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Technical Editor:

1M Sergey Soloviov

Cover design by:

Kalojan N achev

Translation by: GM

Evgeny Ermenkov

The publishers would like to thank Phil Adams for advice regarding the English translation.

Copyright © Vladimir Barsky 2010

Printed in Bulgaria by "Chess Stars" Ltd. - Sofia 1SBN13: 978-954-8782-79-1

Vladimir Barsky

A Universal Weapon 1.d4 d6

Chess Stars

Bibliography

Opening for White Acc. to Kramnik l.ltJf3 vol. 3 by A.Khalifman, Chess Stars

200l.

"An Explosive Chess Opening Repertoire for Black" by Jorni Yrjola's and Jussi Tella's, Gambit 2001.

"l

...

d6

Universal" by Nigel Davies, DVD-box, 2004.

Other CHES S STARS Books

Repertoire books:

Opening for White Acc. to Kramnik l.ltJf3 by A. Khalifman Volume la: Old Indian, rare lines in the Classical Variation, 2006 Volume lb: The Classical Variation, 2006 Volume 2: Anti-Nim-Ind, Anti-Queen's Indian, English, 2008 Volume 3: Maroczy, English (L.c5), Modern, Dutch Volume 4: Queen's Gambit Accepted, Slav, Semi-Slav

Volume 5: Queen's Gambit Declined Opening for White According to Anand 1.e4 by A. Khalifman Volume 8: The Sicilian, Paulsen-Kan and rare lines, 2006 Volume 9: The Sicilian, Paulsen-Taimanov and other lines, 2007 Volume 10: The Sicilian, Sveshnikov, 2007 Volume 11; The Sicilian, Dragon, 2009 Volume 12: The Sicilian, Rauzer Attack, 2009 Volume 13: The Sicilian, English Attack, 2010

Opening for Black According to Karpov by Khalifman

Current theory and practice series:

An Expert's Guide to the 7.Bc4 Gruenfeld by Sakaev, 2006 The Sharpest Sicilian by Kiril Georgiev and At. Kolev, 2007 The Safest Sicilian by Delchev and Semkov, 2nd rev.ed. 2008 The Queen's Gambit Accepted by Sakaev and Semkov, 3rd. rey. ed., 2008 The Easiest Sicilian by Kolev and Nedev, 2008 The Petrosian System Against the QID by Beliavsky and Mikhalchishin, 2008 Kill KI.D. by Semko Semkov, 2009 The King's Indian. A Complete Black Repertoire by Victor Bologan, 2009

The Scotch Game for White by Vladimir Barsky, 2009 The Modern Philidor Defence by Vladimir Barsky, 2010 The Moscow & Anti-Moscow Variations by Alexey Dreev, 2010 Squeezing the Gambits by Kiril Georgiev, 2010 The French Defence. A Complete Black Repertoire by Nikita Vitiugov, 2010

More details at www.chess-stars.com

Contents

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e5

  • 1 3.dxe5

 

Quick Repertoire

..................

............

.................

...

.......

10

Step by Step ......

12

Complete

Games

...........................

23

  • 2 3.g3j 3.b3j 3.e4j 3.e4 Quick Repertoire .....

................

.........

30

 

Step by

Step .................................

32

Complete

Games

...........................

46

  • 3 3.d5

 

Quick Repertoire

..............................

52

Step by

Step .............

.................

...

54

Complete Games

...........................

71

Quick Repertoire .................. ............ ................. ... ....... 10 Step by Step ...... 12 Complete Games ...........................
 

Quick Repertoire ...............

...............

79

Step

by

Step .................................

81

Complete Games

...........................

96

  • 5 3.lt:lf3

e4 4.lt:lgl; 4.lt:lfd2 Quick Repertoire ......

............

.

...........

107

Step by

Step .................................

110

Complete Games

...........................

117

  • 6 3.lt:lf3 e44.lt:lg5 Quick Repertoire ............... Step by Step

....

...............

.......................

124

126

 

Complete Games

...........................

140

1.d4 d6 2.�f3 i.g4

  • 7 Various wjo 3.tl�bd2, 3.e4 and 3.c4

Quick Repertoire .......

.......................

148

Step

by

Step ............................

.....

151

Complete Games

........

...........

....

159

  • 8 3.lLlbd2

Quick Repertoire .....

......

...................

163

Step

by

Step ...................

..............

166

Complete Games ............

...............

174

  • 9 3.e4

Quick Repertoire ..........

....................

177

Step

by

Step .................................

179

Complete Games

...........................

189

  • 10 3.c4

Quick Repertoire .......

.......................

192

Step by

Step ...............

...............

...

194

Complete Games ...

...........

..........

201

 

1.d4 d6

  • 11 2.c3; 2.J.g5; 2.J.f4; 2.g3

 

Quick Repertoire Step by Step .

.

..............................

...................

............

205

208

Complete Games ...

..................

......

 

221

PREFACE

In this book, in the one volume, I have analyzed two original, and in fact quite distinct, opening schemes: 1.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 and 1.d4 d6 2.ttJf3 J.g4. They are encountered in practice quite frequentIy (there are more than a thousand games with each in the database), but strangely enough the first of these schemes does not have an established official name. The second variation has been referred to by various names - sometimes the Tartakower-Wade system, or the Hodgson variation. Both systems can be characterized by White's first move, Black's re­ sponse, and the somewhat disdainful attitude shown towards them by the chess theoreticians.

  • I believe that it is typical ofboth systems that Black is trying to bring

about a highly concrete struggle, in which the opponent is forced to make important decisions on practically every move. It quickly beco mes clear that White does not have a very wide range of plans that are re­ ally dangerous for Black. You should not infer from this last statement that I have found the "secret of eternal youth", or the panacea that will radically solve the problem of playing with the black pieces in chess.

(Nevertheless, I hope that the book will make this problem easier to

cope with

...).

The fact is that with l.d4 d6 Black "shortens his defensive

perimeter" and reduces White's scope for surprising him with sorne original set-up. In order to try to obtain an advantage in the opening, White has to dig deeper rather than wider. Black should not remain idle however. In four to five of the most principled variations it should be enough for him to set up a solid defensive line and he will have a reliable defence, not only against l.d4, but also against l.ltJf3 and l.c4; for example: l.ltJf3 d6 2.d4 �g4, or l.c4 d6 2.ltJf3 eS 3.d4 e4 etc. That is

why this book has been entitled "A Universal Weapon".

  • I should mention that in this monograph, after l.d4 d6, I have not

dealt with the move 2.e4 - then after 2

...ltJf6

3.ltJc3 eS, we enter the

realm of the contemporary Philidor Defence, to which my previous book was devoted. As an author I should be delighted if you read that book as well, but if the Pirc-Ufimtsev Defence is a part of your open­ ing repertoire then you can manage without the Modern Philidor De­ fence. So, the first six chapters of my book are devoted to the 1.d4 d6

2.c4 e5!? System.

The move 2 . .. eS is really very direct, since Black forces his opponent to

The move 2

. ..

eS is really very direct, since Black forces his opponent

to clarify the situation in the centre immediately. White has numerous possibilities now. He can exchange on eS, advance his centre-pawn, protect it with another pawn or the knight, or ignore altogether the threat of capturing on d4. However, the point is that White has to make

up his mind right at this moment and cannot postpone his decision even for one move. This is very different from the King's Indian De­ fence, for example, where White practically knows in advance Black's first five moves (ttJf6, g6, .ig7, d6, O-O) and the opposing forces might not come into direct conflict for sorne time. It is very interesting to consider how the game develops in the basic theoretical variation 3.iilf3 e4 4.iilg5 f5.

The move 2 . .. eS is really very direct, since Black forces his opponent to

A critical situation has arisen right away. White will try to destroy his opponent's centre and exploit the weakening of his opponent's king, or else Black will manage to fortify his e4-pawn, complete the de­ velopment ofhis pieces and begin playing for a win thanks to his space advantage. There can be no compromise! 1 also want to mention that the endgame after 3.dxeS dxeS 4.\Wxd8+

mxd8 should not be considered as an invitation to a draw. Except for the queens, aIl the pieces are still on the board, and Black has exceIlent chances of seizing the initiative if White plays imprecisely even for a momento In the l.d4 d6 2.tt:lf3 �g4 system (Chapters 7-10), the game gen­ eraIly develops quietly, as a positional struggle, with the emphasis on strategy.

mxd8 should not be considered as an invitation to a draw. Except for the queens, aIl

Black intends to compromise his opponent's pawn-structure and obtain a non-standard po sitio n in which a less experienced opponent might easily go astray and make strategic errors. If White avoids the doubling of his pawns on f3, for example with 3.e4 or 3.ttJbd2, then Black plays in the spirit of the "French Defence Deferred" (with a bish­ op on g4, instead of on c8): e7-e6, :li.e7, advancing later with d6-d5 and, in response to e4-eS, organizing the standard undermining pawn­ breaks c7-c5 and f7-f6. FinaIly, in the eleventh and last chapter of the book, we analyze various possibilities for White on his second move, among them sorne developing moves such as 2.g3 and 2.:li.g5, as weIl as sorne other, some­ what bizarre, possibilities. I have tried to suggest the most resolute and concrete replies for Black against them. I hope that this "universal weapon" wiIl be a valuable addition to your opening repertoire, as it has become for many grandmasters, masters and even ordinary chess enth usiasts. In conclusion, I would like to express my sincere thanks to Intema­ tional Master Maria Fominykh and to the editor of this book Intema­ tional Master Sergey Soloviov, for their great help with this work.

