­up Offset ................................................................................... 125  Figure 78  Growing on Auriculas ........................................................................... 126  Figure  79    Segment  of  Bergenia  Rhizome  That  Will  be  Used  to  Generate  a  New  Plant............................................................................................................... 129  Figure 80  Example of a Graft................................................................................ 132  Figure 81  A Grafted Apple Tree............................................................................ 133  Figure 82  A Compatible Graft Union with Different Growth Rates......................... 136  Figure 83  Budding and Grafting Knives ................................................................ 137  Figure 84  Graft Union........................................................................................... 138  Figure 85  Preparing the Rootstock ....................................................................... 141  Figure 86  Scion Preparations ............................................................................... 141  Figure 87  Joining Stock and Scion Wood ............................................................. 142  Figure 88  The "T" Cut on the Rootstock ............................................................... 143  Figure 89 The Bud Shield...................................................................................... 144  Figure 90  Insert Bud in the Rootstock................................................................... 144

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

INTRODUCTION 
Plant propagation can be one of the most satisfying aspects of gardening.  It requires  considerable knowledge of plants and how they naturally reproduce themselves.  There is also a high degree of craftsmanship involved through which both young and  older gardeners can develop their skills.  It gives one the opportunity to both handle  plants and see them at close quarters.  Many  believe  there  is  nothing  more  rewarding  than  to  raise  their  own  plants  from  seeds and cuttings.  Even in a very small glasshouse many hundreds of plants can  be raised with considerable financial saving.  Excess plants can be given to friends or  swapped for something else.  Plant sales can be organised at local school fairs. 

Figure 1  Small Domestic Glasshouse ­­ Packed With Plants  This  lesson  will  focus  on  the  principles  and  main  practices  involved  in  plant  propagation.  The lesson will commence with propagation via sexual means (that is,  using  seeds  to  produce  new  plants)  and  then  will  address  propagation  via  asexal  methods (using cuttings, offsets and other vegetative parts of the plant to make new  plants).  At the end of the lesson there will be an introduction to budding and grafting  techniques.    Finally,  there  is  a  brief  overview  of  the  health  and  safety  concerns  involved with the propagation process and some environmentally friendly issues.  The  focus  of  this  lesson  will  be  propagation  in  a  garden  situation,  however  some  mention of commercial propagation will sometimes be made.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

TWO LONGER QUESTIONS 
Please answer both of these longer questions:­ 

QUESTION ONE  (a)  Define  the  terms  physical  and  physiological  dormancy  of  (4 marks)  seeds.  (b)  (c)  (d)  (e)  Describe one method for overcoming a named physical and a  (2 marks)  named physiological dormancy mechanism in seeds.  State  the  essential  conditions  for  the  successful  seed  (4 marks)  germination of viable seeds.  Describe how conditions for successful germination can be met  (5 marks)  in a protected environment for a named half­hardy annual.  Describe how the conditions for successful germination can be  (5 marks)  met in the open for a named hardy annual. 

QUESTION TWO  (a)  Define  the  term  “vegetative  propagation”  and  give  four  (4 marks)  examples of different types of vegetative propagation.  (b)  (c)  (d)  Describe  the  propagation  of  plants  by  division  and  give  two  (8 marks)  named examples of suitable plants.  Explain  how  plant  stress  can  be  reduced  when  leafy  cuttings  (4 marks)  are placed into a suitable environment to form roots.  Explain the process of “weaning” of rooted cuttings and explain  (4 marks) the reasons why “weaning” of rooted cuttings may be valuable. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

EIGHT SHORT ANSWER QUESTIONS 
Answer all the short answer questions, confining your answers to a few lines only.  Short answer questions are worth 5 marks each.  1.  (a)  (b)  Give one advantage of raising plants from seeds.  Give three advantages of obtaining seed commercially. 

2.  What is (a) stratification and (b) scarification of seeds?  3.  (a)  (b)  Name three types of graft.  Name the rootstocks used for plum. 

4.  State briefly how you would propagate the following plants: Cissus antarctica,  Ficus elastica decora, Aphelandra squarrosa. 

5.  Vegetative  (asexual)  propagation  has  advantages  and  limitations  when  compared with sexual propagation.  State two of these advantages and two of  the limitations.  6.  Distinguish  between  ‘leaf  cuttings’*  and  ‘leaf  petiole  cuttings’.    Give  one  example of a suitable genus that can be propagated by each method. 

7.  Why does the use of ‘bottom heat’ promote rooting in cuttings?  8.  List five factors to consider when selecting plant material for taking cuttings.  *Leaves are remarkable in a range of ways.  Some leaves will proliferate, some root  from their petioles.  Others may root from the leaf blade – the lamina yet others may  root from the leaf with the leaf bud.  For this question please assume that the term “leaf cuttings” refers to cuttings which  are the leaf blade.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

1  PROPAGATION METHODS 

By  the  end  of  this  section,  you  will  be  able  to  differentiate  between  the  characteristics  of  plants  produced  by  seed  and  plants produced by vegetative propagation methods: · Define  the  terms  seed  propagation  and  vegetative  propagation. · Compare  two  characteristics  of  plants  produced  from  seed  as  compared  to  those  produced  by  vegetative  methods. · State  the  relative  benefits  and  limitations  of  seed  propagation and vegetative propagation. 

Definitions of Propagation  Propagation is the method by which plants may be increased in number.  In the natural environment, the majority of plants reproduce through the production of  seed (that is, via sexual methods).  Sexual reproduction gives plants the advantage  of genetic variation.  This capacity for genetic change permits the plants to adapt to a  changing environment and to grow in hostile areas.  One reason for this is due to one  of  the  qualities  of  seeds  –  most  seeds  have  the  ability  to  remain  dormant  when  environmental conditions are not suitable for growth.  However,  not  all  plants  reproduce  themselves  exclusively  by  seeds.    Some  plants  produce  exact  copies  of  themselves  via  vegetative  or  asexual  methods.    For  example,  many herbaceous perennials and  bulbs  produce  offsets,  each of  which  is  genetically  identical  to  the  parent  plant.    Some  woody  plants  (for  example,  the  American  Beech,  Fagus  grandifolia)  produce  colonies  of  clones  –  each  genetically  identical – through root suckers.  Vegetative  or  asexual  reproduction  is  a  way  of  reproducing  quickly  (faster  than  through seeds). This method, however, has one drawback – all plants produced are  genetically identical to the parent.  If environmental conditions change, the plant may  not  have  the  ability  to  adapt  to  the  new  conditions.    All  plants  share  the  same  qualities and weaknesses.  For example, most elm trees (Ulmus procera) growing in  Britain during the 1960s and 1970s were clones of a small group of plants and these  were  susceptible  to  Dutch  Elm  Disease.    If  more  plants  had  a  greater  degree  of  genetic variation, perhaps some would have possessed an ability to withstand the  effects of the disease.  However, all methods of plant propagation involve living material and for success to be  achieved the needs of the tissues have to be met.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

10 

Can you note down what these needs might be?  Check your answer at the end of this section. 

Seed Propagation  Seed propagation is the production of new plants through the use of seeds.  The production of seeds involves the combination of genetic material from both the  plant that contributes the ovule and the plant that contributes the pollen.  As a result,  seeds  are  the  result of sexual  reproduction*.    The  processes  that  produce both the  ovule and pollen and the process of pollination have been described in lesson 1.  Because  seeds  result  from  a  combination  of  genetic  information  from  two  sources,  for  many  centuries  both  gardeners  and  farmers  have  manipulated  this  to  their  advantage.    The  original  wheat  plant  has  been  improved  over  thousands  of  years  because higher­yielding seedlings were selected by astute early farmers.  The ability  to  produce  variable  offspring  from  sexually  produced  seed  is  a  miracle  of  nature  which gives huge  benefit to plant adaptation.    Plants  can  evolve  to fit  into  an  ever­  changing natural world. 

Figure 2  Selective Breeding Has Produced the Many Cultivars of Rose (Rosa)  As  a  quick  review of  lesson 1  material,  seeds are  the  result of  meiotic  cell  division  and thence sexual reproduction in flowering plants.  A sexually produced seed gives  rise  to  new  combinations  of  the  genetic  material  derived  from  both  the  male  and  female parent plants.  Some plant species have their male and female flowers on different plants (these are
*

There  is  a  situation,  called  apomixis,  whereby  seeds  are  produced  via  asexual  methods.    In  some  grasses  (for  instance  the  annual  meadow  grass,  Poa  annua)  and  a  small  number  of  other  plants  (dandelion, Taraxacum officinale) seed is produced without meiosis and fertilisation.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

11 

called  dioecious plants)  and  this ensures  that two  individuals are  involved  in  seed  production.  Holly (Ilex spp.) species provide a good example of this type – plants are  either  female  (which  produce  attractive fruit during  the  autumn  and  winter)  or  male  (which  do  not  produce  the  attractive  fruit,  but  are  necessary  for  fruit  formation  on  nearby female plants).  Having  a  grasp  of  what  a  species  is  helps  in  developing  your  knowledge  of  seed  propagation.  The species can be defined as “populations of plants which when they  interbreed produce similar offspring”.  Wild  populations  of  plant  species  do  tend  to  breed  true**.    The  variation  in  the  individual seedling may be minimal and may not be observable.  However, in some  natural populations the variation is considerable both in plant morphology (form) and  “productivity”.  These natural variations are the starting point for selective breeding.  By  choosing  parent  plants  with  some  desirable  quality  (for  example,  better  fruit  or  attractive  flowers  or  disease  resistance),  a  plant  breeder  may  magnify  the  characteristic  in offspring.   The  result of  a breeding programme  may be  plants  with  more valuable characteristics than the original wild form.  Most cultivated plants are  the  result  of  breeding  programmes  that have focused  on  improvement  of  wild  plant  forms.  When to Propagate By Seed  The  vast  majority  of  annual  plants  are  seed­propagated.    Most  commercially  available annuals are the result of decades of selection and breeding because they  have desirable qualities and are easily propagated from seed.  Seed propagation is the method usually preferred under the following circumstances: · · · · · Seed is readily obtained and inexpensive. Seed can be sown immediately upon ripening or the seed is easy to store. Seed has no difficult­to­break dormancy. Large  numbers  of  inexpensive  plants  are  required  (possibly  to  be  used  as  root stock). The  plant  does  not  have  a  prolonged  juvenile  period  (either  delaying  the  generation  of  seed  or  delaying  the  production  of  a  saleable  plant  that  is  flowering). Plant breeding.  Seed is the only way to combine the genetic material from  one  plant  with  the  genetic  material  from  another  (whether  within  species  or  between species). Plant material is to be collected and transported large distances. Plant material is to be saved for conservation purposes. Maintenance of genetic diversity is desired. The parent  plant has  a  disease that  would  be  carried forward to any  plants  produced vegetatively.

·

· · · ·

**

A plant “breeds true” when the offspring share the same desirable traits as the parent.  Many hybrid  plants do not “breed true” because the resulting offspring do not share the same desirable qualities of  the parent.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

12 

Properties of Seed­Propagated Plants  A plant grown from seed has the following qualities: · The  complete  plant  growth  cycle  is  involved  –  from  a  juvenile  period,  through transition until the mature phase.  This may include an undesirable,  prolonged juvenile period for some plants. The genetic composition of the seedling (and eventually the plant) is usually  different  to  that  of  the  parent  plants.    The  exception  is  for  self­pollinated  plants, where the same plant provides both male and female genetic material. The  entire  plant  is  composed  of  the  same genetic  material.  Grafted  plants  (produced by asexual means) have some portion of the plant with one genetic  composition  and  another  portion  of  the  plant  with  another  genetic  composition. The  seedling  is  usually free  of  any diseases even  through  the parent plants  may have been infected with some diseases (including viruses). 

·

·

·

Some of these characteristics will be advantages while others will be a disadvantage.  Seed­propagated plants are  the  key to breeding  programmes.    For example,  if  the  seed is the result of a breeding programme that is trying to produce a plant with both  disease resistance and an attractive flower (and one parent has an attractive flower  but  is  prone  to  disease,  while  the  other  parent  has  a  lesser  flower  but  disease  resistance).  Some of the offspring produced via sexual reproduction between these  two parents may have all the qualities desired.  Some (or perhaps all) of the offspring  may not have the desired combination of traits.  Only by growing the seeds that were  produced  via  this  cross  to  the  flowering  stage  (or  beyond)  will  these  qualities  be  determined.  Asexual  reproduction  will  produce  identical  copies  of  either  one  parent or  the  other  and  a  combination  of  traits  of  the  two  plants  cannot  be  produced  without  sexual  production.  Benefits of Seed Propagation  1.  Storage and Transport  Seeds are usually quite easy to store and can be transported easily.  As a result,  some seeds may be kept for a length of time before successful germination.  This  permits  many  seeds  to  be  saved  from  year  to  year  or  for  even  longer  for  the  purposes of plant conservation within seed banks.  2.  Genetic Variability  Seedling  variability  can  be  an  advantage  enabling  selection  of  better  forms  or  permit the plant to withstand in a changing environment.  Plants  grown  by  seed  exhibit  small  genetic  differences  between  plants  (unlike  clones  that  are  vegetatively  reproduced  and  have  no  genetic  variation)  and  by

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

13 

propagating by seed, this genetic diversity may be maintained.  The  variability  of  a  seed  may  be  controlled  through  the  use  of  carefully­made  crosses.  The  F1  hybrids  are  an  example  of  this.    F1  hybrids  are  the  result  of  crosses  between  two  deliberately  established  parental  lines,  each  of  which  has  minimal  genetic variability within it (that is, the two parents are homozygous).  As a result  F1  hybrids  have  predictable,  desirable  qualities  but  their  offspring  (called  the  F2  generation) may not.  3.  Seed Volume  Large numbers of plants may be grown at a very low cost. 

Figure 3  Commercial Production of Viola (Viola cornuta 'Sorbet Coconut Duet’)  4.  Pests and Diseases  Very few pests and / or disease organisms carry over in seed.  As a result, new  stock is potentially very healthy.  5.  Hybrid Vigour  Many  commercially  available  seeds  are  F1  hybrids  which  give  healthy,  uniform  and early crops. They are also “true to type” and exhibit hybrid vigour.  6.  Plant Breeding  Breeding  programmes  require  the  recombination  of  genetic  material  from  the  male and female plants.  The only method to produce this is via seed production.  Limitations of Seed Propagation  1.  Genetic Variability  This point was also listed as a benefit of seed propagation.  However, there are  two  sides  to  variability.    Many  plants  and  most  trees  and  shrubs  are  cross­

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

14 

pollinated, which brings about variable offspring.  Variability  in  nature  allows  the  species  to  adapt  to  changes  in the  environment.  However,  for  many  cultivated  plants,  the  unpredictable  results  from  cross­  pollination  are  a  disadvantage  because  offspring  may  be  inferior  to  the  parent  plants.  Variability may be especially disadvantageous in production of rootstocks  for grafting purposes if the rootstock has a specific quality that is being exploited  (for example, a dwarfing rootstock).  2.  Loss of Desirable Characteristics  Poorer  plants  may  result  if  seed  is  not  selected  from  plants  with  desirable  characteristics.  3.  Seed Supply  Although the situation is improving, reliability of some seed supply is difficult.  In some plant groups (such as trees and shrubs) seeds may be difficult to obtain.  Seed production varies from year to year in a number of plants – in some years,  there is an abundant supply in others, a shortage.  Many trees and shrubs bear  abundant crops of seed every year, some every second or third year and others  at  longer  intervals  of  up  to  ten  years.    During  the  intermittent  years,  small  sporadic crops may occur.  4.  Seed Dormancy  Some seeds have complex dormancy conditions to overcome.  While dormancy  is  a  quality  exploited  during  seed  storage,  it  may  present  a  difficulty  when  it  comes time to germinate the seed.  Breaking seed dormancy can only be achieved by having a full understanding of  the factors involved.  Frequently, dormant seeds require treatments lasting one or  several months.  Those seeds requiring multiple treatments (for example, a cool  period  followed  by  a  warm  period  and  then  another  cool  period),  may  require  more than a year before germination is completed.  5.  Slower Propagation  Seed propagation may be a slower option for some subjects.  Propagation  by  seed  may  be  a  slow  method  of  increase.    This  is  an  important  consideration  for  both  rare  plants  and  for  plants  being  propagated  for  sale.  Plants  must  pass  through  the  juvenile  phase  and  reach  maturity before bearing  seeds – this may translate into a long wait for initial seed production.  Some  plants, for  example Wisteria spp.  can  be  slow  to  mature from  seed  while  plants  grown  from  vegetative  propagules  may  flower  the  second  year  after  propagation.    If  the  goal  is  to  produce  a  flowering  plant,  clearly  vegetative  production is the better choice in this case.  Some  plants,  for  example  Trillium  spp.,  may  take  several  years  to  reach  a  saleable size when propagated by seed.  Again, when growing commercially, the  longer  the  time  spent  before  the  plant  is  saleable,  the  more  the  plant  costs  to  grow.  For the home gardener, this may be less of a concern. 15 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

Vegetative Propagation  Vegetative  propagation  involves  the  reproduction  of  plants  using  asexual  (or  nonsexual) methods.  This means that vegetative plant parts (leaves, buds, shoots,  and  roots)  not  involved  in  sexual  reproduction  are  used  in  the  production  of  new  plants.  The key to successful vegetative reproduction is the natural ability of plant tissues to  produce adventitious roots or adventitious shoots or both.  As a consequence, a  portion of a plant may be used to produce an exact copy (genetically) of the original  parent plant.  There are four primary means of vegetative propagation:  1.  2.  3.  4.  cuttings (including shoot, stem and root cuttings),  division  layering  budding and grafting (whereby portions of different plants are artificially joined  together to form a new plant). 
This  is  a  drawing  of  a  sprouted  garlic  clove  that  has been removed from the  compost  and  placed  on  its  side.

Figure 4  Vegetative Propagation of Garlic (Allium sativum) via Bulblets  Vegetative propagation  involves the  production of  clones.    A  clone  is  a  genetically  identical plant produced via vegetative techniques.  Cloning in animals has had bad  press  but  this  practice  has  been  used  in  horticulture  for  centuries.    Most  apple  cultivars, for example, are clonal in origin.  When to Propagate Vegetatively  Vegetative propagation techniques are preferred in the following situations: · The plant does not “come true” from seed.  Vegetative propagation is widely  used in horticulture because one is assured of the progeny being true to type.  The  colours,  form,  habit  and  desirability  is  maintained.    The  vegetative  propagule  develops  by  mitotic  cell  division  carrying  over  the  characteristics  into the developing individual. The seed is not viable. The seed is difficult to acquire or expensive. The seed is difficult to store and cannot be sown immediately when ripe. The seed has a dormancy that is very difficult or time­consuming to break. Seed­produced plants have an undesirable juvenile period or a long juvenile  period. When  the  merits  of  one  plant  (for  example,  the  fruiting  qualities  of  a  one  cultivar of apple) are to be combined with the attributes of another plant (for  example,  the  dwarfing  qualities  of  certain  root  stocks)  and  this  cannot  be  16 

· · · · · ·

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

done  via breeding programmes.    In  this  situation,  propagation  via  grafting  is  the suitable method.  Whilst  all  of  the  desirable  features  of  a  plant  are  perpetuated  in  vegetatively  propagated plants, so too are any defects.  The inability of some plants to flower well  is carried over in the newly produced plant (this has been the case in some cultivars  of Escallonia).  Any susceptibility to disease may also be carried forward to the new  plant.    In  addition,  if  the  plant  being  propagated  has  a  virus,  then  the  offspring  produced from this plant most likely has the virus also.  Properties of Vegetatively­Propagated Plants  A plant propagated vegetatively has the following qualities: · The  plant  is  usually  an  exact  copy  of  the  parent,  genetically.    The  newly  produced  plants  will  have  the  same  qualities  of  form,  leaf,  flower,  fruit,  and  disease­resistance  (to  name  a  few).    There  are  some  minor  exceptions  to  this.    For  example,  some  chimaeras  are  not  successfully  reproduced  by  all  vegetative techniques. The  plant  has  a  shortened  juvenile  period,  in  most  cases.    The  result  is  flower  (and  fruit)  production  earlier  than  a  seed­produced  plant,  or  the  undesirable qualities of the juvenile period (for example, thorniness) may be  skipped. 

·

Benefits of Vegetative Propagation  The reasons for opting for vegetative propagation include the following:  1.  Perpetuate Clone  Vegetative (or asexual) propagation is often the only way to perpetuate a clonal  stock.    This  means  that  the  desirable  and  recognisable  characteristics  of  the  clone will be preserved in the offspring.  There will be minimal variation between  offspring plants.  Cultivars are true to type.  2.  Non­viable Seeds  Plants such as figs and grapes that do not produce viable seeds can only have  their numbers increased by vegetative propagation.  3.  Reduced Juvenile Period  Often  plants  that  are  raised  from  seed  go  through  a  juvenile  and  transitional  phase before maturity is reached.  Undesirable features such as thorniness and  the  inability  to  produce  flowers  and  fruit  can  be  circumvented  by  the  use  of  cuttings.    Although  cuttings  are  often  taken  using  juvenile  material  from  the  parent,  the  duration  of  the  juvenile  period  is  often  reduced  dramatically  when  compared to seed­propagated plants.  Once again, Wisteria spp. is an example  of this.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

17 

4.  Efficient Use of Material  Some  techniques  such  as  budding  or  leaf  bud  cuttings  ensure  efficient  use  of  limited  plant  material.   A  large  number  of  plants may  be produced from  a  small  amount of parent material.  Vegetative micro­propagation techniques may be able  to use  a  very  small amount  of plant  material  to produce  a  large number of  new  plants.  5.  Seed Dormancy  Difficulties  with  seed  dormancy  no  longer  pose  a  barrier  to  propagating  new  plants from existing ones.  6.  Speed of Plant Production  Some  vegetative  techniques  may  produce  plants  very  quickly  –  for  example,  division  may  be  used  to  produce  a  number  of  new  plants  from  an  established  daylilies (Hemerocallis sp.). 

Figure 5  Daylily ­­ Hemerocallis sp.  Limitations of Vegetative Propagation  1.  Diseases  Vegetatively propagated plants may be infected by disease that is present in the  parent  plant.    There  is  a  greater  chance  of  spreading  pathogenic  organisms  compared to seed propagation. These could include viruses, rust and mildew.  2.  Root System Weakness  On  occasion,  the  adventitious  root  system  produced  from  cuttings  fails  when  rapid growth occurs following planting.  3.  Plant Limitations  Not all plants may be propagated successfully via vegetative techniques.  Some  groups  of  plants  do  not  possess  appropriate  anatomical  tissue.    For  example,  most monocotyledonous plants are not raised from cuttings (although asparagus

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

18 

can be propagated this way).  Some commercially grown plants are very difficult  to propagate vegetatively and, because these techniques produce so few viable  plants, they are usually seed­grown.  For example, Chionanthus virginicus (North  American  Fringe  Tree)  is  usually  propagated by seed  –  vegetative  reproduction  produces only small number of rooted cuttings even under the best of conditions.  4.  Need to Maintain Stock Plants  When vegetative techniques are used, the propagator must have access to stock  plants (the source of root cuttings, stem cuttings, or leaf cuttings) or be able to  purchase  these  propagules.    For  hardy  perennials  (both  herbaceous  and  woody), this may mean a separate area either under cover or in the field for the  maintenance  of  plants  in  a  condition  suitable  for  harvesting  propagules.    For  tender  plants,  the  commercial  grower  must  maintain  stock  plants  under  glass.  For  example,  for  Fuchsia  spp.  plants  may  need  to  be  maintained  in  a  heated  greenhouse in order that cuttings may be taken from them in the early spring. 

List some disadvantages of vegetative propagation methods.  Check your answer at the end of this section. 

Micropropagation  The  laboratory  technique  of  micropropagation  involves  the  taking  of  very  small  pieces of tissue and culturing these in sterilised media.  Very clean healthy stock can be produced using this technique and large numbers of  plants may be produced from an individual in a very short period of time.  When this material is taken from a vegetative portion of a plant (for example, a small  amount of callus tissue), the plant produced is a clone of the original plant (that is, it  has exactly the same genetic makeup as the parent plant).  Micropropagation  techniques  are  also  used  to  help  germinate  some  of  the  most  notoriously  difficult­to­germinate  seed.    For  example,  seeds  of  orchids  and  some  carnivorous plants (for example pitcher plants, Sarracenia spp.) are raised in a sterile  environment.  Agar  (a  polysaccharide  gel)  supplemented  with  hormones  and  fertilisers provides a suitable environment for a much improved rate of germination.  Micropropagation permits the precise manipulation of the environment so seeds can  be given exactly what nutrients and hormones have been established as necessary.  It limits what the seed is exposed to and also what the seed is not exposed to.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

19 

Figure 6  Orchid Seedlings Germinated Using Micropropagation Techniques*

Figure 7  Orchid Seedlings Ready for Potting Up  Micropropagation techniques are usually not for most home gardeners.  Genetically Modified Crops  Genetically  modified  crops  can  be  produced.    This  is  achieved  by  artificially  and  unnaturally allowing gene implanting.  The result is a genome (or total chromosomal  content)  which  could  never  have  occurred  in  nature.    Plants  which  have  been  genetically  modified  have  been propagated thereafter  by conventional  means using  seeds.

*

These  photographs  of  orchid  micropropagation  were  taken  at  the  Eric  Young  Orchid  Foundation  in  Jersey.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

20 

Seed Versus Vegetative Propagation  Characteristics of Seed Propagated  Plants  Characteristics of Vegetatively­  Propagated Plants 

Plants  are  usually  genetically  different  Plants are usually genetically identical to  from the parent plants.  the parent plant.  The  result  is  that  some  of  the  desirable  All  qualities  of  the  parent  plant  are  qualities  of  the  parents  may  not  be  shared by the offspring.  reflected in the offspring.  In  addition,  some  of  the  less­desirable  qualities  of  the  parents  may  also  not  be  present in the offspring.  Plants  produced  by  seed  go  through  all  Plants  produced  by  vegetative  means  of  the  plant  growth  stages  (juvenile,  may  have  shortened  juvenile  phases.  transitional, adult) at the normal rate.  This  means  that  the  desirable  adult  phase (i.e. flowering and fruiting) may be  The  result  may  be  a  plant  with  a  longer  reached much sooner.  than  desired  juvenile  (non­flowering)  phase. 

As noted previously, there are advantages and disadvantages of each of the different  propagation techniques.  Many plants may be propagated by a number of different methods.  Usually  only  one  method  is  preferred  by  commercial  propagators  –  this  may  be  because of the availability of material or the effort required to produce a plant using  the  technique  (that  is,  the  convenience  of  the  technique)  or  the  reliability  of  the  technique.  The  home  gardener,  however,  may  choose  to  use  a  method  that  is  not  commonly  used  in  commercial propagation  because the factors  of  mass production and  costs  are  usually  not  as  critical  a  factor  for  the  gardener  wishing  to  produce  only  a  few  plants.  Example: Drumstick Primrose  The  white  flowered  form  of  the  drumstick  primrose,  Primula  denticulata  var.  alba,  may be propagated by a number of methods: · Seed · Root cuttings · Division of offsets  Usually  seed  is  the  method  preferred  by  commercial  propagators  of  the  drumstick  primrose.    A  large  number  of  plants  may  be  easily  grown  without  any  special  equipment.  However,  if one  suspects  that  pollination has occurred  with  the  more  common  lilac

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

21 

flowering form of  P. denticulata, then a vegetative propagation technique should be  used.  If the seeds were sown, the majority of seedlings would ultimately have lilac  flowers and not the desired white flowers.  In commercial propagation, the seeds of a true­breeding white form would not have  been permitted to cross­pollinate with the white flowered form if the seeds were to be  used in propagation.  As a result, the seeds would be safe to use to propagate the  Primula denticulata var. alba form.  However,  in  the  home  garden,  isolation  of  plants  to  prevent  cross­pollination  is  difficult.  If the propagated plants must be true to type, then a vegetative process is  the suitable choice.  Example: Chinese Wisteria  All  seed­grown  wisteria  have  prolonged  juvenile  periods.    In  the  case  of  Chinese  Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis), a plant grown from seed may not produce flowers until  the  plant  is  20  years  old  (although  this  is  an  extreme,  a  period  of  7  years  is  not  uncommon).  Because  the  plants  are  variable,  a  seed­grown  plant  may  also  produce  an  unattractive flower.  It is a long time to wait for a seed to produce a flowering plant  only  to  discover  that  it  does  not  possess  the  qualities  desired.    For  this  reason,  commercial propagation of wisteria use vegetative techniques exclusively.  Wisteria  may  be  propagated  by  stem  cuttings,  layering,  and  grafting  (using  seed­  grown root stock).  Production methods focus on stem cuttings and grafting – because these techniques  are  able  to  produce  larger  numbers  of  plants  using  a  few  stock  plants  and  the  qualities of the new plants will match that of the parent.  The home gardener, who is interested in only producing a few plants, may consider  using  layering  techniques.    Layering  will  result  in  plants  with  the  same  desirable  qualities of the parent without the difficulties associated with rooting stem cuttings or  producing  successful  grafts.    This  process  may  be  slow  (taking  more  than  a  year)  and may occupy more than a little space in the garden, but it is an effective means of  vegetative reproduction. 

Figure 8  Wisteria sinensis Cultivar

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

22 

Example: Rhubarb  Rhubarb  (Rheum  x  hybridum)  is  another  plant  where  there  are  a  number  of  propagation alternatives, each with advantages and disadvantages.  In general, rhubarb may be propagated by: · Division · Seed.  Rhubarb seed is fairly easily purchased.  It is an inexpensive alternative – a packet of  60 seeds is priced at less than £2.  However, the plants produced from these seeds  will  be  variable  –  some  may  have  desirable  qualities  while  some  may  have  less  desirable characteristics.  Rhubarb plants are usually selected for disease­resistance  (particularly  to  root  rot  diseases),  flavour,  colour,  and  length  of  the  stalks.    Seed­  grown plants will not always possess these qualities.  Rhubarb plants are usually propagated by division.  The crown is divided into pieces  (each  with  at  least  one  good  bud)  in  early  spring  or  late  winter.    Each  crown  is  capable  of  producing  a  new  plant  with  all  the  same  qualities  of  the  parent  plant.  However there is a difference in price – a single crown of a known cultivar may cost  £3.  In  general,  commercial  propagation  of  rhubarb  focuses  on  division  of  named  cultivars,  although  there  is  some  seed­based  production.    The  goal  is  to  produce  plants with all the desirable qualities the home gardener demands.  A  home  gardener,  however,  would  almost  always  choose  to  propagate  by  division.  In  the  case  of  rhubarb,  flowers  are  not  desirable  and  the  home  gardener  often  removes any flowers as they start to form (well before they set seed).  Seed saving is  therefore  not  possible.    Division, however,  is a  simple  operation  that  is easily done  when the plant is dormant (late autumn may be the best time, although the late winter  or spring before new growth commences is another possibility).  Divisions are easily  grown on to produce plants of harvestable size without any special handling, outside  of ensuring the new plant receives sufficient moisture during the first growing season.  In this case, the simplest method for propagation is the one with the most desirable  outcome.  Example: Petunia  Although  treated  as  half­hardy  annuals  in  most  temperate  areas,  petunias  (Petunia  spp.) are in fact tender perennials native to Brazil and Argentina.  Their spreading form  with generous flowering habit has made them popular plants for both bedding displays  as well as hanging baskets.  Petunia may be propagated in one of two ways: · Many  cultivars  of  petunia  are  grown  from  seed.    The  very  fine  seed  of  the  petunia  is  sown  in  late  winter  (February)  to  early  spring  (April)  and  grown  on,  under glass, until temperatures are suitable for planting out.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

23 

Many  petunia  cultivars  sold  are  F1  hybrids.    Careful  breeding  has  produced  parent strains of plants that, when crossed, produce seeds – producing uniform  plants with hybrid vigour, consistent flower colour and regular plant size. 

Figure 9  Seed­Propagated Petunia · Some petunias do not come true from seed.  These hybrids and cultivars must  be propagated vegetatively.  Examples of these include the Surfinia petunias.  Surfinias are valued for their vigour, floriferous habit and tolerance of extremes  in  weather  (from  heavy  rainfall  to  drought).    Surfinia  petunias  are  hybrids,  the  result  of  a  cross  between  Petunia  hybrida  with  P.  pendula  (a  wild  South  American species petunia).  The first plants were propagated from seed (this is  how  the  cross  was  first  made  by  the  breeders)  but  these  plants  cannot  be  propagated  from  the  seed  they  produce.    Some  of  the  superior  qualities  of  Surfinias will not be carried forward to the seed­produced offspring.  These are  propagated by cuttings.  Surfinias  are  plants  protected  by  plant  breeder’s  rights  and  cannot  be  propagated without approval by the appropriate agent representing the breeder.  For the gardener, there two options available for the propagation of plants.  One is to  purchase (or save) seed – germinating and growing the seedlings on to plants in time  for the summer display.  The second is to produce new plants vegetatively.  A gardener  may dig up a petunia plant before the frosts of autumn, pot it up and overwinter it in a  frost­free place.   This plant may be a source of cutting material to be grown into new  plants  the  following  spring.    However,  there  are  some  concerns  with  this  approach  –  one is that some plants are protected by breeder’s rights and propagating these plants  (even for one’s own use) may be illegal, and the  second is that these plants must be  maintained  over  winter  (and  the  costs  associated  with  this  –  space  in  a  heated  greenhouse or other location and the risk of overwintering pests and diseases with the  plant).  Example: Annual Sunflower  A  final  example  of  the  choice  of  vegetative  techniques  involves  the  annual  sunflower  (Helianthus annuus).  The annual sunflower is a hardy annual.  This plant is easily propagated by seed.  Technically, these plants may be propagated  vegetatively  by  the  use  of  cuttings.    However,  both  commercially  and  in  the  home

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

24 

garden, the propagation method chosen is the sowing of seed.  The annual sunflower  seed is easily handled, germinated and grown.  The only choice left to the gardener is to  choose where to sow the seeds – they may be started in late winter under glass or may  be sown in situ in the garden in spring.  There is a huge choice of cultivars of Helianthus annuus – ranging in both height (from  less than 30cm to more than 3 metres), colour (from the more common yellows through  white and  red and combinations of shades) and flower form (many are singles, some  are doubles, some produce seeds while other flowers are sterile) and plant form (some  produce  single  stems,  others  are  freely  branching).    Some  of  these  cultivars  are  F1  hybrids,  so  saved  seed  will  almost  certainly  not  produce  offspring  with  the  desired  qualities of the parent. 
These  sunflower  “seeds”  are  actually  the  fruit  of  the  sunflower – the achene.  Within  the  achene  lies  the  true  seed  and this is easily removed from  the  hardened  case  of  the  fruit.  The  entire  achene  is  usually  sown  to  produce  new  sunflowers.

Figure 10  Fruits/Seeds of Annual Sunflower 

Answers to Self Check Questions from page 11  Can you note down what plant needs might be?  Temperature,  moisture,  relative  humidity,  oxygen  and  for  leafy  plants  in  daylight  –  carbon  dioxide,  light,  its  wavelength,  intensity  and  duration,  nutrition,  hormonal  states,  as  well  as  enough  freedom  from  competitors  and poisons. 

Answers to Self Check Questions from page 19  List some disadvantages of vegetative propagation methods.  Disadvantages of vegetative propagation methods include:  1.  The carry­over of pests and diseases present on the host plant.  2.  Specialist facilities are often required.  3.  Cost.  4.  There is less chance of new forms arising.  5.  While some plant material can be stored for short periods, leafy cuttings  in general are more difficult to store and transport than seeds. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

25 

2  SEED PROPAGATION 

By  the  end  of  this  section,  you  will  be  able  to  describe  the  conditions for successful propagation by seed: · Define the terms physical and physiological dormancy. · Describe one method of overcoming a named physical  and a named physiological dormancy. · State the conditions for successful germination of viable  seed. · Describe the seed harvesting and collection of a range  of different plants. · Describe the effects of storage on seed. · Describe how conditions for successful germination can  be achieved in a protected environment. · Describe  the  sowing  and  aftercare  of  a  range  of  seed  types sown in containers. · Describe how the conditions for successful germination  can be achieved in the open. · Describe  the  sowing  and  aftercare  of  a  range  of  seed  types sown outdoors. 

Introduction  Propagation by seed involves the following steps:  1.  preparing seed  2.  sowing of seed  3.  germination of seed 

Subsequent steps  may be  required,  depending  on  the  location of  the  seed  sowing.  These may include some or all of: · · · · growing on of seedling, pricking out, transplanting, thinning, hardening off. 

The actual process of seed germination has been covered in lesson 2.  In this lesson  more practical aspects of seed propagation are covered.  Seed Dormancy  Dormant  seeds  are  those  that,  although  viable  and  subjected  to  favourable  environmental conditions for germination, will not germinate.  A seed that is viable that will not germinate because the conditions are not suitable  for germination is called quiescent.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

26 

Dormancy  is an essential  mechanism  in  some plants to  time  germination  when  the  environmental conditions are favourable for further growth.  Seed dormancy has been a concern of plant propagators for a very long time.  As a  result, there have been numerous studies of dormancy and a number of attempts to  classify dormancy.  Seeds  can  show  varying  degrees  of  dormancy that  are  sometimes  referred  to  as  shallow, intermediate and deep dormancy.  Shallow  dormancy  is  very  common  and  disappears  after  a  few  days  or  weeks.  Often  seeds  are  light  and  temperature  sensitive  and  respond  well  to  mechanical  abrasions ­ this is common with herbaceous plants.  Intermediate dormancy is common in conifers and other woody plants where short  periods of moist chilling stimulate germination.  Deep  dormancy  is  seen  in  many  plants  (woody  and  herbaceous)  in  the  U.K.,  a  temperate zone.  These seeds respond well to prolonged, moist chilling.  However,  there are some species that require a warm period before a cold moist period, which  stimulates radicle and hypocotyl growth, e.g. Lilium, Paeonia spp. 

Figure 11  Paeonia Flowers  The  type  of  dormancy  condition  affecting  plants  is  species  dependent.    It  may  be  uncomplicated when only one factor has to be removed (single dormancy), or more  complicated  with  two  or  more  factors  involved  (double  dormancy  and  multiple  dormancy respectively).  In double or multiple dormancy a sequence of treatments  are required and this entire process can take over two years to complete.  Unfavourable germination conditions often throw seeds into dormancy.  For example  strong light and high carbon dioxide are two factors which often inhibit germination.  In  some  seeds, a  lack  of  light  prevents germination  whilst others germinate equally  well in light or darkness.  It is difficult to generalise but there are three types of dormancy that exist:  1.  innate dormancy  2.  induced dormancy  3.  enforced dormancy.  These  terms  were  introduced  in  the  late  1950s  to  try  to  categorise  dormancy  behaviours.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

27 

Innate Dormancy  Seeds that are dormant when shed from the parent plant are said to be in a state of  innate dormancy.  These seeds are “born dormant”.  This may be considered as a  physiological condition* when a period of after­ripening is required before seeds  will germinate.  In examples such as the ash tree, Fraxinus excelsior, Acer (including  the  Sycamore)  and  Sorbus  (including  the  mountain  ash)  the  embryos  are  not  completely differentiated.  This is overcome with time and suitable conditions.  Induced Dormancy  An  induced  dormancy  is  one  in  which  the  seed  has  achieved  dormancy.    Seeds  (which may have overcome innate dormancy) can enter an induced dormancy when  they are exposed to some unfavourable environmental condition.  Examples  of  unfavourable  conditions  include  low  oxygen  levels  in  the  sowing  medium  (perhaps  as the  result of  deep  burial).    Induced  dormancy  may  also  result  from conditions brought about by extraction or storage.  Induced dormancy is characterised by the fact that the state of dormancy remains for  a  time  even  after  the  detrimental  factor  has  gone.  The  normal  physiological  processes must then be satisfied before germination can occur.  Lettuce seed (Lactuca spp.) may exhibit induced dormancy.  Some lettuce cultivars  will  normally  germinate  in  either  light  or  dark  conditions  if  maintained  at  20°C.  However,  if the  seeds are  sown  in  dark,  warm  conditions  (at  around  30°C)  and the  temperature  is  lowered  to  20°C,  these  seeds  will  only  germinate  if  they  are  given  light.    The  pre­treatment  of  warm,  dark  conditions  provided  to  the  imbibed  seed  induces a requirement for light.  Enforced Dormancy  Enforced  dormancy  occurs  when  a  seed  (that  is  capable  of  germinating)  is  prevented  from  germinating  by  an  unsuitable  environment.    This  may  involve  insufficient  water  or  inappropriate  temperatures.    When  optimum  conditions  return,  immediate germination occurs.  These seeds are not truly ‘dormant’ because they will germinate when conditions are  right  (a  truly  dormant  seed  will  not  germinate  even  when  the  immediate  conditions  are  suitable).    Sometimes  these  seeds  are  called  “quiescent”  –  meaning  that  they  will  not  germinate  because  of  an  unsuitable  environment  but  will  once  a  suitable  environment is provided.  Seeds in a packet are quiescent.  Any  seed  that  is  placed  in  an  unfavourable  condition  when  it  is  not  dormant  will  exhibit this type of “dormancy”.

*

Physiology is the science which deals with the functions of life processes of plants and animals.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

28 

Dormancy Mechanisms 

The  RHS  Level  2  syllabus  identifies  only  physical  and  physiological  dormancy  explicitly.    Other  dormancy  mechanisms  will  be  briefly  identified in this section and are included for completeness only. 

Although there is no formally recognised naming convention for dormancy, the work  of  M.G.  Nikolaeva  (commencing  in  the  1960s)  and,  more  recently,  two  seed  researchers (Carol and Jerry Baskin) have resulted in a classification scheme. This  scheme identifies two broad classes: · endogenous (due to properties of the embryo – “endo” meaning “within”) and · exogenous (due to properties of the endosperm or other tissue of the seed or fruit  – “exo” meaning “outside”). 

Exogenous Dormancy  Exogenous dormancy mechanisms are further broken down into: · physical dormancy (the seed or fruit coat is impermeable to water), · chemical dormancy (germination inhibitors occur within the seed coat or fruit), · mechanical dormancy (the seed coat is a physical barrier stopping development  of the embryo).  Physical Dormancy  Physical dormancy has already been covered in some detail in lesson 2.  The cause of physical dormancy is the seed coat (or testa).  These hardened seed  coats  have  become  impervious to  water  because  the tissue  has become  suberised  (the cells have been impregnated with a substance called suberin).  The advantage  of these types of seed is that they tend to have a long storage life, once dried to a  suitable  level  –  even  seeds  stored  at  warm  temperatures  remain  viable  for  long  periods.  Studies of dormancy determine the source of the block to germination by a series of  experiments  –  one  of  which  is  the  removal  of  the  embryo  from  the  seed  and  the  attempt  to  grow  this  isolated  embryo  using  laboratory  techniques.    If  the  removed  embryo grows successfully, then the embryo is not dormant, it is merely waiting for  clues of a suitable growing environment but these clues are blocked by the seed coat  barrier.  This type of dormancy may be overcome either through: · a treatment of the seed coat called scarification  Scarification involves the injury to the seed coat to permit the entry of moisture  into the seed’s tissues.  These treatments will be outlined later in this lesson.  The  seeds  of  sweet  pea  (Lathyrus  odoratus)  sometimes  need  scarification  before  sowing  to  ensure  germination.    Other  seeds  with  this  type  of  dormancy  include

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

29 

Lupinus, Geranium (Cranesbill), and Convolvulus (Bindweed). 

Figure 12  Cranesbill (Geranium sp.) · the sowing of slightly immature seeds (where the seed coats have not yet had a  opportunity  to  harden).    This  procedure  takes  advantage  of  the  fact  that  hard  seed  coats  usually  develop  during  the final  stages  of  seed  development.    Early  sowing of  the  seeds  of  Baptisia  australis  (Wild  Indigo)  is  an example of  a  seed  with  a  physical  dormancy  that  may  be  germinated  without  any  other  special  treatment. 

Chemical Dormancy  When  the  seed  coat  contains  chemical  inhibitors,  the  seed  exhibits  a  chemical  dormancy.    This  occurs  in  many  tropical  plants  where  the  pericarp  is  fleshy.  Leaching or absorption of the soil reduces the amount of the chemical, permitting the  seed, ultimately, to germinate.  A  second  type  of  chemical  dormancy  occurs  when  the  seed  embryo  contains  inhibitors,  but the  seed  coat prevents  these from  leaching  away.   Germination  will  not occur until these inhibitory chemicals are permitted to leach away.  Plants with fleshy fruits often present this type of dormancy.  The seeds of the tomato  (Solanum esculentum) exhibit chemical dormancy – when the tissues of the tomato  are removed, the chemical inhibitor is removed.  Mechanical Dormancy  In mechanical dormancy, the seed coat acts as a physical restraint on the embryo.  Examples  of  seeds  exhibiting  this  type  of  dormancy  include  the  hard  shells  of  the  walnut (Juglans spp.) and the hardened pericarp of Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.). 

Endogenous Dormancy  Endogenous dormancy involves some quality of the internal tissues of the seed that  prevent germination.  This category is divided into three groups: · physiological  dormancy  involves  a  mechanism  in  the  embryo  that  prevents  germination from commencing, · morphological  dormancy  involves  the  incomplete  embryo  development  that  prevents germination, · morphophysiological  dormancy  (which  involves  a  combination  of  the  first  two  categories).

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

30 

Physiological Dormancy  Physiological dormancy has also already been described in lesson 2.  Seeds  with  physiological  dormancy  have  some  aspect  of  the  embryo  itself  that  prevents germination.  The embryo is fully developed, but must complete some kind  change  before  germination  may  occur.  Physiological  dormancy  has  been  further  broken  down  into  three  groups  based  on  the  intensity  of  the  dormancy:  non­deep,  intermediate, deep.  In some instances, seeds with non­deep physiological dormancy may need such a  short treatment that they may germinate immediately upon sowing.  The short period  of  dry  storage  that  occurs  between harvesting, post­harvest preparation,  packaging  and shipping may be sufficient to overcome any dormancy that may have occurred.  During  this  time,  “after­ripening”  may  have  occurred.    After­ripening  is  the  maturation of the embryo during dry storage that enables it to germinate when sown.  The seeds of many flowers sold in packets, most vegetables and grasses exhibit this  type of dormancy.  For example, the seeds of cucumber (Cucumis spp.) have non­  deep  physiological  dormancy  as  well  as  such  commonly  grown  garden  annuals  as  Calendula  (Pot  Marigold)  and  Helianthus  (Sunflower).    If  these  seeds  are  sown  immediately upon harvesting, they may not germinate.  One theory is that the seed  needs  a  signal  to  indicate  it  has  left  the  parent  plant  before  germination  may  commence.  In  others  with  non­deep  physiological  dormancy,  a  period  of  light  or  darkness  is  necessary  to  germinate  –  these  seeds  are  called  photodormant.    The  seeds  that  exhibit  this  type  of  dormancy  are  most  likely  sensitive  to  levels  of  phytochrome.  Lesson 2 describes the mechanism involved with detection of phytochrome in the two  forms  Pr  and  Pfr.    Many  common  bedding  plants  also  exhibit  photodormancy  –  for  example  the  tiny  seeds  of  Begonia  spp.  and  the  seeds  of  Busy  Lizzy  (Impatiens  walleriana)  need  light  to  germinate.    Seeds  of  Nigella  are  the  opposite  and  need  darkness for germination.  Seeds with intermediate or deep physiological dormancy need a period of storage  in a moist state.  Sometimes seeds with these types of physiological dormancy are  treated  with  a  period  of  chilling  (called  stratification).    Later  in  this  lesson,  stratification  is  described  more  fully.    Seeds  that  exhibit  this  type  of  dormancy  are  often  classified  as  obligate  (meaning  that  they  require  special  treatment)  or  facultative  (meaning  germination  without  stratification  will  occur,  but  the  chilling  process  increases  the  rate  of  germination).    The  seeds  of  many  temperate  woody  plants exhibit this type of dormancy – for example, the seeds of most Acer species  require  moist  chilling  before  germination  will  occur.    There  are  some  annuals  and  perennials  that  fall  into  this  classification  of  dormancy.  Penstemon,  Primula  and  Aster require periods of chilling before germination will commence while Antirrhinum  and  Salvia  do  not  require  chilling  but  will  germinate  faster  following  a  chilling  treatment.  Morphological Dormancy  Morphological dormancy involves those seeds where the embryo is not completely  formed or developed at the time the seed completes ripening.  Usually, these seeds  require  warm  temperatures  to  permit  the  embryo  to  complete  development.    This  may  reflect  an  adaptation  to  the  climate  where  the  seed  dispersal  occurs  in  late 31 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

summer and, even if the autumn remains warm, germination will be delayed until the  following  spring.    This  type  of  dormancy  may  also  prevent  overcrowding  of  germinated  seedlings.    Some  examples  of  the  many  plants  with  seeds  with  morphological dormancy include Anemone, Cyclamen, and Hosta.  Temperature  conditioning  and  hormonal  treatment  can  break  this  dormancy  artificially – the precise requirements varying from species to species.  Germination  will not occur until the embryo has reached a fully developed stage.  Morphophysiological Dormancy  This  form  of  germination  dormancy  involves  both  an  under­developed  embryo  (of  Morphological  dormancy)  and  a  physiological  mechanism  (of  Physiological  dormancy).  To break this dormancy, two sets of conditions are needed – to complete  development  of  the  embryo  and  then  to  break  its  dormancy.    The  seeds  with  morphophysiological dormancy are said to have a double or multiple dormancy.  The common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) exhibits this type of dormancy – this seed has  an  immature  embryo.    After  embryo  maturation  (provided  by  warm  temperature)  there  is  a  requirement  for  a  cold  temperature  treatment  (provided  by  temperatures  o  less  than  5  C).    In  practical  terms,  this  requires  the  seeds  to  be  placed  in  a  stratification pit for the first winter and summer after collection.  This is followed by  a  second  winter  in  the  stratification  pit  before  germination  will  occur.    Or  the  seed  may be placed in a cold store for the “winter” treatment and then a warm store for the  “summer” treatment.  Some seeds require the opposite treatment  – first a period of  cold, then a period of warm.  Double and Multiple Dormancy  Not  all  seeds  with  double  dormancy  exhibit  morphophysiological  dormancy.    Some  have  a  dormancy  of  the  seed  coat  and a physiological  or  morphological  dormancy.  Any combination of two or more different forms of the exogenous and/or endogenous  dormancy are called double (or multiple) dormant.  The  seed  of  the  Dove  Tree  or  Handkerchief  Tree  (Davidia  involucrata)  is  doubly  dormant.    This  seed  has  both  a  physical  dormancy  involving  the  seed  coat  and  a  physiological dormancy involving the embryo.  This seed requires storage in a warm,  moist medium until the radicle emerges and then storage in a cold, moist medium for  about 3 months.  Unlike some seeds with a dormancy related to the seed coat, the  recommendation for this one is that the fruit (a drupe) be planted without removal of  the coating around the seeds. 
The  seeds  of  the  Dove  Tree  (Davidia  involucrata)  do  not  need  to  be  removed  from  the  drupe  fruit  before  planting.    They  should  be  placed  in  moist  vermiculite  and  then  placed  in  a  warm  location  (usually  about  20°C) until the radicle emerges. A polythene bag with  moistened  vermiculite  will  be  used.  After  the  radicle  emerges, the moistened vermiculite and seeds will be  stored  at  about  5°C  for  3  more  months.    Then  the  seeds may be sown outdoors.

Figure 13  Davidia involucrata Ready for Warm Storage 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

32 

Seeds in nature tend to germinate the following spring or over a longer period.  TREATMENTS FOR DOUBLE DORMANCY  Paeonia suffruticosa  (tree peony)  Two  periods  of  storage  required  to  address  the  morphophysiological dormancy: · first a warm period to allow radicle growth, · then a cool period to allow epicotyl development  The breaking of the epicotyl dormancy is influenced by the  stage  of  growth  of  the  radicle.    The  greater  the  radicle  growth,  the faster  and  more  effective  the chilling  treatment  is for the growth of the epicotyl.  Cercis canadensis  (North American Redbud)  Two treatments required: · mechanical  scarification  or  immersion  in  either  boiling  water  or  sulphuric  acid  to  address  the  physical  (seed  coat) dormancy, · then moist chilling (stratification) at about 2 to 5°C for 5  to  8  weeks  to  address  the  physiological  (embryo)  dormancy.  (The treatment with sulphuric acid may only be applicable in  commercial horticulture due to the hazard of the acid.)  Viburnum spp.  Two periods to address morphophysiological dormancy: · first  a  period  (2  to  6  months)  of  high  temperatures  to  stimulate radicle · then  1  to  4  months  of  low  temperature  to  encourage  epicotyl development  Other examples include Convallaria, Sanguinaria, Trillium and Polygonatum 

Treatments to Overcome Dormancy  Scarification  Scarification is the process whereby the seed coat is deliberately damaged prior to  sowing  the  seed.    This  seed  coat,  when  damaged  or  etched,  has  tiny  openings  through  which  moisture  and  gases  can  cross.    As  a  result,  the  first  stage  of  germination  may  commence.    The  goal  of  scarification  is  to  address  the  physical  dormancy associated with an impermeable seed coat.  Seed coats are damaged by: · scratching, · cutting (also called chipping) or puncturing, · soaking in water or acid, · alternately freezing and thawing, or · fire (this melts the resins in or around the seed coat).

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

33 

In nature, seeds with hard seed coats are softened by the actions of chemicals and  microorganisms within the soil.  In addition, the abrasive nature of some soil particles  may also play a role.  And natural cycles of freezing and thawing often weaken the  seed coat.  The acid of digestive systems of animals and birds also can help break  down the impervious quality of hard seed coats.  There are a number of methods to scarify seeds: · Scratching the seeds with sandpaper to remove or thin a portion of the seed  coat.  One  technique  that  is  useful  especially  for  small  seeds  (that  are  difficult  to  chip  with  a  knife  without  causing  extensive  damage  to  the  seed)  involves  sandpaper and a jar.  The sandpaper is placed in the jar so that the abrasive  side faces the centre of the jar.  The dry seeds are placed into the jar.  The  cap is replaced and the jar is shaken so that the seeds make contact with the  sandpaper.  The goal is not to remove the seed coat, but to etch it slightly. 

Figure 14  Scarification of Seeds  Commercially,  this technique  is  accomplished by  rotating  the  seed  in drums  lined  with  sandpaper  or  mixed  with  gravel.  Dry  tumbling  can  also  aid  germination in plants such as Acacia. · Chipping the seeds with a knife to remove a small portion of the seed coat or  puncturing the seeds to provide an opening in the seed coat.  Please refer to lesson 2 for an illustration of chipping with sweet pea seeds.  Care must be taken, particularly when handling small seeds, to avoid cutting  fingers in place of seed coats. · Soaking the seeds in water for a short time.  For resolution of physical dormancy, the seeds are dropped into a volume of  boiling water – the source of heat is immediately removed (the intention is not  to cook the seeds) and the water is permitted to return to room temperature.  About 12 to 24 hours later, the seeds are removed.  This will help soften the  hard seed coat.  Examples of these seeds include Beetroot (Beta vulgaris).  For  resolution  of  chemical  dormancy,  the  seeds  may  be  soaked  in  water  o  between  5  ­10  C  for  24  to  48  hours.    Plants  such  as  Pinus  and  Ceanothus

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

34 

seeds  may  be  treated  in  this  way.    Soaking the  seed  can  also  increase  the  speed of germination and emergence especially with those seeds, which are  slow to germinate. · Soaking  the  seeds  in  concentrated  sulphuric  acid.    An  acid  bath  is  sometimes  used  by  the  commercial  grower  (under  carefully  controlled  conditions to prevent injury to workers).  Seed should be mixed as 1 part seed  o  to  2  parts  acid  at  18  ­  21  C  for  1  to  2  hours.    The  seed  coat  becomes  carbonised  and  the  seed  expands.    It  is  of  obvious  importance  that  the  embryo  should  not be  damaged during  this  process  so  close  observation  is  required.    Following  this  treatment,  the  seeds  are  washed  thoroughly  and  sown  immediately  or  dried  and  stored.  Examples  are  rose  rootstocks,  Hamamelis, Daphne and Tilia. 

It is important that scarification be done carefully to ensure that the seed contents (in  particular, any parts of the embryo) are not damaged.  Seeds  can  be  stored  for  periods  of  time  after  mechanical  scarification.    Examples  include  Wisteria,  Cercis,  Cytisus,  some  pines  and  Cornus.    These  seeds  must  be  stored  carefully,  however,  because  they  are  more  susceptible  to  invasion  and  damage  by  microorganisms  that  are  now  free  to  enter  through  the  damage  in  the  seed coat.  Stratification  Stratification is the process whereby the seeds are subjected to a period of chilling  (and  sometimes  warming)  after  the  seeds  have  been  imbibed.    The  goal  of  this  procedure  is  to  address  seed  dormancy.    Usually  only  seeds  of  plants  of  the  temperate zones with cold winters require this process.  The process of stratification  is  sometimes  called  “moist  chilling”.    Low  temperatures  (usually  below  5°C)  are  involved in this process.  Many woody tree and shrub seeds require this treatment.  Examples include Sorbus,  Crataegus,  Acer,  Fraxinus,  Berberis,  Cotoneaster,  Rosa  ­  they  all  have  complex  dormancy characteristics.  The exposure to low temperatures allows physiological changes to take place within  the  embryo,  as  may  occur  with  after  ripening.    Although  some  species  may  not  require stratification, their germination may be quicker and more uniform after being  subjected to stratification.  For the commercial grower, a uniform germination rate is  particularly useful because it allows for a production of a uniform product.  The  procedure  is  simple.    Seed  is  mixed  with  moist  sand,  peat,  vermiculite,  or  a  combination  of  these  ingredients.    The  ratio  used  is  approximately  3  parts  of  sand/peat/vermiculite to each part of seed.  The seed mixture is held at warm, room  temperatures for about 12 to 24 hours to permit the seed to imbibe moisture.  Then  the mixture is placed in cold conditions.  Seeds  in  stratification  units  should  be  checked  each  month.  Seeds  must  be  put  in  and  taken  out  at  the  correct  time.  Seeds  should  be  sown  immediately  following  removal  from  stratification  units.    It  is  important  to  examine  the  containers  fairly  frequently  (particularly  after  about  2  to  3  months  of  treatment)  because  once  the  seed begins to germinate, it should be sown at once.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

35 

Originally, this procedure involved the digging of pits outside.  Perfect drainage was  ensured in the pit (by adding a layer of coarse stone or sand).  The sides of the pit  were lined with timber (and a fine wire mesh – perhaps 6mm – to prevent the entry of  rodents and to establish the exterior perimeter of the pit.  Then layers of a seed/sand  mixture were added into the pit.  The use of layers is where the term “stratification”  comes from.    The  entire  mixture  was covered  including  another  wire  mesh  layer  to  prevent rodents from entering.  The contents of the pit were then subject to natural  outdoor  temperatures  (cold  in  winter,  warm  in  summer).    All  of  this  needed  to  be  protected from damage by animals – particularly mice.  Sometimes this is done using pots.  The bottom of the pot has stones for drainage.  Above this were layers of sand and seed.  The entire pot was protected with mesh (to  prevent  animals  from  eating  the  seed).    The  pot  was  placed  outside  in  a  relatively  protected area – sunk up to the surface level in a pit prepared in a suitable location  outside (this pit needed perfect drainage to prevent  the seeds from rotting).  Again,  the  contents  of  the  pot  were  subjected  to  the  natural  changes  in  temperature  and  were kept moist by precipitation.  This technique is still sometimes used today. 

mesh 

alternating  layers  of sand and seeds

stones for drainage 

view through the centre  of the pot  Figure 15  Seed Stratification 

However,  much  stratification  today  is  carried  out  using  containers  (often  polythene  bags) to hold the moist seed/sand/peat/vermiculite mixtures.  For cold stratification,  these  are  placed  in  either  the  refrigerator  or  cold  storage.    For  warm  stratification,  these may be kept indoors, in a heated location, or outdoors when temperatures are  suitable and the container is kept out of sunlight.  The home gardener may stratify some seeds using the same procedures.  Often re­  sealable  polythene  bags  are  the  best  because  they  can  lie  flat,  are  easily  written  upon (to record the contents and the date they entered storage), and can be quickly  checked  to follow  the progress of  the  seed.    Some  seeds  will  actually  germinate  in  the cold storage conditions, so the transparent nature of the plastic bags makes this  easy to check.  Some  people advocate the  use of folded,  moistened  paper  towels.   This  method  is  outlined  in  some  detail  in  “Seed  Germination:  Theory  and  Practice”  by  Norman  C.  Deno.    This  procedure  is  particularly  useful  for  home  gardeners  because  seeds  undergoing  stratification  (both  cold  and  warm)  may  present  little  mess  (since  no  sand, vermiculite or peat is used) and take up little space in a refrigerator or cabinet.  The concept is to use moistened paper towels to act as the source of moisture for the  seeds.  The seeds are placed on these paper towels.  The towels are folded, labelled  and  stored  in  polythene bags.    Periodically, these  packages  may be  removed from  storage and checked for signs of germination.  Germinated seeds may be removed 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

36 

and  planted  up for  growing  in  the  light.   A  large number  of  seeds  may be  stratified  this way and still fit within a single polythene bag.  Figure 16  Seed Stratification for the Home Gardener 
The  second  step  is  to  fold the  paper  towel  again  (so the seeds are between moistened layers) and  place  this inside  a  polythene  bag.   If more  seeds  (from different species) are being started with the  same  treatment,  then  these  may  also  be  added  (using different paper towels) into the same bag.

The first step is to remove the seeds from seed  pods  or fruits.    Then  place  these  seeds  onto  a  moistened  paper  towel  that  has  been  folded  in  half.    This  paper  towel  should  already  be  labelled  (using  a  water­proof  marker)  with  the  seed species and date of start of storage. 

The important points are that the seeds must not be kept wet, just moist.  When the  seed mixture is enclosed in a container or polythene bag and held indoors in a cool  location (a refrigerator or cold storage), excess moisture is not an issue.  However,  seeds being held outside need to be stored in such a way that they will not remain  wet.  Seeds also need to respire (although at a reduced rate when temperatures are low)  so the containers must permit some exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide with the  outside air.  Polythene bags do permit some exchange of air and are suitable for the  home gardener to use.  Examples of Seed Treatment to Overcome Dormancy 

The following table is a list of some tree species and the conditions for storage of  the seed.  However, this list is not to be memorised for the RHS Level 2 Certificate  in  Horticulture  examination.    The  information  in  this  list  is  being  provided  to  illustrate the scope of seed storage periods only.  There are many web sites on the  internet that provide germination and storage information.  In addition, there are a  number of references that list similar information.  See the reading list at the end of  this lesson for a starting point. 

In  the  table  below,  a  number  of  woody  perennial  species  are  listed  along  with  the  treatments to overcome dormancy.  The dormancy conditions identified include: · embryo dormancy (a physiological dormancy) · seed coat dormancy (a physical dormancy). 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

37 

SPECIES  Acer macrophyllum  Acer platanoides  Acer saccharum  Alnus incana  Arctostaphylos uva­ursi 

DORMANCY  Embryo  Embryo  Embryo  Embryo  Seed coat and embryo 

Berberis spp.  Ceanothus thyrsiflorus 

Ceanothus arboreus  Chamaecyparis spp.  Clematis spp.  Cornus nuttallii  Cornus stolonifera  Cotoneaster horizontalis  Cupressus spp.  Fagus sylvatica  Fraxinus excelsior 

Hippophae rhamnoides  Ilex spp.  Larix spp.  Magnolia spp.  Malus baccata  Malus pumila  Picea spp.  Pinus spp.  Platanus spp.  Prunus avium  Prunus padus  Quercus spp.  Rhus spp.  Robinia pseudoacacia  Sorbus aucuparia  Symphoricarpos spp.  Taxus spp. 

TREATMENT  o  Stratify 2 months at 5  C.  o  Stratify 3 ­ 4 months at 5  C.  o  Stratify 2 ­ 3 months at 2 ­ 5  C.  o  Stratify 2 months at 5  C.  Acid  soak  for  3  ­  6  hours  then  stratify  at  o  25  C.  for  2  months  and  further  o  stratification at 4.5  C for 2 months.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 15 ­ 40 days at 0 ­ 5  C.  o  Embryo and seed coat  Hot water treatment for 12 hours at 71  C.  followed  by  stratification  for  3  months  at  2.5 o C.  Seed coat  Hot  water  treatment  for  12  hours  at  76  ­  o  100  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for up to 3 months at 4.5  C  o  Embryo  Stratify for up to 3 months at 4.5  C  o  Seed coat and dormancy  Stratify for 4 ­6 months at 0.5 ­ 5  C.  o  Embryo and seed coat  Scarify followed by stratification at 5  C.  Embryo and seed coat  Acid  soaking  for  1.5  hours  followed  by  o  stratification for 3 months at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 2 months at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 3 months at 5  C  o  Embryo and seed coat  Stratify for  2  ­  3  months at  20  C  to  break  o  seed coat dormancy then at 5  C for further  2 ­ 3 months to break embryo dormancy.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 3 months at 5  C  o  Immature embryo  Stratify for up to 3 years at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 1 month at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 6 month at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 1 month at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 2 ­3 months at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 2 ­3 months at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 2 ­3 months at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 1 ­3 months at 5  C.  o  Embryo  Stratify for 3 ­ 4 months at 1 ­ 5  C.  o  Embryo and seed coat  Stratify for 1 ­2 months at minus 1­ 5  C  o  Some  embryo  dormancy  Stratify for 1 ­ 2 months at 1 ­ 5  C.  may be present  Seed coat  Acid  soak  for  1  ­  1.5  hours  followed  by  o  stratification for 1 ­2 months at 5  C.  Seed coat  Acid  soak  for  1  ­  1.5  hours  and  sow  immediately  o  Embryo  Stratify for 3 months at 0 ­ 1  C.  o  Seed coat and embryo  Stratify at 20 ­ 26  C for 4 months followed  o  by 4 months at 5  C.  Seed coat and dormancy  Acid  soak  for  1  ­  2  hours  followed  by  o  stratification for 3 ­4 months at 0 ­ 5  C.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

38 

SPECIES  Tilia cordata  Viburnum acerifolium 

DORMANCY  Seed coat and embryo  Embryo 

Viburnum opulus 

Embryo 

TREATMENT  o  Stratify  for  4  ­5  months  at  15  ­  25  C  o  followed by 4 ­5 months at 1 ­ 5  C.  o  Stratify  for  6  ­  10  months  at  20  ­  30  C  to  produce  root growth  then  2 ­  4  months at  o  5  C to promote shoot growth.  o  2 ­ 3 months at 20 ­ 30  C followed by 1 ­ 2  o  months at 5  C. 

External Environmental Factors Affecting Germination  A  note  on  viability:  To  be  viable,  seeds  must  normally  have  been  fertilised  and  contain  a  living  embryo.    They  should  also  be  collected  at  the  correct  stage  of  maturity.    Premature  harvesting  may  arrest  development  and  shorten  storage  life.  Delayed  harvesting  may  lead  to  rapid  deterioration  or  loss  by  natural  dispersal.  Conditions  of  storage  also  affect  the  viability  and  longevity  of  seeds.    Dry  seeds  remain  viable  longest  under  cold,  dry  storage  conditions  of  low  humidity.    Other  conditions  that  contribute  to  maintaining the  viability  of  seeds  are artificial drying of  the seed, and a reduction of the oxygen supply.  Sometimes large seeds produce a  better seedling. 

Which of the following would rapidly kill germinating seed, and why? · excess moisture · excess air/oxygen · excess heat  Check your thoughts at the end of this section. 

The four main external factors, which affect germination of the viable seed, are: · · · · water, gases, temperature, light. 

The environment  should  also  be free of  diseases (for example,  the organisms  that  lead  to  the  development  of  damping­off)  and  free  of  competition  from  other  crop  plants or weed plants.  Later, as the seedling develops, the new plant should also be  grown  in  a  compost  or  soil  with  adequate  nutrition  to  support  the  plant  growth  and  maturity.  Water  Water  is  essential  for  the  germinating  seed.    In  the  case  of  many  seeds  (not  recalcitrant  seeds  that  have  been  maintained  moist  since  they  ripened  and  were  harvested), the first step is to rehydrate the seeds.  Water is the most important factor that affects the germination of seed.  Absorption  of water is the first stage of germination.  This water must be present in the compost

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

39 

or seedbed and available to the plant.  For seeds being sown in containers, peat is added to seed compost because of its  capacity for holding moisture.  Pots or boxes are watered immediately after sowing  (or, in some cases, immediately before sowing).  The pots or trays are then usually  covered with glass and paper, or polythene.  This prevents evaporation and makes  further watering before germination unnecessary.  The water­holding capacity of the outdoor seedbed relies largely upon the residue of  bulky organic manures.  Again, it is important to see that the soil is well supplied with  moisture before sowing, to avoid watering again before germination.  In dry soil, the  open drills can be watered before sowing (on a small scale).  Firming after sowing  permits the seed to come into close contact with moisture on and in the soil particles.  One technique for watering compost in containers involves the use of a water bath.  The  compost­filled  container  is  placed  in  a  very  shallow  bath  of  clean  water  –  the  idea  is  to  submerge  only  the  bottom  of  the  container  and  not  the  entire  container.  Water will be pulled up by capillary attraction through drainage holes in the base of  the  container.    This  method  does  not  reduce  the  quality  of  the  soil  structure  and  does not dislodge the seeds.  Stand  the  seeded  pans  in  the  water  for  capillary  attraction  to  absorb  the  water.  When  the  pan  is  fully  moist,  remove  the  container  from  the  water  bath  and  set  it  where the seeds are to germinate. 

seeds 

water bath

Figure 17  Watering from Below  It is essential that moisture remain available to the seed during the entire process of  germination.  The lack of available water is the most common cause of seed death or  seedling death.  Gases  The germinating seed is respiring.  As a result, the rate of germination decreases if  oxygen levels are decreased.  Carbon dioxide that is produced by the germinating seed (as a consequence of the  respiration  process)  must  be  permitted  to  escape  from  the  growing  medium.  Elevated levels of carbon dioxide also lead to decreased rates of germination.  This  is  one  reason  why  it  is essential  to  maintain  the soil  structure during germination –  the formation of a cap on the soil surface (from vigorous irrigation, for example) will 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

40 

prevent the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases between the atmosphere  above the soil and the soil atmosphere.  The  exception  to  this  is  seed  that  germinates  and  grows  in  aquatic  environments.  For  example,  North  American  Wild  Rice  (Zizania  sp.)  will  germinate  in  anaerobic  environments, when the seed is fully emersed.  Temperature  Temperature  requirements  vary  greatly  for  different  kinds  of  seed.    Temperature  influences the rate of metabolic processes (one of which is respiration), and this is  an  important  step  in  germination.    This  does  not  mean,  however,  that  all  seeds  require  warm  temperatures  to  germinate.    The  optimum  temperature  range  varies  from seed to seed.  Some seeds will even germinate during cold storage.  Germination may be prevented if the temperature is very high or very low.  Seeds of  o  pansy (Viola spp.), which have been sown in June, need to be kept below 12  C.  In  controlled  conditions  under  glass,  seeds  can  be  supplied  with  the  ideal  germinating temperature.  The covering of glass and paper or polythene will help to  maintain  the  temperature  in  a  seed  tray.    The  use  of  newspaper,  in  particular,  is  necessary  if  containers  are  situated  where  hot  sunshine  falls  on  them  –  the  temperature inside the glass covering would otherwise become excessive.  Outside,  little  control  is  possible.  Timing  of  sowing  is  critical.    Ensuring  that  soil  is  well drained will help increase soil temperature early in spring.  Some seeds, particularly seeds of wild plants, require fluctuating temperatures.  For  these  seeds  to  germinate  successfully,  a  regime  of  temperatures  may  need  to  be  followed – often these seeds require different daytime temperatures than night­time  temperatures.  Light  The  common belief  is  that  seeds  will  only  germinate  in darkness.    There  are  some  seeds that require darkness to break dormancy, but most seeds either require light  or are tolerant of both dark and light.  Examples of seeds requiring light include: · Lamium purpureum (red dead nettle) · Arabidopsis thaliana · Sinapsis arvensis (charlock) · Primrose · Impatiens, Petunia  Seeds whose germination may be inhibited by light include Tomato.  The mechanism involved in the detection of light involves phytochrome and its two  interchangeable  forms.    Please  refer  to  lesson  2  for  details  about  this  mechanism.  Buried seeds (or those seeds in the shade of other plants) will receive little red light,  and  more  light  in  the  far­red  wavelength  range.    The  consequence  is  that  phytochrome is converted into the red form (Pr) – this inhibits the germination of light­

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

41 

sensitive  seeds.    Many  small  seeds  are  light  sensitive  because  they  have  only  a  small  reserve  of  energy that  cannot  support  extensive  growth  to  the  soil  surface  to  commence photosynthesis.  In fact, most small seeds would not be able to grow to  reach the surface and this may be why this adaptation has occurred.  Seed Harvesting and Collection  The goal of harvesting or collecting seed is to collect viable seed.  Through correct  treatment and storage conditions, the viability of the seed will be retained.  There is  little point in saving a seed that no longer has the ability to germinate.  There are different approaches to collection of seed.  But some basics apply to every  seed: · · Collect seed when it is mature (or, when necessary, just slightly immature). Do not save diseased tissue; do not save seeds with insect damage. 

A quick note about collecting seed from plants in the garden:  Some plants produce  viable seed that does not breed true.  That is, the seed will not produce a plant with  the same qualities as the parent plant.  In particular, the seeds of the F1  hybrid may  not  produce  plants  with  the  same  qualities  as  the  parent.    However,  the  seeds  of  many other plants (including most varieties termed “heritage” or “heirloom”) will breed  true.    These  “open­pollinated”  varieties  tend  to  have  stable  traits  from  one  generation to the next.  Seeds of Woody Perennials  For tree seeds, once mature, carefully pick or collect the fruit (this may be a dry fruit,  for  example  the  pods  of  Cercis,  the  Judas  Tree,  or  a  fleshy  fruit,  for  example  the  berries  of  Sorbus  spp.).    At  this  point,  identify  the  source  of  the  seed  (it  may  be  difficult to tell the difference between seeds later) – try to determine both the genus  and specific epithet of the plant whenever possible.  Seeds  within  fleshy  fruit  must  be  removed  from  the  pulp.    For  larger  fruit  (for  example, the seeds within an apple, Malus sp.), the seeds may be picked out from  within the fruit.  For smaller fruit (for example, the berries of Sorbus spp.) the berries  must be pulped, mixed with warm water and left for several days.  After this time, the  seeds should have sunk to the bottom of the water.  These seeds should be carefully  removed (ensuring that the pulp has been removed successfully) and dried. 
After  extracting  the  hard  seeds  from  the  pulp,  the  seeds  are  washed  clean  before sowing or  drying  and  storing.