Vladimir Barsky Moscow, December 2010

Chapter l

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5

Quick Repertoire

Chapter l l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 Quick Repertoire We wiIl begin the analysis of this opening

We wiIl begin the analysis of this opening scheme with a the­ matic endgame (or rather a mid­ dlegame without queens), which Black cannot avoid. However, why should he avoid entering a quite comfortable and safe position?

3.dxe5 dxe5 4.fbd8+ �xd8
3.dxe5
dxe5
4.fbd8+
�xd8

It would be useful to com­ pare this endgame with the "Phi­ lidor type", arising after l.e4 d6 2.d4 ttJf6 3.ttJc3 e5 4.dxe5 dxe5 5.�xd8+ �xd8 (see my book - "The Modern Philidor Defence").

Chapter l l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 Quick Repertoire We wiIl begin the analysis of this opening

Black's king has lost castling rights in both cases. However, in the contemporary Philidor Defence White has many more chances of seizing the initiative in the opening. For example, he can play 6.�c4 and he not only devel­ ops his bishop, but simultaneous­ ly attacks his opponent's f7-pawn. Yet even in that opening Black has his chances to hold the balance and graduaIly equalize. The end­ game to which we devote the first part of our book, is much more

7.g3

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.dxeS dxeS 4. Wixd8+ <llxd8

comfortable for him. White's c4- pawn impedes the development of his fl-bishop and the e2-pawn is still on its initial square.

5.tDc3 i.e6

Here Black can also play 5 ... c6, since he can hardly manage without this prophylactic move, with which he restricts the enemy knight on c3 and frees the c7- square for his king. Still, it is psy­ chologicaIly tempting to aUack a pawn as early as on move S!

6.b3 tDd7

7.g3 l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.dxeS dxeS 4. Wixd8+ <llxd8 comfortable for him. White's c4- pawn

White is not playing this move to fiancheUo his bishop on g2. It would do nothing there, restricted by Black's pawn on c6. He wishes to develop it to h3 and exchange the light-squared bishops.

campo White wiIl hardly be able to exploit this however, since the pawn-structure is symmetrical, without obvious defects, and both sides' pieces are practicaIly unde­ veloped. Black is perfectly capable of protecting his weak squares if necessary.

9 ...f6

He is not afraid of ghosts and place s his pawn on f6 immedi­ ately. It is useful to cover the gS-square, restricting the enemy bishop and knight in the process.

10 .i.b2 <llc7

Black does not have any prob­ lems, but his position should not be overestimated. After the over­

optimistic line: 10

...hS

11.f3 h4?!

White plays 12.g4 and Black's pawn on h4 becomes a liability.

11. 0-0-0 tDh6

7.g3 l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.dxeS dxeS 4. Wixd8+ <llxd8 comfortable for him. White's c4- pawn

7

..

c6 8

.ih3 .ixh3 9.tDxh3

Black wiIl need to place a pawn on f6 sooner or later, supporting his central eS-pawn. There wiIl be only dark-squared bishops left

This position was tested dur­ ing the 'SOs and the '90s of last century and the evaluation was that Black's position was perfectly

on the board, so theoreticaIly we

acceptable. 12JM2 i.e7 13.ghdl

can diagnose a potential weak­

gad8

with

an

approximately

ness of the light squares in Black's

equal game.

 

Chapter 1

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5

Step by Step

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 Step by Step 4.Y«xd8+ In several games White avoid­

4.Y«xd8+

In several games White avoid­ ed the exchange of queens and played for instance 4.�c2, but that move was dubious. After the exchange of the d-pawns, he has neither a lead in development nor a space advantage. Black's sim­

plest move seems to be 4

...

lLlc6.

He develops his piece to an ex­ cellent position and is threatening knight-sorties on b4 and d4 with tempo at an opportune momento It would still be too early to say that Black may seize the initiative, but one or two careless moves by White may create serious difficul­ ties for him. See what happened in the following game: 5.lLlf3 �c5 6.a3 a5 7.lLlc3 lLlge7 8.e4 Ot is not

advisable for White to weaken the important d4-outpost. He should play more prudently - 8.e3 O-O 9.lLld2 f5 10.�e2� with mutual chances, although I already prefer

Black's position.) 8

...ig4

9.�e2

O-O 1O.lLld5 hf3 1l.lLlxe7+ �xe7 12.hf3 a4 13.�c3 �d4 14.�c2 :¡Ud8::¡:, with an undoubted advan­ tage for him, Gogollok - Vatter, Oberwinden 2007.

4 ••• �xd8

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 Step by Step 4.Y«xd8+ In several games White avoid­
  • A) 5.g3

  • B) 5.ttJc3

It is rather dubious for White to play 5.f4?! He is trying to ex­ ploit his minimal lead in develop­ ment and disrupts radically his

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4. 'fffxd8+ 'i!ixd8 5.g3 c6

pawn-structure in the process. AH this is hardly worth the effort. 5 ... tLlc6 6.tLlf3 id6 7.cS ixcS 8.fxeS ig4 9.�gS+ 'i!ic8 1O.tLlc3 h6 11.�f4 tLlge7+ Truskavetsky - Matjushin, Dnepropetrovsk 2005. The move S.e4?! does not seem convincing either, since it unnec­ essarily weakens the important d4-outpost. In the following game the English grandmaster Anthony Miles started the occupation of the dark squares immediately: 5 ...

�b4+ (It is also good for Black to

play more prudently S

...c6,

for ex­

ample: 6.tLlc3 tLla6 7.�e3 tLlcS 8.f4 tLlf6 9.fxeS tLlfxe4 1O.tLlxe4 tLlxe4? Aguirretze - Strikovic, Monda­ riz 1994.) 6.�d2 ixd2+ 7.tLlxd2 �e6 8.tLlgf3 f6 9.�e2 tLld7 10.0-0 aS 11.b3 tLle7 12.!l:fd1 tLlc6 13.tLlf1 'i!ic8 (His king runs away from the open file and continues to protect the c7-pawn in the process, in case White plans the manoeuvre tLlf1-e3-dS.) 14.tLle3 tLlcS lS.tLld2 tLld4+ L.Grigorian - Miles, Adela­

ide 1991 (game 1).

White has also tried in prac­ tice the move S.id2. He wishes to develop his dark-squared bishop to the long diagonal, avoiding the move b2-b3, which provides his opponent with a target for the pawn-break aS-a4. However, this plan is too slow and completely harrnless for Black, for example:

S

...�e6

6.e3 tLld7 7.ic3 aS 8.tLlf3

f6 9.�e2 tLlh6 10.0-0 c6 1l.tLlbd2

'i!ic7 12.!l:fd1 tLlf7 13.a3 tLlcS 14.tLle1 ie7+ He has deployed his light

pieces harmoniously and his posi­ tion is already preferable, Fulop -

Gulko, Yucatan 1999. S.tLlf3 f6 6.e3 - This move is too cautious; (after the seemingly more aggressive attempt - 6.e4, the d4-outpost may become a cause of trouble for White in the

future: 6

...�cS

7.a3 aS 8.tLlc3 �e6

9.tLla4 �a7 1O.�d2 tLle7 11.�e2 tLlbc6 12.0-0 tLld4 13.tLlxd4 hd4 14.tLlc3 c6+ Petkova - Rausis, Athens 1993 - game 2; it is bet­

ter for him to play 6.tLlc3 ie6 - see S.tLlc3 �e6 6.tLlf3 f6) 6 ... tLla6 7.�e2. Now Black can be­ gin an immediate diversion on

the

queenside:

7

...tLlb4

!?

8.tLla3

c6 9.0-0 'i!ic7 1O.e4 tLla6 11.ie3 (It was sensible for White to re­ move his knight from a3 in order

to impede Black's attempts to unbalance the position.) 11 ...�g4 12.!l:ac1 ha3!? 13.bxa3 b6 14.cS?! tLlxcS lS.ixcs bxcS 16. !l:xcS tLle7 17.!l:fc1 ixf3 18.�xf3 !l:hd8+ Pena Cabrera - Azmaiparashvili, New York 1997.

A) 5.g3

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4. 'fffxd8+ 'i!ixd8 5.g3 c6 pawn-structure in the process. AH

Chapter 1

The development of White's light-squared bishop to the long diagonal would not bring him any dividends, since Black can coun­ ter this with the immediate move

5

..

c6

building a barrier on this di­ agonal. In general, the move c7 -c6 is an integral part of Black's plan. He must cover the d5-square and ensure the comfortable c7-square for his king.

ttJc5, attacking the b3-pawn. He wiIl then have nothing to com­ plain about. He wiIl place his king's rook on d8 and his knight on f7, after which he wiIl have at least equal chances.

Al) 6.i.g2 a5

After this pawn-advance, Black's rook on a8 and his bishop on f8 wiIl participate actively in the game without having made a single move yet.

7.ttJf3 f6 8.tiJc3

Al) 6.J.g2 A2) 6.J.h3 8 ••• a4
Al) 6.J.g2
A2) 6.J.h3
8 ••• a4

White cannot harm his op­

ponent in any way with the Hne:

6.ttJf3 f6 7.�g2 �e6 (7

...a5

- see

variation Al) 8.b3 cJ;:;c7 9.0-0 ttJd7 1O.�b2, Dukaczewski - Ilic, Belgrade 2010, and here, instead of the overly optimistic move 10 ... g5, Black should complete his de­ velopment according to the stand­

ard scheme: 1O

ttJh6 1l.ttJc3 a5

... 12J:Udl �b4, provoking White to play a2-a3. After this, Black wiIl retreat his bishop to e7 and play

Black is trying to seize the initiative (not without reason,

though

...)

by seizing space on the

queenside, and he plans to attack his opponent's c4-pawn, which cannot easily be protected without the move b2-b3. No doubt White has not done anything wrong yet, so he should not be worse, but it is quite obvious that Black has solved all his opening problems.