Figure 18  Collecting Seed from Cotoneaster spp. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

42 

Winged seeds (for example the samara of Acer spp.) or those seeds within a catkin  (for example the small samara of birch, Betula spp.) should be collected before the  seeds  are  dispersed.    In  the  case  of  catkins,  the  entire  catkin  can  be  placed  in  a  paper  bag* and  left  for  several  days  to  two  weeks  –  during  this  time,  the  seeds  should have separated from the catkin and may be saved.  In the case of individual  samaras (like those of maple, Acer spp.), the wings of samaras may either be kept  intact or rubbed off (to make the handling of seeds easier).  Collecting  seeds  from  cones  is  as  simple  as  placing  the  cone  in  a  paper  bag  in  a  warm, dry location.  The cone will open and the seeds will be released.  Seeds of Herbaceous Perennials, Biennials and Annuals  Collecting  and  saving  seeds  from  annuals,  biennials  and  herbaceous  perennials  is  one  way  of  propagating  new  plants.    Many  perennial,  annual  and  biennial  species  produce  capsules  or  pods,  within  which  the  seeds  are  found.    It  is  important  to  collect  the  seed  when  it  has  ripened,  but  before  dispersal  has  occurred  –  for  example, it is usually best to save seed that has not yet come into contact with the  soil.  The most ideal conditions for collecting seed is a dry day – wet seeds, unless  dried sufficiently before storage, are at greater risk of rotting during storage.  Collect pods and capsules when ripe (often a colour change from green to brown or  black  is  a  clue  that  the  seeds  are  ripe).  Then,  over  a  piece  of  paper,  crush  them  carefully (usually using your fingers is the best way to prevent damaging the seeds).  Seeds  will  be  released  onto  the  paper  –  where  they  may  be  left  to  dry  before  packaging in glassine or paper envelopes.  It is critical to label the seeds at this time.  Usually  the  name  of  the  plant  (including  variety or  cultivar  name,  if known) and  the  date of collection are adequate.  Some seedpods eject the seeds with considerable force when ripe.  For these plants,  it  is  best  to  enclose  the  seedpods  within  paper  bags  so  that  the  natural  ripening  process can occur but the seeds will remain within the bag.  The seeds of the annual Love­in­a­Mist (Nigella damascena) often do come true from  seed  (meaning  that  the  seeds  collected  from  garden  plants  will  often  produce  new  plants with the same qualities as the parents).  These seeds are easily collected and  removed from the decorative, inflated seed produced. 

Contents  within a split  capsule

Figure 19  Seed Capsule of Nigella damascena  The  seeds  of  poppies  (whether  annual,  biennial  or  perennial)  are  easily  collected  from the “pepper pot” shaped seed capsules.
*

The use of paper bags, and not polythene bags, is critical.  Paper will permit the seeds to remain dry.  While polythene bags will trap moisture and permit the growth of undesirables like different fungus that  may lead to the seeds rotting. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

43 

Figure 20  Seeds of Poppy (Papaver sp.) 

Case Study of Primula japonica  Primula  japonica  is  a  stunning  late  spring flowering herbaceous perennial for  damp  soil in dappled shade.  The whorls of flowers are produced on sturdy stems.  Six or  seven whorls develop over several weeks.  Here they are seen in mid­May with the  first and second whorls just starting.  These are one year old plants. 

Figure 21  Primula japonica Flowers in May  By late June, the seed pods are forming and by late July they are ready to collect. 

Figure 22  Seed Pods of Primula japonica  By late July the seed capsules are full of ripening seeds. The flowers are self­fertile

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

44 

and  so  different  coloured  forms  routinely  but  not  always  come  true.    Because  P.  japonica are reasonably reliable at self­pollination there is no need to isolate these  plants from other species of Primula.  Very special cultivars would normally be kept  at a distance from other plants (to ensure cross­pollination does not occur).  The seed capsules are removed just before the ripe seeds fall to the ground.  Timing  is critical as the seed is dispersed quite quickly.  The seed trays are placed in a cool  dry airy shed until the seeds fall readily from the capsules. 

Figure 23  Collected Seed Pods of Primula japonica  Please  note  that  each  tray  is  labelled.    Within  some  of  these  trays,  some  loose  seeds are visible.  When  the  seeds  have  ripened  and  fallen  from  the  capsules  it  is  time  to  clean  the  seed before storage.  Once the capsules are dry, they are slightly crushed between  thumb  and  finger  before  being  placed  in  the  sieve.    They  are  sieved  to  remove  all  extraneous material such as capsule parts and small insects.  An ordinary domestic  flour  sieve  is  perfect for  Primula  seed.    However,  do not  use  this  sieve for  cooking  because some seeds may be poisonous and it is not worth the risk of contaminating  food with seed residues. 

Figure 24  Seed Cleaning  Seeds  must  be  stored  in  packets,  which  do  not  let  moisture  in.    These  moisture  resistance packets are perfect for small quantities of seeds.  Clean paper envelopes ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450  45 

can  do,  if  glassine  envelopes  are  not  available,  athough  paper  envelopes  may  absorb moisture more readily than the glassine ones (this is particularly a concern if  they  are  being  stored  within  a  refrigerator).    It  is  important  that  the  envelopes  be  labelled with the name of the species (and perhaps cultivar or variety) and the date  of seed collection. 

Figure 25  Glassine Seed Packets  Finally the packets of seeds are stored in a domestic refrigerator (with the permission  of the person in charge!) 

Be  careful  these  seeds  are  not  inadvertently  eaten  or  come  into  contact  with food.

Figure 26  Refrigerated Seed Storage  These seeds are stored within the refrigerator only to ensure that they remain viable  until the time they are sowed.  It is important that the containers are air­tight – if the  containers  are  not air­tight,  then  there  is  a  risk  that  moisture  may  condense on the  seeds.  These seeds are not undergoing stratification to overcome dormancy.  In this case,  the  seeds  are  collected  in  between  mid­July  to  September  and  are  sown  the  following February (under glass) – refrigeration is used only to ensure the viability of  the seed remains as high as possible between collection and sowing. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

46 

Seed Storage  Seed storage has two functions.  One is to keep seed from one growing season to  another.  The other is to permit the seed to overcome any dormancy condition.  In  lesson  2,  an  overview  of  seed  storage  techniques  was  described.  The  basic  approaches are: · temperature  Provide  conditions  that  will  slow the  seed’s  natural  respiration  rate.    Often  low temperatures result in seed remaining viable for the longest time.  Avoid  temperature fluctuations. · moisture  Keep desiccant­tolerant seeds dry.  Because seeds are hygroscopic, even  moist air is sufficient to affect the moisture content of seeds.  Wet seeds often  rot.    For  this  reason,  keep  the  dried  seeds  in  an  airtight  container  and  maintain  the  dryness  of  the  air  within the  container  through  the use  of  silica  gel.  Only store recalcitrant seeds in suitable (moist) conditions.  These seeds, in  general, do not store for long. · gases  Seeds  continue  to  respire  even  in  storage.    For  seeds  stored  dry,  there  is  little  respiration  (this  has  been  limited  by  both  temperature  and  moisture  levels), so exposure to oxygen has little effect on storage.  Recalcitrant  seeds  (those  stored  in  a  moist  condition)  will  require  oxygen  in  storage.  Storage of seeds may influence: · viability (the number of  seeds  that  will  germinate  when  ideal conditions  are  provided), · vitality  (the  rate  that  the  seeds  germinate  –  that  is,  the  speed  of  the  germination and the vitality of the seedling that results) · dormancy  Some  seeds  overcome  dormancy  during  storage.    Other  seeds  will  develop  dormancy  during  storage.    The  seeds  of  Baptisia  australis  (Wild  Indigo)  develop seed coat dormancy when the seed coat dries.  For the home gardener, avoid keeping seeds in the kitchen drawer (the temperature  fluctuations  will  cause  premature  aging  of  the  seeds),  garden  shed  or  greenhouse  (the seeds may become damp in these conditions).  Commercial  seed  companies  often  seal  their  seeds  in  foil  packets  to  keep  the  moisture away from  the  seeds  and  to  reduce the  amount of oxygen that  the  seeds  are exposed to.  When only some of these seeds have been sown, use sticky tape to  reseal the remainder in the foil packet in which they were purchased.  Some  seeds  require  a  period  of  storage  before  they  will  germinate.    Usually  these  seeds are exhibiting a type dormancy of within the seed, involving the embryo.  The  embryo may be dormant or may not be completely formed.  Warm, dry storage may  be  the  only  step  required  to  overcome  this  dormancy  (for  example,  the  seeds  of

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

47 

Calendula) or may be the first step required to overcome this dormancy.  The two main points of seed storage are: · When  saving  dry  seeds,  use  glassine  envelopes,  paper  bags  or  envelopes,  or  cloth bags.  Avoid using polythene bags, because these trap moisture (should the  seeds not be completely dry) and the seeds may rot. Know  what  conditions  are  necessary  for  the  specific  species  of  seed  is  being  collected – some tolerate or require dry storage to remain viable, others are not  tolerant of drying  (these  seeds are  often  called  recalcitrant  seeds)  and  must be  collected when moist and stored in moist conditions. 

·

Treatments  Many  of  the  seeds sold  in  packets have undergone some  treatment  by  the grower.  These include priming, pelleting, coating and dusting.  An  additional  treatment  is  chitting.    Seeds  that  have  been  chitted  have  been  pre­  germinated.    Although  commercial  growers  may  be  able  to  purchase  this  type  of  seed, it is unlikely that a home gardener would have access to seeds with this pre­  treatment.    Usually,  these  seeds  are  sold  in  plastic  containers  (to  protect  the  emerged radicle).  However, the home gardener may pre­germinate seeds at home –  effectively, producing chitted seeds themselves. 
These sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus)  seeds were chitted by first soaking in  water overnight and then by storing in  a rolled­up, moistened paper towel for  several  hours  (in  a  warm  location).  Remember, seeds need both oxygen  and  moisture  to  germinate.    When  sowing  chitted  seeds,  some  care  must  be  taken  to  ensure  the  radicle  does not become injured.

Figure 27  Chitted Seeds 

Seed Priming  A primed seed is one that has been pre­treated so that it germinates quickly and  uniformly.    Primed  seed  is  of  particular  value  to  the  commercial  grower,  since  the  irregularity of germination in many seed species (for example Phlox drummondii and  Verbena)  cause  problems  in  nursery  growing  programmes.    This  irregular  germination  results  in  increased  production  costs  (both  in  terms  of  space  and  heating).    Priming  is  also  common  practice  with  some  vegetable  seeds  –  including  carrot, leek, celery and parsnip.  The principle of  'seed  priming'  is  based on  the fact that  seeds  must  imbibe  water  prior to germination.  If imbibition is controlled throughout a sample of seed, a state  of preparedness is possible.  All seed should subsequently germinate and develop at  48 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

the same rate.  The actual process used commercially uses the chemical polythylene  glycol (PEG).  This rehydrates the seed but it does not permit the seed to completely  germinate.    The  seeds  become  metabolically  active  and  are  prepared  for  germination.    PEG  acts  as  an  osmoticum  and,  because  of  its  large  molecular  structure, allows only sufficient water into the seed to permit limited germination.  The  radicle is just ready to protrude.  Following priming, seeds can be dried and stored for  many months in this primed state.  The technique used is:  1.  Temperature should be constant and appropriate to the species  2.  Dissolve polythylene glycol crystals (creamy white) in distilled water overnight  3.  Treatment  lasts  for  about  14  days  in  an  airtight  container  to  prevent  evaporation  4.  Bottom of container lined with capillary matting  5.  Moisten with polythylene glycol  6.  Sprinkle seeds on to surface of matting  7.  Test samples for percentage germination. When this reaches 80% priming is  complete.  8.  Rinse primed seeds in cold running water and dry at room temperature.  Pelleting Seed  Some  seeds are  sold  with a  clay  coating  so that  the  seed appears  like  a  uniform­  sized ball.  The idea behind pelleting is that tiny seeds may be handled accurately  (particularly  by  seed  sowing  machinery)  and  that  irregular­shaped  seeds  may  be  rounded sufficiently that they may be handled accurately by machinery. 
Pelleted seeds of Begonia  are  available  in  packets  for  the  home  gardener.  As  small  as  these  pellets  appear,  the  seed  is  smaller still. The  British  one  penny  coin used to give some  idea  of  the  size  of  the  pelleted seed is 2cm in  diameter. 

Figure 28  Pelleted Seed of Begonia sp.  Often the contents of the pelleting material are proprietary, but the pellet is usually  composed of clay, along with fungicide or insecticide and even some fertiliser.  Because of this coating, pelleted seeds often require moister conditions to germinate.  The pellet coating must be fully imbibed before it breaks down – and it must break  down before the seed within it may germinate.  Often commercial growers find that the germination percentage of pelleted seeds is  slightly  lower  than  that  of  unpelleted  seed.    However,  the  ability  to  accurately  sow  seeds  at  the  desired density  (particularly  the  very  fine  seed  of  Begonia  spp.)  more  than  compensates  for  the  increased  cost  of  the  seed  and  the  lower  potential  for  germination.  There are limitations to the seed – for example, stratification of pelleted seed is not  possible.  ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450  49 

Seed Dusting and Coating  Seeds  are  often  coated  or  dusted  with  treatments  to  prevent  attack  by  disease  organisms.    Seeds  that  are  sown  in  the  cold,  damp  soils  of  early  spring  are  particularly  susceptible  to  rotting.    In  addition,  the  environment  suitable  for  germinating seeds (warm, moist conditions) is also ideal growing conditions for some  fungi.    One  of the  major problems  can be  control  of  disease, especially  'Damping­  off'.  Damping­off may be due to Pythium spp., Phytophthora spp. and Rhizoctonia  spp. – all are fungal disease­causing organisms.  Any disease can have a devastating effect on the emerging seedling, as they are so  weak  and  vulnerable.    Damping­off  may  occur  at  the  pre­emergent  stage,  at  the  post­emergent stage or in larger plants where it is termed root rot.   Damping­off will  be covered in more detail later in this section.  Organic  gardeners and growers  may  wish  to avoid  coated  or dusted  seeds.    Some  seed companies sell untreated seed that may be more vulnerable to rotting in cold,  wet soils than treated seeds. 

Can you give an example of a seed dressing used on vegetable seeds?  Check your answer at the end of this section. 

Other Seed Treatments 

The  following  table  is  not  to  be  memorised  for  the  RHS  Level  2  Certificate  in  Horticulture examination.  The information in this list is being provided to illustrate  the scope of seed pre­treatments only. 

There are a myriad of treatments that may be used to encourage seeds to germinate.  The following table is just a small sample. 

Pre­germination Treatment  Sown in Autumn  Chill if no seedlings appear in 3 months  Pre­chill sow in Spring  Pre­soak  Seeds take 30 to 90 days to germinate  Seeds take more than 90 days  Leave seeds uncovered when sown  Barely cover seeds  May need two chilling periods to break dormancy  Keep moist and dark 

Seed Genus  Adonis  Adonis  Androsace  Alstroemeria  Actaea  Betula  Allium  Anemone  Alnus  Cyclamen

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

50 

Pre­germination Treatment  Use lime­free compost  May take over a year to germinate  Chilling may improve germination  May take two winters to germinate  Sow shallowly  Sow outside  Hot  water  treatment  ­  pour  boiling  water  over  the  seed  to  promote germination  Cold stratify the seed:  Place  in  the  coldest  part  of  the  fridge  –  length  of  time  in  weeks (4 weeks)  Warm stratify the seed:  Place  seed  in  a  reasonably  warm  position  e.g.  Airing  cupboard. – length of time in weeks (4 weeks) 

Seed Genus  Erica  Acer  Chaenomeles  Euonymus  Colchicum  Colchicum  Glycyrrhiza  Leucojum 

Sorbus 

(In the case of Sorbus the warm treatment must precede a 12 week cold stratification.)  Damping­off  Damping­off  is  the  single  term  used  to describe underground,  soil  line,  or  crown  rots  of  seedlings  due  to  unknown  causes.    The  term  actually  covers  several  soil  borne diseases of plants and seed borne fungi.  Rhizoctonia root rot (Rhizoctonia solani) is a fungal disease, which causes damping­  off of seedlings and foot rot of cuttings.  Infection occurs in warm to hot temperatures  and  moderate  moisture  levels.    The  fungus  is  found  in  all  natural  soils  and  can  survive indefinitely.  Infected plants often have slightly sunken lesions on the stem at  or  below  the  soil/compost  line.  Transfer  of  the  fungi  to  the  germination  room  or  glasshouse is should be eliminated.  Pythium Root Rot (Pythium spp.) is similar to Rhizoctonia in that it causes damping­  off of seedlings and foot rot of cuttings.  However, infection occurs in cool, wet, poorly  drained soils and composts, and by overwatering.  Infection results in wet odourless  rots.    When  severe,  the  lower  portion  of  the  stem  can  become  slimy  and  black.  Usually, the soft to slimy rotted outer portion of the root can be easily separated from  the  inner  core.    Species  of  Pythium  can  survive  for  several  years  in  soil  and  plant  refuse.  Phytophthora  root  rot  (Phytophthora  spp.)  is  usually  associated  with  root  rots  of  established plants but are also involved in damping­off.  These species enter the root  tips  and  cause  a  water­soaked  brown  to  black  rot  similar  to  Pythium.    These  fungi  survive indefinitely in soil and plant debris.  Black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola) is a problem of established plants.  It does not  occur in strongly acid soils with a pH of 4.5 to 5.5.  It usually infects the lateral roots  where they just emerge from the taproot.  The diseased area turns dark brown, and  is quite dry.  The fungi survive for 10 years or more in soil.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

51 

Symptoms of Damping­off  Seeds  may  be  infected  as  soon  as  moisture  penetrates  the  seed  coat  or  as  the  radicle  begins  to  extend.    The  radicle  or  seed  may  rot  immediately  under  the  compost/soil  surface  (pre­emergence  damping­off).    It  results  in  a  poor,  uneven  stand of seedlings that is often confused with low seed viability.  Cotyledons  may  break  the  soil  surface  only  to  whither  and  die  or  healthy  looking  seedlings may suddenly fall over (post­emergence damping­off).  Infection results  in  lesions  at  or  below  the  soil/compost  line.    The  seedling  will  discolour  or  wilt  suddenly, or simply collapse and die.  Weak seedlings are especially susceptible to  attack by one or more fungi when growing conditions are only slightly unfavourable.  Damping­off is easily confused with plant injury caused by insect feeding, excessive  fertilisation,  high  levels  of  soluble  salts,  excessive  heat  or  cold,  excessive  or  insufficient soil moisture, or chemical toxicity in air or soil. 
This  seedling  has  been  removed  from  the  soil  and  placed on its side. Note the thin  section  where  the  soil  level  would  have  been  –  this  is  one  sign  of  damping  off.    The  seedling  has  collapsed.    The  cotyledons  and  true  leaf  are  wilted.

Figure 29  Damping Off  Control of Damping­off Diseases  The  best  control  of  damping­off  is  prevention.    The  following  steps  outline  some  preventative procedures used by professional growers:  1.  Purchase disease free plants and seeds.  2.  Use of fungicidal coatings on seeds, which will be direct sown out doors in cold  soils,  such  as  corn  and  peas.    The  organic  gardener  will  not  usually  consider  treated  seeds,  but  should  consider  other  cultural  procedures  to  prevent  seed  rotting.  Later,  in  the  section  on  sowing  seeds  in  the  open,  these  will  be  briefly  covered.  3.  Seed borne disease can also be avoided by soaking the seeds for 15 minutes in  a dilute sodium hypochlorite solution (1:20 water) prior to sowing.  4.  Use sterile, well drained soil media.  5.  Maintain a pH at the low end of the average scale, i.e. 6.4 pH is less susceptible  to root rot than a pH of 7.5.  6.  Seeds must not be covered more than 4 times the thickness of the seed.  7.  Do not allow pots to stand in water as excess water cannot drain and the roots  will be starved for oxygen bringing all growth to a halt.  8.  Avoid  overcrowding  and  overfeeding  of  plants.  It  is  important  to  maintain  constant  levels  of  growth  through  proper  lighting  and  complete  control  of  the  growing environment.  9.  Disinfect tools and containers.  10. Provide  constant  air  movement.    Ideally,  air  should  move  freely  24  hours  per  day, but not directly aimed at the plants.  This helps the seedlings to aspirate. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

52 

Fungicides  may  be  applied  as  a  soil  drench  after  sowing.    They  may  be  incorporated into the soil before sowing as a dust.   They can be sprayed in mist form  on  all  seedlings  as  a  precaution  until  they  have  been  transplanted  into  individual  pots.    Once  transplanted,  only  those  seedlings  known  to  be  especially  sensitive  to  damping­off need be misted with fungicide daily until the first or second seed leaves  have  emerged.      An  organic  gardener  cannot  use  most  fungicides,  but  there  are  cultural practices that may be used and these are outlined below.  A home gardener  may control damping­off diseases by: · the use of strict hygiene.  All containers, trays and tools must be sterilised. · the use of only clean, sterilised compost · avoid sowing seeds too thickly · ensure adequate air circulation around seedlings · ensure composts do not become water­logged.  Successful Seed Germination in a Protected Environment  Sowing  of  seeds  within  a  protected  environment  gives  much  more  control  of  the  conditions  under  which the  seed  germinated.    These  protected  environments  include:  within a greenhouse, on a windowsill inside the house, under lights inside the house.  A  home  gardener  may  maintain  keep  a  close  watch  on  the  seedlings  and  control  the  levels of: · light (critical for the germination of some seeds, essential for the healthy growth  of seedlings), · moisture  (often  watering  the  compost  before  sowing  or  immediately  after  sowing may be supply sufficient moisture until the seeds have germinated), · heat (depending on the seeds being started, use of a heated propagator may  help improve the germination rate – though the use of a warm location within  the house or greenhouse is an alternative).  The basic steps involved are: · Choose an appropriate compost and container · Sow the seeds · Provide appropriate conditions for germination (warm, cool, light, or dark) · Prick­out seedlings · Grow on · Harden off  Seed­Starting Media  Seeds  started  under  glass  or  indoors  require  a  compost  that  will  provide  the  basic  germination  environment.    The  compost  must  retain  moisture  while  still  providing  adequate aeration to the germinating seed.  The compost must be loose enough that  the  seed’s  radicle  may  easily  penetrate  and  that  the  plumule  may  emerge  without  damage or delay.  The compost must be sterile so that disease­causing organisms are  not present (these include those organisms that cause Damping­off).  Often seed starting composts are very fine in texture and have a higher organic material  composition.    This  ensures  good  contact  between  the  compost  and  the  seed  and  adequate moisture retention for the imbibing seed.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

53 

There are a number of alternatives available to the home gardener: · Seed composts (either loam­based or loam­less, with or without peat), · Peat pellets (for example Jiffy 7s), · Peat­less pellets for the organic gardener (for example, Coir­7s).  Composts 

There  are  advantages  and  disadvantages  to  using  loam­based  composts.    Make  a  point of finding out about these and make a note of them.  Lesson 7 covers growing composts, both loam­based and loam­less. 

The  home  gardener  may  consider  either  purchasing  a  ready­made  seed  starting  compost  or  may  consider  making  the  compost  from  its  components.    Usually,  on  a  small  scale,  it  is  easier  to  purchase  a  ready­made  mixture,  because  this  will  ensure  consistency and appropriate qualities of the compost.  On a commercial  scale,  where  the equipment for sterilisation, screening and mixing are cost­justified, a grower may  consider the value of preparing the compost on site.  In general, the composition of a seed starting compost may include any of the following  ingredients: · Loam  The loam selected is usually medium to heavy turf loam that was stacked with  straw­y  manure  for  six  months.  Any  nutrient  deficiencies  would  have  been  corrected by adding the appropriate amendments.  The loam will have been  sterilised (often by steam).  The pH is usually slightly acidic (often around 6.3)  and the loam is screened through a 9mm sieve to ensure large particles are  removed.  Loam contributes a source of nutrients, an ability to retain nutrients  against the forces of leaching and the ability to buffer sudden changes in soil  pH. · Peat or peat­substitutes  Both peat and coir permit the retention of moisture within the compost.  When  peat  is used,  it  is  usually a  granulated  moss peat  with a  pH  of  between 4.0  and  4.5  and  sifted  as  identified  for  loam.    Substitutes  of  peat  for  seed  composts include coir, leaf mould and composted garden waste.  As the peat­  free  initiative  gains  momentum,  more  proprietary  peat­free  seed  mixes  will  become readily available. Sand or grit  Sand must have been washed to ensure it is free from lime or chalk.  Usually  the  sand  selected  is  sharp  and  coarse  with  between  60  and  70%  of  the  particles  between  1.5  and  3mm  in  size.    Sand  adds  to  aeration  drainage  (preventing  water­logging  and  ensuring  the  seed  receives  the  appropriate  balance of moisture and oxygen).

·

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

54 

·

Perlite  Perlite is an alumino­silicate of volcanic origin.  It is the product of a process that  o  involves crushing and rapidly heating (1000  C) of the mineral material.  Perlite is  a  white,  lightweight,  stable  aggregate.    In  a  seed  compost,  it  provides  good  aeration, some moisture retention but contributes little nutrition.  It is available in  several  grades:­  from  supercoarse  to  superfine.    Perlite  has  a  wide  range  of  uses outside of seed starting composts, and these will be outlined in lesson 7. 

Figure 30  A Small Sample of Perlite · Vermiculite  Although less frequently used  in seed composts,  vermiculite provides  many of  the  same  qualities  as  perlite.    Vermiculute  is  an  aluminium,  iron,  magnesium  silicate  that  has  also  been  treated  at  high  temperature  to  produce  flakes  of  material  (each  containing  thousands  of  tiny  air  cells).    It  is  sterile,  light  and  improves drainage and aeration.  Unlike stable perlite, the plate­like scales can  break down in two years or  less.   This  limits its use to shorter­term composts.  Again, this product is used in a wide range of horticultural situations and will be  described in more detail in lesson 7. 

Figure 31  A Small Sample of Vermiculite  Loam Composts  Loam composts are composed of loam, peat and sand (or grit) – the relative  proportion may be slightly different in different proprietary mixes.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

55

One  available  pre­mixed  seed  starting  compost  is  called  the  John  Innes* Seed  Compost (JIS) which is composed of: · by volume:  o  2 parts loam  o  1 part peat  o  1 part sand or grit · plus the following amendments (per cubic metre of mix):  o  1.10 kg superphosphate  o  550 g chalk or ground limestone  Loamless Compost  Because quality loam is scarce, a number of composts that do not contain loam have  been developed.  These have become more widely used. 

Can you think of other reasons why this is?  Check your answer at the end of this section. 

Loamless composts may be "peat and sand" based or may include other materials.  The Glasshouse Crops Research Institute has formulated a number of composts.  One  recommended for seed starting has the following ingredients: · by volume:  o  50% peat  o  50% sand 3  · amendments, at kg/m :  o  potassium nitrate 0.4  o  normal superphosphate 0.75  o  ground limestone or chalk 3.0  The resulting composts are relatively low in soluble nitrogen (when compared to other  formulations  for  other  uses).    Because  of  the  length  of  time  a  growing  seedling  will  reside in the compost, this lower nitrogen is quite acceptable.  Peatless Composts  Because  both  of  the  above  composts  contain  peat  as  a  main  ingredient,  the  organic  gardener would have to find another seed starting compost mixture.  A number of larger  manufacturers are now producing peat­free alternatives for seed starting.  Although at  the time of writing (January 2005), these may be difficult to find at a garden centre.  The  HDRA  (Henry  Doubleday  Research  Association)  has  some  peat­free  compost  recipes on their web site www.hdra.org.uk.

*

As  a  result  of  research  carried  out  commencing  in  the  1930s,  the  John  Innes  Horticultural  Institute has produced a number of loam­based composts.  This is covered in more detail in lesson 7.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

56 

Seed Starting Pellets  An alternative to using loose composts in containers is to use pellets.  One common  pellet  is  the  peat­based  Jiffy  7.    These  pellets  consist  of  a  compressed  peat  disc  surrounded by a degradable mesh cover.  When moistened with water, the peat disc expands and remains enclosed within the  mesh  cover.    These pellets  may  then  be  placed into a  tray  and the  seeds  inserted  into  the  opening  in  the  mesh  (that  indicates  the “top”  of  the  pellet).    The  seedlings  may grow on in this pellet until ready for planting out. 

A dry Jiffy­7 in the  compressed state. 

A  moist  Jiffy­7  in  the  expanded state.  Note  the  mesh  surrounding  the  peat  and  the  opening  at  the top of the pellet.

Figure 32  Peat­Based Jiffy 7  Because of the growing concern of some gardeners and growers about the use of peat,  a peat­free alternative has been produced.  These Coir­7s may not be widely available,  although  it  is  anticipated  that  they  will  become  more  readily  available  as  demand  for  them increases.  Containers for Seed Sowing  Under glass or indoors, seeds may be sown in a number of different containers.  The most commonly used include: · trays  The traditional approach to  seed sowing has been to fill a tray to the  rim with  compost,  firm  the  compost  (so  that  there  are  no  large  cavities  within  the  compost to prevent the movement of water and to encourage root dryness), and  then sow the  seeds  (covering  the  seeds  if  necessary).    After  the  seeds  have  germinated  and  reached  some  size,  they  are  pricked  out  and  grown  on  in  separate containers.  Trays  may  be  stacked  after  sowing  (this  permits  the  more  economical  use  of  space), as long as each tray has a glass cover.  This may only occur before the  seeds have commenced germination – at that time they must be removed from  the stack so that the seedlings develop in full light. · pots or pans  Pots are frequently used for seed starting.  The most common today are plastic  pots,  although  clay  pots  may  also  be  used.  Pots come  in  different  sizes  and  depths.  Standard pots are as wide as they are deep.  Half pots are between  one half to two­thirds the depth of a standard pot.  Pans are about one third the  depth  of  a  standard  pot.    All  of  these  containers  are  suitable  for  starting  seed  and  for  growing  seedlings  on.    However  one  consideration  for  the  home  gardener is the depth of compost these  containers require and the amount of  57 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

compost  the  seedling  requires.    Clearly,  containers  used  for  large  seeds  or  seeds producing a deep root system quickly will need a considerable depth of  compost to germinate in.  However, smaller seeds with shallower root systems  being  germinated  only  in  the  pot  (and  transplanted  elsewhere  for  growing  on)  may not require such a deep pot. · peat pots or peat­free pots  Peat  pots  and  peat­free  pots  may  be  used  for  either  sowing  of  seed  or  for  potting on transplants.  The advantage of these pots is that they may be planted  directly into the garden, once the time for planting out has arrived.  This may  avoid  some  root  disturbance  that  may  occur  if  re­usable  containers  are  involved.  Traditionally, these pots have been made of peat.  However, new coir pots may  be found that may be used when peat is not desirable. · paper pots and paper grow tubes  Paper  containers  provide  the  same  advantages  and  disadvantages  as  peat.  These  pots  are  made  of  some  combination  of degradable  fibres (the  precise  content is proprietary) and are slightly less expensive than peat pots.  Paper tubes do not have a bottom.  They are intended for tap­rooted seedlings  – particularly sweet pea seedlings (and these are sometimes called sweet pea  tubes).    Unlike  other  containers,  these  tubes  are  used  primarily  for  the  direct  sowing of seed in a suitable compost.  The tubes take up relatively little space in  a tray for germination and growing on. 
From left to right: · Jiffy Pot made of peat · Paper fibre Grow Pot · Paper fibre Grow Tube

Figure 33  Degradable Containers For Seed Starting · module trays  Module  trays  are  used  more  frequently  for  commercial  growing  operations.  Module trays come in a wide range of sizes – from more than 500 “cells” per  tray to only a dozen or so cells. 

Figure 34  Module Tray 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

58 

The smaller modules are intended for growing of seedlings for only a short time  – the contents of the entire cell may be potted up (this permits automation of the  potting up process as well as presenting little root disturbance during potting up).  Larger  cells  are  used  when  the  seedling  will  remain  in  the  tray  for  a  longer  period of time or when large seeds are sown. · specialised modules (like root trainers)  Root  trainers  are  plastic  cells,  each  of  which  is  hinged  at  the  base.    These  containers encourage deep root growth through the grooves within the cell that  direct developing roots downwards.  The hinged feature permits the seedling to  be removed with reduced disturbance. containers from recycled household material  Some  home  gardeners  may  find  that  they  may  be  able  to  recycle  some  household  waste  for  use  as  containers  for  seed  starting.    One  example  is  the  plastic milk jug – once thoroughly cleaned, the top may be cut away and holes  bored into the base (to permit drainage) and these containers may be used to  start seeds. 

·

The main points to remember about container selection are the following: · the container must be sterile (if re­using containers from previous years, a good  washing with a dilute horticultural disinfectant, followed by a thorough rinsing in  clean  water  and  drying  is  necessary  to  prevent  contamination  of  the  new  compost with diseases from previous years), · the container must be of adequate depth to support the seedling for the length  of time the seedling will grow in it before transplanting up, · the  container  must  have  adequate  drainage  holes  to  permit  excess  water  to  drain from the compost – if the compost remains water­logged, seeds will rot, · the container is of a suitable size for the propagating environment (for example,  it fits within the heated propagator, on the window sill, within the shelves of the  airing cupboard) and for the number of seeds to be sown.  Sowing and Aftercare of Seeds Sown In Containers  When to Sow  The  first  step in  sowing  seeds  is  to  decide  when  is  the most  suitable  time.    Sowing  indoors too early may lead to spindly seedlings that have languished indoors too long.  Sowing  indoors  too  late  may  lead  to  delayed  planting  in  the  garden.    In  general,  it  is  best  to  be  too  late  than  too  early.    Often  the  seed  packets  or  gardening  books  will  provide  a  range  of  seeding  dates  (for  example,  Begonia  seeds  should  be  started  between the start of January to the middle of March).   In a home gardening situation,  with or without a heated greenhouse, the better time to start these seeds might be from  the middle of February to middle of March or even later.  If you maintain a garden or seeding journal, you may consider writing the dates of seed  sowing and transplanting in this journal.  Then, as the season progresses, you may wish  to make comments about your choice of dates.  This will be a guideline to help refine  the timing for your seed sowing next year.  The  dates  for  sowing  seeds  will  be  staggered  –  some  species  require  longer  times  before planting out and others require shorter times.  It might be possible that you will  start some seeds indoors in the middle of February, while others will be started indoors

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

59 

in the middle of April.  It is important to carefully plan how many seeds to sow – taking  into account how much space they will require once potted on.  How to Sow Seeds  Although  the  goal  is  the  same  (to  sow  seeds  sufficiently  thinly  that  the  seeds  may  develop  successfully  and  are  able  to  be  transplanted  without  excessive  disturbance),  the techniques vary depending on the sizes of the seed:  First, prepare the container by filling with compost: · Over­fill a suitable container with compost, firm slightly with the fingers (and ensure  that the corners of the container are filled adequately, in the case of a square tray).  Tap the container to remove any large air pockets. · Scrape off any excess compost with a board or straight edge. · Firm (slightly) the compost in the container – use a presser board or the bottom of a  similar­sized container.  This should leave the top of the compost about ½ to 1½ cm  below the top of the container.  The  container  may  be  watered  at  this  point.    One  technique  was  illustrated  and  described on page 40.  The other alternative is to water from above using a watering  can  with  a  fine  watering  rose.    Once  the  compost  is  moist,  permit  the  container  to  drain.  Then prepare the seeds for sowing.  For very large seeds, consider sowing into individual pots or peat pellets.  For large seeds (and pelleted seeds), space each seed individually on the top of the  compost.  Space the seeds evenly over the surface of the compost.  Use the spacing  identified on the packet.  When in doubt, seeds are often spaced in proportion to their  size  –  leaving  sufficient  room  for  the  seedling  to  develop  without  interference  from  neighbouring  seedlings  and  enabling  the  pricking­out  process  to  proceed  without  too  much disturbance of the roots.  Larger seeds (like those of Dahlia) might be spaced at 1  to 2 cm apart.  For medium seeds, scatter the seeds over the surface of the compost.  Ensure that the  seeds are not sown too thickly.  Seeds may be sown directly from the packet, your palm  or  from  the  fold  of  a  piece  of  paper.    Usually,  sowing  from  the  packet  takes  more  practice than the other techniques to distribute the seeds evenly.  For small seeds, mix the seeds with a small amount of silver sand (that is, sand with  the  iron  oxides  washed  out  that  is  low  in  lime  and  salts).    Then  scatter  the  entire  mixture thinly over the compost surface.  In  general,  do  not  cover  pelleted  seeds  or  very  fine  seeds.    Other  seeds  may  be  covered with a layer of compost about ½ cm deep (again, it is usually better to err on  the side of too little compost than too much).  Another choice is to cover the seeds with  a thin layer of fine vermiculite – this permits air and light to reach the seeds and also  reduces the risk of damping­off (about ½ cm of vermiculite is sufficient).  The  compost  has  to  provide  a  suitable  resting  place.    The  ideal  depth  of  sowing  is  important because at this position the seed is held adequately so that the thrust of the  radicle is contained without dislodging the seed.  Also the energy of the germinating

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

60 

seed is not dissipated in the etiolation of the epicotyl (or hypocotyl in some seeds) as it  grows through too great a depth of "earth" cover.  To ensure adequate contact between the seeds and the compost, the surface may be  pressed down slightly with an empty container.   In general, do not do this for pelleted  seed.  Never press moist compost too firmly – seeds desire a fairly loose medium but  one without large air cavities.  Prepare  a label – identify  the  date  and  cultivar  sown.    There  is  a  technique  used  for  writing labels that is used by professional propagators: · The information is written on the tag so that the start of the species name and  cultivar will appear above the compost level once the label is inserted. 
Begonia ‘Devon Gems‛ February 20, 2005

Figure 35  Label Writing · If the label is written the other way around, then once inserted into the compost,  all  that  might  be  seen  is  “Gems”  and  this  might  not  be  enough  to  identify  the  seedlings  at  a  glance  (as  a  result,  removing  the  label  might  be  necessary  to  read it – and this might cause disturbances to the seedlings). 