9.i.e3 i.e6 10 .tiJd2 i.b4

Black is threatening a4-a3. It is also useful for him to provoke

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4. Wffxd8+ �xd8 5.g3 c6

White into playing a2-a3 and at sorne moment Black can even con­ sider the possibility of doubling his opponent's pawns on c3.

lUkl ¿¿¡d7 12. 0-0

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4. Wffxd8+ �xd8 5.g3 c6 White into playing a2-a3 and
 

¿¿¡e7+±

with

a

double­

edged position, Stierle - V.Geor­ giev, Bad Woerishofen 2003

(game 3).

 

A2)

.th3 !?

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4. Wffxd8+ �xd8 5.g3 c6 White into playing a2-a3 and

This is the idea behind the move g2-g3. In principIe, the ex­ change of the light-squared bish­ ops is favourable for White, since sooner or later Black wiIl have to deploy his central pawns on dark

squares - adding to the pawn on e5 another one on the f6-square. Still, in the words of a popular cartoon film, "We will live through

this

..."

.

6

...

¿¿¡d7

Black can hardly avoid the ex­ change of the light-squared bish­ ops, so he wishes to do this under the most favourable circumstanc­ es, first activating the rest of his pieces.

7.¿¿¡f3

White cannot achieve much with 7.ltlc3 f6 8.f4, since he do es not have sufficient resources to break in the centre and attack the enemy king effectively. For exam­

pIe:

8

...�e7

9.�d2 exf4 1O.gxf4

ltlc5 11. 0-0-0 �e8 12

.txc8 �xc8

. 13.ltlf3 ltlh6 14.�hg1 �f7 15.�e3 �he8� Spacek - Hausner, Prague

1978.

7..

.f6 8.0-0 <Jtc7 9.gdl

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4. Wffxd8+ �xd8 5.g3 c6 White into playing a2-a3 and
  • 9 ...a5

Black ensures the c5-square for his knight. Meanwhile, he is still playing "obligatory" pro­ gramme moves (king on c7, one

Chapter 1

of the knights on c5, the other

one on f5 eyeing the d4-square)

come to a position in which White

wiIl end up with a weak isolated

and his moves do not require any

pawn on e4.

strenuous brain work.

6.e4

10 .ttle3 ttle5 U.heS �xeS 12.b3 ttle7 13.�bl ttlf5� with

mutual chances, Flores - Solak,

Internet 2003.

B) 5.ttle3 i.e6

Chapter 1 of the knights on c5, the other one on f5 eyeing the d4-square) come
Chapter 1 of the knights on c5, the other one on f5 eyeing the d4-square) come

We have already comment­

ed on the con sequen ces of this

move and it aIl applies here as

weIl. There are insufficient tacti­

cal possibilities to compensate

for the gaping hole on d4 and

White should refrain from this

pawn-advance. Still, if he plays

Bl) 6.ttlf3

energeticaIly and precisely, he

B2) 6.b3

can maintain the balance: 6 ...

White can prepare quick

queenside castling, but it is not

so clear how he should folow this

up: 6.e3 c6 7 .id2 (7.ttlf3 f6 - see

.

6.ttlf3 f6 7.e3 c6) 7

...ttld7

8.0-0-0

(8.ttlf3 f6 - see 6.ttlf3 f6 7.e3 c6

8

..id2

ttld7) 8

...�c7

9.f4, Shish­

kov - Neff, Estonia 1996 (White

is obviously trying for too much

out of this position; it would be

better to play 9.tLlf3, but we have

already mentioned that this plan,

including the development of the

knight to f3, wiIl be analyzed sep­

arately.) 9

...tLlgf6

1O.e4 g6 n.tLlf3

tLlg4 12J"!e1 .id6+ - It wiIl finaIly

tLld7 7.f4 (7.ie3 .ib4 8.�d2 tLlgf6

9.f3 a5 1O.�c2 .ic5 n.hc5 tLlxc5

12J"!d1+ tLlfd7 13.g3 c6 14.f4 f6

15 .ie2 !'le8� Black cannot occupy

.

the d4-square yet, so the position

remains approximately equal,

Trachtmann - Mokry, Germany

1993.) 7

...exf

4 8.M4 ib4

Chapter 1 of the knights on c5, the other one on f5 eyeing the d4-square) come

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.dxeS dxeS 4. V9xd8+ �xd8 5. CiJc3 .ii.e6

and now:

9.CiJf3?! CiJgf6 1O.CiJgS (It is

difficult to give White any good

advice here. It would hardly be

satisfactory for him to opt for

1O.i.d3 .bc3+ n.bxc3 CiJcS 12.

0-0-0 �c8 13.Éihel CiJxd3+ 14.

Éixd3 .bc4 15. Éid2 Éie8::¡: Gross -

Benjamin, Hawaii 1998.)

1O ...Éie8

11.0-0-0 hc3 12.bxc3 h6 13.eS

CiJg4 14.CiJe4 �c8::¡: White volun­

tarily created an isolated pawn in

his Own camp and now he can no

longer protect it, LZakharov -

Efanov, Cheliabinsk 2006;

9.i.d2 CiJgf6 10.CiJf3 Éie8 n.

0-0-0 CiJg4 12.CiJbS hd2+ 13.

Éixd2 a6 14.CiJc3 �c8 IS.b3 c6

16.i.e2 �c'ñ' - Black's position is

more attractive, but he may not

have sufficient resources to break

his opponent's defence, Smolich

- Varnavski, Minsk 2009.

Bl) 6 .!Llf3

White wins a tempo by attack­

ing the enemy pawn, but he no

longer has the possible manoeu­

vre g2-g3 and .ii.f1-h3. Meanwhile,

the move f7-f6 is almost always

useful for Black.

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.dxeS dxeS 4. V9xd8+ �xd8 5. CiJc3 .ii.e6 and now: 9.CiJf3?! CiJgf6

should not create a permanent

hole on d4 in his position. The

advantages of this move are not at

all evident.

7... .!Lld7 8 . .te3
7...
.!Lld7
8
.
.te3

If he plays 8.a3, not allowing

his opponent to play i.b4, then

6 ...f6

Black can continue with his devel­

(diagram)

opment in a standard fashion: 8 ...

Bla) 7.e4

aS 9.i.e3 CiJh6 1O.h3

CiJf7 11 .te2

.

Blh) 7.e3

i.cS (eyeing the d4-outpost) 12.

7.b3 CiJd7 - see 6.b3 CiJd7 7.CiJf3

f6.

Bla) 7.e4

This move was played by sorne

very strong

players,

but

White

.beS CiJxcS 13.0-0-0+ �e7 14.

CiJd2 c6 15. �c2 a4+ Guerra - Ko­

gan, Odivelas 2000.

After the modest move 8 .ii.d2,

.

White can avoid the exchange of

his bishop, but it wiIl not be active

Chapter 1

there. Black wiIl have no open­

ing problems then, for example:

8

...c6

9.a3 a5 1O.i.e2 a4 11.i.e3

(White has decided to transfer

his bishop to a more active posi­

tion, but Black is well prepared

to counter this.) ll

...�c5

12.hc5

tLlxc5 13J'!d1+ cJ;]c7 14.0-0 tLlh6

15.tLld2

l"lhd8+ Alonso Gonzalez -

Torres, Cambados 2005

After 8.i.e2 �b4 9.0-0, Black

can double his opponent's pawns

and begin exploiting the defects

1l ••

..ie7

NaturaIly, it is not advísable

for Black to exchange his bishop

for the enemy knight and the

move

ll

...ic5?

would

not work

because of 12.l"lxd7+.

His bishop is weIl placed on e7

and it does not impede his knight,

since he has other plans for its fu­

ture.

12.ttJa4 g5 13.ttJd2 ttJh6

This is a standard route for

Black's king's knight - to the f7-

of his pawn-structure: 9 ...hc3

square vía h6.

1O.bxc3 tLle7 ll.l"ld1 cJ;]e8 12.l"lb1

14.f3

b6 13.ia3 cJ;]f7 14.tLle1 l"lhd8?

If White plays carelessly, then

Serralta - Chatalbashev, Plancoet

Black's knight may go to g4 as

2004.

weIl.

  • 8 ....ib4

9.0-0-0

14 •• .tbf7 15.e5 b5 16.cxb6+

9.l"lc1 a5 1O.a3 .tc5 ll.hc5

axb6 17.ttJe3 b5? H.Santos -

tLlxc5 12

.te2 a4 13.0-0 tLle7 14.

Paunovíc, Figueira da Foz 2008

tLle1 tLlc6. Black has resisted the

(game 4).

temptation to play c7-c6 (This

move is ofien played almost au­

Blb) 7.e3 e6

 

) and has preserved

the c6-square for his knight. From

there, it can go later to d4, or to

b3 vía a5. 15.tLlc2 cJ;]c8 16.l"lcd1 b6't

Piankov - Dorfman, France 1995.

9 •••e6 10.cJ;]e2 cJ;]e7 11.a3
9 •••e6 10.cJ;]e2 cJ;]e7 11.a3
Chapter 1 there. Black wiIl have no open­ ing problems then, for example: 8 ...c6 9.a3

8.�d2

White's rather timid plan, in­

cluding castling short, would still

maintain control over the situa­

tion, but he has no chances then

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4.'�xd8+ r;f]xd8 5JiJc3 ie6

of fighting for the advantage: 8.

ie2 lLld7 9.0-0 r;f]e7 1O.Éld1 lLlh6

(this is the weH familiar route to

the f7-square) 11.b3 aS 12.lLla4

liJf7 13.ib2 lLleS 14.liJxeS .beS 15.

liJd2 ifS 16.a3 Élhd8 17.ie3 ie7

18.b4 axb4 19.axb4 b6f:±Vojinovie

- Vaulin, Nis 1993.

9.0-0-0 r;f]e7 1O.Élg1 (The een­

tralization of White's knight by

1O.lLle4 would only provoke sim­

plifieation: 1O

...lLleS

1l.lLlxeS heS

12.ie3 lLlh6 13.h3 liJf7 14.id3 aS

lS.b3 lLld6 16.lLld2 ib4 17.r;f]b2

Élad8, draw, Miton - Czerwonski,

Koszalin 1998.) and here after

8 •••lLld7 1O (Under the cireumstanees, Blaek can still play 1O lLlh6 with sueeess, for example:
8
•••lLld7
1O
(Under the cireumstanees,
Blaek can still play 1O
lLlh6 with
sueeess, for example: 1l.h3 lLlf7
12.g4 Éld8 13.b3 ie7 14.r;f]e2 lLld6
lS.ie1 liJe8 16.ie2 Éldf8°o Dieu -
Sanduleae, Avoine 2008.) 1l.liJe4
aS and there arises the position
from the game Antonsen - Hillarp
Persson, which we have already
analyzed above.
Here is one relatively reeent
game, in which Blaek sueeeeded
in realizing almost aH the basic
9
.ie2
ideas of this variation: 9.lLle4 aS
.

9.Élg1 hS (This is a quite natu­

ral reaetion against White's diver­

1O.Élg1 liJh6 11.h3 lLlf7 12.ie3 r;f]e7

13.g4 ib4 14.liJfd2 lLld6 1S.Éle1 if7

sion on the flank. It is also good

16.lLlxd6 r;f]xd6

.id3 ig6 18.ifS

for Blaek to

opt for 9

1O.h3

lLleS and he soon seized the initia­

liJf7 1l.g4 r;f]e7 12.0-0-0 aS 13.

tive, Perdomo - Felgaer, Sao Pau­

lLle4 lLld6 14.liJxd6 hd6 and the

lo 2009.

opponents agreed to a draw in the

game Kalantarian - A.Minasian,

Yerevan 1994.) 10.0-0-0 r;f]e7 11.

lLle4 aS 12.ie3 lLlh6 13.ie2 lLlf7

14.h4 (lt is obvious that White is

afraid of hS-h4 foHowed by ie7

and g7-gS and Blaek's pawn-of­

fensive on the kingside may turn

out to be very unpleasant.) 14 ...

ie7 lS.b3 lLlh6 16.Éld2 lLlg4 17.

Élgd1 liJeS 18.liJxeS heS'!' Anton­

sen - Hillarp Persson, Denmark

2009.

9 a5 10. 0-0 lLle7 ...
9
a5 10. 0-0 lLle7
...

Chapter 1

After White has castled short,

gerous for Black however, for

Black is not afraid of the pawn­

example: 7

8.e3 (8.g3 f6 -

offensive g2-g4-gS and he decides

see 7.g3 c6 8

.tb2 f6; 8.0-0-0!?

not to go to the f7 -square with

r:J;;c7 9.e3 f6

1O

.td3 aS 11

.tc2

lLle7

his king's knight, but to transfer

it to the queenside with the idea

of breaking his opponent's pawn­

structure there.

12.lLlge2 lLlc8 - this is an interest­

ing manoeuvre of his knight. It

goes to b6 in order to support the

pawn-break aS-a4 - 13. r:J;;b1 lLlcb6

ll.gfdl

lLlc8

12.lLla4

<t;c7

14.lLlg3 a4

.tfS hfS+ 16.lLlxfS

13.a3 lLlcb6

g6 17.lLlg3 fS 18.lLlge2 .tb4+! D.

The c4-pawn has become the

Ponomarev - A.Moskalenko, Da­

target for the attack.

 

gomys 2006) 8

.f6

14.lLlxb6 lLlxb6 15.gacl .ie7

16

.

.iel lLld7

Black has failed to provoke the

move c4-c5 and he begins a re­

grouping ofhis forces.

17.lLld2 lLlc5 18.lLlbl lLlb3 19.

gc3 a4 + Battaglini - Sakaev, Sto

Petersburg 2009 (game 5).

Chapter 1 After White has castled short, gerous for Black however, for Black is not afraid
B2) 6.b3 lLld7 9 .td3 (At least, it looks a bit strange for White to continue
B2) 6.b3 lLld7
9 .td3 (At least, it looks a bit
strange for White to continue
with the line 9.g3 r:J;;c7 1O .th3
- he has played e3 and g4 and
now he trades the light-squared
bishops - 1O
11.lLlxh3 hS
12.f3 lLlh6 13.lLlf2 lLlfS 14.r:J;;e2
aS lS.lLlfe4 .te7 16.:1l:ad1 !l:hd8+!
T.Balogh - Bauer, Zagan 1997.)
9
1O.lLlge2 r:J;;c7 11. O-O aS
12.lLla4 lLlcS 13.lLlxcS hcS 14.lLlc3
!l:ad8 lS.!l:fd1 .tg4
.te2 he2

7.g3

It seems logical for White to

fianchetto his other bishop first

-

7

.

.tb2 and consider the future

of his light-squared bishop only

latero This plan is not at all dan-

17.lLlxe2 a4+! Bregadze - Gagu­

nashvili, Tbilisi 2009.

7.lLlf3 f6 8

.

.ib2 (The somewhat

enigmatic move 8.!l:gl enables

Black to equalize easily after 8 ...

.tb4 9

.

.td2 lLlh6 - he develops his

pieces and in the process prevents

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.dxe5 dxeS 4. Wffxd8+ <JJxd8 S. liJc3 ie6

White's plan of advancing g2-g4 -

1O.liJe4 ixd2+ 11. <JJ xd2 liJf7 12.e3

<JJ e7 13.ie2 liJd6 14.liJxd6 cxd6=

Sosonko - Hort, Bad Kissin­

gen

1981.) 8

...c6

9.0-0-0 (9.g3

<JJ c7 1O.ig2 ib4 11.0-0-0 a5 12.

liJd2 liJh6 13.liJde4 liJf7 14.h4 h6

15. <JJ bl ghd8 16.f4 ge8 17. <JJ al

if5+ Akhmedov - R.Mamedov,

Baku

2008)

9

...

<JJ c7

1O.e3

liJh6

l1.h3 (Here, White did not find

anything better than to advance

his g-pawn, but this plan proved

to be insufficient even for equal­

ity.) 11

...

a5

12.g4 liJf7 13.gg1 liJc5

14.liJd2 a4! 15. <JJ c2 h5! (Black

makes two consecutive pawn­

breaks on both flanks and his

rooks suddenly beco me very ac­

tive.) 16.liJde4 hxg4 17.hxg4 gh2+

Kveinys - Azmaiparashvili, Tal­

linn 1988 (game 6).

7

...c6

8.ih3

Instead, 8 .tb2 f6 9.ih3 hh3

.

1O.liJxh3 <JJ c7 amonts to just a

transposition.

8

...hh3

9.c!iJxh3

mately equal. The pawn-structure

is symmetrical and there are no

long-term weaknesses. The de­

velopment of both sides' pieces is

comparable and rather slow.

9 ...f6

It is useful for Black to take the

g5-square under control, restrict­

ing both his opponent's bishop

and knight. Still, he can also play

the move h7-h6 with the same

purpose, preserving the f6-square

for his knight:

9

...h6

10.f3

(10.

ib2 liJgf6 l1.f3 .tc5 12.liJf2 ge8

13.liJfe4 liJxe4 14.liJxe4 ib4+ 15.

.tc3 .txc3+ 16.liJxc3 <JJ c7 17.

0-0-0 liJc5 18.1=í:d2 gad8= Mi­

chenka - Mokry, Czechoslovakia

1992) 1O

...liJgf6

l1.liJf2 <JJ c7 12.id2

liJc5 13.e3 ie7 14. <JJ e2 a5 15.ghdl

ghe8 16.iel .tf8 17.g4 b6 with

mutual chances, Gheorghiu - Kir.

Georgiev, Haifa 1989.

10.ib2

1O.f3 h5 11.liJf2 .tb4 12.id2 a5

13.liJd3 ie7 14.e3 <JJ c7 15. <JJ e2 liJh6

16.gac1 liJf7 17.ghdl liJd8 18.iel

liJe6� Jimenez Martinez - Serna

Lara, Almansa 2009. 10 ... <JJc7 After 1O White wiIl play simply l1.f3 and it is
Lara, Almansa 2009.
10
...
<JJc7
After 1O
White wiIl play
simply l1.f3 and it is not advisable
for Black to opt for 11
be­
cause of the natural reply 12.g4;!;
11.0-0-0 c!iJh6
(diagram)
12J:�d2
White should not try anything

The prospects of both sides

in the coming battle are approxi-

too risky. For example, it is not

good for him to choose 12.f4? be­

cause of 12

...

liJg4! and his numer-

Chapter 1

Chapter 1 ous self-inflicted weaknesses will become a telling factor for the fu­ ture. For example:

ous self-inflicted weaknesses will

become a telling factor for the fu­

ture. For example: 13.fxe5 tt'ldxe5

14.tt'le4 :ge8 15.:gd4 c5! 16.:gd2

tt'lxc4 17.tt'lxf6 gxf6 18.bxc4 �h6

19.tt'lf4 tt'le3 20.E:d3 E:hf8-+ Bai­

kov - Lukin, Leningrad 1985.