After sowing the seeds, water them if the compost was not watered before sowing.  If  the  covering  compost  is  dry  and  container  has  already  been  watered,  moisten  the  covering compost using a mist­sprayer.  Then cover the  container  to  maintain  humidity  levels  in  the  compost.    The  traditional  way  is  to  cover  the  pot  or  tray  with  a  sheet  of  clean  glass.    Another  alternative  is  to  place the container in a covered propagator or cover with a plastic dome.  A final option  is to enclose the container within a polythene bag or cover with cling film. 

label ­ date and cultivar  glass, paper or polythene cover  no need for crocks in  plastic pots with  ample drainage holes 

thin compost covering seeds  a suitable compost, e.g. organic  multi­purpose compost 

Figure 36  Methods of Seed Sowing ­­ Sowing in Pans or Pots  Place the container in a suitable  location – in light or darkness, in warmth or cool  conditions.    In  general,  seed  packets  are  the  best  source  of  information  about  germination temperatures.  Do not place the covered container in very bright light or  direct sun – this may cause the seedlings to overheat and die. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

61 

Sowing Seeds of Hardy Plants  The  technique  described  above  is  suitable  for  starting  many  annuals,  biennials  and  perennial  seeds.    However,  some  seeds  will  remain  a  long  time  in  the  seed  starting  compost before germination begins.  For example, the seeds of many woody plants,  alpines and some perennials require a long exposure to appropriate conditions before  germination will commence.  These seeds require slightly different treatments.  All the steps up to and including seed  sowing remain the same (prepare clean equipment, fill with compost, press the compost  down and sow the seeds).  However some differences do exist: · The compost usually has a higher percentage of grit or sand to provide better  drainage. · The seeds are covered with a thin layer of horticultural sand or grit.  This is  preferred because it helps prevent the growth of mosses and  liverworts, helps  preserve the compost moisture and does not break down with time.  It also will  not blow away when exposed to the elements.  This covering also prevents the  seeds and compost below from being washed out by heavy rains. · The seeded containers are not covered with plastic or glass.  They are placed  outside, in a shaded location.  Often a cold frame is a good location.  For example, most Mediterranean species germinate in the autumn after the first rain.  This works well with the mild winters but for the UK climate, sowing hardy species in the  very early part of the year and standing them outside to take the chill of winter has much  to  commend  it.    Glass  frame  lights  with  their  increased  warmth  could  go  on  in  early  April.  A useful system is to use 90mm plastic half pots of good quality (not every seed pan will  germinate in the first spring). 
label and date  12mm  layer  of  pea  grit  (sized  approx.  6mm  to  9.5mm)  over  seed layer  plastic  pot  (special  crocks  unnecessary) 

Mypex or capillary matting

Figure 37  Methods of Sowing – Hardy Perennial seed  This system provides the essential conditions for germination for the viable seed.  The  main  ones  are  adequate  warmth  (for  hardy  plants),  moisture,  oxygen,  light  for  light­requiring species and dark for those with a dark requirement.  Light for the seedlings after emergence, a suitable resting­place, relative freedom from  pests,  diseases  and  weeds  plus  a  relatively  low  competition  for  water  from  the  soluble salt concentration in the compost are the others. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

62 

Pricking Out and Potting Up  Once the seedlings start to appear, any covering should be removed from the container  – this includes the glass or plastic cover or the lid from the propagating unit.  At this point, the ideal location would be to place the seedlings in a heated greenhouse,  but  using  lights  indoors  or  a  bright  windowsill  is  often  an  adequate  substitute.    The  seedlings  need  strong  light,  but  should  not  yet  receive  full  sunlight.    The  moisture  levels of the container should be checked frequently to ensure that the compost has not  dried.  Any reduction in compost moisture at this point may “check” (that is, delay) or kill  the  seedlings.    However,  the  compost  should  never  be  so  wet  that  the  roots  do  not  receive sufficient oxygen.  The key is to keep the compost moist but not wet.  After  a  time,  the  seedlings  will  be  large  enough  to  prick  out  and  transfer  to  other  containers  for  growing  on.    The  seedlings  must  be  removed  from  their  original  containers before they become so crowed that there is little room to develop adequate  but after they have reached sufficient size that transferring them is possible. 

Figure 38  Seedlings of Primula reidii var. williamsii Grown in Modular Tray  These seedlings of Primula reidii var. williamsii are the result of seeds that were sown  directly into the modular or cellular tray in February.  The seeded trays were then placed  into a cold glasshouse, because Primula seeds prefer to germinate in cold conditions.  Germination took about 4 weeks.  This photograph of the seedlings was taken in July.  Potting Composts  This step requires a potting compost to act as the growing media for the seedlings.  A  potting  compost  may  be  loam­based  or  loam­free,  it  may  contain  peat  or  peat  substitutes.  Potting  composts  usually  have  a  slightly  coarser  texture  than  seeding  composts.  They usually also contain some fertiliser.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

63 

The John Innes loam­based compost (called J.I. Potting No. 1) consists of: · 7 parts screened sterilised loam · 3 parts peat · 2 parts grit · to each cubic metre of this mixture, the following amendments are added:  o  1 kg hoof and horn (which supplies nitrogen)  o  1 kg superphosphate (which supplies phosphorus)  o  0.5 kg potassium sulphate (which supplies potassium)  o  0.5 kg calcium carbonate (to neutralise the acidity of the peat).  Loam­less composts are also formulated for potting up of seedlings.  The Glasshouse  Crops Research Institute has developed a number of composts including:  GCRI Potting Composts  General Use  Winter 

Summer 

High P (for  longer term  use) 

Peat:sand ratio  Ammonium nitrate  Urea formaldehyde  Magnesium ammonium  phosphate  Potassium nitrate  Normal superphosphate  Ground chalk or limestone  Ground magnesium limestone  Fritted trace elements (WM  225) 

75:25 (by volume)  3  Amendments at kg/m :  0.4  0.5  1.0 

0.2  1.5 

0.75  1.5  2.25  2.25  0.4 

0.75  1.5  2.25  2.25  0.4 

0.75  1.5  2.25  2.25  0.4 

0.4  2.25.  2.25  0.4 

Peat­free  alternatives  also  exist.    Proprietary  ones  may  be  purchased  through  some  garden  centres  (although  availability  may  be  limited).    The  HRDA  web  site  (www.hdra.org.uk) identifies a number of different recipes that the home gardener may  wish to consider.  As  with  all  composts  used  for  potting  on,  the  compost  must  provide  a  suitable  root  environment  (adequate  moisture  retention  and  adequate  drainage)  and  a  source  of  nutrients for the growing seedling.  More details about composts may be found in lesson 7.  Pricking Out and Potting Up Procedure  The procedure for pricking out involves the following basic steps:  1.  prepare the containers for planting up  If using re­usable containers,  these should be sterilized (or new).   Containers  should  be  filled  with  a  potting  compost  (again,  sterilized)  and firmed down  so  that the top of the compost is about ½ cm below the surface of the container.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

64 

2.  moisten  the  compost  of  the  container  with  the  seedlings,  permit  the  water  to  drain  3.  tap  the  seedling  container  so  that  the  compost  is  loosened  a  little  from  the  edges (this makes lifting the seedling with the compost “ball” around its roots a  little easier)  4.  by gently holding the seedling by a leaf (or expanded cotyledon) and carefully  inserting a widger or small dibber underneath the root system, lift the seedling  – trying to retain as much of the seedling’s root as possible 

dibber 

metal  and  plastic  widgers

Figure 39  Widgers and Dibbers  Never hold the  seedling by the  stem.  As gentle as you  might be, the stem  is  easily  damaged  while  the  seed  leaves  or  true  leaves  tolerate  handling  much  better. 

Figure 40  Seedling Ready to Transplant  5.  in  the  potting  compost,  make  a  small  hole  or  depression  with  the  widger  or  dibber (of sufficient size to house the root of the seedling)  6.  carefully “drop” the seedling root ball into this hole and gently firm the compost  around the roots  7.  water  the  seedlings  carefully  –  this  helps  remove  large  air  cavities  that  may  have  been  created  by  the  insertion  of  the  seedling  and  ensures  adequate  contact between the roots and the compost  Continue with all the seedlings.  Space them sufficiently that they have  room to grow  (perhaps 4 to 5 cm apart) if transplanting to a tray.  Place them in an appropriate­sized 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

65 

container if transplanting them to individual containers.  More  experienced  gardeners  grade  their  seedlings  –  transplanting  similar­sized  seedlings together so that smaller seedlings are placed together.  This permits smaller  seedlings  to  grow  unaffected  by  the competition that  the  greater  vigour  of  the  larger  seedlings  tends  to  produce.    Unless  growing  a  species  where  the  weaker  seedlings  produce the more desirable plants, transplant up the healthier seedlings and discard the  weaker seedlings.  An example of an exception to this rule is for certain strains of Stock,  Matthiola incana.  The yellowish­green coloured seedlings (which produce the desirable  double  flowered  forms)  are  potted  up  while  the  dark­green  coloured  seedlings  (which  produce less desirable single flowered forms) are discarded.  Ideally, seedlings are only potted on once before they are placed in their final growing  location  (whether  that  is  within  a  bed  or  a  container).    However,  if  the  transplanted  seedlings  require  further  potting  on  to  prevent crowding,  then  there  is  nothing  wrong  with transplanting up again.  The balance between container size and space  must be  determined by each gardener.  Often space is in short supply during the late winter and  early spring months, so smaller containers are used to permit the growing on of more  seedlings.  However, these seedlings may start to become crowded later in the spring  and may require potting up again.  It is usually better for the seedling to be potted up  into  a  container  that  is  not  excessively  big.    The  compost  conditions  in  smaller  containers  is  often  more  suited  to  the  needs  of  the  smaller  root  systems  of  the  seedlings.  The  containers  of  potted  up  seedlings  should  be  placed  in  a  location  where  they  can  grow on.  Light levels should normally be as high as possible without being so high that  they scorch or damage the transplant.  Initially slightly higher temperatures may help the  transplant  re­establish.    Ultimately,  lower  growing  temperatures  (although  not freezing  temperatures) may help produce sturdier plants.  Depending on how long the seedlings will grow on before they are planted out, it might  be necessary to fertilise the seedlings.  Usually, a general­purpose fertiliser or organic  feed  is  applied  (often  at  weak  concentration  – to  ensure  that  the  young  roots  are  not  burned and that the salt concentration in the compost remains low).  Hardening Off  Before planting into the garden, seedlings require a period of adjustment to the higher  light levels, effects of the wind, and varying moisture levels of the soil.  This process is  called “hardening off”.  This process must occur gradually – generally over a period of up to six weeks or so  before planting out.  Slowly the temperatures that the seedlings are enjoying must be lowered.  Watering will  also  become  less  frequent  –  never  letting  the  seedlings  wilt,  but  waiting  until  the  moisture  levels  in  the  compost  are  lower  than  they  have  been  previously.    And  seedlings must gradually be introduced to higher light levels – this is especially true of  seedlings being grown indoors.  A cold frame is an ideal site for hardening off – gradually opening the lights a little each  day so that the inside temperatures become cooler and the seedlings experience a little  more wind disturbance.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

66 

A  gradual  process of  hardening  off  prevents  or  limits  the  growth  check  that  would  occur if seedlings were subjected to the harsher environment outdoors suddenly.  Germinating Seeds in the Open  Sowing  seed  directly  in  the  garden  is  an  option  for  many  hardy  annuals,  biennials,  perennials  and  vegetable  seed.    Hardy  annuals  are  usually  sown  where  they  are  to  flower,  root  vegetables  are  sown  where  they  will  grow  to  maturity  and  biennials  and  perennials are often sown in nursery beds where they will grow before being planted out  into the beds and borders of the garden.  There are two main methods of sowing seed directly in the garden broadcast seeding  and sowing seeds in drills.  In both cases, prepare the soil well.  It is best to wait until soil has dried before starting  to prepare the soil – this minimizes the risk of damaging the soil structure.  If the soil is lacking in nutrients (often a soil test is the only way of knowing this), add  amendments at this time.  For example, a pre­plant incorporation of a balance fertiliser  (for example Growmore 7­7­7) or the organic alternative (Fish, blood and bone) would  be  appropriate  at  this  time,  if  these  nutrient  deficiencies  were  not  addressed  the  previous  autumn.    Lightly  rake  or  fork  the  fertiliser  into  the  top few  centimetres  of  the  bed.    Organic  gardeners  tend  to  look  after  their  soil  –  its  depth,  structure  and  water  holding  capacity  by  using  manures  and  composts.    These  tend  to  maintain  nutrient  levels.  The environment for successfully starting seeds in the open does not vary greatly from  that  in  a  protected  environment.    Seeds  need  warmth,  light,  oxygen and  moisture.  However, what is different between the open and a protected environment is the degree  of control that the gardener has on these conditions.  The question of temperature can be dealt with by ensuring that seeds are started at the  right  time.    If  the  soil  is  to  be  warm,  a  gardener  may  speed  this  process  by  using  a  black  plastic  mulch.    Placed  on  the  ground  a  few  weeks  before  sowing  seed  (or  planting seedlings grown elsewhere), the soil may be warmed early.  Moisture levels may also be controlled somewhat by the gardener.  For small locations  in a dry year, periodic watering with a watering can may be sufficient.  There is a wide  range of irrigation equipment that may be used in larger situations – from sprinklers to  seeping hoses.  Light  levels should  be  adequate  in  the  site  chosen.    Plants  requiring  full  sun  should  probably not be sown in a shady location.  Plants requiring some shade should not be  sown in an exposed, sunny location.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

67 

Broadcast Seeding  Broadcast  seeding is  occasionally  the  most  appropriate  for  direct  sowing  of  annuals  (and sometimes biennials and perennials).  This is the best method for sowing between  existing plants – for example, within an established border.  Weeding may be more difficult, because the seeds and weed seeds will both germinate  but using a hoe to eliminate the weeds without affecting the desired seedlings is difficult.  When the seedlings are not in rows, hand weeding may be necessary.  The basic steps are:  1.  Bring  the  soil  up  to  field  capacity  –  if  it  is  at  all  dry  –  then  let  the  sticky  wet  condition dry.  2.  Prepare the  beds to  a fine  tilth – on  the  last  pass,  rake  the  entire  bed  in  one  direction.  3.  Scatter  the  seeds  as  thinly and  evenly  as  possible  –  there  are  a  number  of  techniques possible and equipment that might help (for example, a seed sower)  Mixing the seeds with silver sand before broadcasting the entire mixture is one  alternative that helps distribute fine seed evenly.  4.  Ensure  that  there  is  adequate  seed/soil  contact  by  raking  the  area  in  a  direction at right angles to the last pass of the rake before sowing.  Seeds sown  in drills can be firmed by treading down the row before the final rake over.  5.  Label the seeds (and water in well, if the step 1 was not possible). 

Sowing Seed in Drills  A drill is a narrow furrow that is made in the soil for the purpose of sowing seeds.  Sowing seeds in drills is appropriate for sowing: · vegetable seed (i.e. turnips and onions – or for brassicas and leek seed beds), · annual seed – for example, in cut flower beds, · biennial seed and perennial seed – for nursery beds.  The  advantage  of  sowing  seed  in  a  drill  is  that  the  seeds  are  easier  to  weed  (particularly, they are easier to distinguish because weeds seldom germinate in straight  rows).  The basic steps are:  1.  establish  where  the  rows  of  plants  are  to  be  –  the  spacing  between  rows  is  critical  since  it  must  be  large  enough  to  permit  the  plants  to  grow  adequately  and to permit cultivation between rows, but it should not be so large that space  is wasted in the garden  At  this  time,  determine  how  much  seed  is  to  be  sown.    There  are  two  approaches  –  calculate  the  number  of  plants  that  may  be  grown  in  the  area

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

68 

allocated  (using  the  plant  size  and  seed  packet  information  to  determine  how  much  room  each  mature  plant  requires),  or  calculate  the  number  of  plants  desired,  determine  the  amount  of  space  this  requires.    Seed  more  than  the  desired  number  of  plants  because  there  will  be  some  losses  between  sowing  and harvesting.  2.  use a garden line to establish a straight line  If rows are short, a faster alternative  is to use the straight handle of a rake or  hoe  or  even  a  straight  cane.    Pressing  this  lightly  into  the  soil  surface  will  establish a straight row as well as prepare a shallow drill.  3.  using  the  corner  of  a  hoe  or  a  trowel,  draw  down  the  line  established  by  the  garden line  This process produced a “v” shaped trench in the soil – the drill. 

A  hoe  being  used  to  draw  down  a  garden  line  to  establish a “V” shaped drill.  Garden  line  acting  as  a  guide  for  the  hoe.

Figure 41  Drill For Sowing Seeds  The depth of this drill is determined by the planting depth of the seed.  Larger  seed  is  usually  sown  deeper  than  smaller  seed.    Usually  drills  are  not  deeper  than 2 to 3 cm.  The most important point is that the drill should be of uniform  depth for the entire row – this ensures that the seeds are sown at equal depth,  so germination will be uniform.  Drills in heavy (clay) soils are usually shallower.  Drills in light (sandy) soils are  usually deeper.  If the soil is very dry, water the drill before sowing the seed.  If the soil is very  wet  (although  this  is  not  an  ideal  time  for  working  the  soil,  sometimes  the  schedule dictates that this happen), put a shallow layer of dry sand in the bottom  of the drill before sowing the seed this will help keep the seed from rotting in the  cool, wet soil.  4.  sow the seed in the drill – space the seed as evenly as possible  5.  fill in the drill to cover the seed, firm the soil and water if necessary  At  this  stage,  it  might  be  necessary  to  determine  if  the  seedbed  requires  protection from rabbits and birds.  If so, now is the time to put down deterrents –  69 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

this may simply be the use of a wire mesh over the seedbed area that will keep  diggers at bay until the seeds emerge.  Then the mesh should be removed to  avoid causing problems for the seedling growth.  6.  monitor  the  seeded  area  to  ensure  that  sufficient  moisture  remains  in  the  seed bed – water when necessary  Thinning Seedlings  Once the seeds have started to germinate, it may become clear that the seedlings need  to be thinned.  Thinning helps ensure that the seedlings are spaced adequately that the  ones remaining have room to grow and develop normally.  If seedlings are left growing  in crowded conditions, then they will compete with each other for space, moisture  and  nutrients.  The result will be weak, spindly growth.  There are two methods used to thin  the seedlings: · carefully transplant the seedling from an area of too many seedlings to an area  of too few seedlings (a widger  is helpful in doing this) – try to avoid disturbing  the existing seedlings when doing this for seedlings that are very thickly sown, it is often best to pinch off or snip out  the undesired seedling at the soil surface – this will prevent disturbance of the  remaining seedlings (if using this method, be sure to remove and compost any  undesired seedlings – leaving them on the soil’s surface may entice pests to the  crop plants). 

·

Always try and grow a few spare to swap but to try and grow all that may come up could  be a self­inflicted disaster. 

Check your understanding so far …  What is meant by 'seed dormancy'?  What is the first stage of seed germination?  What  is  the  importance  of  oxygen  for  seeds,  and  how  do  we  ensure  their  oxygen  needs are met?  Why is the correct sowing depth important?  What is stratification?  What are the seed's main competitors?  Check your responses against the lesson text.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

70 

Answer to Self Check Question from page 39  Which of the following would rapidly kill germinating seed, and why? · excess moisture · excess air/oxygen · excess heat  Excess water would cut off the oxygen supply.  Air that is too dry will quickly  desiccate the seeds, and too high a temperature will scorch leaves and stop  photosynthesis  because  of  damage  to  the  leaf  cells  and  excessive  water  loss. 

Answer to Self Check Question from page 50  Can you give an example of a seed dressing used on vegetable seeds?  Examples  of  seed  dressings  used  on  vegetable  seeds  are  hard  to  find  currently because of the pesticide regulations:  1.  Deltamethrin  Is  a  pyrethroid  insecticide  with  contact  and  residual  activity  and  is  available  to  professional  growers  as  a  micro­pearl  for  control  of  flea  beetle  in  broccoli,  Brussels  sprouts,  cabbages,  cauliflower, swedes and turnips.  2.  Pea  seed  can  be  treated  with  thiram  against  foot  rot  diseases,  although this seed may not be available to amateur gardeners. 

Answer to Self Check Question from page 56  Can you identify why loamless composts have become more widely used?  Loamless  composts  have  become  more  widely  used  because  they  have  the following qualities: · · · they are lighter to handle they may be cleaner (fewer pest and disease problems). Gardeners  and  growers  can  generally  be  assured  they  are  of  a  standard quality.  JI composts have become very variable. 

Because  the  loam  ingredient  has  become  scarce,  the  cost  of  producing  these composts has increased.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

71 

3  FACTORS INFLUENCING PROPAGATION BY CUTTINGS 
By the end of this section, you will be able to demonstrate an  understanding  of  the  factors  which  influence  successful  propagation by cuttings: · State  the  role  of  physiological  factors  upon  the  speed  and success of rooting of cuttings. 

Introduction  Vegetative  plant  propagation  includes  all  plant  production  techniques  that  utilise  any part of a plant not associated with flowering, i.e. roots, stems, and leaves.  One  group  of  vegetative  propagation  techniques  involves  the  use  of  cuttings  to  produce new plants.  Cuttings may be taken from the stem, the leaf or the root.  The  use  of  stem  cuttings  is  the  most  popular  method  of  vegetative  propagation  –  used  by  both  commercial growers  and by  home gardeners.    However,  some  home  gardeners  may  already  be  familiar  with  the  use  of  leaf  cuttings  to  establish  new  houseplants (for example, African violets, Saintpaulia spp., are frequently propagated  by  leaf  petiole  cuttings).    And  gardeners  who  have  battled  with  dandelion  weeds  (Taraxacum  officinalis)  may  already  be  familiar  with  propagation  by  root  cuttings  –  since leaving even the smallest piece of root in the soil often results in the growth of  a new dandelion plant.  Of all the aspects of propagation by cuttings, the most difficult one is how to keep the  cutting alive  until  new  roots and  shoots are formed,  and the  cutting has developed  into a new, independent plant.  There are steps that a gardener/grower may take to  speed up these natural processes.  The basic steps (and sequence) in the propagation process are:  Choice of appropriate plant material  ê  Treatment of plant material  ê  Manipulation of conditions for regeneration  ê  Secure subsistence of plant material (stay alive)  ê  Establishment of new plant

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

72 

The Physiology of Propagation by Cuttings  Before we discuss the factors that influence the successful propagation via cuttings,  a review of the physiology behind the use of cuttings is essential.  Propagation through cuttings exploits the plant’s natural ability to produce roots and  shoots  from  pieces  of  a  plant  to  permit,  eventually,  the  generation  an  entirely  new  plant (this is called totipotency).  Not all plants are capable of being propagated by  cuttings.    Even  those  plants  that  are  capable  of  being  propagated  by  cuttings  may  only be propagated using stem cuttings or leaf cuttings or root cuttings.  It is a rare  plant that may be propagated by all of these methods.  Some  plant  material  has  the greater  capacity for regeneration  –  and the  choice  of  cutting material uses this difference in ability to speed the process.  For example, the  juvenility of the cutting material may affect the speed (of even likelihood) of rooting.  (The concept of juvenility was introduced in lesson 2.)  The time of year and the type  of material used are just some of the different issues involved.  For a cutting to develop into a new plant, the cutting has to do the following: · Stay  alive  (this  means,  absorb  moisture  and  oxygen  to  permit  respiration  processes to continue). · Heal the wound to prevent the entry of undesirables into the plant tissue and  to reduce the loss of water through the cut. · Produce adventitious roots to absorb water and minerals. · Produce  adventitious  shoots  to  develop  new  leaf  material  to  increase  photosynthesis.  Cutting Anatomy  Anatomically,  plant  parts  used  in  propagation  must  have  the  cellular  potential  to  dedifferentiate* and become meristematic.  The  first  priority  of  any  cutting  is  to  re­establish  a  structure  to  absorb  water  and  minerals.    Water  is  needed  to  replace  any  moisture  lost  via  transpiration.    Water  and  minerals  will  ultimately  be  required  to fuel  photosynthesis and  respiration  to  permit growth.  The  roots  formed  from  a  cutting  are  adventitious  roots.  They  form  from  root  initials that either already exist in a dormant state near the vascular tissue (near the  cambium in woody plants or near the vascular bundles in the cortex of herbaceous  plants)  or  form  near  this  tissue.  Pre­formed  root  initials  can  be  found  in  easily  rooted  plants  such  as  willow  and  poplar.    Advantage  is  taken  of  pre­formed  root  initials  in  these  species  when  the  technique  of  hardwood  cuttings  is  used.    These  pre­formed  root  initials  develop  naturally  and  may  appear  as  aerial  roots  in  humid  environments.  Root initials can develop into root buds and eventually break through the epidermis  to emerge from the cutting.  When the new root emerges, it is fully formed – with root  cap and vascular tissue that connects with the vascular tissue of the cutting.

*

The process of dedifferentiation involves the ability of mature cells to return to a meristematic state –  that is, to lose specific function and return to the simple cells that can develop into new cells.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

73 

In some plants, a ring of tough sclerenchyma cells may present a barrier to the root  bud – in this case, wounding of the cutting may break up the sclerenchyma barrier  to permit the root to emerge.  HERBACEOUS  PLANT  8 to 12 days  ROSE  7 days  CHRYSANTH'  3 days  CARNATION  5 days 

Days for  root  initiation  Days for  root  emergence  Origin of  root initials 

21 to 28 days 

21 days 

10 days 

21 days 

Outside of but  between vascular  bundles 

Young  secondary  phloem 

Interfascicular  region 

Inside a fibre  sheath roots  emerge from  cutting base 

Callus  When a cutting is placed in a suitable environment for rooting to occur, callus tissue  develops at the cut end.  This callus is a mass of parenchyma cells  The  growth  of  callus  at  the  cut  base  of  a  cutting  is  often  independent  of  root  formation but both  require  similar environmental circumstances.    Callus  is  therefore  seen as an appropriate activity of a healthy cutting and is likely to produce a good  root system.  The point of origin of callus growth is from vascular cambium.  Root emergence is influenced by the sort of callus growth develops.  This, in turn, is  influenced by pH of the rooting medium.  When the rooting medium pH is around 6.0,  callus is easily penetrated because the cells are large and not compact.  In order to heal the wound, the cambium cells have to divide and produce additional  cells, which become the callus tissue.  Callus tissue is the plant’s natural reaction to a  wound – the  intention  is  to prevent the entry of  insects  or  disease  into  the  exposed  tissue  and  to  prevent  loss  of  moisture.    To  encourage  this  cell  division,  various  steps  can help:  1.  Suitable cutting size, condition and selection  A large surface area of the wound requires more effort to cover with callus than a  slender  cutting.    But  too  thin  a  cutting  means  fewer  stored  food  to  provide  the  resources to enable the callus tissue to form.  2.  Dunking in fungicide to reduce the "load" of disease inoculum.  A  reduction  in  the  number  of  disease  organisms  present  on  the  cutting  tissue  means  fewer  disease  organisms  may  be  present  to  penetrate  into  the  cutting  before  the  callus  tissue  has  formed.    This  is  not  a  suitable  task  for  the  organic  gardener.  3.  An ideal rooting mix compost ­ very low in salt concentration and yet supplying  ample water film and oxygen in the "soil" air.  This is a suitable environment for cell growth – ensuring an adequate supply of  moisture to the cutting.  4.  Suitable  basal and  air  temperatures ­  it  is  the base of  the  cutting  which  needs  the stimulation for cell division at this stage.  Warmer  temperatures  mean  cellular  processes  occur  faster  –  this  includes  cell

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

74 

division  involved  with  the  creation  of  callus  tissue.    Temperatures  that  are  too  warm will delay cellular division. 
xylem  vessel 

vascular  bundle  phloem  cambium  xylem  parenchyma  thin walled  storage cells  chloroplasts 

epidermis

cambium 

strengthening cells 

cambium  dividing 

cells  cortex  phloem  When  exposed  as  in  cutting  preparation  the  cambium  may  divide  to  form  callus  tissue  of  parenchyma  cells  –  which  heal  the wound and may enable root initials to  arise. 

A new cell wall  arises as the  new cells are  produced. 

Figure 42  Cross Section of Young Deadnettle Stem  Physiology of Root Initiation  Plant hormones are naturally occurring organic chemical compounds which in very  low  concentrations  co­ordinate  physiological  processes.    They  are  used  for  communication  between  one  part  of  the  plant  and  another  to  bring  about  growth  regulation.  Unlike animal hormones that act on distant cells, plant hormones can act  on  adjacent  cells  as  well  as  distant  ones.    Hormones  are  chemicals,  which  are  released  from  one  cell  that  affects  growth  and  development  of  other  cells  and  tissues. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

75 

It is best to think of hormones as 'plant growth regulators'.  Not all growth regulators  are hormones.  Within  the  plant,  the  following  naturally­occurring  plant  growth  regulators  influence  rooting: · Auxins, · Cytokinins, · Gibberellins, · Abscisic acid, · Ethylene (This in minute concentrations acts as a plant hormone).  All of these substances were briefly introduced in lesson 2.  Of these, however, it is  auxin that plays the greatest role in rooting of cuttings.  Auxin  Auxin  is  produced  in  the  shoot  apical  meristem  tissue.    Within  the  plant,  auxin  plays the following roles:  1.  promotes cell elongation in stems i.e. stem growth.  2.  promotes development of lateral roots, even at very low concentrations  3.  may also participate in stem / root growth responses to light and gravity  4.  inhibits lateral bud sprouting and therefore enhance apical dominance.  Indole acetic acid (IAA) is a naturally occurring auxin.  This form of auxin is unstable  and breaks down easily with exposure to sunlight and plant debris.  Auxin is involved in the very first step in the creation of adventitious roots.  During  this stage, auxin must be continually present.  This auxin would naturally be supplied  from  the terminal bud.    However,  since  the  mid­1930s,  synthetic auxins  have  been  available.  Two of the most common are: · · indole butyric acid (IBA) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). 

IBA is the more commonly used synthetic auxin.  It is widely applied in general use  because it is stable and non­toxic to most plants over a wide concentration range  and  promotes  root  growth  in  a  large  number  of  plant  species.    Some  softwood  cuttings  may  have  toxic  reactions  to  IBA,  which  will  lead  to  poor  or  no  growth  and  mortality.  NAA  is  less  widely  used  as  a  pure  hormone.    Usually  mixtures  of  IBA  and  NAA  promote root initiation better than either one alone.  There is a synergistic effect. Both  of these chemicals are available in talc or in liquid formulations.  The  solubility  of  IBA  in  water  is  very  slow  and  when  applied  to  the  basal  end  of  a  cutting  a  lot  is  lost  as  the  cutting  is  inserted  into  the  compost.    The  use  of  liquid  hormones is becoming more widely accepted in the U.K.  Hormone  rooting  powders  are  not  usually  considered  suitable  to  be  used  in  an  organic  garden.    There  are  now  some  commercially  available  organic  substitutes  (some  are  based  on  extracts  from  seaweed)  and  these  may  be  effective.    In  additional,  a  second  approach  is  to  use  a  “rooting  enhancer”  sometimes  called

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

76 

“willow water”*.  Auxins help with the rooting of cuttings in the following ways: · Synthetic  auxins  help  reduce  the  length  of  time  required  for  adventitious  roots to form.  This  is an  important factor  in the success  of  rooting  cuttings,  because  the  longer  the  cutting  has  to  survive  without  the  ability  to  absorb  water and nutrients efficiently, the less chance the cutting has of surviving to  produce roots and shoots. The  percentage  of  rooted  cuttings  increases  when  synthetic  auxins  are  applied.    In  fact,  synthetic  auxins  help  difficult­to­root  cutting  material  form  adventitious roots.  In these cases, without the application of synthetic auxin  to  the  cutting,  the  cutting  would  probably  not  produce  roots  before  it  deteriorated and died. Auxins also help improve the quantity and quality of roots produced. 

·

·

The  amount  of  auxin  applied  to  the  cutting  is  important,  however.    At  too  high  a  concentration, synthetic auxin applied can inhibit subsequent shoot growth.  Synthetic auxins can also be used in herbicides (an example is 2,4­D), but not for the  organic grower. 
This cutting has an  organic rooting  stimulant, not a  synthetic auxin.  These cuttings  have been dipped  in a synthetic  auxin powder.

Figure 43  Rooting Hormone Visible on Bottom of Cutting  Cytokinin  Cytokinins are plant growth hormones that play a role in cell growth.  1.  stimulates cell division in root meristems where they are abundant.  2.  promotes  sprouting  of  buds,  in  the  correct  balance.    This  is  of  obvious  importance in root cutting regeneration.  3.  can promote leaf expansion and retard leaf ageing.  However, plant tissues with too much natural cytokinin may be more difficult to root  than tissues with a lower cytokinin level.

*

“Willow water” is an extract produced by soaking, in warm water, small green­wood cuttings taken from  any  willow  (Salix  spp.).    Willows  are  one  of  the  easiest  woody  plants  to  root  (they  readily  form  adventitious  roots)  and  this  is  why  the  water  containing  extracts  from  the  willow  cuttings  may  help  promote rooting in other species. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

77 

Gibberellins  Gibberellins  are  naturally­occurring  group  of  substances  that  play  a  role  in  the  synthesis of proteins.  In general, gibberellins can retard root formation when at too  high a concentration.  But they have a positive effect at low concentrations.  Other roles of gibberellins in the plant include:  1.  promote  cell  elongation  and  urge  buds  and  seeds  to  break  dormancy  and  resume growth in the spring.  2.  stimulate the breakdown of starch and may influence flowering in some species. 

Abscissic Acid (ABA)  Abscissic acid often acts as an inhibitor within plants.  The role in root formation is  not clearly understood.  However abscissic acid, amongst others, reduces gibberellin  activity and therefore promotes rooting.  Ethylene  Ethylene is a gas that is produced by plants and is often grouped with plant growth  regulators  even  though  it  is  not a hormone.   Ethylene  can promote root  formation  on stem and leaf tissues, at concentrations of about 10 parts per million.  In addition, ethylene plays a role in:  1.  stimulation ripening of fruit and is used commercially for this purpose.  2.  promotion "abscission" of leaves, fruit and flowers thereby causing them to drop  from plants at appropriate times of the year.  Selection of Cutting Material  The  first  step  in  the  successful  propagation  from  cuttings  is  to  select  appropriate  plant material and the most suitable stage of growth from which to take the cutting.  Some cutting material has better potential to form adventitious roots and shoots.  The  important considerations in this choice are:  1.  Select  material  with  the  genetic  potential  to  regenerate  (that  is,  produce  adventitious roots and shoots).  It should be true to type (the same variety).  2.  Select  material  with  the  most  suitable  phase  of  growth  (juvenile  growth  is  usually best).  3.  Select material with the most suitable nutritional state.  4.  Select sturdy, healthy material – free from pests and diseases.  5.  Take cuttings at the most appropriate time of year.  It is important that commercial growers use only the best forms and selections (that  is,  up­to­date  clones)  and  avoid  propagating  inferior  stock.    A  home  gardener, 78 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

however,  is  usually  limited  to  which plants  may be propagated by  the  availability  of  “stock” plants – these may be plants within the gardener’s own garden, the gardens  of friends and neighbours or other sources.  Always select material that exhibits “normal” growth.  Take cuttings from material with  closely spaced nodes (not from material with abnormally widely­spaced nodes). 