Here are two more practical

examples:

12.e4 �e7 13.f4 E:he8 14.f5 tt'lg4

15.'itid2 a6 16.'itie2 b5 17.tt'lb1 bxc4,

draw, Oral - Neuman, Olomouc

ing more energetically: 12

...tt'lc

5!?

13.f3 tt'lf5 14.tt'le4?! (White did not

need to disrupt his pawn-struc­

ture in this fashion. It was betler

for him to continue with 14.tt'lf2,

with approximate equality.) 14 ...

tt'lxe4 15.fxe4 tt'ld6 16.tt'lf2 tt'lf7 17.

E:hd1 :gd8 18.E:xd8 tt'lxd8 19.e3

tt'le6+ Mikhalevski - Avrukh, Ra­

mat Aviv 1998.

Chapter 1 ous self-inflicted weaknesses will become a telling factor for the fu­ ture. For example:

13.ghd1

  • 1995. The fight did not continue

12.f3 tt'lf5 13.tt'lf2 �b4 14.tt'ld3

a5 15.'itib1 tt'le3 16.E:d2 �e7 17.tt'le1

tt'lc5 18.tt'lc2 tt'lxc2 19.'itixc2 a4 20.

for long in the following game:

13.tt'le4 E:he8 14.e3, draw, Dovzik

- APanchenko, Cseppko 2002.

E:hd1 axb3+ 21.axb3 E:hd8 22.

13.•• gad8

14.tLle4

tLle5

15.

:gxd8 hd8= Amura - Tal, Bue­

gxd8 l!xd8

16.gxd8

'itixd8 -

nos Aires 1991.

the

endgame

is

approximately

12 .••.i.e7

equal,

Sanchis

-

Radulov,

Ma­

Black could also consider play-

romme 1994.

Chapter 1

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4J�'xd8+

�xd8

Complete Games

1 L.Grigorian Miles

Adelaide 1991

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4.'@xdS+ It>xdS 5.e4 J.b4+ 6. .id2 hd2+ 7.c!lJxd2 .ie6 S. c!lJgf3 f6 9 .ie2 c!lJd7 10.0-0 a5 1l.b3 c!lJe7 12J;fdl c!lJc6 13.c!lJfl It>cS 14.c!lJe3 c!lJc5 15.c!lJd2 c!lJd4

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4J�'xd8+ �xd8 Complete Games 1 L.Grigorian Adelaide 1991 1.d4

Black has occupied the vulner­

able dark squares in the centre of

the board with his knights, but

White's position remains very sol­

id and will not crumble by itself.

Miles brings his last reserves into

the battle and seeks a weak point

to break through.

16 .ifl c6 17.t3 �dS lS.c!lJbl b6 19.c!lJc3 �a7

Under the cover of his knight

on d4, Black is preparing to dou­

ble his rooks along the d-file.

20.1t>f2 �ad7 21.lt>el h5 22. c!lJe2 h4

He is ready to exchange his

beautiful knight, but only on the

d4-square, sine e after that he will

have a powerful passed pawn.

23.1t>f2 It>c7 24.�acllt>b7

Black's king has made a trian­

gle - c8-c7-b7. Naturally, the el­

ement of zugzwang is completely

absent. Miles obviously did not

like the juxtaposition of his king

with the enemy rook along the

e-file (White might have the idea

of liJe3-d5+ at an opportune mo­

ment...

) and he withdrew his king

to a safer position. The loss of

tempo evidently did not bother

him, since White could not do

much anyway.

25.c!lJc3 .if7 26.J.e2 .ih5 27. �bl c!lJce6

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4J�'xd8+ �xd8 Complete Games 1 L.Grigorian Adelaide 1991 1.d4

Chapter 1

The only plan to win this posi­

tion was probably connected with

advancing the kingside pawns, but

then the position would become

much sharper and White could

obtain counter chances. Miles

postpones this plan and makes a

diversion on the kingside, which

suddenly brings him success.

2S.g3?!

White allows his opponent to

fulfil his plan; he parries the im­

mediate threat of ttJf4 but he com­

pro mises his kingside consider­

Chapter 1 The only plan to win this posi­ tion was probably connected with advancing the

3S.llJd2

Another mistake, but White's

position was already very bad an­

yway. For example: 38

.

.ie2 ttJd3+

39.�f1 ttJc1, or 38.�f2 Eld4 39J;,¡h8

ably.

ltJxf3!

 

He should simply retreat his

3S.•. gxd2! 39.�xd2 llJxf3+.

bishop - 28

�c7 (28

ltJf4

White resigned.

29.b4!) 29.a3, trying to create

sorne counterplay on the queen­

side.

2 Petkova

Rausis

 

2S ...hxg3+

29.hxg3

llJg5!

Athens 1993

30

.g4

l.d4 d6 2.e4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5

This is the only move, but now,

4. ªxdS+ �xdS 5.llJf3 f6 6.e4

after the opening of the h-file, the

.ie5 7.a3 a5 S.llJc3 .ie6 9.llJa4

transfer of Black's knight to the

f4-square becomes a very power­

fuI threat.

3 O ..

.ig6

3U�hl llJge6 32.

gbdl

llJf4

33 ..tf1

llJde6

34.

gxd7+ gxd7 35.llJbl

It was better for White to de­

fend with 35. �g3, to be able to

counter 35

...

l:'ld2 with 36.!'lh2,

with chances of holding the posi­

tion.

35 •••gdS

�el?

36.gh2

�e7

37.

This is the decisive mistake.

After 37.�g3 White may still save

the day.

37...

llJg5

.ia7 10 . .id2 llJe7 1l . .ie2 llJbe6 12. 0-0 llJd4 13.llJxd4 .ixd4 14.llJe3 e6
.ia7 10
.
.id2 llJe7 1l
.
.ie2 llJbe6
12. 0-0
llJd4
13.llJxd4
.ixd4
14.llJe3 e6

Black managed to occupy the

central d4-square in this game as

well. This time he did it with his

bishop rather than his knight, but

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4. Wixd8+ ¿;;xd8

it was still quite effective. Once

again, White's position is quite

:!'1:xe6 :!'1:c7 31.idl, maintaining a

defensible position.

solid and not easy to break.

 

29

•.•.ixb6

.te3 J.t7 31.

lS.gfd1 ¿;;e7 16.gae1 ghd8

ga4 ge7 32.¿;;f1 J.d4 33 .td2

17.b4

geS 34.gb4 ¿;;b6 3S.J.e1 gxbS

He should stop marking time

36.gxbS+ 'i!;>xbS

and create quite real counterplay

 

Not only has Black won a

on the left side of the board.

 

pawn, he has al so concentrated all

17••• axb4 18.axb4 gd7 19.

It was obviously stronger to

his forces to support the advance

.te1 ¿;;d8 2 O .ga1 gxa1 21.gxa1

ofhis passed pawn.

lLle8 22.eS ¿;;e7 23.h3

37.'i!;>e1 'i!;>b438.f3e339.'i!;>d1 i.b3+ 4 O.'i!;>e1 i.e4

play 23J''la8, not allowing the op­

 

Now White must give up his

ponent to accomplish the pawn­

bishop for the enemy passed

break b7-b6, and maintaining ap­

pawn, so he resigned.

proximate equality.

 

23 ••. ¿;; b8 24.ga3 b6 2S.cxb6

3 Stierle

V.Georgiev

lLlxb6

Bad Woerishofen 2003

Black is again better, because

 

l.d4

d6

2.e4 eS 3.dxeS

his king takes an active part in the

dxeS 4Jbd8+ 'i!;>xd8 S.g3 e6

battle and his forces outnumber

6

.tg2 aS 7.lLlf3 f6 8.lLle3 a4

White's on the queenside.

 

9.i.e3 i.e6 10.lLld2 i.b4 ll.ge1

26.ga6 ¿;;b7 27.bS?!

 

lLld7 12. O -O lLle7

This is a dubious decision, be­

cause Black will attack this pawn

 
13.f3

13.f3

much more easily on the fifth

rank.

27.•• eS 28.lLla4 e4

 
 
solid and not easy to break. 29 •.• .ixb6 .te3 J.t7 31. lS.gfd1 ¿;;e7 16.gae1 ghd8
 

White is restricting his own

 

light-squared bishop. He should

have played 13

.te4 instead.

 

13

.•• 'i!;>e7 14.a3

29.lLlxb6?!

 

This is another poor decision,

White

should play

here

29.

since now White's queenside

.tb4

and if

lLlxa4

then

30.

pawn-structure loses its flex-

Chapter 1

i.d3

ibility. Little by little, thanks to

such trifles, Black obtains a quite

meaningful advantage.

14•.• .iaS

1S.lUd1 ghd8 16.

It was more resilient for White

to defend with 22.'Llb1 gad8 23.

E1xd7+ gxd7 24.gc2. Now his

bishop is isolated from the actions

tDce4 tDf5 17.i.f2 tDd4 18

.if1

forever.

bd2!?

gxd1 23.gxd1 tDxe4 24.

After this surprising exchange,

fxe4 @b6

Black occupies the cS-square.

Black is preparing to gobble

Maybe it was even stronger for

the enemy c4-pawn.

him to play 18

f5 19.'Llc3 'LlcS

2S.@f2

with the same purpose.

19.tDxd2 tDcS

Chapter 1 i.d3 ibility. Little by little, thanks to such trifles, Black obtains a quite meaningful

20.bd4

It is understandable that

White complied with this ex­

change reluctantly, but what can

we advise him to do instead? The

foHowing variation shows that

the enemy penetration to the b3-

square simply cannot be ignored:

White would not achieve any­

thing with 2S.E1d6 E1e8 and after

26 his rook wiH have to re­ treat. 2S ... @cS 26.gc1
26
his rook wiH have to re­
treat.
2S
...
@cS
26.gc1

26 ...gd8

AH the positional pluses are in

Black's hands. His pie ces are ac­

tive and he dominates the open

file. Still, as the classics asserted,

20J'k3 'Lldb3 21

.ie1

b6! (protect­

just one weakness (the c4-pawn)

ing the

knight on eS; after 21

E1d7

may not be sufficient to win the

22.'Llxb3! 'Llxb3 23.E1xd7 + @xd7

White solves aH his problems with

the move 24.@f2) 22.@f2 e4!?

23.f4 E1d6 - his position is very

unpleasant and it is inconceivable

how he can get rid of the pin along

the d-file.

2 O ...gxd4

tDe4?

21.e3

!;d7

22.

game, therefore Black must cre­

ate another weakness for his op­

ponent, if possible at a greater

distance. Accordingly, this should

mean the kingside.

27.'it>e1 .if7 28.gc3 hS! 29.

White wishes to attack the en­

emy a4-pawn with his bishop, but

1.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.dxe5 dxe5 4. �xd8+ c;t;xd8

it does not even come to this.

29 ••• h4! 30.c;t;f2

Possibly, the least of the evils

for him was 30.g4, trying to keep

the position closed.

30 •.• hxg3 + 31.hxg3 .lh5

Now Black's pie ces use the

hole on the kingside (the second

weakness) in order to penetrate

quietly into his opponent's campo

32.c;!;>g2

White cannot let the enemy

rook attack from behind: 32.�c2

gd2+ 33.c;t;el gh2 and his position

is a disaster.

32 •• ..idl 33.c;t;f2 g5 34.c;t;e1 .if3
32 ••
..idl
33.c;t;f2 g5 34.c;t;e1
.if3

35.b4+

He is evidently fed up with

doing nothing, but this attempt

at activity only speeds up his de­

mise. However, White's position

was already very bad in any case,

for example: 35.ic2 ga8 36.c;t;f2

g4 37.c;t;el l':\h8 etc.

35 .•• axb3 36J�xb3 b6 37. c;t;f2 .id1 38.13e3 13h8 39.c;!;>g2

g4 40

.ie2 .lf3+ 41.c;t;f2 13h2+

. 42.c;t;f1 13h1+ 43.c;t;f2 13e1

In

anticipation

White resigned.

of 44 ...he4,

4 H.Santos Paunovie

Figueira da Foz 2008

1.d4 d6 2.e4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4.Ybd8+ c;!;>xd8 5.llJf3 f6 6.llJe3 .le6 7 .e4 llJd7 8 .le3 .lb4 9.0-0-0 e6 10.c;!;>e2 c;!;>e7 11. a3 .ie7 12.llJa4 g5 13.llJd2 llJh6 14.f3 llJt7 15.e5 b5 16.cxb6+ axb6 17.llJc3 b5

18 . .le2 Black's pieces are more
18
.
.le2
Black's
pieces
are
more

ac­

tive on the queenside, so later

he can develop his initiative

there. Therefore, White had to

begin immediate action on the

other

side

of the

board:

18.h4

g4 19.ie2 with mutual chances.

18 ....le5

 

Black

uses

the

opportune

moment to exchange the dark­

squared bishops.

 

19.he5 llJxe5 20.13a1 13hd8

21.llJa2?

White does not have the

time for such abstract manoeu­

vres.

Instead he had to play 21.l':\adl

c;t;b6 22.h4, creating counterplay

on the kingside.

21 •.• 13d4 22.llJb4 13ad8 23.

13ad1

Chapter 1

23 •.• f5! Black breaks his opponent's
23 •.• f5!
Black breaks
his
opponent's

centre with a series of blows.

24J�he1 g4 25 .ifl tt:\g5 26. h4 gxh3 27.gxh3

Chapter 1 23 •.• f5! Black breaks his opponent's centre with a series of blows. 24J�he1

tt:\cb6 14.tt:\xb6 tt:\xb6 15.�ac1 iLe7 16.iLe1 tt:\d7 17.tt:\d2 tt:\c5 18.tt:\b1 tt:\b3 19.�c3 a4

Chapter 1 23 •.• f5! Black breaks his opponent's centre with a series of blows. 24J�he1

20.f3 .if5 21.tt:\d2 tt:\c5 22. .if2 iLg6 23.e4 .if7 24.tt:\b1 �hd8 25.�d8 �xd8 26 .b:c5?

This is a positional mistake.

White should on no account part

with his dark-squared bishop.

26

....b:c5+

27.'it>fl 'it>b6 28.

�c2 iLd4 29.tt:\d2 .ic5

Black is not in a hurry. He can

afford to play preparatory consol­

idating moves without revealing

27 .•.tt:\xf3 !

his further intentions.

This is simple,

but still very

30.tt:\b1 g6 31.tt:\c3 �a8 32.

beautiful.

iLd3 iLd4 33.tt:\b1 h5 34.tt:\d2

28.tt:\d5+

i.c5 35.h3 i.e6 36.g4

Or 28.lLJxf3 ib3+.

White in fact helps his oppo­

28 •••.b:d5

29.exd5

tt:\xe1 +

nent by voluntarily advancing his

3 0.�xe1

�4xd5.

White

re­

pawns and placing them on the

signed.

same squares as his bishop.

 

36 ••• 'it>c7 37.tt:\b1 tt:\c3 iLd4 39.tt:\b1 'it>c5

'it>b6

38.

5 Battaglini

Sakaev

Black improves the position of

Sto Petersburg 2009

1.d4

d6

2.c4

e5

3.dxe5

dxe5 4.tbd8+ 'it>xd8 5.tt:\c3

.ie6 6.tt:\f3 f6 7.e3 tt:\d7 8

.

.ie2

c6 9 .id2 a5 10.0-0 tt:\e7 11.

�fd1 tt:\c8 12.tt:\a4 'it>c7 13.a3

his pieces to the maximum.

40 .tt:\d2

.ie3

41.tt:\b1

�d8

42.'it>e2 .if4 43.tt:\c3

Naturally, White's po sitio n is

probably beyond salvation any­

way, but now he loses immediate-

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4.f1xd8+ cj;;xd8

ly, and quite beautifully at that.

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4.f1xd8+ cj;; xd8 ly, and quite beautifully at that. 43

43 .••gxd3 ! White resigned.

6 Kveinys - Azmaiparashvili

Tallinn 1988

White defended betler but still

failed to equalize: 2U'le2 §ah8

22.�c3 .bc3 23. cj;;xc3 §h1 24J:'lxh1

1:'lxh1 25.�g2 §c1+ 26.cj;;b2 §g1+

Kosikov - Pavlov, Kiev 2005.

21 .•. tLlg5!

Black wins at least a pawn af­

ter this aggressive knight-sortie.

22

hg4 23.f4 exf4 24.

exf4 .tf5+

He could have finished his op­

ponent off immediately with 24 ...

lLle6! 25.�e4 lLld4+. However, this

game was played in rapid chess

(in the USSR Cup) and Black did

not have enough time to calculate

1.d4

d6

2.c4 e5 3.dxe5

everything to the end.

dxe5 4.tyxd8+ 'i!?xd8 5.tLlc3

25.'i!?cl tLle6

i.e6 6.tLlf3 f6 7.e3 c6 8.b3

It was again stronger for Black

a5 9 .tb2 tLlh6 10 .h3 tLld7 11.

to play here

�c5 26.§e1 lLle6

0-0-0 'i!?c7 12.g4 tLlf7 13.gg1

27.�e4 1:'lxd2 28.cj;;xd2 §d8+ 29.

tLlc5 14.tLld2 a4 15.'i!?c2 h5

cj;;c1 �g4. However, what he played

16.tLlde4 hxg4 17.hxg4 gh2

in the game proved to be sufficient

18.gd2 axb3+ 19.axb3 tLlxe4

as well.

2 O .tLlxe4 .tb4

26.i.e4 gxd2 27 .txt'5 hc3

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 dxe5 4.f1xd8+ cj;; xd8 ly, and quite beautifully at that. 43

21.tLlc3

The same variation was epeat­

ed almost twenty years later

(probably through ignorance ...).

In the diagrarnmed position,

28.hc3 ge2 29.he6 gxe6 30.gxg7+ 'i!?b6
28.hc3
ge2
29.he6
gxe6
30.gxg7+ 'i!?b6

31.f5 ge2 32.hf6 gaa2 33.

ggl

'i!?c5

34.

.tc3 gf2 35.'i!?bl

ga3. White resigned.

Chapter 2

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5

Quick Repertoire

Chapter 2 l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 Quick Repertoire 3.e3 This is not the most ambitious In

3.e3

This is not the most ambitious

In general, Black would like

to advance f7-f5 and begin active

operations in the centre and on

the kingside; otherwise, he will

have problems countering White's

queenside offensive. Still, this

pawn-advance needs sorne prepa­

ration.