Tightly spaced  nodes 

Widely spaced  nodes

Figure 44  Spacing of Nodes  The  goal  is  to  choose  the  appropriate  cutting  material,  of  the  appropriate  age  and  condition,  at  the  correct  time  of  year  that  the  rooting  process  or  new  shoot  development  will  be  the fastest.    The  sooner  the  cutting has established new  roots  and leaf area, the faster the new plant will be able to survive independently and the  greater chance the new plant has of surviving.  Some  conditioning  of  the  stock  plant  prior  to  the  taking  of  cuttings  may  help  increase  the  rooting  success  rate.    Many  of  these  are  suitable  for  the  commercial  grower,  but  some  may  be  performed  by  the  home  gardener.    These  treatments  include: · etioliation · temperature manipulation  Genetic Potential  Some plants are not suitable for propagation by cuttings.  For  example,  a  number  of  woody  plants  are  not  propagated  by  cuttings  because  these cuttings are unlikely to form adventitious roots.  For example, the Dove tree,  Davidia  involucrata,  (whose  fruits  were  illustrated  earlier  in  this  lesson)  are  not  propagated by cuttings.  Other plants root easily from cuttings, and no special care need to be taken when  handling these cuttings.  Some cuttings may be taken from the stock plants and then  immediately planted outside.  Willow (Salix spp.) are often within this second group.  Many  plants  fall  between  these  two  extremes.    In  these  cases,  some  care  will  be  required.  The extra treatments that help root cuttings will be described in more detail  later in this lesson. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

79 

Juvenility  The  phenomenon  of  juvenility  is  well  known  but  the  mechanism  for  influencing  rooting  in  cuttings  is  still not  well  understood.    In  lesson  2,  the  concept of  juvenility  was introduced.  Usually juvenile cutting material is more likely to root faster than more mature cutting  material.  Cuttings taken from the most mature (and older) portions of a plant may be  slow  to  develop  adventitious  roots.    In  some  plants,  mature  growth  will  not  form  adventitious roots.  However, cuttings taken from the juvenile phase may root quickly.  Because  it  is  important  to  develop  roots  quickly  to  ensure  that  the  cutting  remains  alive to permit the formation of new shoots, speed of rooting is critical.  The ability of cuttings to produce adventitious roots declines as plant material ages.  This  is  believed  to  be  the  result  of  the  production  of  rooting  inhibitors  in  more  mature  wood  or  the  lowering  of  the  amount  of  hormones  that  work  with  auxin  to  promote rooting in mature material.  Propagules from juvenile growth will often root  well while mature growth from the same plant will root less readily or not at all.  Growth in the juvenile condition is found in tissues:  1.  Originating from young seedlings.  2.  Arising from adventitious buds on stems.  3.  Grafted onto young wood.  One of the qualities of juvenile tissue is that it does not produce flowers.  Flower buds  themselves may play a role in the reduction of rooting of cuttings.  In  many  plants,  cuttings  will  root equally  well  when flowering or  vegetative  wood  is  used.  However in plants that are difficult to root (such as some Vaccinium species),  the  use  of  wood  entirely  in  the  vegetative  state  is  necessary.    It  is  thought  that  flowering  and  the  production  of  adventitious  roots  are  antagonistic  with  regard  to  concentration of natural auxin levels.  Removal of flower buds appears to accelerate  rooting; this is probably related to auxin levels.  Apart  from  these  effects  it  is  normal  practice  to  remove  flower  buds,  as  they  are  attractive  sites  for  disease  producing  fungi  such  as  Botrytis  and  can  utilise  stored  carbohydrates if they continue to develop.  Stock plants may be kept in a juvenile state by regular pruning.  This is often what  commercial growers must do to maintain their plants in a condition that will permit the  annual  removal  of  cutting  material  for  propagation.    A  home  gardener,  selecting  cuttings  from  plants  he  or  she  wishes  to  propagate  will  usually  not  maintain  stock  plants but take cuttings when and where available.  Nutritional Status of Cutting  The nutritional balance of the stock plant plays a role in the success or failure of the  cuttings taken from it.  In particular it is the ratio of carbohydrate to nitrogen content  of the stock plants that influences the root­ability of the cuttings.  Carbohydrates are  present  in  starches  –  food  reserves.    Nitrogen  is  present  in  proteins  –  and  is  in  abundance in soft, succulent, young growth.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

80 

In general, low nitrogen to carbohydrate ratio is desirable in this respect.  The cutting  taken from a  stock  plant  with  this  nutritional balance  will  have a  large  reservoir  of  food  resources  but  not  a  great  deal  of  succulent  growth  that  decays  rapidly.    An  appropriate  manurial  programme  for  stock  plants  will  ensure  adequate,  but  not  excessive, nitrogen supplies.  It is generally thought that high levels of nitrogen are  not conducive to rapid rooting.  Tissues  with  a  high  nitrogen  content  also  have  low  carbohydrate  storage  capacity.  This situation is considered to have a negative impact on rootability.  Ostensibly carbohydrate content can be determined by stem firmness.   There is a  low  carbohydrate  content  when  stems  are  soft  and  flexible.    Carbohydrate  is  high  when the stem is rigid and snaps effortlessly.  A  reduction  in  nitrogen  supply  will  reduce  elongation  growth  but  result  in  good  carbohydrate  storage.    Soft  growing  tips  are  not  generally  used  as  carbohydrate  storage is poor in such regions of stems.  In  poor  soils,  fertiliser  should  be  applied  to  permit  the  growth  of  healthy  growth  suitable for cuttings.  High nitrogen fertilisers are often not suitable.  Health of Cutting Material  Use only healthy stock – free from viral infections.  Unlike seed propagation where  diseases  of  the  parent  are  rarely  transferred  to  the  seed  to  infect  the  new  plant,  vegetative  propagation  may  also propagate any diseases  that  the parent plant  may  have.  In the case of some plants infected with viral diseases, it is possible that the  soft  growth  of  shoot  tips  may  not  be  infected,  and  may  be  considered  for  use  as  cutting material.  Avoid  any  material  where  diseases  or  pests  are  obviously  present,  or  where  the  material is damaged (this may be an entry point for diseases).  The  health  status  of  both  stock  plants  and  propagules  (cuttings)  is  important  at  all  stages of the propagation process.  Timing  Timing of preparation and insertion of cuttings can be critical with some species.  For  example  lilac  can  be  rooted  when  new  shoots  are  6  to  8  cm  long  and  in  active  growth.  This is only feasible for a few weeks.  Some other plants will root at any time  of year e.g. Ligustrum spp.  It is the physiological and anatomical condition of plant material that is significant  and not just the time of year.  These can be manipulated by the use of bottom heat  and mist or fog systems.  Select cuttings of the appropriate age and at the appropriate time of year.  There are  specific criteria for each type of cutting: · For  stem  cuttings,  use  juvenile  (immature)  portions  of  plant  material,  which  cannot produce flowers or fruit.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

81 

Plant group  Deciduous species  Deciduous species  Narrow leaved evergreens  Broadleaved evergreens  Many plants 

Detail  Softwood and semi­ripe  Hardwood  Growth  flushes,  twice  per  year  Just after growth flush  Softwood cuttings 

Timing  Growing season  After leaf fall  Late autumn early winter  From spring to autumn  Spring  or  if  forced  under  glass at any time

·

For  root  cuttings,  select  roots  of  adequate  maturity  that  there  is  sufficient  food  resources  to  keep  the  cutting  alive  until  photosynthesis  occurs  again.  Choose a time of year when this food supply is at its greatest – this is often  during the dormant period. For leaf cuttings, select those leaves that have only recently fully expanded.  These  have  the  most  leaf  area  for  photosynthesising.    In  addition,  a  fully  mature  leaf  will  not  undergo  any  delay  associated  with  completing  development that an immature leaf will require. 

·

This  African  Violet  (Saintpaulia  cultivar)  has  some  leaves  suitable  for  use  as  a leaf  cutting  and  many  leaves  not  yet  mature  enough  for  use  for leaf cuttings. 

These  leaves  are  too  immature  for  use  at  this time.

These  leaves  are  ideal  for use as leaf cuttings. 

Figure 45  Leaves Suitable for Leaf Cuttings 

Etioliation  Etioliation  is  the  exclusion  of  light  from  a  growing  shoot.    In  some  difficult  to  root  species, etioliated shoots have a greater chance of forming adventitious roots.  Although the mechanism to explain why this occurs is not completely understood, it is  believed to be some inhibition of auxin development that is associated with light.  In  the absence of light, auxin levels may naturally be higher and this results in greater  success with rooting of the cuttings.  The etioliated tissue also has:  1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  Smaller content of starch.  Less mechanical strengthening tissues.  Thinner cell walls.  Less cell wall deposits.  Fewer vascular tissues.  Larger amount of parenchyma cells.  A good supply of undifferentiated tissue. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

82 

A  home  gardener  is  unlikely  to  keep  stock  plants  within  trenches  so  that  cutting  material  remains  below  ground,  as  commercial  growers  may  do.    But  in  the  home  garden there  are  alternatives that  may  be fairly simple  to do  (for  example,  tape  up  stems  of  the  plants  where  cutting  will  be  taken  later,  or  cover  the  entire  plant  in  a  black  plastic  cover  for  a  period  of  time,  for  example  7  to  10  days,  prior  to  taking  cuttings).  Even  following  insertion  of  stem  cuttings  in  the  rooting  compost,  they  become  etiolated to some extent.  Temperature Manipulation of Stock Plant  Sometimes the best cutting material is that taken from a plant that has been initially  subjected to a period of cold (for example, temperatures of about 2°C for 2 weeks  or so), then a period of warm temperatures (for example, 15°C).  This forcing of young shoots rapidly produces growth that may be the best source of  easily rooted cuttings.  However, some planning for this must take place – for example, it may be best to use  a container­grown plant as the stock plant since this plant may be easily moved from  cool location to warm location.  Treatment of Cutting Material  Now that the fundamentals of stock selection have been described, there are some  treatments of the cutting material that will aid speedy rooting.  Cutting material must be handled carefully to ensure the best success in rooting. · Moisture content  When  dealing  with  leafy  cuttings  (either  softwood,  greenwood  or  semi­ripe  cuttings),  it  is  important  that  moisture  content of the  cutting  remains  as  high  as  possible.    These  cuttings  are  usually  best  taken  early  in  the  morning  before  moisture  is  lost.    Cuttings  should  be  kept  in  cool,  moist  conditions  while  they  are  being  collected  and  should  be  held  in  these  conditions  until  they  are  planted.    This  helps  slow  down  transpirational  losses  and  helps  keep the material turgid. Bruising  Cuttings should be handled carefully to prevent bruising of the tissue.  This  is particularly important in handling of cuttings with leaves.  Bruising may be  the  entry  point  for  fungal  diseases  and  start  early  deterioration  of  the  cutting material. Wounding  In contrast to the above point, there are times when wounding of the base of  a cutting may help stimulate rooting.  For  example,  Rhododendron  and  those  with  older  wood  at  the  base  benefit  from wounding to encourage root formation.  The callus produced appears to

·

·

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

83 

stimulate  cell  division  and  the  production  of  root  primordia.    Injured  tissue  produces ethylene,  which  is  known  to promote  the formation  of  adventitious  roots.    It  is  also  thought  that  wounded  cuttings  absorb  more  water,  which  helps in the production of roots.  The  technique  of  wounding  a  cutting  by  removing  a  longitudinal  sliver  of  tissue from  its  base  is  sufficient  to  remove  a  continuous  sclerenchyma  ring.  This may have prevented roots from emerging (as in many species such as  olive). 

Thin section of  bark tissue  removed.

Figure 46  Wounding of Cuttings · Polarity  It is important to remember the polarity of the cuttings.  That is, it is essential  that  the distal  portion  of  the  cutting be  readily  identified from  the proximal  portion of the cutting.  For stem cuttings, the distal end is the end furthest away from the roots.  The  proximal end is the end closest to the roots.  For root cuttings, the distal end is the end furthest away from the shoot.  The  proximal end is the end closest to the shoot.  The translocation and activity of root­promoting hormones – such as auxin –  takes  place  according  to  the  powers  of  polarity.    This  manifests  in  the  production of roots at the proximal end of a stem cutting and shoots being  produced at the distal end.  Roots and shoots form at different ends in this  case.  For  many  leafy  cuttings,  and  some  hardwood  cuttings,  the  orientation of the  petioles  and  buds  may  easily  indicate  the  “top”  of  the  cutting  from  the  “bottom”.  However, for some hardwood cuttings and root cuttings, this is not  always obvious.  Usually it is best to cut the distal end of the cutting with a  sloped cut and the proximal end of the cutting with a straight cut.  By  following  some  standard,  it  will  be  easy  to  ensure  that  the  cuttings  are  inserted  with  the  top  above  the  bottom  when  it  comes  time  to  insert  the  cuttings in a compost for rooting. · Fungicide treatments  Protective fungicides used as a dip during cutting preparation can give some  protection and result in better survival and improved root quality.  However,  organic  gardeners  usually  should  not  consider  these  treatments. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

84 

Although sulphur compounds may be permitted under the organic definitions,  they should not be used as a regular, preventative treatment.  This leads the  organic gardener to using basic hygiene to try to avoid problems with fungal  diseases  during  propagation – ensure  only  healthy,  clean  cuttings  are used,  sterilise all propagation equipment and use a sterilised compost.  Environmental Factors Which Affect Rooting of Cuttings  A  number  of  environmental  factors  if  not  adequately  controlled  can  contribute  to  propagule  stress.    Alleviation  of  stress  factors  is  essential  for  successful  propagation.    Excessively  high  or  low  temperatures,  excessive  water  loss  and  light  levels out of the desired range can limit the rate of root development and can result in  death of the propagule.  The factors that are most often modified include:  1.  2.  3.  4.  Air and soil temperature  Relative humidity at the leaf surface  Light duration and intensity  Nutrition. 

Temperature  The most favourable temperature is species dependent and dependent on the type of  cutting involved.  Species of temperate zones have generally performed well with soil  temperatures  of  18  to  20°C  and  air  temperatures  somewhat  cooler  than  the  soil  temperatures.  The  optimum  may  be  slightly  higher  for  some  tropical  plants  and  lower  for  plants  commonly grown in colder climates.  Air  temperature  in  enclosed  structures  must  be  controlled.    This  may  be  within  a  greenhouse structure, a cold frame or cloche or a propagation unit within the house  or potting shed.  Soil temperatures may also be manipulated through the use of soil  heating cables. · Ideally the tops of cuttings should be kept fairly cool, to reduce the opportunity  for  bud  expansion  in  the  case  of  hardwood  cuttings  and  to  reduce  transpirational losses for any leafy cuttings.  Reduction  of  excessive  or  damaging  temperatures  can  be  achieved  by  appropriate  ventilation.    This  is  most  needed  during  the  summer  but  also  when  high  light  intensity  occurs  during  winter.    There  are  many  ways  to  ventilate a structure, including passive and active means, but the description  of these is beyond the scope of this lesson – this lesson focuses only on the  propagation techniques that may be used by home gardeners. · The  use  of  artificial  heat  may  be  advantageous.    Early  in  the  season,  hardwood  cuttings  may  be  encouraged  to  produce  callus  tissue  faster  if  placed  into  a  propagation  bed  that  is  kept  warm  through  the  use  of  soil  warming cables.  But the concept is usually “warm bottoms and cool tops”.  Other  source  of  heat,  however,  may  not  be  necessary  and  may  be  detrimental if it encourages transpiration or bud expansion.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

85 

Commercial  growers  use  heated  structures  to  speed  propagation.    Often  these  growers have purchased cuttings in an advanced state (for example, by importing or  purchasing  forced  leafy  cuttings  prior  to  when  they  are  available  naturally)  or  may  have forced  stock  plants  into  early  growth and  this  dictates  a need  to  maintain  the  plants in warm temperatures throughout the rooting process.  A home gardener, however, is usually propagating plants from a garden source and,  may  be  using  garden  beds  to  propagate  plants  from  cuttings.    As  a  result,  the  ambient temperatures may be suitable.  In these conditions, no artificial manipulation  may be possible outside the use of mulches that help warm the soil before planting  (for  example,  black  plastic  mulches).    If  a  more  controlled  environment  is  desired,  then using a heated propagation unit is one alternative.  Moisture  The  degree  of  water  stress  in  plants  or  cuttings  is  influenced  by  relative  humidity  (please refer to the section on transpiration in lesson 2).  In  the  propagation  phase,  plant  material  without  roots  (cuttings)  are  particularly  vulnerable  to  water  stress.    Water  loss  continues  but  the  lack  of  root  systems  prevents water replacement.  The higher the water content of air adjacent to the leaves, the lower the amount of  water loss.  Techniques have evolved to address this problem. · In  commercial  operations,  intermittent  mist  and  fog  systems  are  the  primary ways to maintain moisture content on the leaf surface approaching 95  percent  relative  humidity  during  the  day,  when  potential  transpiration  is  highest. Another  technique  used  by  the  commercial  growers  is  to  keep  a  layer  of  polythene  film  in  direct  contact  with  the  moistened  leaves.    This  reduces  moisture loss from the leaf by transpiration. The  home  gardener  may  use  something  as  simple  as  a  polythene  bag,  misted by a hand mister and then sealed to keep the moisture levels around  the  leaf  as  high  as  possible.    This  is  comparable  to  a  humid  chamber  technique.  This procedure involves confining the crop to a smaller volume of air in which  the humidity can be more easily controlled.  Disadvantages of this technique  include  the  possible  encouragement of disease development  by  reduced  air  circulation.

·

·

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

86 

·

Plastic  propagation  units  or  clear  plastic  domes  may  also  help  keep  the  moisture levels up around the plant – but these require careful monitoring to  ensure  that  the  moisture  level  does  remain  high.    An  inexpensive  plastic  dome may be created using the bottom of a clear plastic drinks bottle (a 2 litre  bottle is a good size to use). 

Propagation  “unit”  for  a  single African Violet leaf

Figure 47  An Inexpensive Home Propagation Unit  It is important to remember that any technique to keep humidity levels up may reduce  the amount of light reaching the plant material.  This will reduce any photosynthesis  that  is  occurring  –  the  result  is  slower  growth  of  roots  and  new  shoots.    However,  desiccated cuttings will not photosynthesise at all, so the loss of some photosynthetic  potential is more than offset by the increased turgidity of the plant material.  Some commercial operations use a porous material that is kept moist – a structure  called  a  wet  tent  is  the  result.  This  could  allow  some  air  circulation  while  adding  moisture to the environment around the plants during propagation.  The  quality of  the  water  applied  during  propagation  is  important.  The  soluble  salt  levels  should  be  well  within  the  acceptable  range.  Higher  concentration  of  calcium  and/or  iron  in  the  water  applied  through  a  mist  system  result  in  deposits  on  the  leaves.  These  deposits  may  not  be  obvious  while  the  leaves  are  wet,  but  a  white  calcium deposit or a reddish iron deposit is seen when leaves dry.  Light  Both  the  quality  and  quantity  of  light  need  to  be  optimum  for  growth  and  development  of  propagules.    This  is  important  when  rooting  leafy  cuttings.    For  example, hardwood cuttings with no need to photosynthesise are not sensitive to day  length. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

87

Some  plants  are  sensitive  to  day  length.    During  rooting,  vegetative  growth  is  desired and an appropriate day length should be provided.  For short day plants (like  chrysanthemums), cuttings respond to long days (usually between 14 and 16 hours  of light per day).  For long day plants (like sedum), short days may be best so that  vegetative growth is encouraged.  For most woody plants, the longer the day length,  the greater the opportunity for growth (and root development).  In general, only commercial growers would consider manipulating day length.  These  growers may extend the day length artificially through the use of lighting equipment  or use night break lighting (as described in lesson 2).  An appropriate light intensity is species dependent.  Matching the light requirement  of  any  given  species  may  be  desirable.    Insufficient  light  intensity  will  result  in  etiolated plants with weak stems that are sparsely foliated.  Excessive light will stress  the  plant,  resulting  in  a  short,  stubby,  weakened  plant  with  light  green  or  yellowish  foliage.  It is important to maximise photosynthesis during propagation, since the products  of photosynthesis are used for growth and development.  The light level may have to  be a  compromise between  optimum  light for  photosynthesis  and  reduction  of  water  stress  and  transpiration,  depending  upon  air  temperatures  and  the  ventilation  capabilities.  In  the  home  garden,  maintaining  moisture  levels  in  the  cuttings  is  usually  a priority  and cuttings (within polythene bags or other propagation structures) must be kept out  of  direct  sunlight.    Bright  but  indirect  light  is  often  best  and  some  shading  may  be  desirable  –  for  example,  beneath  the  laths  of  a  shade  house,  or  in  the  shade  of  a  deciduous tree or large shrub.  Fertilisation  When  roots  of  developing  cuttings  emerge,  they  can  absorb  nutrients.    However,  excessive nutrients in the compost result in high levels of soluble salts that can injure  tender roots.  Controlled­release fertilisers can be used in the propagation medium, but the rate  of  nutrient  release  and  the  period  of  release  must  be  carefully  considered.    A  controlled­release fertiliser  must  be predictable over  the  range of  temperatures and  moisture conditions possible in a particular propagation system.  Controlled­release  fertilisers may be incorporated in the medium during mixing or applied to the surface  after cuttings have been stuck.  Soluble fertilisers applied at moderate rates give more control of nutrient levels in  the medium but require more intense management.  Soluble fertiliser should not be  incorporated in the propagation media.  Organic growers  and  gardeners  may  use naturally  slow­release  organic fertilisers  –  for  example  by  incorporating  fish,  blood  and  bone  meal  into  the  compost  before  potting on  the  rooted  cutting.   A  liquid feed  of  seaweed extract  may also provide  a  boost of nutrients to the rooted cutting.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

88 

Establishment of a New Plant  Following rooting, the plant must be weaned from the carefully controlled conditions  in the propagation unit or bed.  The cutting must be gradually introduced to “natural”  conditions.    The  high  humidity  levels  that  may  have  been  maintained  around  the  cutting  must  be  gradually  lowered  so  that  the  cutting  slowly  adjusts  to  ambient  humidity  levels.    If  soil  warming  was  used,  this  also  must  be  removed  –  although  there is usually little need to reduce this slowly.  Over a period of a few days, gradually lower the amount of misting applied, or open  the propagation unit (or polythene bag) to permit the entry of lower humidity air into  the area around the cuttings.  Eventually, the cutting will be able to tolerate normal  humidity levels.  Cuttings  that  have  been  rooted  indoors  will  also  need  a  gradual  adjustment  to  the  light levels outside.  This hardening­off procedure should be gradual, as described  for the hardening off of seedlings in the previous section of this lesson.  Some cuttings require some additional time to grow on before they may be planted  out  into  their  final  location.    In  a  commercial  operation,  this  process  is  often  called  “lining out”.  The rooted cuttings (or, depending on the method of propagation used,  layers) are planted out into a nursery bed in rows (“lines”). 

Figure 48  Lining Out of Rooted Cuttings or Layers  A home gardener may also do something similar using a portion of a garden bed set  aside to nurse along the tender growth of young plants.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

89 

4  VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION TECHNIQUES 

By  the  end  of  this  section,  you  will  be  able  to  describe  the  production  of  plants  by  vegetative  techniques  in  a  garden  situation: · Name the types of stem cuttings. · Describe  the  propagation  of  plants  using  a  range  of  stem cuttings. · Describe the propagation of plants using a range of leaf  cuttings. · Describe  the  propagation  of  one  plant  using  root  cuttings. · State  the  environmental  requirements  for  successful  rooting  of  each  of  the  types  of  cuttings  defined  above  (stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, root cuttings). · Describe the equipment required to propagate plants by  cuttings. · Describe  the  aftercare  required  for  plants  raised  by  cuttings. · State  the  physiological  factors  to  be  fulfilled  for  successful propagation by layering. · Describe a range of different types of layering. · Describe  the  aftercare  required  for  plants  raised  by  layering. · State  the  conditions  which  have  to  be  met  to  ensure  successful propagation by division. · Describe the propagation of plants by division. · Describe the aftercare of plants propagated by division. 

Introduction  This  section  focuses  on  the  specific  techniques  involved  in  the  vegetative  propagation of plants via the following processes: · cuttings  –  including  different  types  of  stem  cuttings,  leaf  cuttings  and  root  cuttings, · layering – including simple layering, tip layering, serpentine layering and air  layering, · division.  Budding and grafting techniques will be covered in the next section of this lesson.  Cuttings  The use  of cuttings is  the  most  common form  of  vegetative propagation.    Cuttings  used in propagation involve stems, leaves or roots.  The process is relatively simple  and  a  single  mother  or  stock  plant  can  yield  many  cuttings.    Large  numbers  of

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

90 

ornamental  plants  are  propagated  in  this  way.    This  technique  is  usually  used  to  vegetatively propagate dicotyledonous plants.  There  are  a  number  of  types  of  cuttings:  stem  cuttings,  leaf  cuttings  including  petiole cuttings and bud cuttings, and root cuttings.  In the propagation of plants from cuttings it is essential to produce root growth before  shoot growth begins.  In most cases the base of the cutting should be warmer then  the top.  Frequently in the descriptions that follow, it is often stated that bottom heat  is desirable (commercial growers use mist benches and electric propagators).  Home  gardeners, however, may not have the equipment necessary to provide bottom heat  and they may still be able to produce plants from cuttings.  Living tissues need:  1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  Oxygen  Warmth  Water and a suitable relative humidity  Freedom from poisons  Freedom from competition  Freedom from excessive osmotic demands.  Green, leafy tissues need light and CO2  in the daylight period. 

It  is  important  to  remember  these  points  when  attempting  to  propagate  a  plant,  particularly when using cuttings.  All  cuttings  carry  the  risk  of  a  carry­over  of  pests  and  diseases.    As  a  result,  it  is  important that the commercial grower avoid cuttings with pests  (such as scale  insects  and stem eelworm) or diseases (like canker).  A commercial grower must also ensure  that  the  cutting  is  from  material  that  is  true  to  type.    A  home  gardener  will  also  try  to  avoid material  with pests and diseases, however  there is usually less need to ensure  that cuttings are taken from plants that are true to type.  Advantages of Propagation By Cuttings  There are a number of advantages to the home gardener to production of new plants  through the use of cuttings.  These include: · Cutting  material  is  frequently  available  for  use  (from  the  gardener’s  own  plants,  from  the  plants  of  friends  and  neighbours)  and,  given  suitable  conditions, may be easily transported from one location to another. · Propagation  by  cuttings  does  not  require  the  use  of  expensive  equipment.  Although  commercial  operations  use  mist  propagating  units,  the  home  gardener may use easy­to­construct substitutes to keep the humidity levels in  the air around the rooting cuttings high. · A small area may be used to produce a fairly large number of new plants.  Disadvantages of Propagation By Cuttings  Not  all  plants  may  be  propagated  successfully  through  the  use  of  cuttings.    Many  monocotyledons  are  not  propagated  this  way  (because  the  anatomical  and  physiological  basis  for  regeneration  –  the  lack  of  vascular  cambium  in  these  is  the  primary barrier to successful propagation by cuttings of monocotyledons).

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

91 

Some  cuttings  are  so  slow  to  develop  adventitious  roots  that  they  may  perish  before  these  roots  are  formed.    Some  plant  parts  may  be  capable  of  producing  adventitious roots but cannot form adventitious shoots, thus preventing the creation  of a complete plant from the cutting.  Stem Cuttings  The  use  of  stem  cuttings  is  still  one  of  the  most  common  methods  of  vegetative  plant propagation.  All cuttings must survive without roots until these form when the new plant can exist  independently.    Speed  of  handling  and  placing  of  prepared  material  into  an  environment  that  will  enhance  root  development  is  fundamental  to  success.    The  rooting environment must maintain the cutting until it is self­supporting.  The appropriate environment will ensure:  1.  Appropriate temperatures both above and below cuttings.  2.  The maintenance of a suitable relative humidity of the air around the cuttings.  3.  Adequate water content of the compost to meet the demands of the developing  propagules.  Taking  cuttings  is  always  a  challenge  because  there  are  variables  like  the  time  of  year, the quality of the cutting material and the techniques available.  Stem cuttings are the most variable in that they could usually be divided into: · Softwood (leafy)  These include apical meristem cuttings and the surface sterilised larger propagules  (for  example,  single  rose  eyes)  that  are  now  frequently  used  for  roses  in  “microprop”. Greenwood Semi ripe (also called semi­hardwood – again leafy) and Hardwood cuttings (leafy only if evergreen). 

· · ·

The size of the cutting matters.  Very small cuttings may need more care than can be  provided and too large a cutting may become desiccated due to lack of water.  Virtually  all the water has to enter through the cut base.  If one gains a good root and a good  shoot from a smaller cutting, a fine plant can be formed.  On the other hand, a cutting  just that bit too large may make a scrubby root system lacking vigour and a very poor  sparse  branch  framework  of  sad  shape  which  may  never  pick  up  to  make  the  100%  standard.  The plant is made up of cells.  The cells, which divide, are said to be meristematic and  are  most  common  in  the cambium  and  at  the apical  meristems (in  the  growth  buds  and shoot tips).  The cut cells at the base of the stem of the cutting have several jobs – one of which is to  absorb water.  In order to stay alive, the cells need a suitable temperature, water and  oxygen,  i.e.  from  the  well  aerated  and  drained  rooting  compost.    They  must  resist  organisms of decay like the fungi.  The absorption of water is not quite so easy to get right because the supply of water

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

92 

needs to be as a thin water film.  Standing cuttings in water somehow tends to cause  the cells at the bottom to die even though ample water may be absorbed to support the  cutting for the time being.  There  are  more  methods  than  may  be  described  here,  but  the  principles  are  the  same.  Attention  to  detail  does  matter  and  not  every  species  roots  easily  from  cuttings. Alternative methods of propagation are usually used for "difficult" species ­  they are usually seed raised, or grafted (or divided or layered). 

Figure 49  Longitudinal Section of Nodal Cutting Base  There  are  no  absolutely  hard  and  fast  general  rules  for  the  time  to  take  cuttings.  However it may be said that leafy softwood stem cuttings benefit from the good light of  spring  and  summer.    Cuttings  of  deciduous  material  rooted  in  the  late  summer  and  autumn may be difficult to overwinter if they shed their leaves.  Some evergreen shrubs  and tree material will  root in the early autumn  much better than  later  in the year  (e.g.  Garrya), and some deciduous hardwood stem cutting material will root very well at the  very end of the winter and just before the spring upward sap flow commences. (Once  this  starts  there  is  little  chance  of  rooting  hardwood  stem  cuttings.)    Many  books  on  plant propagation offer times for rooting species and cultivars.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

93 

PLANT 

TYPE OF CUTTING 

SEASON/MONTHS  PREPARATION 

FOR 

Begonia rex  Geranium  Viburnum davidii  (evergreen)  Buddleja davidii  Buddleja (deciduous)  Buddleja 

leaf cutting  softwood stem  softwood  semi ripe  evergreen hardwood  softwood stem  semi hardwood  hardwood 

Spring, summer and autumn.  August to October.  March to  May.  June, July  July, August  October to late January.  June, July.  July, August.  October ­ November.  December, January,  February 

Softwood Cuttings  Although softwood cuttings have the greatest potential for forming roots quickly, the  nature  of  the  material  in  the  cutting  (usually  very  young,  soft  tissue)  means  that  the  cutting is very susceptible to desiccation.  As a result, these cuttings need special care  to ensure that it remains viable.  These  cuttings  are  also  the  most  susceptible  to  bruising  (and  the  resulting  fungal  infections that may follow this damage).  Softwood cuttings are taken from lateral shoots (of about 7.5 to 12.5 cm long).  These  cuttings should not be in bud, seed or flower.  Avoid taking cuttings from below 45 cm  above  the  soil  surface  to  reduce  the  number  of  rain  splashed  soil­borne  disease  problems.  Cut the cutting off below a node or at a stem junction.  This has the advantage of a solid  cross section and more naturally present plant hormones.  Internodal  cuttings  are  useful  for  some  plants  like  Hydrangea.    They  may  root  easily  enough and from internodal cuttings where the preparation work is a little simpler. 

The  cut  is  made  in  the  internode  –  between  the  nodes.  100 mm  node

Figure 50  Internodal cutting of Hydrangea macrophylla 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

94 

At  least  two  good  leaves  should  be  included  on  each cutting.  Lower  leaves  are  removed. 

To  reduce  the  number  of  cells  cut  (and  the  resulting  water  loss),  cut  straight  across the stem and not on  an angle.

Figure 51  Softwood Stem Cuttings (e.g. Weigela Bristol Ruby)  Cut below a node.  This “flat cut” for examination purposes is best cut square as shown.  But in practice most cut through at a slant ­ cutting “with the grain” is easier and quicker.  These  have  leaves  and  are  made  from  the  first  flush  of  growth  in  spring.    These  cuttings are taken before lignification, which can include young soft growing shoots  during periods of continuous growth or a flush of growth at other times.  New  spring  growth  of  Forsythia,  Magnolia,  Weigelia  and  Spiraea  and  even  some  maples root particularly well under the right circumstances.  Their stems are normally very soft because they have grown extremely rapidly; and  they  require  sophisticated  environmental  controls  to  minimise  water  loss  and  so  ensure their survival until they become established.  Whenever possible, try to keep  o  the temperature at the basal end warm (perhaps between 23 and 27  C) to encourage  root formation and the temperature around the foliage cooler to reduce transpiration.  Sometimes the term herbaceous cutting is reserved for leafy cuttings of herbaceous  plants which are broadly similar to softwood stem cuttings and need the same degree  of care and environmental control.  Time of collection: · Cuttings  should  not  be  taken  by  calendar  time  alone,  but  at  a  particular  growth stage of a plant usually during mid­April to July period. · Collection  is  best  undertaken  early  in  the  morning,  before  transpiration  has  reached its peak, thus helping to prevent any loss of turgidity. · Collection  of  material  with  high  nitrogen  to  carbohydrate  ratio,  high  water  content and low dry matter. · Some species must be taken at a particular stage of growth, which may last  for only a week or two e.g. Syringa. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

95 

Selection of material: · The best propagation material is obtained from growth exposed to full light but  is not excessively vigorous. · All shoots used must be from healthy stock; in many cases stock plants are  specially grown for the production of young vigorous growths. · Hard pruning of stock plants results in lateral side growth, which often yields  good material.  Preparation and size of cutting: · Remove all flower buds and depending on species the soft tip. · The lower leaves are normally removed although sometimes are not. · If  these  are  not  removed  they  can  rot  off  and  especially  in  species  like  Cotinus coggygria may lead to Botrytis infections. · Retaining  leaves  does  however  increase  the  photosynthetic  area  of  the  cutting  and  can  reduce  rooting  time.    But  retained  leaves  also  mean  increased  transpirational  losses.   A home  gardener  may  reduce  the number  of leaves (or reduce their leaf size) to reduce transpiration even if this means  an  increase  in  the  length  of  time  it  takes  for  roots  to  form.    Commercial  growers, with specialised misting or fogging systems do not need to make this  compromise. · Shoots selected should have a terminal bud and at least two nodes. · Cuttings  may  be  nodal  or  internodal,  depending  on  species  and  the  size  ranges from 5 ­ 12 cm long.  Pre­planting treatment: · Softwood cuttings respond very well to hormone treatments.  Just the lowest  portion  of  the  cutting  should  be  inserted  into  the  hormone  (or  organic  substitute) – extra hormone should be knocked off. · Apart from hormone treatment, no special treatment is required. · Handle cuttings quickly after taking and ensure they are kept turgid.  Insertion and care during rooting: · A suitable compost may be any of:  o  Equal parts peat and grit or sand.  o  Equal parts peat and perlite.  o  Equal parts peat and terragreen* o  Equal parts grit and terragreen.  The compost must have very low soluble salt levels.  It must hold moisture but  remain well aerated.  It must have a texture which is comfortable for roots and  root hairs. · A dibber should be used to make a small hole in the cutting compost.  Then  the cutting should be inserted, the compost firmed against the cutting.  Once  all  cuttings  have  been  inserted,  the  compost  should  be  watered  and  the  container labelled. Ideally, a relative humidity of 100% should be provided around the leaves to  reduce  transpiration  losses  while the  cutting  is not able  to  replenish  the  lost  moisture  through  roots.    In  a  commercial  setting,  softwood  cuttings  are  usually inserted under mist.  A home gardener may use a mist system (there  are  ones  designed  especially  for  small  greenhouses)  or  may  just  use  other

·

*

Terragreen is a gritty, granular, clay­like material.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

96 

methods  to  increase  the  relative  humidity  in  the  air  surrounding  the  leaves.  However, some plants (for example woolly plants) do not like mist.  One of the  simplest methods is to place the pot with the cuttings within a polythene bag.  This sealed bag, placed out of direct light, will provide a suitable environment  for rooting a few cuttings.  Another involves the use of bell jars.  The cuttings  must remain turgid to keep photosynthesising – the more food produced, the  faster the root development. · The  cuttings  should  be  in  setting  with  the  level  of  illumination  equivalent  to  that of a bright, cloudy day.  Some open opaque shade helps.  The cuttings  must never be exposed to bright, direct sunlight while they are still developing  roots.  Too much light may cause excessive tension within the leaves, resulting  in closing stomata.  The goal is to keep the cutting photosynthesising steadily.  Closed  stomata  reduce  photosynthesis,  as  do  excessively  dark  conditions.  Some  commercial  growing  operations  also  use  night  break  lighting  to  ensure  that the plants are exposed to long days (or short nights). A  home  gardener  may  consider  some  soil  warming,  if  the  cuttings  are  being  rooted inside a greenhouse.  Ideally temperatures of between 23 and 25°C will  help  speed  rooting  and  many  commercial  propagators  do  provide  some  soil  warming  to  speed  rooting.    This  helps  the  cells  at  the  base  of  the  cutting  to  divide and heal the wound.  Later it will assist in cell division at the new root tips  and  stimulate  water  and  soluble  salt  absorption  by  the  root  hairs.    However,  ambient soil temperatures from during the late spring and summer months may  be suitable for the home gardener. Rooting can be expected in 2 to 6 weeks depending on species. 

·

·

Figure 52  A Rooted Greenwood Cutting of Daphne cneorum (Garland flower)  Many  woody  shrubs  and  trees  may  be  propagated  using  this  technique  –  both  deciduous  and  broadleaf  evergreen.    Some  species  commonly  propagated  using  softwood cuttings include Syringa, Cotinus, Magnolia, Clematis, Hamamelis, Azalea  and many herbaceous plants.  After cuttings have formed roots, the cuttings have to be potted up or lined out into a  nursery bed.  Those cuttings rooted under mist will require some period of adjustment to

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

97 

ensure  they  are  weaned  off  the  very  high  moisture  levels.    In  addition,  some  species  need  to  experience  a  period  of  drying  off  from  the  very  wet  state  in  order  that  development of root hairs occurs.  Often  a  loamless  compost/bark  mix  (with  ample  feed  for  immediate  growth  and  sustained nutritional resources) is used for potting up.  The ideal compost is stable, well  aerated,  holds  lots  of  water  and  nutrients,  and  is  free  from  pathogens.    John  Innes  mixes were often short on the capacity for aeration and moisture holding if compared  with the peat and forest bark and controlled release* fertiliser mixes and FTE (the fritted  trace elements which provide the micro nutrients for the life of the compost).  Greenwood Cuttings  Greenwood is the term used to describe that transition from soft wood (fresh growth)  and the more mature wood of semi­ripe wood.  Greenwood is that which has started  to  firm  up  –  secondary  thickening  has  commenced.    Usually  there  is  a  distinct  colour change occurring, both in the colour of the stem and also in the colour of the  leaves.  This type of cutting often requires as much attention as the softwood cutting.  These  cuttings are also prone to excessive moisture loss by transpiration.  A  wide  range  of  trees  and  shrubs  are  propagated  by  greenwood  cuttings.    For  example,  gooseberries  are  frequently  propagated  this  way.    However,  those  plants  that  are  very  difficult  to  propagate  should  use  softwood  cuttings  rather  than  greenwood cuttings.  Greenwood cuttings require more time for roots to successfully  develop.  Greenwood  cuttings  are  taken  when  the  spring  growth  of  the  plant  has  started  to  slow  –  often  near  the  beginning  of  June.    Cuttings  must  be  protected  from  desiccation – they should be taken in the early morning, placed in either a moistened  polythene bag, or in a container of cool water.  Discard lower leaves.  Dip the base of  the  cutting  in  a  rooting  hormone  (usually  the  grade  of  hormone  identified  for  “softwood”  strength).    Make  a  hole  in  the  surface  of  some  well­drained,  moisture  retaining compost, place the cutting in the hole, firm the compost, label and water in.  The container should be placed within a polythene bag or under mist to ensure that  excessive moisture loss does not occur.  Some light should be provided because the  cutting also needs to photosynthesise.  These cuttings do not have sufficient stored  food to fuel root growth without photosynthesising.  Once  roots  have  formed,  gradually  wean  the  cutting  from  the  high  humidity  environment it has enjoyed.  Re­pot or plant out into a nursery bed to grow on.  Semi­Ripe Wood Cuttings  Semi­ripe wood (or semi­hardwood) is that which occurs later in the growing season.  As the summer progresses, lignification intensifies and, as a result, these cuttings are  both  thicker  and  firmer  than  greenwood  cuttings.    Although  deciduous  plants  are  propagated  as  semi­ripe  wood  cuttings,  many  broadleaf  evergreens  and  conifers  are
*

Controlled release fertilisers identified include Ficote and Osmocote products.  These are not suitable  for  use  by  an  organic  gardener  but  there  are  slow  release  organic substitutes.    These  are  covered  in  more detail within lesson 7.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

98 

propagated at this stage.  Semi­ripe  wood  has  an  advantage  over  both  softwood  and  greenwood  in  that  the  cutting has been able to store some food resources.   These cuttings are capable of  producing roots without the urgent need to photosynthesise.  There are a number of different types of cuttings classified as semi­ripe wood cuttings.  These  include:  leaf  bud  cuttings,  nodal  tip  cuttings,  nodal  stem  sections  and  heel  cuttings. 
high relative  humidity 

O2  ­ provided by open  rooting media 
o  T  C to suit the species 

low salt levels in the soil  solution

Figure 53  Leaf Bud Cutting (Ficus elastica)  These  need  treatment  in  virtually  the  same  way as  greenwood  cuttings.    They  root  more slowly and more reliably perhaps for the amateur with less than ideal facilities.  The  snag  with  deciduous  material  in  particular  is  that  if  the  plant  fails  to  make  adequate food storage within itself before winter and leaf fall, it may fail to grow out in  the spring.  This is the reason why the majority of material propagated by this method  is evergreen or semi­evergreen.  The main season for such cuttings is in July and August.  The simple tented system  below provides for all the principles and works well for the common species.  These are made in late summer from stem growth that has slowed and hardened but  is  still  actively  growing.  Although  these  leafy  stems  are  subject  to  water  loss,  they  can survive under less rigorous environmental controls than softwood cuttings.  These  cuttings  may  be  collected  any  time  during  the  growing  season  when  shoots  are at the correct stage of development – that is, the wood is no longer “greenwood”.  Normal collection time is July to September, when there is a slowing down of growth,  buds  set,  stem  colour  change,  high  carbohydrate  to  nitrogen  ratio,  a  lower  water  content than softwood cuttings, and higher dry matter.  Cuttings should be selected  from  plants  of  moderate  vigour  and  that  are  free  from  insect  (e.g.  aphids)  and  disease attack.  A  semi­ripe  cutting  is  one,  which  has  not  yet  reached  seasonal  maturity,  but  is  beyond  the  stage  where  it  could  be  used  as  a  softwood  cutting.  The  base  of  the  cutting should be lignifying (becoming woody) whereas the tip should still be soft.  The preparation and size of cutting used: · Cuttings may be taken, internodal, nodal (especially for hollow stems), or with a  heel. · Size relates to species but range from 7 ­ 12 cm long. · Lower leaves should be removed. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

99 

· ·

Heel cuttings should have excess heel trimmed off. Mallet  cuttings  are  advantaged,  as  all  of  the  meristematic  tissue  is  intact.  However  as  there  will  be  two  cut  surfaces  there is  an  argument  that  there  is  a  larger surface area to heal. 

Preplanting treatments include: · Handle immediately after preparation. · May be wounded and / or treated with hormones.  Cutting insertion and aftercare include: · Rooting is obtained under glass. · Depending  on  the  size  of  the  cutting,  insert  5  ­  15  cm  apart,  and  10  ­  12  cm  between rows. · Good light, high humidity and bottom heat are required for satisfactory results. · Bottom heat, if used, should be around 21° C. · Depending  on  the  species  being  propagated,  the  compost  may  vary  from  pure  sand to peat / sand (50 / 50 ), or perlite / sand  (25 / 75 ). · May be rooted in cold frames.  A suitable set­up for the home gardener may be:  North side of bush in the shade  Water  the  tray  once  thoroughly  and  drain before putting into the poly wrap.  Loosely wrapped clear polythene bag.  60mm deep tray well filled with  cuttings.  Good garden earth ­ no fertilisers and  no  obvious  slugs,  snails,  woodlice  or  millipedes. 

Figure 54  A System for the Amateur  Alternatively,  trays  of  cuttings  may  be  placed  in  a  cold  frame,  cloche  or  cold  greenhouse as long as conditions are moderately shaded.  The  species  commonly  propagated  using  this  technique  include  Ribes,  Camellia,  Cotoneaster,  Escallonia,  Deutzia,  Philadelphus,  Vinca,  Clematis,  Ceanothus  and  Berberis. 

Hardwood Cuttings  Hardwood cuttings are frequently made from leafless dormant stems of deciduous  plants.    They  require  minimal  environmental  control  for  survival.    Evergreen

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

100

hardwood cuttings are also taken but are treated differently.  For the commercial grower, propagation by hardwood cuttings is one of the cheapest  methods of  vegetative propagation.   A  home gardener  may also take  advantage  of  the  fact  that  little  ancillary  equipment  is  required  for  the  simpler  methods.    Some  hardwood cuttings, however, are best made within the protection of an outdoor frame  or under mist.  Plant  material  used for  hardwood cutting preparation  is  taken from  mature,  ripened  wood of the most recent growing season's growth.  Depending on species hardwood  cuttings  are  prepared  and  inserted  between  November  and  February.    The  most  important aspect of a hardwood cutting is that it has an adequate store of starch that  will be used to fuel the growth of adventitious roots and the growth of a shoot.  Once  the  shoot  starts  to  photosynthesise,  the  new  plant  may  start  to  manufacture  new  food.  Sometimes  the  bottom  of  the  cutting  is  “wounded”.    As  a  technique,  wounding  is  definitely an advantage for those with good facilities because it may "let the roots out"  more  quickly.    Apart  from  roots,  which  may  arise  at  the  base  of  the  cut  and from  the  callus, many roots could arise from the central vascular cylinder within the bottom few  inches  of  the  cutting.    The  problem  for  such  root  primordia  may  be  the  physical  constraint of the cortex.  A thin slice into the bark and down to the xylem may permit the  roots to come out more quickly and reliably. However, care must be taken to ensure that  these wounds are not additional sites for infection entry.  Deciduous Hardwoods  These cuttings have their store of starch.  They are best taken from juvenile wood ­ as  would be produced by a hedge.  Indeed many major propagators keep their stock plants  in  hedge forms  because  the  system  tends  to  produce  large  numbers  of  fairly  uniform  cuttings.    These  are  low  in  nitrogen  and  high  in  carbon  as  against  the  very  dominant  shoots perhaps at the top of a young plant which may have a higher nitrogen to carbon  ratio and which root less readily. 

avoid  ultra  vigorous shoots

discard  cutting  material  below  450mm due  to  rain ­  splashed  spores  of  diseases from the soil 

Figure 55  Stock Plants Used to Supply Cutting Material  The  season  for  rooting  ends  when  the  sap  begins  to  rise  in  the  early  spring.  Traditionally  November  is  a  very  good  time.    For  some  species  it  may  be  better  in  October  or  even  in  early  March  just  before  the  breaking  of  spring.    It  pays  to  keep  a  record of the treatments so that improvements may be aimed for as each season and  crop  of  results  is  likely  to  vary  and  even  tantalisingly  good  results  may  be  difficult  to 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

101 

repeat.  The ideal hardwood cutting material – “Fairly thin and hungry to grow”.  The steps involved in propagating a plant through the use of hardwood cuttings are:  1.  Take cuttings of suitable plant material while the plant is dormant – well before  bud break occurs.  2.  Place these cuttings  in a suitable location to permit wound healing and callus  formation.  Two different activities must occur – the formation of callus tissue that heals  the wound (the ends of the cutting are effectively wounds) and the creation of  adventitious roots.  Both of these activities usually occur best when the base  o  of  the  cutting  is  kept  warm.    Even  temperatures  of  10  C  are  much  more  stimulating than the outdoor winter temperatures.  Cuttings  taken  in  mid­November  may  not  callus  before  mid­March  ­  a  long  period for an  open  wound  which  provides an opportunity for  pathogens  (like  stem  rotting  fungi)  to  enter.    Often  reduced  rooting  percentages  also  occur  when a cutting has been slow to develop callus to seal the wound. 
Open sunny site, well drained soil.  Rows spaced 1 m apart.  Cuttings spaced 300 mm within row.  Season – October to March. 

soil level  depth of insertion  approximately 200  mm.  flat cut below a node 

base of rooted  cutting 

callus

roots may  start 

Figure 56  The Traditional Deciduous Hardwood Stem Cuttings of Ribus nigrum,  Black Currant  To encourage both callus and root formation, cuttings may be placed in a bed 

The  cuttings  take  2  to  3  weeks  to  callus  under ideal conditions.  The cambium tissue  produces the wound­healing callus tissue 

cambium 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

102 

with bottom heat.  Commercial growers often use something called a Garner  Bin  –  more  about  this  later  in  this  section.    A  home  grower  may  place  the  cuttings into a propagation unit with bottom heat.  It  is  essential  that  the  top  portion  of  the  cutting  not  receive  heat.    Bud  development and bud break must not occur before the cutting has formed an  adequate root system.  3.  Once the cutting has developed an adequate root system, the top growth may  be encouraged.  Once the cuttings are callused, they can be put into "waiting" beds or frames to  await  the  spring  when  the  nursery  site  may  be  prepared  to  receive  them.  Callused cuttings are quite fragile, and so for most soils it would not be ideal to  push them into the rotovated earth (as is quite reasonable for a standard cutting)  and then firmed.  It is better to insert the cutting into a prepared hole ­ and then  firm it.  A hazel stick "dibber" might do just fine.  (Commercially fine grooves are  cut in the soil with discs.)  If  this  occurs  before  the  root  system  forms,  the  stress  of  supporting  leafy  growth  (and  the  increased  transpiration associated  with  this)  may  cause  the  cutting to die.  A root system is needed to provide the moisture requirements  of the growing shoot.  A home gardener may not differentiate between the second and third step –  and  place  cuttings  directly  into  a  nursery  bed  in  the  garden.    Although  this  delays  the  formation  of  callus  and  roots  (through  cold  soil  temperatures),  cuttings  will  still  root  and  develop  shoots.    The  nursery  bed  should  be  in  a  sheltered  location,  with  well­drained  but  moist  soil.    Root  development  requires the same conditions as other plant growth – a balance of oxygen and  moisture.  A number of ornamentals (both trees and shrubs) may be raised in this way.  Many  dogwoods (Cornus spp.), willows (Salix spp.), grape vines (Vitis spp.), and Forsythia,  just to name a few.  The pattern of taking the cutting follows the practices before of cutting below a node or  at the junction with older wood.  Traditionally  hardwood  cuttings  are  inserted  in  a  shallow  trench,  one  side  being  vertical with the bottom lined with sand if the soil is heavy.  Recent experiments confirm  that if cuttings are pushed through black polythene laid flat and secured, the results are  much  improved.    The  warmer  conditions  underneath  encourage  callus  formation  and  rooting,  no  weed  competition  can  occur  and  more  moisture  retention,  but  with  less  chance of waterlogging.  One method suited to propagation by a home gardener is to root hardwood cuttings in a  roll.  A strip of black polythene (about 5 cm wider than the longest cutting, and a metre  or 2 in length) may be used as the propagating environment.  Place the polythene flat  on a surface, and cover it with about 1 cm of a mixture of peat and fine bark.  On top of  this  mixture, place the  individual  cuttings – each about 3 cm apart  – with  the base of  each  cutting  about  a  third  of  the  way  up  the  polythene  strip  (this  will  leave  the  top  portions  of  the  cuttings  sitting  above  the  top  edge  of  the  polythene  strip).    Make  sure  you label it and tie it securely with jute or raffia.  Water well and place these bundles into  a sheltered location in the garden or a cold frame.  In spring, check to see if they have 103 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

rooted, and line them out into a nursery bed to develop fully.  Some plants propagated by hardwood cuttings tend to produce suckers.  To limit the  production of suckers, the lower buds are removed from the hardwood cutting before  being placed to form roots (leaving only the top two or three buds on each cutting).  This is often performed for gooseberry and red currants.  The wounds created from  cutting  out  the  lower  buds  are  often  treated  with  a  fungicide  to  prevent  disease  organisms from  penetrating  through  these  sites.   This  procedure  is  called  growing  on a leg. 

Top buds  retained – 4 in  this sample 

Lower  buds  removed  to  prevent  sucker  growth  later 

Figure 57  Cutting for a Bush Grown on a "Leg"  Other types of hardwood cuttings include: · Mallet cuttings 

older wood 

Figure 58  A Mallet Cutting of Berberis stenophylla  A mallet cutting really does work better for Berberis. · Vine eye cutting 
Sometimes  the  cuttings  are  cut  in  the  centre  lengthwise before placing  on the rooting compost

Figure 59  Vine Eye Cutting  Vine  eye  cuttings  are  traditionally  used  to  propagate  vines,  however  they 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

104 

may also work for any woody plant that produces a solid stem.  The length of  stem is cut so that only one bud occurs in the centre of the cutting.  Then this  cutting is placed into the compost, so that half of the wood is buried and the  bud  remains  above  the  compost  level.    Sometimes  the  stem  portion  of  the  vine eye cutting is sliced in half. · Willow sets  A set is the word used to describe a cutting of length between 1½ to 2 metres  in length.  This wood is from the last season’s growth (the youngest wood on  the tree).  The technique is used to propagate plants to provide a windbreak,  Because  willow  produce  such  easy  to  root  cuttings,  these  sets  are  placed  where they are to grow on, and are staked, just like a young tree would be. 

Evergreen Hardwoods  A commercial nursery may root small hardwood cuttings of evergreen shrubs under  double polythene but without heat. 

floating polythene cover equal parts peat/grit /loam 

Figure 60  Professional Environment for Rooting Evergreen Hardwood Cuttings  In a commercial operation, large numbers of cuttings need to be rooted and grown on  quickly.  However, in a home garden, only a few cuttings may be started and these may  be allowed to root more slowly – in a sheltered location in the garden or in a cold frame.  However,  any  additional  protection  that  will  permit  the  cutting  to  receive  additional  humidity  will  assist  in  the  speed  of  rooting.    A  small  polythene  tent  (either  within  a  greenhouse  or  under  a  tunnel  cloche)  will  help  keep  these  humidity  levels  up.    The  reason why evergreen cuttings require addition care to humidity levels is that the leaves  continue  to  lose  moisture  through  transpiration  (deciduous  hardwood  cuttings  do  not  have these moisture losses).  Weed  control  by  hand  is  desirable,  weeds  depress  crop  growth  and  quality  enormously.  Evergreen cuttings may be collected between late autumn and late winter – the exact  time  varies  from  species  to  species.    Cuttings  should  be  taken  when  plants  are  "completely dormant".  Each cutting should be between 5 and 25 cm long.  The lower  leaves  are  usually  removed  and  a  hormone  treatment  or  basal  wounding  is  often  carried out.  Mature  terminal  shoots of  previous  year's growth  are  normally  selected  although  in  some  cases  (for  example  Taxus  and  Juniperus)  older  and  heavier  wood  may  be  used.    In  some  species  side  growths  give  better  results  than  tip  growths.    In 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

105 

Juniperus species, many of the juvenile foliage forms root more readily than the adult  foliage types.  Usually cuttings are inserted between 5 and 15 cm apart, with 10 to 15 cm between  rows.  Species  that  are  commonly  propagated  by  hardwood  cuttings  include  the  following  conifers:  Thuja,  Chamaecyparis,  Juniperus,  Taxus,  Picea,  Tsuga,  Pinus,  Cryptomeria, Cupressus and x Cuprocyparis.  Although  broadleaf  evergreens  are  less  likely  to  be  propagated  by  hardwood  cuttings,  many  may  be  done  using  this  method.    Some  examples  include  Prunus  lusitanica  and  Olearia  macrodonta.    In  the  case  of  broadleaf  evergreen  hardwood  cuttings,  each  cutting  is  usually  50  cm  long  and  placed  into  pots  for  rooting  and  growing  on.    Because  of  the  increased  moisture  losses  through  transpiration  occurring at the large leaves, these are often decreased in size. 

The  lines  mark  the  location  where  the  leaf  reduction  cuts  may  be  made.

Figure 61  Broadleaf Evergreen Hardwood Cutting 

Leaf Cuttings  Some plants may be propagated from single leaves.  Although the leaves of a number  of  different  plants  are  capable  of  rooting  (for  example  the  leaves  of  Clematis  may  produce  adventitious  roots),  not  all  are  also  capable  of  producing  adventitious  shoots.   The new plant  will need both roots and  shoots to be a fully functioning new  plant.  A surprising number of plants have this ability.  A number of monocotyledonous plants  will reproduce from leaf cuttings.  Some dicotyledonous plant families in particular have  the  ability  to  be reproduced  from  leaves – Begoniaceae  (Begonias),  Crassulaceae  (a  family of succulent plans) and Gesneriaceae (the family that includes the African Violet,  Saintpaulia spp., and Cape Primrose, Streptocarpus spp.).  Leaf cuttings consist of: · Leaf petiole cuttings  Leaf petiole cuttings are those where both the leaf blade and the leaf petiole are  removed from the plant.  The petiole is inserted into a suitable rooting medium. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

106 

After adventitious roots develop, plantlets form from the tissue of the petiole.  Perhaps  the  most  common  example  of  plants  propagated  this  way  is  the  African Violet (Saintpaulia spp.). 

Plantlet  will  arise  from  the base of the petiole

Figure 62  African Violet Leaf Petiole Cutting · Leaf squares  One technique for propagation of plants with large leaves is to cut the leaf into  postage­stamp sized pieces.  This technique is used to propagate Begonia rex.  Healthy  leaves are  removed from the parent plant and the petiole is  removed.  Then, this leaf is cut into pieces about 2.5 cm square using a very sharp knife.  It  is  important  that  each  leaf  piece  have  a  section  of  a  main  vein  running  somewhere  through  it  (these  are  the  sites  where  the  new  plantlets  form)  and  that the leaf section not have any bruising or damage on any part (these will be  sites of decay).  There are two techniques used for rooting these cuttings.   One is to put each of  these squares flat on the surface of the cutting compost (pinning each main vein  portion  of  the  square  to  the  compost).    The  alternative  is  to  place  these  leaf  squares into the compost vertically, just as the sections are inserted for lateral  vein leaf cuttings (see below).  This option requires a little more care because it  is important that the section of the leaf closest to the petiole (and parent plant) is  inserted into the soil. · Lateral vein leaf cuttings  A number of plants with long, narrow leaves may be propagated by lateral vein  leaf  cuttings.    Many  monocotyledons  may  be  propagated  this  way.  Streptocarpus (Cape Primrose) are also propagated using this technique.  Once  again,  healthy,  mature  leaves  are  removed  from  the  parent  plant  and  cut  into  pieces  across  the  midrib.    These  pieces  are  then  placed  vertically  into  a  suitable cutting compost ensuring that the proximal end (the end closest to the  parent plant) is inserted into the compost leaving the distal end (the end closest  to  the  leaf  tip)  out  of  the  compost.    Some  monocotyledonous  plants  are  not  sensitive to the polarity of the leaf cutting being maintained. · Midrib leaf cuttings  Some plants develop new plants at the point where their leaf veins intersected  with the midrib.  An example is Streptocarpus.  A healthy, fully­expanded leaf is  removed  from  the  parent  plant,  it  is  placed  upside  down  on  a  clean  surface  (often a clean piece of glass is used) and then the mid­rib is carefully cut away. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

107 

The  two  sides  of  the  leaf  may  be  potted  up  in  a  suitable  rooting  medium  (for  example, moistened vermiculite or a cutting compost). 
The  lines  illustrate  the cuts that may be  made  to  produce  midrib leaf cuttings. 

These  lines  illustrate  the  cuts  required  to  make transverse  cuttings.  New  plants  will  form  along  the  basal edges.

Figure 63  Cuttings That May be Taken From a Streptocarpus Leaf · Leaf slashing  Leaf  slashing  is  often  used  to  propagate  some  large,  fleshy  leaved  plants  like  Begonia rex.  A healthy, mature leaf is removed from the parent plant.  First, the  petiole is removed carefully where it connects with the lamina (blade).  Then, the  lamina is placed upside down on a clean surface and, using a sharp knife, cuts  are made across the large veins (about 1 cm long).  Cuts may be made every 3  cm or so.  This cut leaf is placed on a suitable compost with the cut side facing  up  (that  is,  the  top  side  against  the  compost).    It  is  secured  to  the  compost  –  often by using small wire loops over each vein cutting.  After a period of time,  small plantlets will form at each cut location. · Foliar embryos  Some  plants  produce  plantlets  at  different  places  on  the  leaf.    The  Thousand  Mothers plant (Tolmiea menziesii) produces plantlets where the leaf petiole joins  with  the  lamina.    Some  Kalanchoe  species  produce  plantlets  at  the  sites  of  indentations in the edge of the leaf. · Bulb scaling  Leaf scales are also considered a leaf cutting.  Many bulbs may be propagated  through  the  use  of  bulb  scales.    The  scales  of  the  lily  bulb  are  particularly  obvious  and  may  be  removed  carefully  from  a  bulb  (this  is  made  simpler  by  using a sharp knife to make a small cut into the basal plate).  At this point, there  are two options that may be taken:  o  Each of these healthy scales may be potted in moist sand or vermiculite  – inserting the base of the scale into the mixture leaving only the tip of  each scale showing.  o  Placing  the  scales  into  a  polythene  bag  containing  moistened  vermiculite, or peat. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

108 

Usually about 4 to 8 weeks later, small bulblets will appear at the base of each  scale.  Each bulblet may be grown on to, eventually, form a flowering bulb. 

bulblets  forming  at  the  base  of  a  scale

Figure 64  Scaling Lily Bulbs  Root Cuttings  The  theory  behind  using  root  cuttings  is  that  a  plant  should  be  able  to  produce  adventitious shoots from a root cutting just as easily as a cutting from a shoot may  produce adventitious roots.  Unfortunately,  few  plants  are  easily  propagated  through  the  use  of  root  cuttings.  Those woody plants that have a tendency to produce suckers may be propagated by  root  cuttings  –  for  example  Bottlebrush  Buckeye  (Aesculus  parviflora)  and  Lilac  (Syringa spp.).   Some  perennials  and  alpines  that produce  somewhat  fleshy  roots  may  also  be  propagated  by  cuttings  –  for  example,  Primula  denticulata,  oriental  poppy (Papaver orientalis) and garden phlox (Phlox paniculata) may be successfully  grown from root cuttings.  This form of propagation is used for species and cultivars difficult to root in other ways.  For  example,  Phlox  paniculata  cultivars  (but  not  the  variegated  leaf  forms  like  Phlox  'Norah  Leigh')  may  be  produced  through  root  cuttings  while  other  methods  of  propagation are difficult.  The main disadvantage is that the 'donor' plant has to be disturbed.  The technique cannot be used to propagate plants originating as chimeras.  Plants,  such as the variegated Aralia and Pelargonium, will revert to the normal green (un­  variegated) form following growth of adventitious shoots.  One advantage of this mode of propagation is that some pest problems may not be  passed on to the new plants.  For example, Phlox root cuttings are free from the stem  eelworm.  It  is  important  that  the  root  cutting  contain  as  much  food  as  possible  to  fuel  the  developing  adventitious  root  and  shoot.    Unlike  leafy  cuttings,  the  root  is  unable  to  manufacture food through photosynthesis until the shoot has been formed – and this  new shoot is sometimes formed after the creation of adventitious roots.  As a result,  the  best  time  to  take  root  cuttings  is  when  the  plant  is  dormant.    At  this  time,  the  carbohydrate stored within the root is the highest level.  The general advice is to select root cuttings that are about as thick as a pencil (about  ¾ cm) and between 5 and 10 cm long.  However, smaller roots may be successfully  propagated (and in some cases, the plant does not possess roots as thick as a pencil  to select).  However, keeping in mind the idea of food storage, if the roots are thin,  then the cutting should be longer. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

109 

The basic steps involved in propagation by root cuttings are:  1.  dig the parent plant while it is dormant  For many plants, this is between mid­autumn and late winter, before the start  of  new growth for  the  new  season.    However, for  the  oriental  poppy,  this  is  usually mid­summer.  2.  carefully wash the soil off the roots  3.  select  some  of  the  strongest­looking  roots,  sever  them  from  the  parent  by  cutting as close to the crown of the plant as possible.  Do not take more than about one third of the roots from the parent plant, if the  parent plant is to be re­planted and grown again.  Roots may be placed vertically in the compost or horizontally on the surface  of the compost.  Usually  thicker  roots are placed  vertically  so  it  is  important  remember  which  end of the root came from the portion nearest the plant crown (the proximal  end)  and  that  portion  that  was  most  distant from  the  crown  (the  distal  end).  This maintains the polarity of the cutting.  Usually the distal end is cut with a  sloping cut and the proximal end is cut with a flat cut.  Thin roots will be placed flat on the compost surface, so it is not necessary to  make distinctive cuts to identify the ends.  Cuttings may be treated with a fungicide, but they are not treated with rooting  hormones.  4.  Place the root cuttings in a location for to develop.  There are two choices for starting root cuttings.  Thick  roots  may  be  grown  outdoors  or  in  a  well­drained  compost  in  a  greenhouse.  o  Outdoor propagation usually involves the bundling of these thick root  pieces.  These bundles are kept in damp sand or peat moss at about  4°C for about 2 to 3 weeks while the callus develops.  Then the roots  are  inserted  into  a  suitable  nursery  bed  or  pots  (with  well­drained,  moist soil) so that the proximal end is just at or just below the surface  of the soil.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

110 

flat cut at the top  cover with 1cm of sand or  grit

sloping  cut  at  distal  end 

Figure 65  Root Cutting  o  Indoor or under glass propagation does not involve a separate period  for callus formation.  The cuttings are inserted immediately into pots,  pans  or  trays  (filled  with  an  open,  freely  draining  compost  that  has  already been watered).  Again, the roots are inserted with the proximal  end at or just below the surface of the compost.  A dibber is used to  make holes into the compost as deep as the root cutting is long.  Once  the  roots  are  placed  into  the  compost,  and  the  container  is  labelled  and the surface of the compost is covered with a 1 cm layer of grit or  coarse  sand.    These  pots  should  be  placed  in  a  cold  frame  or  propagator.    The  compost  should  only  be  watered  to  keep  it  from  drying out – the grit mulch will help retain moisture in the compost.  Thin roots are usually only started under glass.  The roots are placed on the  surface  of  a  moistened,  freely­draining  compost  and  are  then  covered  with  about 5 mm of compost.  A top dressing of grit or sand is then added onto the  compost and the labelled containers are placed into a propagator.  In all cases, when new top growth occurs (this may take place a year later),  the cuttings should be carefully lifted to confirm if adventitious roots have also  developed.    When  root  growth  has  occurred,  these  are  ready  to  pot  on  to  larger  containers.    These  rooted  cuttings  must  be  grown  on,  with  careful  management  of  temperature  extremes,  until  they  are  large  enough  to  be  planted out. 

How  would  you  propagate  perennial  Phlox  to  obtain  a  stock  free  from  eelworm (nematodes)?  Check your answer at the end of this section. 

Equipment for Propagation by Cuttings  Heated Propagation Units  Professional  propagators  have  extensive  systems  to  support  the  cutting  during  the  rooting process.  Within a glasshouse environment, special heated benches provide 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

111 

bottom heat. 

flats or rooting trays  polythene  film  cover 

Polythene  film  cover  touching  foliage 

mobile  benching  ­  for  economy  of  glasshouse  space 

Frame support 

pathway 

pathway 

Figure 66  A Heated Bench for Propagation of Cuttings  Usually these heated benches use the heat produced by running hot water or steam  through  pipes  that  lie  beneath  the  bench.    Home  gardeners  may  create  a  smaller  version  of  these  through  the  use  of  electrically  heated  propagators  or  soil  heating  cables. 
Heating  cables  are  looped  within  a  bed  of  sand  –  the  cable  loops  are  carefully  arranged  to  ensure  they  do  not touch other loops.  Above  the  cables  is  another  bed  of  sand  –  with  a  thermometer  in  it  to  ensure  the temperature is suitable.

Figure 67  Heated Propagation Unit  Cold frames  may  be used  to  root  cuttings that are  too  soft or  weak for  the outdoor  methods.  Each cutting is carefully inserted at 5 to 8 cm centres in a frame with light  soil or made up compost used as a rooting medium with 1cm of sand covering. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

112 

Garner  Bins  are  used  to  speed  the  callus  formation  and  root  development  on  hardwood cuttings in commercial propagation operations.  In essence a soil warmed  o  compost where the base of the cuttings are kept at around 20  C. 
Tops  of  the  cuttings  cool  at  the  ambient  outdoor temperature 

rainproof cover 

Cuttings  best  singly  or  conveniently  in  small bundles 

Base  of  cuttings  at  20°C

Soil  warming  cables 

Thermostat 

Figure 68  A Modified Garner Bin 

Compost  of  peat  and  grit,  free  from  lime 

There is much to be said for bundling the cuttings and inserting them in a protected  site like a frame surrounded by straw bales.  The compost they are stood in should  be  of  such  a  quality  that  it  is  never  sticky  wet  ­  a  very  open  gritty  earth  and  some  granulated peat might work well.  Mist  To  maintain  relative  humidity  around  leafy  cuttings,  commercial  propagators  use  automated misting systems or fogging systems.  Mist systems keep the leaf surface  wet (thereby reducing transpiration losses while permitting photosynthesis to occur).  After  rooting  has  occurred,  the  cuttings  are  removed  from  the  mist  environment.  Most  plants  suffer  during  the  move,  as  under  conditions  of  mist  few  root  hairs  are  produced, hence a weaning period is necessary.  At least one firm produces a "weaner"  which  automatically  reduces  the  amount  of  water  falling  on  the  rooted  plants,  thus  allowing the change in regime to be carried out in controlled stages.  If a "weaner" is not  used and the plants are struck in the bed itself, the change can be to some extent offset  by placing the cuttings, when potted off, into a closed frame for a few days, after which  they can be placed on the open benches.  A dedicated home gardener may be able to purchase or construct a small mist unit to  be used in a home glasshouse.  Some passive systems may be used to help maintain relative humidity around leafy  cuttings.  These systems work by confining a volume of air around the cutting – once  this air becomes moist, it remains moist for a long period of time.  Some choices that  may  be  used  by  a  home  gardener  include  plastic  propagation  units,  cloches,  polythene film, or even plastic bags supported over the cutting and plastic bottles (as  described in the previous section). 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

113 

Rooting Media  Experiments  have  been  carried  out  at  various  centres  and  by  individual  growers,  and  there are different opinions as to what is the best.  Whatever is used, it must be a free­  draining  material  or  the  bed  will  become  soaked  and  remain  so.    A  suitable  medium  seems  to  consist  of  four  parts  coarse  perlite  or  sand  to  one  part  compost.    Some  compost seems necessary, partly perhaps to create a more acid rooting medium, e.g.  for such plants as Rhododendrons and Ericas.  Whilst  it  is  the  common  practice  to  root  the  cuttings  into  the  bed,  some  commercial  growers  are  now  using  the  bed  as  a  plunging  medium  and  are  striking  the  cuttings  directly into pots or boxes.  This eliminates the problem of having to move them when  the cuttings have rooted.  Aftercare For Plants Produced By Cuttings  Once rooting has occurred and the plant has both a fully functioning root and shoot,  the new plant must be prepared for survival outside of the propagation environment.  This process should occur gradually so that the new plant is not overly stressed at  any  one  time.    The  amount  of  care  that  a  cutting  requires  depends  on  the  type  of  cutting, the time of year and the environment under which this plant was propagated.  Those  cuttings  that  were  propagated  under  mist  (or  other  protected  environments  with  high  humidity  levels)  need  to be  gradually acclimated  to  lower humidity  levels  (the conditions that they will grow under in the future).  This is best done over a 2 to 3  week period.  If  bottom  heat  was  used,  it  is  often  turned  off  first.    Then  the  humidity  level  is  gradually lowered to natural levels – plants grown within plastic domes or polythene  bags  must  be  gradually  exposed  to  the  air  outside  their  protective  chambers.    The  length  of  time  that  the  cuttings  are  exposed  to  “normal”  conditions  should  become  longer each day.  Once weaned of heat and humidity, they should be acclimated to  higher light levels.  The  cuttings  should be  monitored  to  ensure  that  excessive  shoot growth does not  occur  –  this  may  be  too  much  for  the  new  root  system  to  support.    Usually  this  is  done  by  a  reduction  in  watering.    Watering  is  reduced  gradually  so  that  the  root  system begins to tolerate slightly drier compost conditions – water is not withheld to  the point of wilting, but the frequency of watering is slowly reduced.  New  plants  may  need  additional  protection  from  winter  temperatures.    For  those  more tender plants, winter in a heated glasshouse may be needed.  For less tender  new  plants,  winter  in  a  protected  area  of  the  garden  or  in  a  cold  frame  may  be  adequate.  Layering  Layering of plants in reality is the preparation of a plant for subsequent division.  Only  after  adventitious  root  formation  is  the  layer  detached  and  planted  as  a  separated  plant.    The  advantage  to  layering  is  that  the  stem  that  will  eventually  become  an  independent  plant  remains  attached  to  the  parent  plant  (receiving  water,  nutrition  and hormones from the parent plant) during the formation of adventitious roots.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

114 

In some species, layering occurs naturally.  Climbing plants often exhibit this ability  (for  example,  Ivy,  Hedera  helix,  often develops  roots  when permitted to trail  across  the ground).  Strawberry plants (Fragaria sp.) naturally produce plantlets on runners  and these often root where they touch the soil surface.  Layering  is  often  used  in  species  that  may  be  particularly  difficult  to  root  from  cuttings.    The  home  gardener  may  use  layering  as  a  fairly  certain  method  for  producing a small number of plants.  Commercial growers, however, do not routinely  use this method because it is not the most efficient use of plant material or space.  In  a  commercial  environment,  layering  beds  are  established  to  grow  stock  plants.  Because these beds are frequently used for many years, utmost hygiene has to be  practiced to prevent the spreading of pests and diseases, especially nematodes and  viruses.  The  formation  of  roots  is  stimulated  by  treatments  of  the  stem  that  interrupt  the  downward  movement  of  carbohydrate,  auxin  and  other  rooting  factors  from  leaves.  These  treatments  stimulate  root  formation  in  the  area  of  the  treatment.    These  materials accumulate in the region of the stem to be layered and encourage roots to  develop.  Rooting  requires  sufficient  moisture,  good  aeration  and  reasonable  temperature,  which are provided by a light sandy soil.  Irrigate in drought and prevent frost damage  in winter by mounding the soil.  Various  techniques  have  been  devised  some  of  which  are  based  on  natural  regeneration (e.g. tip layering) and others are unnatural.  In a home garden, layering  is usually performed to produce a few additional shrubs, perennials and occasionally  herbs.    Houseplants  may  be  propagated  by  air  layering,  although  this  technique  is  not confined solely for this use.  There  are  a  number  of  different  layering  techniques  used:  tip  layering,  simple  layering, serpentine layering, mound or stool layering, and air layering.  The advantages of layering include:  1.  A wide range of plants may be propagated by layering – including some very  difficult to root cuttings, e.g. Corylus (Hazel).  2.  Not  much  skill  or  equipment  is  required  –  this  permits  the  propagation  of  some plants where other techniques require specialised equipment.  3.  A large plant may be produced in a fairly short time.  The disadvantages include:  1.  Layering is an expensive method, because much land and labour is required  and  there  is  no  mechanisation  method  available.    Not  issues  for  the  home  gardener, but these are issues for commercial growers.  2.  Inefficient  use  of  propagation  material.    A  single  stock  plant  may  only  produce  a  very  limited  number  of  new  plants  –  limited  by  the  number  of  suitable branches available on the stock plant and the area around the stock  plant.  3.  The commercial grower, with established stock beds may find them difficult to  maintain and cultivate.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

115 

Tip Layering  Tip layering is the technique used to propagate some members of the Rubus genus  (including blackberries and loganberries).  This method takes advantage of the plants  within  this genus  to  root from  stem  tips  that  touch  the  soil.  Brilliant  in  its  simplicity,  blackberries  (will  do  it  with  no  encouragement  at  all.    Other  members  of  the  Rubus  genus  that  are  propagated  this  way  include  Rubus  biflorus,  R.  cockburnianus,  R.  coreanus, R. phoenicolasius, R. ulmifolius, R. linkianus and R. thibetinus.  Late in the summer, a vigorous, healthy shoot of the current season’s growth is bent  downward.    At  the  point  where  the  shoot  tip  will  touch  the  soil,  prepare  a  slanted  trench about 15 cm deep.  This trench should be shaped so that there is a sloping  side at the edge closest to the parent and a vertical side at the edge furthest away  from  the  parent  plant.    This  configuration  is  recommended  because  it  not  only  permits the shoot to be buried without breaking but it also encourages the formation  of new growth upwards.   Bury the tip of the shoot (about 10 to 15 cm of the growth)  into this trench and, if necessary, pin down the shoot so that it has good contact with  the soil.  Fill in the trench and keep the soil moist.  The tip will grow down a little and  then recurve to form a sharp angle and this is the site where roots develop.  The tips should develop roots within a few weeks.  At this point, the new plant may  be  lifted,  severed  from  the  parent  plant  (usually  leaving  about  a  15  to  25  cm  “handle”) and either moved to a new location or potted up to grow on.  The new plant  consists of a terminal bud, a mass of adventitious roots and the “handle”.  New plants  require  some  special  attention  while  they  adjust  to  independence  from  the  parent  plant – the compost or soil should be moist (but not wet) and they should be given  protection  from  the  extremes  of  both  temperature  and  light.    For  those  layers  produced with weak root systems, some over­winter protection may be desirable (for  example, being grown in the protected environment of a cold frame).  In a commercial setting, stock plants are spaced about 3.5 metres apart.  The mother  plants  are  cut  back  to  20  cm  when  planted.    The  resulting  new  growth  is  trimmed  back (when a “rat­tail” phase occurs) to encourage even more shoots (each of which  is a potential tip layer.  After harvesting of the new plants, the stock plant is cut back  to  about  20  cm  to  initiate  new  shoots  to  be  used  the  next  season.    Using  this  technique, a stock plant may be productive for about 10 years. 
branch of  parent plant  shape of trench  new plant in 3 ­ 4  months 

side towards  parent plant

soil level 

Figure 69  Tip Layers 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

116 

Simple Layering  Simple  layering  is  often  practiced  to  produce  new  plants  from  a  wide  range  of  shrubs (particularly those that produce multiple shoot systems such as Corylus) and  some  prostrate  herbaceous  perennials  (for  example,  border  carnations  Dianthus  cultivars).  This  form  of  layering  is  often  considered  to  be  the  most  common  form  of  layering.  Vigorous,  one  year  old  shoots  should  be  encouraged  to  develop  near  to  the  soil’s  surface – this may be the result of such practices as coppicing or other hard pruning  activities.  Like tip layering, the stems of the shrubs (or herbaceous perennials) are bent down  to the soil and pinned down into a shallow trench.  The steps involved are:  1.  at the location where the shoot will touch the ground, dig a trench about 10  to 15 cm deep  2.  trim away the leaves from the shoot that occur between about 10 to 40 cm  behind the shoot tip  3.  bend the shoot and pin it down into the bottom of the trench – ensuring that  the top of the shoot will be well above ground (perhaps 8cm or so above the  surface when the trench is refilled)  4.  fill the trench, and firm and water the soil  5.  keep the soil moist but not saturated  Although  the described  technique uses a  trench and  either  wire  staples or  wooden  pegs  to  pin  down  the  shoot,  another technique  pins  the  shoot to the  top of the  soil  with a weight (like a brick).  Unlike  tip  layering,  in  simple  layering  the  shoot  tip  is  led  up  as  near  to  vertical  as  possible.  After bending, the shoot is covered but leaving the tip of the shoot exposed  above the soil’s surface. 