We will examine sorne other

possible plans for White, which he

usually plays when Black's open­

ing choice has surprised him.

3.g3 (This is a solid move,

move for White, but it is reliable

but it is somewhat premature,

and quite logical. Black has at­

since the bishop may be useful

tacked the central pawn and

on d3 and even on e2.) 3 ...exd4

White protects it, postponing the

4.�xd4 ttJc6 5.iWd2 �e6 6.e4 (This

important strategical decisions

is a sad necessity for White, be­

for the future. Meanwhile, he

cause after 6.b3 d5! Black seizes

maintains the tension in the cen­

the initiative.) 6

7.ttJc3 a5

tre and continues to control

8J'!b1 (Black can counter 8.b3?

slightly more space. If Black

with an atlractive combination:

wishes to occupy additional

8

ttJxe4! 9.ttJxe4 d5 - for details,

space himself, with the move 3 ...

see the Step by Step chapter.) 8 ...

f5, then after the exchange on

g6 9.b3 a4 1O.�g2 axb3 1l.axb3

e5, the transition into an end­

�g7 12.ttJge2 o-o 13.0-0 ttJd7

game is much more effective for

14.ttJd5 ttJc5 with mutual chances.

White, because he will atlack the

White has acquired additional

enemy e5-pawn and Black can

space, while Black has deployed

no longer protect it with the move

his minor pieces perfectly and has

f7-f6.

opened the a-file for his rook.

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS

White cannot hurt his oppo­

nent with 3.b3 exd4 4.'\Wxd4 ttJf6

(preparing the pawn-break dS)

S.�b2 ttJc6 6.Wd2 dS Of Black

succeeds in opening the position

White can develop his king­

side naturally and then focus his

attention on the queenside: S.ttJf3

i.g7 6.i.e2 ttJe7 7.0-0 O-O 8.b3

ttJfS 9.i.b2 ge8 with a very so lid

like this, then he has no problems

position for Black.

 

whatsoever.) 7.cxdS i.b4 8.ttJc3

 

5

6.tlJge2

ttJxdS with a double-edged posi­

If White reduces the tension

tion.

in the centre with 6.dS, then after

3

..

tlJd7

6

.fS 7.ttJge2 ttJgf6 8.b3 O-O,

He is preparing f7-fS, while

Black obtains a comfortable

avoiding the endgame that would

game.

 

arise after after 3

.fS 4.dxeS dxeS

6

••• tlJe7

7.0-0

O-O

8.b3

S.Wxd8+.

 

tlJc6

 

4.tlJc3 g6

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS White cannot hurt his oppo­ nent with 3.b3 exd4 4.'\Wxd4 ttJf6 (preparing

5.i.d3

S.g3 (In principIe, the moves

g2-g3 and e2-e3 do not combine

well together, but still, it cannot

be described as a mistake yet.) 5 ...

�g7 6.i.g2 ttJh6!? (Black is trying

to seize the initiative; it is more

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS White cannot hurt his oppo­ nent with 3.b3 exd4 4.'\Wxd4 ttJf6 (preparing

Strangely enough, this posi­

tion has not been analyzed prop­

erly yet and both sides have scope

for creative endeavour. Black ex­

erts pressure against the d4-pawn

and wishes to provoke the move

d4-dS, which will free his hands

for a kingside offensive. He must

prudent for him to choose 6

ttJe7

also take care about White's pos­

7.ttJge2 O-O 8.0-0 exd4 9.exd4

sible activity on the other side of

ge8=) 7.ttJge2 o-o 8.0-0 fS 9.b3

the board, therefore after for ex­

ttJf7. He wishes to advance eS-e4

ample: 9.dS ttJb4 1O.i.bl, Black

and to follow this with ttJf7-gS-f3,

must play 1O

preventing the

creating threats against the en­

advance of the enemy a and b­

emy king.

pawns.

Chapter 2

1.d4 d6 2.c4 eS

Step by Step

In this chapter we shall analyze

the less ambitious third moves for

White. He usually chooses them

when surprised by Black's open­

ing choice.

Chapter 2 1.d4 d6 2.c4 eS Step by Step In this chapter we shall analyze the
  • A) 3.g3

  • B) 3.b3

e)

3.e4

  • D) 3.e3

  • A) 3.g3

This move is slightly prema­

ture, beca use White determines

the placement ofhis light-squared

bishop a bit too early. It might be

useful on d3 and even on the e2-

square. Black has the possibility

to react against the king's bishop

fianchetto in the optimal manner.

3

..

exd4 4. exd4 tLlc6

Black's plan is quite simple.

First he wins a tempo by attack­

ing the enemy queen. Then he

develops his bishop to e6, again

with tempo, attacking the c4-

pawn and creating the positional

threat of d6-d5 in the process. If

he succeeds in accomplishing this

pawn-break in the centre, he will

seize the initiative.

Chapter 2 1.d4 d6 2.c4 eS Step by Step In this chapter we shall analyze the

5.Wfd2

This is an attempt to justify

the forced early queen-sortie. At

present the queen's placement

looks awkward, since it impedes

the development of White's own

bishop. Later however he plans to

fianchetto his dark-squared bish-

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS

op and to restore harmony to his

piece-deployrnent.

It is weaker for him to choose

5.�dl, because after 5

. . .

g6 White

is unable to play b2-b3 and �b2.

After 6.�g2 �g7 7.'2Jf3 �e6 8.

'2Jbd2, his pie ces almost do not

participate in the fight for the

centre, so Black can even

bravely try to seize the initiative:

8 ...'2Jf6

9.0-0 O-O 1O.b3 dS! 11.

�a3 l'!e8 12.l'!cl aS (This is a

standard resource for him. After

a5-a4, his rook on a8 wiIl come

into action without having made

a single move of its own.) 13.�b2

d4 14.a3 .ifS+ - Black has occu­

pied space and his pieces are

more active, Z.Mamedjarova -

A.Muzychuk, Rijeka 2010 (game

7).

5 ...i.e6

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS op and to restore harmony to his piece-deployrnent. It is weaker for

6.e4

This looks rather dubious and

inconsistent. Why should White

first play g2-g3 but then close the

long diagonal and leave his light­

over the centre. After 6.b3 dS!

Black already has the initiative

and this should not be a surprise.

He has already developed two

minor pieces, while White has

wasted tempi on moves with his

g- and b-pawns and his queen. In

accordance with aIl the rules of

correct strategy, Black begins ac­

tive operations in the centre and

creates the threat of �f8-b4. After

7.cxdS �b4 8.'2Jc3 hdS 9.f3 �f6!

1O

..ib2

0-0-0+ White has great

problems with his development

and the pin on his c3-knight is

rather unpleasant.

6 •.• lüf 6 7.lüc3 a5

Of course, if Black presents

his opponent with several tempi,

White wiIl fianchetto both his

bishops and then, thanks to his

space advantage, he wiIl have

the edge. Black must exploit his

lead in development and try to

provoke an early conflict, before

White has declared a "general

mobilization" .

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS op and to restore harmony to his piece-deployrnent. It is weaker for

squared bishop on fl? However,

Al)

8 .b3

he is trying to maintain control

A2) 8.13bl

Chapter 2

Al) 8.b3

This move is too careless, since

it unnecessarily weakens the aS­

A2) 8.�b1

As we have already seen, this

prudent approach is not unneces­

el diagonal. sary. 8 �xe4! 8 ...g6 9.b3 Black's pieces become tremen­ dously active after this
el diagonal.
sary.
8
�xe4!
8
...g6
9.b3
Black's pieces become tremen­
dously active after this tactical trick.
9.�xe4 d5
9 •.• a4
Now,
the
idea
9
10.

10.�c3

The game Saric - Majeric, Bo­

rovo 2003 ended very quickly:

1O.cxdS �b4 11.ttJc3 �dS 12.f3

ttJxe4 dS does not work, because

of 11.Wfb2 !

10

.

.ig2 axb3 1l.axb3 .ig7

Black can force the exchange

of the light-squared bishops if he

Wff6 13.i.e2 0-0-0 and White re­

so wishes: 1l

S!? 12.i.g2 �h3

signed.

13.0-0 (13.�h3?? ttJf3+) 13 ...

10

11

dxc312.,ixc3

�xg2 14.i'xg2 �g7, with approxi­

Wfxd2+ 13.�xd2 .ib4

mate equality.

The material is equal and the

pawn-structure is symmetrical,

but the endgame is very unpleas­

ant for White, because he lags

considerably in development and

his king is stranded in the centre.

14.�e2

0-0-0+

15.�c2

.if5+ 16.�b2, Ilic - Majeric,

Yugoslavia 1989 and here Black

could have continued with 16.•.

�d3 17.�c1 �e8, after which he

would have maintained an over­

whelming advantage.

12.�ge2 O-O 13. 0-0

Chapter 2 Al) 8.b3 This move is too careless, since it unnecessarily weakens the aS­ A2)

l.d4 d6 2.c4 eS

White has maintained his

control over the occupied space

and has almost completed his de­

velopment. However, Black has

nothing to complain about, since

his minor pieces are weIl placed

and he has the open a-file for his

active rook. Now the standard

transfer of his f6-knight to the

queenside enables him to hold the

balance.

13

...�d7

14.�d5 �c5 15.b4

�a4 16.\Wc2 �e5+t - He wishes

to play c7-c6 and repel White's

powerful knight from its outpost.

The prospects are approximately

equal, Huebner - Balashov, Río

de Janeiro 1979 (game8).

d5 and wishes to prove that the

move b3 is a loss of a tempo.