Figure 70  Simple Layering  In simple layering, the end portion of the shoot should have a sharp bend about 15 to  22  cm  back from  the  tip.    This acute  angle  created  is  often  sufficient  to encourage  root formation.  However,  sometimes  other  treatments  are  performed  at  this  bend  to  encourage  rooting – these include:  1.  Removal of a ring of bark at the lowest end.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

117 

2.  Cutting inward and upward to form a projecting tongue.  3.  Binding copper wire around the stem to form a constriction point.  4.  Cut and twist to girdle stem. 

Figure 71  Cutting to Form a Tongue  Both the bending of the stem and these wounding techniques may help encourage  root  formation  by  restricting  the  flow  of  sugars  and  hormones,  created  at  the  leaf  (through  photosynthesis),  back  down  the  stem  to  the  rest  of  the  parent  plant.    In  many  cases,  these  wounding  techniques  are  not  necessary,  and  may  provide  an  entry point for diseases.  Dormant,  one­year­old  shoots  are  best  (at  this  time,  these  shoots  should  still  be  flexible  enough  to be bent and  manipulated  successfully).  Suckers produced  near  the crown root more readily.  Whenever possible, anticipate the need for growth near  the  surface  of  the  soil  and  prune  back  a  low  branch  so  that  young  shoots  will  be  produced in the desired location.  Ideally, the soil around the parent plant should be well drained (with the addition of  some  grit)  but  with  good  water­holding  properties  (through  the  addition  of  organic  matter,  for  example  peat  or  well­rotted  garden  compost  or  coir).    These  two  amendments  would  ensure  that  the  rooting  area  has  both  good  moisture  retention  and good aeration – both essential for the growth and development of roots.  In late winter or early spring, as soon as the soil may be worked, the process may be  started.  For subjects like Rhododendron and Magnolia, it is best to use the growth  later in the growing season when it becomes more pliable.  Perennials may be layered in the spring, just before new growth begins, or may be  layered  in  autumn  after  new  growth  has  ended  for  the  year.    Non­flowering  shoots  should  be  used.    Perennial  herbs  (like  trailing  forms  of  Rosemary,  Rosmarinus  officinalis and thyme, Thymus sp.) may also be propagated by layering.  With  spring  layering,  rooting  may  well  be  enough  advanced  for  severing  the  new  plant from the parent plant during the autumn.  Shortly after the new plant is severed  from the parent (often about three to four weeks later), the shoot tip may be removed  to encourage more growth of the roots.  If sufficient root has developed at this time,  then it may be lifted at this point – either to be potted up or to transplant into a new  location.    Those  plants  without  sufficient  root  in  the  autumn  may  be  lifted  in  the  following spring or autumn, once additional roots have formed successfully.  Usually  evergreen  plants  should  be  potted  and  kept  humid  and  cool  for  several  weeks.    Deciduous  species  can  be  planted  in  nursery  rows.    Although  some  defoliation may occur, recovery in spring usually occurs.  Commercial  operations  that  maintain  stock  plants  should  locate  them  far  enough

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

118 

apart  so  all  shoots  can  be  layered  (completely  encircling  the  parent  plant).    The  longevity of stock beds, if adequately maintained, is around 15 years.  Serpentine or Compound Layering  Serpentine layering is nothing more than a series of simple layers being produced  using the same stem.  It is an especially useful technique for propagating plants that  produce  long  shoots  in  a  single  year.    Many  vines  are  examples  where  serpentine  layering is a suitable propagation technique – including Wisteria, Vitis, and Clematis.  The advantage of serpentine layering is it permits several new plants (or layers) to be  produced from a single shoot.  This technique is suited to a home gardener with ample space to permit the trailing of  long shoots over the soil’s surface.  Serpentine layering is not used commercially.  The steps are simple:  1.  A long growth is pegged down to the soil and the stem is arched behind the  bud.  2.  The  shoot  is  alternately  exposed  and  covered  along  its  length.    Each  exposed part should have as a minimum one bud and each buried section will  form adventitious roots.  The buried portions may be wounded prior to being  pegged  and  then  covered  in  soil.    Rooting  hormone  may  be  applied  to  the  wounded areas to encourage root formation.  3.  The  soil  must  be  kept  moist  to  encourage  root formation.    Energy from  the  parent plant is used to assist in the formation of the roots.  4.  After  root formation has occurred  (usually  by  autumn of the  same  year),  cut  the shoot into sections – each with a rooted portion and a shoot portion and  grow on just as those produced by simple layering. 
shoot tip site of future  shoot 

one plant 

Figure 72  Serpentine Layering 

one plant 

Stooling or Mound Layering  Stooling or mound layering is a technique used by commercial growers.  It is used  particularly for the production of rootstocks for the use in grafting.  The principle exploited by this technique is the production of roots from stems as a  result of etioliation and blanching (the elimination of light from the growing shoot –  please  see  earlier  in  this  lesson for an  explanation of etioliation  as  it applies  to  the  development of adventitious roots).  This technique uses stock plants.  A stock bed is carefully prepared of loose, fertile 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

119 

soil.  Healthy stock plants are selected and set into this bed.  These stock plants are  permitted to grow for about a year – establishing an adequate root system.  Spacing  in  the  bed  is  critical  because  soil  between  plants  may  be  used  to  create  mounds  over the plants (although sometimes additional soil is brought into the bed to achieve  this).  Individual plants growing in containers can be also be stooled.  Stool beds are  productive for up to 15 years.  In late winter or early spring, the plants are severely pruned back (to about 2½ to 5  cm above the soil level) and, as a result, produce many strong coppice shoots.  The  new shoots are permitted to develop to about 10 cm and then are covered with moist  soil  (or  other  light  substrate,  like  coir,  sawdust  or  a  combination  of  soil  with  these  ingredients) to about half their height.  This operation continues throughout the first  half of the growing season – as the growth continues, so does periodic mounding  so that half of the new shoot is above the soil and half below the soil’s surface.  This  process stops in midsummer (at this time, the shoots have been covered in about 15  to 20 cm of soil).  During the remainder of the summer, adventitious roots form at the base of the new  shoots.  At the end of the season, the rooted shoots may be cut away from the parent  plant  and  potted  on.    At  this  time,  the  parent  plant  may  be  discarded  or  used  to  produce  new  stools  next  year.    The  new  shoots  will  be  grown  on  in  precisely  the  same  way  as  those  produced  by  other  layering  techniques  –  receiving  adequate  moisture and some protection from extremes of the weather. 
the additional soil is  carefully removed to  reveal the rooted  shoots which may be  severed at the base  of the shoot and  potted on or lined  out (planted in rows)  in a nursery bed

layers of soil are  mounded up over  the stock plant  during the growing  season  soil levels at  different times  of the growing  season 

original soil level  roots develop at the base  of the new shoots 

Figure 73  Mound Layering  In  the  home  garden,  this  technique  may  be  used  to  propagate  quinces  (Chaenomeles cultivars),  Smoke  bush,  Cotinus  coggygria and some herbs are also  propagated  this  way  –  including  lavender,  Lavandula  spp.,  and  sage,  Salvia  officinalis. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

120 

Air Layering  Air  layering  is  also  called  Pot  layerage,  Chinese  layering,  Circumposition,  Marcottage  and  Gootee.  This  technique  is  one  of  the  oldest  forms  of  vegetative  propagation  still  used  today.    However,  today  this  technique  is  not  used  very  frequently.  When it is not possible to bring the stem to ground level, air layering is one method  that may be used.  It can be a useful technique when only small numbers of plants  are required and where the special care required by this technique may be managed.  It is a method that is most appropriate for humid environments but if appropriate care  is taken, it can also be successful in drier climates.  This system is often used for sub­tropical trees and shrubs (for example, some house  plants)  but  is  also  a  valuable  method  for  the  propagation  of  smooth  barked  Rhododendrons.  Some plants that are commonly propagated by air layering include  mango,  Ficus  spp.,  Citrus  and  avocado.    Other  plants  propagated  by  air  layering  include: Ilex, Syringa, Azalea and Magnolia but these are best left for two seasons to  ensure adequate root formation.  The basic steps involved are:  1.  Select a suitable shoot – remove any leaves from this shoot that occur about  15 to 30 cm behind the tip.  Carry  out  air  layering  in  spring  with  previous  seasons'  shoots,  especially  those with just a few leaves developed.  2.  At the point where rooting is desired wound the stem – at the site about 15 to  30 cm behind the shoot tip.  This may be done by girdling – by removing a strip of bark 1 to 2½ cm wide  around the stem.  Or slit at an upward angle – usually a cut about 5cm long is  made  and  kept  apart  through  the  use  of  a  small  wedge,  like  a  wooden  matchstick or by inserting moistened sphagnum moss.  3.  Dust the point of injury with a rooting medium – this is particularly necessary  when dealing with difficult to root plants (for example Rhododendron).  4.  Prepare some handfuls of sphagnum moss by moistening and knead it into  a ball shape, then stretch it into a shape that will cup around the stem.  5.  Place this moistened (but not wet) sphagnum around the wound in the stem  and  hold  this  in  place  with  a  square  sheet  of  black  polythene  (about  25  cm  square) – secure with tape.  The  polythene  must  have  a  high  permeability  to  gases  including  carbon  dioxide  and  oxygen.    It  should  also  have  low  transmission  of  water  vapour  and be long lasting.  Place 'fold' on lower side.  The polythene should be sealed by tying firmly with  insulating  tape.    Ingress  of  water  must  be  prevented;  otherwise  fungal  rots  may occur.  Support the layered shoot with a cane or other shoot.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

121 

Although rooting can be viewed through the transparent film, light entering the  sphagnum may deter rooting of the shoot.  I may be necessary to renew the  polythene after 2 to 3 months.  6.  If any growth occurs on the shoot being rooted, trim it back at the end of the  dormant period.  Eventually, when rooting has occurred successful, it is time  to remove the shoot from the parent plant.  It is best to leave the shoot on the  parent plant until the dormant period.  Cut below the point of layering, remove  the polythene, loosen the sphagnum, and pot up using a potting compost.  It  is  usually  best  to  grow  these  new  plants  under  humid  conditions  for  2  to  3  weeks. 
leaf stalk 

polythene wrapping 

sphagnum  moss  within the wrapping stem 

Figure 74  Air Layering of Scindapsus aureus 

For you to find out …  1.  When would you divide herbaceous peonies (Paeonia spp.)?  2.  How would you propagate Ginkgo biloba?  3.  How are named cultivars of lilac (Syringa spp.) propagated? 

Check your answer at the end of this section. 

Plant Division  Plant  division  is  the  technique  of  separating  one  plant  into  many  smaller  plants  –  each of which has its own root and shoot system.  Many plants are easily divided  because their natural growth pattern is to produce a mass of shoots (forming what is  called a crown) – each with its own root system.  Not  all  plants  may  be  propagated  by  division.    For  example,  many  tap­rooted  perennials  (for  example,  lupines,  Lupinus  spp.)  are  not  suitable  for  propagation  by  division. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

122 

However, many herbaceous perennials may be propagated by division – and in the  home garden, this is a fairly simple method of increasing the number of plants.  Most  commercial  operations  do  not  routinely  use  this  method  because  the  number  of  plants produced from each parent plant is relatively small.  Usually  herbaceous  plants  are  divided  when  they  are  not  actively  growing  –  this  reduces the stress on the new divisions (since they may not have an adequate root  system  to  support  growth  or  a  large  amount  of  foliage  at  this  time).    In  general,  spring­flowering  herbaceous  perennials  are  divided  in  the  late  summer  or  autumn  while summer or autumn flowering perennials are divided in the spring.  Special care must be taken when dividing evergreen perennials (such as Liriope and  Carex).    The  leaf  area  must  be  trimmed  to  reduce  moisture  losses  through  transpiration because the initial root system may not be large enough to support the  leaf area.  The  key  to  producing  viable  divisions  is  to  ensure  that  there  is  more  root  to  each  section than shoot.  Following  division,  the  new  plant  will  require  a  period  of  adjustment  –  to  repair  damaged roots and re­establish shoots.  During this time, the plant may require some  protection  from  intense  light  (that  is,  some  shade)  and  additional  water  may  be  beneficial in assisting the new division to establish itself.  There are a few different methods used to divide plants:  1.  The separation of offsets is a technique of division used for: · · · the removal of offsets of bulbs, removal of pseudobulbs, removal of small plantlets that develop at the base of parent plants 

2.  Herbaceous  perennials  with fibrous  root  systems  may  be  dug up  and either  pulled  apart  or  cut  apart.    Herbaceous  perennials  with  fleshy  roots  (for  example,  Hosta and  Helleborus)  may  require a  little  more attention  but  may  still be propagated by division of the parent plant crown.  3.  Some woody shrubs and small trees (for example Aesculus parviflora, Kerria  japonica)  produce  clumps  of  growth  from  suckers  produced  below  the  soil  from the parent plant.  With care, these may be severed from the parent plant  and removed to make new plants.  4.  Many  bulbs,  rhizomes  or  tuberous  roots  may  be  separated  –  each  piece  producing a new plant.  Iris, Bergenia and Dahlia are examples of the plants  that may be propagated this way.  Division of Offsets  Many  plants  produce  offsets,  including  many  herbaceous  perennials  (for  example,  Sempervivums  and  auriculas,  Primula  auricula)  and  some  semi­woody  perennials  (for  example  Yucca  filamentosa).    An  offset  is  a  small  plantlet  or  side  shoot  that  develops from the parent’s main root.  When ready to be separated from the parent  plant, they have already developed their own root and shoot system.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

123 

Case Study of Offset Division: Primula auricula  Primula  auricula  produce  offsets  throughout  the  growing  season.    Some  cultivars  start  producing  these  offsets  starting  in  the  first  or  second  year  of  independent  growth  (that  is,  from  the  time  they  were  removed  from  their  parent  plant).    Some  cultivars produce many offsets, but others produce perhaps only 2 or 3 per year.  The  separation  of  offsets  of  auriculas  is  performed  in  early  to  mid­summer  (this  is  after the plants have flowered) – these pictures were taken in mid­July.  Offsets taken  at this time may be ready for sale, in a commercial operation, from October onwards.  This parent plant has four offsets (only 2 are clearly visible in this photograph). 

parent plant  offsets

Figure 75  Parent Auricula With Offsets  The steps taken to remove these offsets include:  1.  knock  the  plant  out  of  the  pot,  or  carefully  dig  up  the  parent  plant  from  the  garden  bed  –  try  to  avoid  damaging  the  root  system  as  much  as  possible  (choose a day when the soil is lightly moist but not wet to do this)  2.  shake the compost or soil from the root system  3.  separate or remove the offsets – trying to preserve the root system as much  as possible 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

124 

offsets  1  4  2  3

parent plant 

Figure 76  Separated Offsets and Parent Plant  4.  pot  the  offsets  and  parent  plant  into  a  gritty  compost  (a  multi­purpose  compost with added washed grit, in the ratio of 2 parts compost to 1 part grit,  is usually ideal) 

2  3 

Figure 77  Potted­up Offset  These  pots  have  been  given  a  mulch  of  washed  grit  –  this  preserves  soil  moisture,  prevent  the  growth  of  weeds  (that  may  result  in  undesirable  competition  for  the  young  plant)  and  is  aesthetically  pleasing  (sometimes  a  valuable selling­point).  In this case, a controlled release fertiliser (Osmocote Plus) was incorporated  into the compost before potting up.  This fertiliser was included because these  offsets  are  being  grown  by  a  commercial  operation  and  it  is  essential  that  these  plants  grow  quickly  to  reach  saleable  size.    A  home  gardener  may  choose  to  add  a  controlled  release  fertiliser,  may  choose  to  water  with  a  fertiliser solution later as the offset grows or may, instead, choose to select a  compost with a higher nutrient composition – particularly phosphorus which is  essential for development of root systems.  Offsets need not be potted up into containers.  They may be relocated directly  into a garden bed or may be placed into a nursery bed to grow on. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

125 

In all cases, it is essential that the offsets be watered in (to settle the compost  or  soil  around  the  roots).    These  new  plants  must  be  kept  moist  (not  wet)  initially while the root system adjusts to its new, independent status.  5.  place  the  newly  potted  offset  into  a  cool,  shaded  location  (a  shaded  greenhouse is one option). 

This  greenhouse  has  been  shaded  with 50% shade cloth.

Figure 78  Growing on Auriculas  Ensure  that  the  offsets  receive  adequate  moisture,  nutrients,  and  may grow  free from the competition of weeds and pests or diseases.  Ensure light levels  are  lower  than  that  of  the  parent  plant  initially  –  gradually,  the  offsets  may  tolerate  greater  light  intensities  and  may  endure  more  environmental  stresses.  In the case of offsets being grown on directly in garden beds or nursery beds,  some  protection  from  weather  extremes  is  desirable.    For  example,  some  shade will reduce the light intensity that these young plants are subjected to  and less exposure to drying winds.  A temporary lath structure or shade­cloth  suspended  over  the  plants  (in  a  tunnel  arrangement  perhaps)  may  be  two  alternatives.  The key is to avoid stressing the newly independent plants.  Excess light and  heat  will  mean  that  the  leaves  will  transpire  rapidly  –  this  leads  to  a  loss  of  moisture  that  the  small  root  system  may  not  be  able  to  supply.    The  result  may be temporary wilting of the offset – although the plant will recover from  this  wilt,  the  time  spent  wilted  is  time  the  plant  cannot  photosynthesise  to  produce the food to fuel new root and shoot growth.  In periods of cold, additional protection may be required – this may come in  the form of a cold frame or the use of cloches or horticultural fleece.  Offsets,  with  their  reduced  root  system,  need  to  be  kept  moist  during  the  growing  season.    Protection  from  the  competition  of  weeds  is  essential  if  the  offset  plants  are  to  produce  maximum  amounts  of  food,  by  photosynthesis,  for  growth. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

126 

If growing the offsets in containers, these may require some protection from  temperature extremes – wintering in cold frames and sinking the pots into the  soil  to  prevent  overheating  during  the  summer.    Especially  tender  divisions  may require a heated greenhouse for overwintering.  Division of Crowns  Many  herbaceous  perennials,  as  a  consequence  of  their  natural  growth  patterns,  produce  crowns  of  short  or  buds  –  each  with  an  independent,  functioning  root  system.  Examples include Lily­of­the Valley, Hosta, chrysanthemum and aster.  Plants  that  produce  fibrous  root  systems  are  the  ones  most  easily  propagated  by  division.    The  parent  plants  are  lifted,  damaged  and  dead  portions  are  removed,  surplus  soil  is  removed,  and  the  remaining  crown  is  washed  (this  permits  the  gardener to view where the best locations for divisions naturally occur).  Only wash  roots if this is essential as the recovery of the plant may be hindered by the loss of  many of the fine roots.  Some plants are suited to being separated by hand (the roots and shoots are loosely  intertwined),  some  require  the  use  of  knives  or  border  forks  or  even  machetes  to  divide.  After  cutting,  the  cut  areas  may  be  dusted  with  a  fungicide  to  prevent  the  entry  of  diseases into the exposed areas of the root.  The most important point is that each section must have an adequate root system to  support the top growth.  Each division must contain at least one shoot or bud and  that  adequate  roots  support  each piece.   Stronger  divisions  produce plants  that  re­  establish fastest.  Weaker divisions may require some additional care and protection  to ensure that the division survives.  The  time  of  dividing  varies.    The  goal  is  to  divide  the  plant’s  crown  just  as  active  shoot growth commences – this will permit the vigorous portions to be identified.  For  some  spring­flowering  species,  this  time  may  be  immediately  after  flowering  has  finished.  For some summer and autumn flowering species, this may be in late winter  or early spring – just as new growth commences.  The  divisions  must  be  potted  up  or  planted  in  the  garden  beds  quickly  after  the  division has occurred.  This will result in the least amount of drying to the exposed,  tender  roots.    Once  offsets  have  been  planted,  they  must  be  watered  in  to  ensure  adequate contact between the compost or soil and the roots.  If a division includes a  tall stem, this should be cut back to reduce the amount of moisture that will be lost by  the new  plant.    The  after  care  of  these  divisions  is  identical  to  that  of the  divisions  produced from offsets.  Division of Suckers  Some shrubs are particularly good at producing suckers – these are plants that arise  from  below  the  ground  that  originate  from  the  roots  or  underground  stems  of  the  parent plant.  In these situations, some of the suckers may be removed and planted  up  to  grow  as  independent  plants.    This  is  another  form  of  plant  propagation  by  division.  This method is suitable for the propagation of Kerria japonica.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

127 

This method is not always suitable for the propagation of grafted plants – propagation  of suckers from grafted plants will propagate the root stock plant.  Although this operation may be carried out at any time of the year, the ideal time is  usually during the dormant season or when the plant is not actively growing.  Early  spring  is  often  the  best  time  because  the  soil  is  moist,  air  temperatures  are  cool  (resulting  in  lower  stresses  on  the  newly  separated  division),  but  soil  temperatures  are  beginning  to  warm.    Suckers  that  have  developed  into  a  small  clump  of  stems  may be removed from the parent plant.  The steps involved are:  1.  Locate an underground stem that has suckers growing on it.  2.  Carefully  dig  and  lift  it  –  avoid  disturbing  the  parent  plant  as  much  as  possible.  3.  Confirm  that  the  sucker  has  some fibrous  roots  at  the  base  of  the  sucker  –  without these roots, the removal of the sucker would not be division (it would  be a cutting).  If fibrous roots are absent, the sucker may be returned to the  soil, firmed in and let grow on until the roots form.  4.  Cut  the  suckering  stem  using  a  sharp  pair  of  secateurs  –  make  the  cut  as  close to the parent plant as possible.  5.  Replace the soil around the parent plant and firm it in.  6.  Cut off the portion of the underground stem between the parent plant and the  fibrous  roots  below  the  sucker  and  decided  if  the  sucker  may  be  divided  further into more plants (each new plant must have its own fibrous roots and a  shoot).  7.  Plant  up  the  divisions  –  in  a  nursery  bed,  in  the  location  where  they  are  to  grow (this is an option for very vigorous suckers), or pot them up for growing  on.  Water in the division.  8.  If  the  sucker  is  long, trim  it  back  (the goal  is  to ensure  that  there  is  enough  root  to  support  the  shoot  –  when  in  doubt,  trim  back  the  shoot  to  avoid  stressing the cutting).  The after  care for  these  types of divisions  is the  same as  that described  earlier for  offsets.  Division of Bulbs, Rhizomes and Tuberous Roots  The term “offset” is also used to refer to the bulbs produced within the parent bulb’s  outer covering (or tunic).  This is a natural way that many bulbs reproduce.  Bulbous plants are usually best divided once they are dormant (after flowering has  completed, and the foliage has naturally died back).  When bulbs are evergreen, the  best time to divide is immediately after flowering.  Offsets  are  attached  to  the  basal  plate  (the  origin  of  the  bulb  root  system)  –  sometimes  the  offsets  are  to  the  side  of  the  parent  bulb  (for  example  Daffodils,  Narcissus  spp.)  or  below  the  parent  bulb  (for  example,  Tulips,  Tulipa  spp.).    The  basic steps are:  1.  Carefully dig the parent bulb and clean off the soil (avoid damaging the bulb  and offsets as much as possible).  2.  Detach  the  offsets  –  this  is  often  easily  done  by  hand,  but  occasionally  a  sharp knife may be used. 128 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

3.  Dust the cut surfaces of the parent bulb with a fungicide to protect it from rot  4.  Replant the parent bulb – at the original depth it was growing.  5.  Larger  offsets  might  be  capable  of  flowering  the  next  year,  and  may  be  planted directly into the garden bed.  6.  Smaller  offsets  may  need  to  be  grown  on  before  they  reach  flowering  size.  This may be accomplished in a nursery bed, or in pots.  They may require two  years of growth  before  they  are  large enough to  flower and  may  be  planted  into the garden beds for display.  Rhizomes are propagated by division.  Usually the optimum time is usually just after  flowering has finished.  In the case of bearded iris (Iris germanica), regular division  not  only  results  in  the  propagation  of  new  plants,  but  is  also  essential  to  prevent  overcrowding and to maintain flowering.  The basics are the same as for division of  crowns – the plant is carefully dug up (usually a garden fork is used to limit damaging  of the root) and the soil is shaken off.  At this point, the rhizome may be broken into  new sections (each with a piece of healthy rhizome, a small fan of leaves, and some  fibrous roots).  Cut sections of the rhizome may be dusted with a fungicide.  Finally,  the foliage should be trimmed to about 15cm high – this reduces stress on the newly  independent plant and reduces the chance that wind may shift the rhizome division in  the soil.  Finally, the new division is replanted.  Usually a slight ridge is formed in the  soil with shallow trenches on either side.  The rhizome is placed on this ridge with the  fibrous roots being directed into the two trenches.  The soil should cover the fibrous  roots and leave the upper surface of the rhizome exposed to the sun.  Watering in is  essential.   All  other  after  care  is  identical  to that already outlined for  offsets earlier.  Plants  that  develop  rhizomes  useful  for  propagation  include  Arum  lily,  canna,  asparagus and the weed, ground elder.  Tuberous roots of  Dahlia are also frequently propagated by division.  In this case,  division  occurs  in  early  spring,  just  before  new  growth  commences.    If  the  Dahlia  roots are  left  in  the ground over­winter,  they  must  be  carefully dug.   If  Dahlia roots  are stored over­winter, then they must be removed from storage.  Each division must  contain: · a healthy, dormant bud – often these buds (or “eyes”) are near the old stem,  and appear as small pink bumps in the upper surface of the tuber, · a healthy tuber.  Sometimes  it  is  best  to  wait  to  perform  the  division  of  Dahlia  tubers  until  the  buds  commence  growth,  but  only  slightly.    Then  these  more  obvious  buds  may  be  the  clues  to  where  successful  divisions  may  occur.    Once  the  locations  of  the  division  cuts  are  identified,  a  sharp  knife  is  essential  to  separating  the  divisions  from  each  other.   After division,  the  cut  areas  may be  dusted  with fungicide.   At  this  time,  the  division may be replanted.  Follow on care is comparable to that of already described  for offsets. 

piece of Bergenia rhizome  about 3.5 cm long

Figure 79  Segment of Bergenia Rhizome That Will be Used to Generate a New  Plant 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

129 

Activity  Choose three or four plants with which you are familiar.  In your Journal, note how you  would  go  about  propagating  these.    Be  as  detailed  and  specific  as  you  can,  doing  further reading if necessary.  Include diagrams to illustrate your chosen technique.  If you have access to any specimens, in your garden for example, make plans to try out  at least one of these techniques.  Note suitable dates in your Diary. 

Budding and Grafting  This is the union of two plants.  It is popular with nurserymen as a technique to produce  uniform batches of plants, which are difficult to root as cuttings.  In the next section, the  details of budding and grafting will be explored. 

Answers to Self Check Questions on page 111  How  would  you  propagate  perennial  Phlox  to  obtain  a  stock  free  from  eelworm?  Perennial  phlox  is  propagated  by  root  cuttings.    These  can  be  cut  into  lengths of 3­5cm in winter, laid flat in a container in a frame, and covered  with 7­10cm of soil or 'pea grit'. 

From page 122, were you able to find out that …?  1.  Herbaceous peonies  (Paeonia  spp.)  are  divided  in  late September  or  early October.  2.  Ginkgo biloba is propagated by seed or cuttings.  3.  Named  cultivars  of  lilac  (Syringa  spp.)  are  propagated  by  cuttings  or  budding  on  to  common  lilac  (Syringa  vulgaris)  or  privet  (either  Ligustrum  ovalifolium,  California  Privet,  or  L.  amurense,  Amur  privet)  but this is less satisfactory because of suckers.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

130 

5  BUDDING AND GRAFTING 
By  the  end  of  this  section,  you  will  understand  the  use  of  budding and grafting for the propagation of plans: · Define the terms budding and grafting. · State  the  reasons  for  use  of  budding  and  grafting  for  the production of particular plants. 

Introduction  Put simply, grafting is the unification of two plants.  It is another form of vegetative  propagation but this one involves pieces from two (or mode) different plants that are  joined to form a new plant.  Grafting  techniques  are  used  frequently  in  commercial  production.    In  a  home  garden,  it  is  used  less  frequently  but  still  has  a  role  to  play  for  experienced  or  adventurous  gardeners.    Although  home  gardeners  may  not  perform  grafting  themselves,  they  may  purchase  plants  that  were  produced  by  grafting  techniques  and these may require some special treatment to ensure the plant remains vigorous  over time.  Shoots that form above the graft union have the characteristics of the scion.  Shoots  that form below the graft union have the characteristics of the rootstock.  It is more common for two portions to be joined together.  However there are times  when  three  or  even  more  can  be  used.    A  third  plant  added  between  two  others  becomes the trunk or a portion of it and is termed an interstock.  Multiple grafts may  produce an apple tree with several cultivars.  Scion  The name of the portion that develops into the top portion of the plant is called the  scion.    The  scion  is  usually  chosen  for  some  quality  –  examples  include  fruiting  characteristics  (taste,  disease  resistance, quantity,  size)  in  the  case of fruit­bearing  trees or flowering characteristics (amount of flower and size and colour) in the case  of ornamental trees or shrubs.  Stock or Rootstock  The name of the portion that contributes the root portion of the new plant is called the  stock or rootstock (or sometimes, understock).  A particular rootstock may be used for a number of reasons but the particular scion  species and  cultivar  will govern primarily  the choice.   A carefully  selected  rootstock  can  provide  well­anchored  root  systems,  toleration  to  soil­borne  diseases  and  adaptability to certain soil conditions.  It can also modify the growth and vigour of the  scion,  alter  the  habit  and  size  of  the  plant  and  by  modifying  the  vegetative  /  floral  balance of the scion it can promote both flower and fruit production.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

131 

Seedling  rootstocks  can  be  advantageous  in  that  they  are easy  to  produce,  do  not  generally carry viruses and the root system may be stronger.  However there can be  considerable variation in seedling rootstocks, which can lead to variability in growth.  To avoid this, careful selection is required.  Grafting and Budding  There are many different type of grafting.  Usually the general term “grafting” applies  to those situations where a portion of a stem of one plant (the scion) is attached to a  second  portion  of  a  plant  that  has  a  developed  root  (the  stock  or  rootstock).  Normally, a graft involves a length of scion wood (often of 30 cm long with perhaps  6 or more buds). 

This  pear  tree  is  the  result  of  a  graft  –  note  the swollen graft union.

Figure 80  Example of a Graft  “Budding” is name given to a special form of grafting where the scion consists of a  bud only.  This technique of using only a single bud is sometimes used when only a  small  amount  of  scion  material  is  available  to  produce  a  larger  number  of  plants.  Budding is commonly used for the production of roses and many woody plants.  Why Graft and Bud?  There are four main reasons for grafting and budding:  1.  Grafting is used as an alternative method to reproduce cultivars that do not root  readily  from  cuttings  or  other  vegetative  means.    If  vegetative  reproduction  is  essential to avoid the variability of seed­grown plants, and the production of new  plants using cuttings is not viable, then grafting may be the only method suitable  for creating new plants.  Some situations include: · Fruit trees: apple, pear, plum, peach, cherry 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

132 

· · ·

Roses Speciality conifers – Abies, Picea Speciality oaks, beech, sycamore and wisteria, and sometimes clematis. 

This list used to be much longer because grafting was the only commercially viable  method of producing the desired numbers of plants of many species that were not  produced from seed and where cuttings were very difficult to root.  However, as mist  and  fog  techniques  have  been  developed,  this  has  reduced  some  of  the  propagation  problems  associated  with  some  plants.    For  example,  Clematis  and  Rhododendron  are  now  more  commonly  grown  from  cuttings  in  a  commercial  setting.  An additional advantage is that grafting may produce a mature plant in a shorter  time.  In some cases, plants cannot be produced quickly from cutting or seed.  In  commercial  operations,  these  plants  may  be  produced  more  economically  through the grafting of desirable scion material onto compatible stock tissue.  In  breeding  programmes,  the  speed  of  producing  mature  plants  may  also  be  essential – in some situations grafting may help this process.  However, these are  issues for the commercial grower, not the home gardener.  2.  Grafting also permits the qualities of two or more separate plants to be combined  into one plant.  Grafting  may  allow  the  benefits  of  special  rootstocks  to  be  used.    For  example,  an  apple  cultivar  with  a  superior  fruit  that  grows  into  an  extremely  large  tree  may  not  be  suitable  for  growing  in  an  orchard  or  in  a  garden.    In  this  case,  a  scion  from  this  apple  cultivar  may  be  grafted  onto  a  “dwarfing”  rootstock.    The  result  will  be  a  manageable  sized  tree  that  still  produces the high­quality fruit desired.  Grafting  may  be  the  only  method  available  to  produce  these desirable plants. 

the graft union

Figure 81  A Grafted Apple Tree  The table below lists rootstocks used by the nursery trade.  It is being included for  ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450  133

Apple 

information purposes only and does not require memorisation for the RHS Level  2 examination.  East Malling ­ various rootstocks for the control of vigour  Merton  Malling  ­  for  controlling  vigour  and  resistance  to  woolly  aphis  (EM  rootstock X Northern Spy)  e.g. M9 dwarf, M7, M106 semi dwarf M111 vigorous.  Quince A and C for controlling vigour.  Seedling  pear  occasionally  used  especially  for  standards  but  some  are  incompatible.  Myrobalan B, St. Julian, Pixy (dwarf)  Brompton, St. Julian A  Most of the old rootstocks have been superseded by Colt  Canina seedlings, Rosa rugosa, R. dumetorum 'Laxa'  A. palmatum seedlings for cultivars of A. palmatum and A. japonica.  Cultivars on to R. ponticum or R. decorum. Cultivars on members of the same  species. 

Pear 

Plum  Peach  Cherry  Rose  Acer  Rhododendron 

The qualities that the root stock may contribute include: · dwarfing,  as  described  above  (for  example,  M27  is  the  most  dwarfing  rootstock), · disease  resistance  (for  example    cherries  where  colt  and  cob  rootstock  are  resistant to bacterial canker), · tolerance  of  soil  conditions  (for  example,  roses  used  in  greenhouse  production  of  cutflowers  often  are  budded  onto  rootstocks  that  tolerate  dry,  shallow soils).  Sometimes  grafting  is  used  to  produce  fruit  trees  with  scions  from  different  cultivars.    Normally  fruit  trees  benefit  from  being  grown  with  nearby  trees  of  different  cultivars  so  that  cross­pollination  may  occur.    When  space  is  tight,  a  single tree may perform the work of multiple trees if multiple cultivars are grafted  onto  a  single  rootstock.    In  this  case  the  flowers  from  one  cultivar  may  cross­  pollinate the flowers from another – all within one plant.  3.  Grafting may be used to change the cultivar of established plants  Again, this is a situation for the commercial grower.  If established, healthy plants  produce  fruit  that  is  no  longer  in  demand,  the  cultivar  may  be  changed  by  a  process  of  grafting  called  “topworking”.    This  procedure  permits  the  plants  to  reach maturity faster than if the existing plants were removed and replaced with  new plants of the desired cultivar.  4.  Repairing damaged trees  In  some  cases,  trees  with  damaged  bark  (from  vandalism,  poor  cultivation  practices or animal injury) may be repaired through the use of some specialised  grafting techniques, including: · · For arching with additional rootstocks. Bridge  grafts  to  help  when  sheep  or  rabbits  have  eaten  away  the  bark  tissue and girdled the tree.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

134 

The Limitations of Grafting and Budding  Only plants  that  are closely  related  can  be grafted.    The  stock  and  scion  must be  compatible.  Dicotyledons  lend  themselves  to  grafting  because  of  the  continuous  cambium  and  related tissue.  However monocotyledons have a scattered arrangement of vascular  bundles  and  little  or  no  secondary  thickening  –  this  makes  the  alignment  of  the  vascular tissues in the stock and scion very difficult although there are cases where  successful grafting of monocotyledonous plants occurs.  Incompatible grafts may not form a union, or the union may be weak.  A poor union  results in plants that grow poorly, break off or eventually die.  The  compatibility  of  plants  has  been  determined  through  many  years  of  trial.    The  closer the plants are related, the greater chance the graft will be successful. · Most  varieties  and  cultivars  of  a  particular  fruit  or  flowering  species  are  interchangeable and can be grafted. Plants  of  the  same  botanical  genus  and  species  can  usually  be  grafted  even  though they are a different variety. Plants within the same genus but of a different species may often be grafted, but  the result may be weak or short­lived, or they may not unite at all. Plants of different genera within the same family are less successfully grafted,  although there are some cases where this is possible. Plants of different families usually cannot be grafted successfully. 

·

·

·

·

Some plants are just not good candidates for grafting.  The plants that graft well are  those  that  produce  a  substance  (which  is  sometimes  referred  to  as  'wound  gum')  that forms a seal on exposed xylem vessels.  Plants that do not produce this ‘wound  gum’ are more difficult to graft.  Plant  health  plays  a  role  in  determining  if  a  graft  may  be  successful.    All  material  used in budding and grafting should be free from pests, diseases and viruses.  Virus  infected  material  is  known  to  reduce  the  percentage  of  successful  grafts.    Fungal  infections  of  the  wounds  made  during  the  grafting  process  can  be  frequent  unless  adequate precautions are taken.  It is sometimes believed that two plants can be made into a genetically different plant  by the process of grafting.  However, there is no basis for this idea.  Although there  are  cases  where a  different type  of  shoot  develops from  the graft  union,  this  is  the  result of a chimera, a type of mutation.  This is not a true intermingling of the genetic  structure of two different plants as occurs in seed­produced hybrids.  Graft Incompatibility  When the two pieces of the graft do not form a successful vascular connection, this is

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

135 

called graft incompatibility.  The stock and scion do not unite.  If the union is compatible then the point of join should be as mechanically strong as  the  tissue  above  and  below.    This  may  be  caused  by  a  breakdown  in  the  phloem  tissue  If the union is failing, then the following symptoms may appear: · Corky tissue appear between the scion and rootstock · The scion deteriorates showing yellowing foliage and die­back. · Irregular swellings may appear at the point of the graft union. · The graft union may break – often with a sharp, distinct break between the scion  and stock tissues. · The vigour of one part of the union (either the stock or the scion) is much different  than that of the other.  For example, the rootstock may form a number of suckers  (below the graft union) while the scion languishes. 

Figure 82  A Compatible Graft Union with Different Growth Rates  There are many reasons why the graft fails – some of these are: · the stock and scion were not compatible · the cambium of the two tissues were not meeting adequately or had shifted  following tying so that the cambium tissues were not in contact · the  tissues  of  the  scion  or  stock  were  in  poor  condition  (for  example,  the  scion had been permitted to dry out), or were infected with diseases · grafting was done at the wrong time of the year · the graft was permitted to dry out · the scion had been in active growth at the time the graft was attempted and  the  stock  was  not  able  to  provide  adequate  nutrition  to  the  scion  tissue  to  support this growth  Tools and Materials  Grafting  and  budding  require  a  number  of  specialised  tools.  Some  of  the  more  frequently used tools include: · Knife  A  good­quality  knife,  able  to  hold  a  sharp  straight  edge,  is  the  key  to  good  grafting.  Although special grafting and budding knives are desirable, almost any  good pocketknife can be used.  A budding knife has special “spatula” that helps

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

136 

during the lifting of the bark of the rootstock. 
general purpose  grafting knife – note  the straight blade 

budding knife – note the  “spatula” on the top edge  that helps lift the bark flap

Figure 83  Budding and Grafting Knives · Grafting Wax  Grafting wax was commonly used to seal the graft union to prevent the entry of  pests and diseases and to prevent the tissue from drying out.  The use of waxes  has reduced as the use of transparent polythene grafting tape has become more  popular.  There are two main types of grafting wax:  o  A  hand  wax  is  most  commonly used for home grafting.  It  is  softened by  the heat of the hand and can be easily applied.  o  Heated  waxes  are  for  commercial  use  and  may  be  brushed  on,  but  the  temperature must not be too high. Excessive heat will damage the tender  cambial tissue. · Grafting Tape, Budding Strips and Patches  Grafting tape serves two purposes:  o  It  can  be  used  to  ensure  that  the  two  pieces  of  the  graft  are  immobile  –  enabling the callus tissue to successfully grow together.  o  It can be used in place of waxes to prevent the entry of pests and diseases  into the exposed tissue of the graft and it can prevent moisture loss through  these tissues.  Traditionally this was a special tape with a cloth backing that decomposes before  girdling  can  occur.    Polythene  tapes  are  now  more  commonplace  although  in  some situations they must be cut and removed before girdling can occur.  Tapes may be used for binding grafts where there is not enough natural pressure.  lectrical  and  masking  tapes  are  also  used.    Masking  tape  may  also  be  suitable  where little pressure is required, as in the whip graft.  Budding strips are elastic bands.  A budding strip looks like a wide rubber band  that has been cut open so that it is no longer a loop.  Budding strips are used to secure the union between the stock and scion (make  sure  that  the  scion piece  does  not  move).    Although  they  are  used for  budding  (where the scion is small), they are also used in other types of grafts with small  stocks and scions. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

137 

Budding  patches  are  rubber  patches  that  are  tied  around  the  bud  after  it  has  been inserted into the rootstock.  These patches have the advantage of applying  pressure evenly around the bud to assist in the union of the bud to the rootstock  and they gradually deteriorate and fall away (preventing any girdling).  Formation of the Graft Union  How Graft Unions Form  The formation of a graft union is based on the natural wound healing activities of both  the  scion  and  stock.    Because  the  scion  tissue  is  fresh  (it  must  be  newly  cut),  it  is  capable of meristematic activity when it is placed in close contact with the newly cut  tissue of the stock.  If the conditions (i.e. temperature and humidity) are conducive,  then  the exposed  cells  will  become  active.    The formation of  a graft  union  involves  the following 4 basic steps:  1.  In the first stage both the stock and scion will produce separate callus tissues  (parenchyma cells) in the region of the cambium tissues.  2.  These callus tissues will intermingle and join.  3.  This  is followed by  the  differentiation  of  certain  of  the parenchyma  cells of  the  callus  to  form  new  cambium  (cells  which  act  like  a  bridge  and  connect  the old cambium cells with the new).  4.  The  final  stage  is  the  production  of  new  vascular  tissue  by  the  new  cambium, which will then permit the passage of water and nutrients between  the stock and the scion.  5.  Later,  when  the  cambium  has  made  a  good  bridge  of  callus  tissue,  new  lignified xylem cells will be produced.  The long wood fibres, the vessels and  tracheids will strengthen the graft union. 
callus  cambium  phloem  Close­up  of  the  callus  forming  between the scion and stock  intermingled parenchyma  (callus) 

xylem 

pith 

STOCK  SCION 

xylem of  callus  tissue 

Cross  section  through  a  successful  graft  –  the  smaller  scion  on  the  left  hand  side  and  the  Figure 84  larger  stock  on  the  right  hand  side.

cambium  of callus  tissue 

Graft Union 
phloem of callus  tissue 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

138 

How T­Budding Unions Form  Budding involves a slightly different process:  1.  The  bud  piece  (scion)  consists  of  the  epidermis,  cork  layer,  cortex,  phloem  cambium and sometimes some xylem tissue of a dormant bud.  This piece of  tissue is laid against the exposed xylem and cambium of the stock.  2.  T­budding is only done when the stock plant is actively growing (so the bark  “slips”  as  a  result of  the new  cells  being formed  within  the  cambium  layer).  The bark is lifted so that the bud may be slipped in between the phloem layer  and the xylem layer of the stock.  3.  After  the bud  shield  is  inserted,  a  necrotic  plate of  material  is  released from  the  cut  cells,  and  shortly  after  the  budding  process  callus  starts  to  develop  and break through this plate.  4.  The  callus  mainly  comes  from  the  rootstock  (the  bud  does  not  have  the  resources to permit a large number of callus cells to grow from its tissues).  5.  Once  a  continual  layer  of  callus  is  made between  the  stock and  scion  it  will  start to lignify. This process is completed after about 12 weeks.  Essential Conditions For Successful Graft Unions  There are some important points to note about the formation of a graft union:  1.  It  is  essential  that  the  cambial tissue  of the  stock  and  the  cambial  tissue of  the  scion be in intimate contact.  2.  Air  moisture  around  the  graft  must  be  kept  at  a  high  level  so  that  the  tissues  remains hydrated.  3.  The  graft or bud  must be  covered  immediately after the  join has  been  made  so  that  no  pathogens  may  enter  the  vulnerable  tissue.    This  is  done  either  by  waxing or tying with polythene strips.  Traditionally, raffia is used to tie the stock and scion together (this is to ensure that  the intimate contact between the cambial tissues remains intact) and wax is brushed  over the entire graft to seal in the moisture and to seal out pathogens.  Environmental  conditions  following  the  grafting  process  can  influence  the  development  of  callus  tissue.    For  example,  on  apple  trees  the  growth  of  callus  is  o  o  small below 0  C and above 40  C.  Subjects that are bench grafted (grafted indoors or  under  cover  at  a  bench)  often exhibit  increased  callus formation  if  they are  kept  at  high temperatures for a short time, but if the callus is allowed to develop slowly then  o  a temperature of 8 to 10  C is best.  Humidity is an important factor as the cell walls of the parenchyma cells which form  the  callus  are  thin  and  therefore  subject  to  water  stress.    Turgidity  of  the  cells  will  affect  the  formation  of  callus  cells,  which  is  why  stock  plants  should  be  in  a  well  watered condition before grafting and scion material should be freshly cut.  Oxygen is also necessary for a successful graft union as the rapidly proliferating cells  are  respiring.    It  is  thought  now  that  waxing  can  restrict  air  movement,  and  plants  such as grapes are left uncovered by some growers during the formation of callus.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

139 

Grafting Techniques  This  section  will  provide  a  brief  introduction  to  some  of  the  techniques  involved  in  grafting.  There are many techniques, each with advantages and disadvantages that  lead to situations where these different techniques are most suitable.  It is the goal of  this section to introduce some common grafting and budding techniques and not to  identify all possible techniques.  With dormant scion wood one can do whip and tongue grafts.  This is very useful as  a follow up from budding.  For the nursery rows say 100 rootstocks were budded in  July  and only 70 took for  whatever  reason.    In  the period  Dec to  the  end of  March  (and even April if the scion material is still dormant) it is possible to whip and tongue  graft the failures.  This could result in a much better percentage take growing out in  their first nursery year.  Whip and Tongue Graft  Whip and tongue grafts are commonly used in the grafting of many fruit trees and  some ornamental trees  (Malus  and Prunus  cultivars).    It  is  most  commonly done  in  the  field  (as  opposed  to  bench  grafting  that  is  done  under  cover  in  an  easily  controlled environment).  In whip and tongue grafting, the ideal is to have the scion  and rootstock wood of the same diameter (this helps in aligning the cambium of the  two pieces).  The basic steps involved are:  1.  Collect the scion wood  In mid­winter, select healthy, vigorous cuttings from the scion tree.  This wood  should be from the previous season’s growth.  The cuttings should be about 20 to 25 cm in length – the centre of the shoot is  used (not the tip or the base of the shoot).  Each cutting should have 4 good  buds, the lowest of which should be about 2 cm from the end.  If the graft is not to be made immediately, then bundles of these cuttings may  be placed in a well­drained bed (leaving the top 5 to 9 cm each cutting above  the soil level).  This is necessary to keep the cuttings moist but dormant.  2.  Prepare the rootstock plant  Just before bud break occurs in the spring, trim the rootstock plant.  First, all  side growths near the base are removed.  Then the top of the rootstock plant  is cut leaving about 15 to 20 cm above the ground.  Make a sloping upward cut  ­­ beginning between 4 and 5 cm below the top.  Remove a tapering, wedge­shaped piece from one side.  A second cut is then made vertically downward on the cut surface, beginning  at a point 1/3 of the distance from the top.  This second cut should be about  1/2 the length of the first cut and not just split along the grain of the wood (this  is  the  tongue).    A  common  fault  is  to  begin  the  first  cut  too  near  the  top,  leaving too short a slope for tying.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

140 

Figure 85  Preparing the Rootstock  3.  Lift  the  scion  wood.    Working  the  bottom  of  the  scion  wood,  choose  a  bud  about 3  to 40  cm from  the  base and  make a  cut  on  the  reverse  side  of  the  cutting  to  this  bud.    Then  make  a  second  cut  to  match  that  made  on  the  rootstock cut. 

after the first angle  cut is made, make  the second cut

the view from the  side  note presence of  bottom bud 

Figure 86  Scion Preparations  4.  Insert the scion  The scion and stock are fitted together with the tongues interlocking.  This is  often done by slipping the scion wood over the stock wood in order that the  two slices open slightly – permitting the tongues to fit together.  It  is  extremely  important  that  the  cambial  layers  match  at  least  along  one  side, but preferably along both sides.  5.  Secure the scion and stock  Bind  the  scion  and  stock  together  securely.    This  may  be  done  using  raffia  (that  has  been  moistened  to  make  it  most  flexible)  –  this  is  the  traditional  approach.    The  alternative  is  to  use  grafting  tape  –  a  thin,  transparent  polythene  tape  that  make  be  wrapped  securely  around  the  union  (this  also  helps reduce moisture loss through the wounds and the invasion of pests and  disease organisms).  If using raffia, applying wax will help protect the graft from moisture loss and  from pests and diseases that may enter. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

141 

slide the scion  against the stock –  pressing gently  and carefully to  open the tongues  longer cuts make  the wrap more  secure 

waterproof  wrap    tightly  to  prevent  moisture  loss  and  to  prevent  the movement of the  stock and scion

Figure 87  Joining Stock and Scion Wood  6.  After care of the graft  Remove any growths that appear on the stock (these divert the flow of water  and  nutrition  from  the  new  scion  wood).    Once  the  graft  has  formed  a  successful union, cut and remove the ties that held the pieces together (if not  removed,  these  may  girdle  the  new  growth).    Usually  a  stake  should  be  placed in position to support the graft and union because until a firm union is  formed, there is a danger that the scion may be blown or knocked out.  There  are  some  refinements  of  this  basic  technique  –  designed  to  increase  the  healing of the graft union.  For example, a special notch called the “church window” is  sometimes made to assist in the healing of the stock.  These will not be outlined in  this course.  This method is particularly useful for grafting relatively small material, 6 ­ 12 mm in  diameter.    It  can  be  a  highly  successful  method  if  properly  done,  as  there  is  considerable cambial contact.  It heals quickly and makes a strong union.  Budding  Budding  is  a  special  grafting  technique  in  which  the  scion  piece  is  reduced  to  a  single  bud.    It  is  also  called  bud  grafting.    This  grafting  technique  makes  efficient  use of cultivar material because a single cutting of scion wood (often called the bud  stick)  usually  contains  many buds – each of  which has  the potential of  becoming a  new plant using this technique.  There  are  two  main  types  of  budding  –  T­budding  (or  shield  budding)  and  chip  budding.    This  lesson  will  only  describe  T­budding.    T­budding  is  a  common  technique used for Roses and Apples and is sometimes considered the most suitable  form of budding.   Chip budding enthusiasts would probably disagree,  There  is  one  constraint  with  T­budding  and  that  is  the  rootstock  plant  must  be  actively  growing  when  the  budding  activity  takes  place.    T­budding  relies  on  the  new cell growth in the cambium that permits the cambium layer to be split apart (so  that the bark (and phloem layer) may be lifted away from the xylem wood.  When the  bark  easily  slips,  then  the  rootstock  plant  is  in  the  right  condition  to  receive  bud  grafts.  Chip budding does not require that the bark “slips” and so may be performed  when the rootstock is dormant. 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

142 

T­budding  is  usually  performed  in  the  between  the  spring  and  autumn.    For  roses,  mid­summer  is  the  best  time.    July  and  August  are  the  best  months  for  Pyrus  and  Prunus  spp.    Whenever  possible,  budding  should  be  done  during  dull,  showery  weather – this reduces the stress that the scion bud undergoes  The basic steps for T­budding roses are:  1.  collect the scion wood  When T­budding roses, the scion sticks are usually taken when the stems have  started to flower, and the wood has started to ripen.  Vigorous shoots should be  selected from the desired cultivar.  The  soft  tip  growth  should  be  removed  as  well  as  leaves  from  every  node.  When  removing  the  leaves,  cut  the  petiole  about  ½  cm  from  the  stem  (this  leaves this stub of a petiole to act as a “handle” for the bud shield).  These scion sticks must be kept cool and moist by wrapping in moist paper and  keeping them in a cool place.  Do not stand them in water because this might  lead to the base of the bud stick rotting.  2.  prepare the rootstock  Rootstock plants should be established.  Rootstock plants may be purchased in  the winter and then planted in early spring.  When preparing to T­bud, remove the soil from around the stem of the rootstock  plant (it should be actively growing).  Gently clean off the bark with a soft cloth.  Find a spot where the bark is smooth.  Make  a  “T”  shaped  cut  into  the  bark,  about  2  to  3  cm  below  the  top  growth.  Some prefer to make the horizontal part of the “T” first – this cut should be about  ½ cm.   Then the vertical part of the “T” should be about the same  length and  meet up with the centre of the horizontal part.  The cuts should be deep enough to cut through the bark, but not so deep that  they cut deeply into the wood. 

the horizontal  and vertical cuts  into the  rootstock 

the cuts after the  bark has been  lifted slightly

Figure 88  The "T" Cut on the Rootstock  3.  prepare the bud (or bud shield) 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

143 

First remove the thorns from the bud stick – snap them off.  Then insert the knife  about ½ cm below a dormant bud (with stub of leaf stalk).  Cut down and then  scoop  under  the  bud –  leaving  a  “tail”  at  the  top  of  the  bud.    This  is  the  bud  shield. 
the bud before  removal – note the  stub from the  removed leaf  the  start  of  the  cut  beneath the bud 

the bud being removed  from the scion  or bud  stick 

the bud shield after  removal – this is the back  of the bud showing the  bark and bud initial 

Figure 89 The Bud Shield  At this point, some people remove the wood from inside the bud carefully so that  the contents of the bud are also not removed – leaving the green bark.  Some  people do not do this step and leave the sliver of wood inside the bud piece.  4.  insert the bud into the T­cut  Carefully lift the flaps of the bark on the rootstock (this may be done using the  “spatula” part of the budding knife).  Using the tail of the bud, carefully slide the  bud  into  the  flap  of  the  “T”  on  the  rootstock  plant.    Make  sure  that  the  bud  is  pointing in the right direction (that is, not upside down).  The stub of the leaf may  be used to help position the bud within the “T”.  Trim off the top of the bud tail  above the “T”. 

the  T  flap  in  the  rootstock  –  before  tying

the inserted bud  shield—including the  stub of the old leaf and  the dormant bud 

Figure 90  Insert Bud in the Rootstock  5.  secure the bud within the “T”  The bud may be secured through the use of special rubber grafting patches (the  rubber  square  is  positioned  over  the  bud  and  it  is  pinned  together  behind  the  144 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

stem).  Budding strips may be used to hold the bud in place and hold the flaps  down.  Budding tape may also be used to do the same function.  6.  grow on  The bud and “T” cut will heal over the next few weeks.  The bud should remain  alive but dormant until the next growing season.  The rootstock plant should be  watered  and  fed  for  the  remainder  of  the  season  to  ensure  healthy  growth  occurs.  The tie may need to be released to avoid growth constriction.  During  the  winter  in  harsher  climates,  the  rootstock  is  often  earthed­up  (to  provide  some  protection  to  the  new  bud).    When  earthed­up,  this  should  be  uncovered in the early spring.  When still dormant, the rootstock should be cut  off just above the new, dormant bud.  During the growing season, it is often wise to partly prune back the new shoot  that results from the inserted bud.  This will help establish a bushy shrub.  Another important type of budding is chip budding which is very useful for fruit trees.  Bench grafting is a term which is really about the location for the work.  So while it is  usual for roses and fruit trees to be budded in the field, it can be much more common  that, for example, conifers would be grafted with a type of inverted graft where the short  leafy piece of scion is inserted into the side of the stock plant – into a cut which enables  the slim thinly sliced bottom scion (c. 30mm of the scion) cut on both sides to marry up  with the meristematic tissues (or the rootstock).  Care of Grafted Plants  When a graft has formed successfully, the next step to consider is whether this graft  union should be located above the soil or below ground.  In harsher climates, it is often advisable to position a plant so that the graft union is  below  ground.    This  provides  an  additional  measure  of  protection  to  the  graft  to  protect it from cold temperatures.  In milder climates, graft unions are frequently left  above  the  soil  level  because  the  need  for  additional  winter  protection  is  not  necessary.  However,  there  are  exceptions  to  this  general  rule.    If  the  rootstock  is  providing  certain characteristics to the plant then the graft union should be located above the  soil level.  If, for example, an apple tree consists of a vigorous cultivar for the scion  wood and  a  dwarfing  rootstock,  then  the  rootstock’s  influence  on  the  growth  of  the  scion is important.  If the scion portion is permitted to form its own roots, the value of  the  rootstock  would  be  lost.    That  is,  the  vigorous  cultivar  would form  its  own  roots  and  would  grow  to  the  normal  size  –  this  defeats  the  purpose  of  grafting  onto  the  dwarfing rootstock.  In some cases, for example Paeonia suffruticosa (tree peony) are difficult to root from  cuttings  and  seed  propagation  does  not  lead  to  the  production  of  plants  with  the  desired flower colour and form.  As a result, they are frequently grafted onto the roots  of  P.  lactiflora  (the  herbaceous  garden  peony).    However,  the  ideal  situation  is  to  grow a plant on its own roots.  In this case this graft union is frequently placed below  the soil level so that gradually the P. suffruticosa portion will develop its own roots to  supplement that of the P. lactiflora root.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

145 

6  SAFE, HEALTHY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE  PRACTICES 
Health and Safety  There are a number of situations in the propagation of plants where health and safety  issues are present.  Knives  are  frequently  used  to  prepare  chip  seeds,  prepare  cuttings,  and  during  grafting.  At all times, it is essential that the gardener use the knife with proper care to  prevent injury.  Knives must be kept in a safe location so that children may not have  access to them.  Machetes  and  garden  forks  are  also  used  to  divide  plants.    Again,  the  gardener  should use them with care – using suitable personal protective equipment like steel  toed  boots  or  shoes.    Machetes  must  be  stored  in  a  safe  location  to  prevent  them  being used by inexperienced people.  When digging, gardeners are advised to wear strong footwear, and while digging, to  use the large muscles of the legs (not the back) to lift.  Make sure you are warmed up  sufficiently before starting to dig.  Some seed treatments require extra care. · If  pre­treating  seeds  with  acid,  ensure  appropriate  safety  precautions  are  used.  Use acid only in a well­ventilated location.  Store and dispose of acid  carefully and in an environmentally responsible way. Boiling  water  may  present  a  hazard  for  scalding  and  burning  of  the  skin.  Care  must  be  exercised  when  using  boiling  water  –  particularly  around  children. Some  seeds  have  been  coated  with  fungicide  or  pesticide  treatments.  After  handling  these  seeds,  make  sure  you  wash  your  hands  (particularly  before eating, drinking or smoking). Many seeds are poisonous.  Make sure that they are kept out of the reach  of children. 

·

·

·

The handling of rooting hormones also requires some special care.  Do not breathe  in the dust (in commercial operations, where exposure to these chemicals is frequent  and prolonged, respirators are often used).  Carefully close the containers after use,  store them out of the reach of children, and wash your hands.  If dipping cuttings in fungicides, again, be careful about how these dusts and liquids  are used.  Store them out of the reach of children, carefully seal containers after use  and wash your hands.  Misting  systems  present  a  different  hazard.    In  a  small  greenhouse,  a  misting  system may lead to slippery walkways.  Be careful that these walkways do not grow  algae – making another risk for slipping.  When handling all growing composts, amendments and fertilisers, avoid breathing  in  the  dust  and  wash  your  hands  before  eating,  drinking  or  smoking.    Store  all  fertilisers out of the reach of children.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

146 

All  of  these  precautions  are  common  sense.    Whenever  possible,  try  to  anticipate  how  something  may  cause  an  injury  and  take  precautions  to  prevent  this  from  occurring.  Environmentally Sustainable Practices  There are some instances where the activities of the plant propagator might have an  adverse effect on a healthy environment.  Pesticides  and  fungicides  should  be  used  sparingly.    The  gardener  should  pay  close  attention  to  the  adverse  effects  they  may  cause  in  the  environment  and  balance this against the benefits they may provide.  Many compost mixtures may contain peat, and there are some questions about the  sustainability  of  the  harvesting  of  peat.    This  is  covered  in  more  detail  in  lesson  7.  However, if you are concerned about the use of peat, then investigate the peat­less  alternatives available.  Seed  sources  are  also  another  place  where  the  plant  propagator  may  have  an  adverse effect on the environment.  Native plants and the seed from them should not  be  taken  from  the  wild.    It  is  possible  to  purchase  seed  of  native  plants  from  reputable seed houses and to propagate them in the garden.  Do not purchase wild­  collected  seed  from  questionable  sources.    Do  not  purchase  bulbs  and  tubers  that  may have been collected from the wild.  Finally, plants may escape from the garden and cause damage to the environment  ­  ­ the most well known of these plants may be Japanese Knotweed (Fallopia japonica,  previously  Polygonum  cuspidatum).    Gardeners  whose  property  adjoins  native  woodlands must be particularly sensitive about what plants they choose to include in  their gardens and what plants they choose to propagate.  Some  wild  plant  societies  may  require  enthusiastic  gardeners  to  help  in  the  propagation of wild flowers.  These plants may be used to reclaim areas where the  native  population  has  been  eliminated  or  depleted.    If  you  are  interested  in  plant  propagation  and  have  the  interest  to  help  re­establish  wild  populations  of  native  plants,  this  might  be  an  area  where  you  could  have  a  positive  influence  on  the  environment.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

147 

DEVELOPMENT OF A PROJECT FOLDER 
Whether you are a professional looking to improve your skills at a higher level, or a  keen amateur, undertaking a project can be a rewarding and enjoyable experience.  ‘Why should I consider undertaking a project?’ · Working  on  a project of  your  own  will  give  you the  opportunity  to  do further  research into an area which particularly interests you. This  work,  done  alongside  the  course,  will  involve  you  in  reading  and  research which will help to consolidate and underpin your course work. The  skills  you  gain  while  researching  and  writing  up  your  Project  are  transferable:  they  will  stand  you  in  good  stead  both  as  you  prepare  for  the  RHS examination (if you are working towards it) and for work you may do in  the  future  ­  both  study­wise  and  professionally.    Communication  skills,  the  ability  to  organise  your  thoughts,  presentation  skills,  research  and  reading  skills, report writing and so on are the object of training courses in many fields  today. You will have a well­presented piece of work of which you may be proud.  It  could be added to a professional portfolio and may even form the focus for a  rewarding discussion at interviews.  We will return to this in a moment. 

·

·

·

Of  these  reasons,  it  is  perhaps  the  first  which  is  the  most  important.    Here  is  an  opportunity for you to focus on an area which particularly interests  you, and ­ if you  so wish ­ to have your tutor’s help and advice on it.  ‘Must I undertake a project?’  No,  it  is  entirely optional.   While  it  would  benefit  you,  it  is  not  a  requirement of  the  course or of the RHS examination.  ‘I like the idea of project work, but feel daunted by the prospect.’  The two keys to all successful project work are confidence and planning.  Your  confidence  in  your  own  abilities  will  be  growing  as  you  progress  through  the  Lessons and receive back your tutor’s comments on your work.  You  can  build  your  confidence  further  by  approaching  the  Project  in  stages.    You  need  not  start  work  on  the  main  Project  straight  away.    Have  a  look  at  the  stages  proposed overleaf:

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

148 

Step One:  A Diary  If  you  haven’t  done  so  already,  begin  a  Diary  in  which  to  record  your  gardening  experiences.  Do this over a period of four months or so, staying in regular contact  with your tutor and submitting your Diary to him/her for comment at regular intervals.  An  A4  sized  hard­backed  lined  book  (with  generous  8mm  line  spacings)  would  do  well. This would be durable, and photographs and press cuttings may be stuck in.  It  is easy enough to add some tabs for the months.  Use plenty of space.  The books themselves are cheap enough to afford a couple a  year  if  necessary.    Try  to  record  the  details  of  operations  undertaken,  machines  used,  plant  varieties,  the  time  it  took  to  achieve  the  pieces  of  work,  rates  of  application, sizes of cuttings and all the treatments.  Enough detail, in fact, to be able  to replicate much of the activity in another year and in another place if need be.  Step Two:  A mini­project  This could start at maybe your third review of the diary work.  The contact between  you, the tutor and the diary topic material will be working well, we hope.  The mini­  project could be aimed to take a total of about 30 hours ­ no more ­ say over 6 to 8  weeks.  The short but completed document would be sent to your tutor for his or her  assessment  and  report.    Hopefully  this  would  have  ironed  out  many  of  the  early  weaknesses which may have shown up;  for example, inaccuracy of description, or  failing to give references adequately.  Step Three:  The Project  Your Project will involve you in between 100 and 200 study hours (between 11 and  22 full days).  The best time to begin the Project would be after your tutor’s guidance on your mini­  project.  You will now need to:  1.  Agree a topic with your tutor  By now you will have been mulling over some ideas, but if you need further  help, do talk through your ideas with your tutor, or the College.  We are here  to help.  Take note of your gut feelings:  “Oh, I’d hate to work on that but I’m  interested in irrigation.”  These feelings are the ones to look out for because  work resulting from them is more likely to be progressive and purposeful.  2.  Plan your Project  You will not succeed in project writing unless you plan your work.  Planning at  the  early  stages  saves  time  and  wasted  effort.    It  helps  to  focus  your  thoughts. You are less likely to be side­tracked while researching and writing  up your work if you are following a plan.  So,  a)  Decide your topic.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

149 

b) 

Frame a title.  Here you will need to ask yourself:  Is my title focused enough?    Avoid broad, general themes.  Is the scope of my enquiry realistic?   Limit yourself to what you can  realistically  achieve  in  100­200  hours  of  work.    Check  that  you  have  access to the necessary resources. 

c) 

Write some Aims or Objectives for your Project, along the lines:  In this Project, I aim to show that:  ­  ­  ­  Or  My objectives in undertaking this Project are:  ­  ­  ­  While researching and writing, it will be a great help if you keep these  Aims or Objectives before you at all times.  They will help you to keep  your focus and leave out irrelevant material.  If  you later include your  completed Project in a Portfolio, your Aims and Objectives will impress  the reader as to your organisational skills, forward planning skills, and  project­writing techniques. 

d) 

Begin thinking about resources.  Where and when will you have access to these?  Is there anything you  can do now to widen the resources you already have (e.g. by joining a  professional horticultural society and so gain access to a library, or by  joining a local group)? 

e) 

Produce a timetable.  This is crucial.  Map out a prospective timetable, bearing in mind your  other  study  commitments  (including  work  on  the  Lessons  and  Assignments)  and  things  such  as  holidays,  time  off,  family  commitments and so on.  Space your work.  Few people produce their  best  work  under  pressure,  and  in  any  case,  that  is  not  the  point  of  undertaking the Project.  This is something for you to enjoy.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

150 

Technique  Technique is all­important in project writing.  Many people approach projects with the  idea that the object is simply to find out about something and record the findings.  In  fact, the aim is wider than this.  You will need to master the language and vocabulary  of  your  chosen  theme,  adopt a  suitable  written  style,  work  through a  logical  search  and  review  sequence,  and  be  able  to  produce  a  summary  and  conclusion.    Your  mastery  of  this  technique  may  well  be  useful  later  on.    As  we  have  noted,  many  projects  in  work  environments  require  the  ability  to  research  a  topic,  collate  the  material and present it in a manner fit for reference by outside parties ­ perhaps even  publication.  ‘Will I need to pay for my Project to be marked?’  You are very welcome to proceed independently of the College and work privately on  your Project:  there is no charge for work which is not submitted.  However,  if  you  would  like  the  guidance  and  input  available  from  the  College  and  College  tutors,  assuming  that  arrangements  for  the  topic  title  and  submissions  are  completed, the fees proposed are based on a percentage of the current fully paid up  course fee  rates  (see  overleaf).    Applications for  the  project option  may come from  any of the tutored courses.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

151 

4 months’  Diary 

sub­  missions 

MINI  PROJECT 

sub­  missions 

MAJOR  PROJECT 

sub­  missions 

Level 1 

10% 

15% 

25% 

Leisure Gardening 

Level 2 

10% 

20% 

30% 

Organic Gardening  RHS Level 2  RFS Cert. Arbor.  Conservation Studies  Herbs  for  Pleasure  &  Profit  Market Gardening 

Level 3 

15% 

25% 

40% 

Garden Landscape & Design Drawing  Garden Planting & Layout  Intro to Management  Garden Centre  RHS Advanced  RHS Diploma  IoG NID in Turfculture  Beyond the Basics  Garden Landscape Construction  Mixed Farming 

Level 4 

15% 

25% 

50% 

M.Hort. Studies  P.Dip.Arbor. Studies  IoG NDT Studies 

The fees relate to the time that a tutor will be expected to take in reading the work,  reviewing  it and  reporting  back  to  you  with  recommendations.    The  aim  is  that  you  get  the best  advice and  maximum  help  that  we are  able  to  offer  in  support of  your  effort  and  input.    The  prices  include  return  postage  in  the  UK.    Our  worldwide  students would be charged extra at cost.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

152 

A Project Completion Certificate will be issued with an appropriate grading.  The  annual  Prizes  and  Awards  list  may  well  include  project  prizewinners  recommended by the tutors.  If  you  should  decide  to  commence  the  Project  study  programme  at  enrolment  or  during your first course with us the fees are as per the table with the rates quoted to  you.  If  you  decide  to  enrol  after  completing  your  course  then  the  current  rates  would  apply. 

ORGANISING A PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO  Do you seek recognition within the horticultural world as someone with something to  offer?  If so, a portfolio, beautifully presented and containing a selection (or all) of items from  the list below could be invaluable.  The list is not exhaustive:  different individuals will  have different items worth including:  a)  b)  c)  d)  e)  f)  g)  Your qualification certificates / diplomas.  Your written references.  Your curriculum vitae.  School reports if relevant.  Your project folder.  Associated  materials  like  a  well­kept  work  diary,  photographs  of  work  achieved/past work places, etc.  Your memberships of learned societies, RHS, Institute of Horticulture, IPPS,  NFU, etc. 

The usefulness of a Portfolio at interviews  For a moment, imagine that you are an employer seeking staff (or on a smaller scale,  a committee seeking an expert speaker).  A preliminary selection of applicants takes  place based upon a variable set of factors which may include known ability, age and  experience,  the  way  the application has been presented,  references  and telephone  calls made.  The selection by interview may then take place.  What  will  the  interviewer  look  for?  conducting the interview?)  There has to be evidence of:  CAPABILITY  (qualifications are in this sector)  ENTHUSIASM  COMMITMENT  Suppose  that  the  interviewer  has  no  knowledge  of  what  your  qualifications  mean.  He/she  may  never  have  heard  of  the  HCC  and  have  no  idea  what  its  Completion  Certificate at Credit Grade means.  (Even after 70 plus years of advertising, such is  life!)    If  the  candidate  can  present  his/her  Project  Folder  at  this  point  it  may  be 153  (What  would  you  look  for  if  you  were 

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

tangible  evidence  of  his/her  capability,  enthusiasm  and  technical  mastery  of  the  subject.  This could be enough to convince the interviewer that he/she is looking at  ‘just the person for the job’.  Ideally  the  Project  should  include  written  work,  photographs,  records,  references  concerning the theme, all carefully combined to make a neat portable folder such as  a lever arch A4 file.  There you are at the interview:  you look the part ­ keen, anxious to please, healthy,  very well presented, maybe very well dressed for the part, on time and enthusiastic.  But then so are all the others .... or are they?  At  the  interview  you  are able  to produce  your  Project  Folder,  your  work  references  and your qualifications.  This may be all the evidence required, always assuming that  the interviewer is unaware of your capabilities first­hand, or from first­hand telephone  calls  with  someone  who  knows  of  you  and  whose  judgement  is  respected.    Very  frequently the selection will go in favour of the good candidate who is already known.  Better  to  go for  “the devil  you  know”  than for an unknown  quantity,  all  things being  equal.  People are astonishingly different in their background, outlook and motivation.  A bit of known provenance takes a great deal of beating.  Back  to  the  interview:    you  will  have  handed  over  the  file  and  the  interviewer  is  interested enough to ask a question or two.  Will you be floored or could you answer?  There  may  be  superb  work  cribbed  from  elsewhere,  and  it  may  only  take  one  question to unearth this weakness;  so do your own work and quote your references  for the work of others. 

WE HOPE THAT YOUR PROJECT FOLDER WILL BACK UP YOUR HCC COURSE  COMPLETION  CERTIFICATE  ­  A  DISTINCTION  CERTIFICATE  AND  A  DEMONSTRABLY DISTINCTION­LEVEL PROJECT FOLDER.

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

154 

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND FURTHER READING LIST 
181 Propagation from cuttings  182 Propagation from seed  206 Plant Propagation  Auriculas  Container Plant Manual  Growing Media Manual  Hardy Woody Plants from Seeds  Nursery Practice  Nursery Stock Manual  Jim Gardiner  Jim Gardiner  P D A McMillan  Browse  G. Baker & P. Ward  Edmonds J  N Bragg  Philip McMillan  Browse  Aldhous, J R  RHS Wisley handbooks  RHS Wisley handbooks  RHS Wisley handbooks  Batsford  Grower Books 1980  Grower Books  Grower Books  HMSO Forestry  Commission 1972  Grower Books 

Lamb, Kelly &  Bowbrick  Plant Propagation  Philip McMillan  Mitchell Beazly  Browse  Plant Propagation ­ Principles and  Hartmann & Kester  Prentice Hall  Practices  Plant Propagation: Insight,  Oliver N. Menhinick  HCC Publishing  Fundamentals and Techniques  et al.  Practical Woody Plant Propagation  Macdonald B  Batsford 1987  for Nursery Growers  Principles of Horticulture  Adams, Bamford,  Butterworth: Heinmann  Early  Propagation of Hardy Perennials  Bird R  Batsford 1993  The Grafters Handbook  Garner R.J  Cassell  The Hardy Nursery Stock Technical  Lothian and  Belwood Nurseries Ltd.  manual  Edinburgh  Enterprise Limited  The New RHS Dictionary of  RHS  RHS  Gardening  Tree Nurseries  Liebsher, K  BCTV 1984  Seed Germination: Theory and  Deno, Norman C.  Self­published by Dr.  Practice  Deno

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450 

155 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer: Get 4 months of Scribd and The New York Times for just $1.87 per week!

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times