5.i.b2 �c6 6.\Wd2 d5

This is a standard resource in

similar positions. If Black manag­

es to open the game without ma­

terial concessions, then usuaIly he

at least equalizes.

7.cxd5 i.b4 8.�c3

After 8.ic3 lLlxd5 9.ixb4

lLlcxb4+, Black has a considerable

lead in development and his ini­

tiative is very powerful.

8

...�xd5

9.a3

It is worse for White to play

9.e3, Kreutzkamp - Perschke,

Germany 1984, 9

...0-0

1O.a3

lLlxc3 ll.hc3 \Wxd2+ 12.hd2

id6+ and Black's pie ces wiIl soon

attack White's vulnerable queen­

B) 3.b3 side pawns. 9 ••• hc3 10 .hc3 �xc3 11. \Wxc3 O-O 12.�f3 i.g4 White
B) 3.b3
side pawns.
9 ••• hc3 10 .hc3 �xc3 11.
\Wxc3 O-O 12.�f3 i.g4
White is playing too carelessly.

He does not react to his oppo­

nent's provocation in the cen­

tre and almost "passes". Black is

however not so "easy-going" and

seeks an immediate conflicto

3

..

exd4 4.\Wxd4 �f6

He prepares the pawn-advance

It is quite obvious that Black

has no problems at aIl.

13.e3 :ae8

Here Black have grasped the

opportunity to disrupt his oppo­

nent's pawn-structure. Opening

Chapter 2

the g-file would not be dangerous,

since Black will play g6, empha­

sizing the fact that White is left

with the "wrong" bishop on the

for his queen's knight than the c3-

square, while his light-squared

bishop may be fianchettoed, in

which case the move e2-e4 may

board: 13

14.gxf3 1.WdS 15.

not turn out to be obligatory, to

E:g1 g6+

say the least.

 

Tinstead, there was a transi­

3

••• exd4 4.Wlxd4 tDc6 5.Wld1

tion into an approximately equal

After the retreat S.1.Wd2, Black's

major-piece endgame in the fol­

most principled line would be 5 ...

lowing game.

 

fS!?

lLlf6 6.lLlc3 - see 3.lLlc3)

 

14 .ie2

Wld6

15.0-0

tDe5

6.exfS .bfS. He has exchanged

16.�fd1

Wlf6

17.Wlxc7

tDxf3+

one of his opponent's central

18

.ixf3

.ixf3

19.9xf3

Wlxf3�

pawns and he wishes to prepare

Mantovani

-

V.Milov,

Bratto

quick queenside castling and

2001 (game 9).

the opening of the centre. 7.lLlf3

 

(7.�d3, Kelecevic - Lematschko,

Davos 2010, 7

8.1.Wxd3 dS!

 

e) 3.e4

9.cxdS lLlb4 1O.1.We2+ 1.We7+) 7 ...

Chapter 2 the g-file would not be dangerous, since Black will play g6, empha­ sizing the

White plays an active move

in the centre, but the ensuing

early queen-sortie does not solve

the problem. In general, there

should not be anything so wrong

with this, but if White is willing

to capture on d4 with his queen,

he would do better to start with

3.lLlc3 (we will analyze this possi­

bility on our Chapter 4). The point

is that there will be no better place

lLlf6 8.lLlc3 \!!Vd7 and thanks to his

lead in development, Black will

soon play d6-dS, force numerous

exchanges and equalize.

Chapter 2 the g-file would not be dangerous, since Black will play g6, empha­ sizing the
  • 5 ...f5!?

This move is consistent and

logical, even with the white queen

on the d1-square.

S

...lLlf6

6.lLlc3 - see Chapter 4.

6.exf5

Black's choice is much greater

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e53.e3 'Lld7

after 6.'Llc3 fxe4 7.'Llxe4 'fffe7, for

example: 8.�d3, Recalde - De Los

Rios, Asuncion 1960 (8.f3 'Llf6+')

8

...'Llf6

9.f3 $.e6 1O.'Lle2 0-0-0

11.0-0 dS+

6

.

...ixt'5

7.�f3

�d7 8.�c3

0-0-0 9.Ae2 �f6

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e53.e3 'Lld7 after 6.'Llc3 fxe4 7.'Llxe4 'fffe7, for example: 8.�d3, Recalde - De

10.�d5

This is the most principled

move for White.

If he allows his opponent to

advance dS, then the position is

simplified immediately and be­

comes equal: 10.0-0 dS 11.cxdS

'LlxdS 12.'LlxdS 'fffxdS 13.'fffxdS

!'í:xdS 14.$.c4 !'í:d8=, or 12.'fffa4!?

'Llb6 13.'fffh4 �e7 14.'fffg3 $.d6 1S.

�f4 hf4 16.'fffxf4 'LldS=

10

..

�e7

Of course, this move was sug­

gested by the computer; it does

not look in the least a "human"

move. It is essential for Black to

eliminate his opponent's power­

fuI knight on dS and the appear­

ance of an isolated pawn on f6

should not bother him too mucho

White cannot exploit this weak­

ness, whereas the half-open g-file

wiIl help Black to exert pressure

on the kingside.

11.�xf6

gxf6

12.�d4

Ae4

13. 0-0 �g8 14.f3 i.g6

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e53.e3 'Lld7 after 6.'Llc3 fxe4 7.'Llxe4 'fffe7, for example: 8.�d3, Recalde - De

There has arisen a complicated

position with opposite sides cas­

tling in which Black's prospects

are very good.

D) 3.e3 �d7

1.d4 d6 2.c4 e53.e3 'Lld7 after 6.'Llc3 fxe4 7.'Llxe4 'fffe7, for example: 8.�d3, Recalde - De

1 have already mentioned that

Black wishes to advance O-fS, but

the transition into an endgame

after (3

..

.fS 4.dxeS dxeS S.'fffxd8+)

is not favourable for him, since

his eS-pawn may become a target

for White. Therefore, he choos-

Chapter 2

es a preparatory move with his

knight.

attack is over before it has even

started and in addition he cannot

castle on the kingside.

DI) 4.lLlf3

10 ..

e5

D2) 4.lLle3

This is an important resource,

 

which enables Black to ensure the

DI) 4.lLlf3

eS-square for his pieces, most of

White's knight on bl has no

better square than c3, so he should

develop it first. Still, the move 4.

lLlf3 is also playable. AH this will

not affect Black's set-up.

  • 4 •••g6 5.b3

After S.llJc3, the game trans­

poses to variation D2. Meanwhile,

it would be almost impossible to

avoid sorne transposition of moves,

because White will have to devel­

op his knight to c3 in any case. It

has no other sensible future.

5 • ..i.g7 6.i.b2 e4
5 •
..i.g7
6.i.b2 e4

Black exploits the fact that his

knight is still on g8 and he builds

up a pawn-chain on the kingside.

7.lLlfd2

f5

8.lLle3

lLlgf6

9.

i.e2 o-o 10.Yfe2

The simplest way for Black to

counter 1O.h4 is by playing 10 ...

hS, after which White's kingside

all for his knight.

In this pawn-structure it be­

comes obvious that White's knight

on f3 is a bit misplaced: after eS­

e4 it had to retreat to d2 and from

there its route to the wonderful

f4-square is too long...

Dla) 1l.dxe5 Dlb) 1l.d5 Dla) 1l.dxe5 dxe5 12.gdl b6
Dla) 1l.dxe5
Dlb) 1l.d5
Dla)
1l.dxe5 dxe5
12.gdl
b6

Whenever White's pawn is not

on dS, Black's light-squared bish­

op is perfectly deployed on the

long diagonal.

13.lLld5 i.b7

15.exd5

14.lLlbl

lLlxd5

White's pawn is on dS indeed,

but it is too far away from the rest

of his forces and needs additional

protection.

1.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.e3 ttJd7 4.ttJj3 g6

lS .•. ltleS

16.0-0

�gS

17.

Wh1 gad8� - The results of the

opening are exceIlent for Black:

his knight is very active and his

pawn-structure is superior, Cy­

borowski - Krasenkow, Warsaw

2003 (game 10).

D1b) 1l.dS

This move leads to a sharp­

er position, but Black has good

chances of creating counterplay,

since his pieces are perfectly cen­

tralized. NaturaIly, his knight on

c5 is particularly powerful.

1l

...

ltle5 12.0-0-0

Or 12.h3 Wffe7 13.0-0-0 i.d7

transposing to situations we wiIl

analyze later.

12 .. J�·e7 13.h3 .id7
12
..
J�·e7 13.h3 .id7

14.f4

White could consider the pre­

paratory move 14J''lde1 (His rook

is placed opposite the enemy

queen in order to protect the pawn

on

e3

later.)

14

...a6

15.f4

exf3

16.gxf3 ttJf7 17.i.d3 gae8 (Here

Black could have tried a flank at-

tack -

17

...

b5!? 18.f4 b4 19.ttJd1

ttJh6 with a very comfortable po­

sition.) 18.f4 ttJh5 19.9hg1 Wffd8

20.ge2 ge7� - he exerts pressure

against his opponent's backward

e3-pawn and keeps up his sleeve

the flank diversion b7-b5, Haus­

ner - Mokry, Zlin 1995.

14

...

exf3

ltlf1

lS.gxf3

ltlt7

16.

If White protects his pawn

with the move 16.e4 his dark

squares become vulnerable: 16 ...

ttJh5 17.ghe1 ttJe5 with an excel­

lent game for Black.

16 ...f 4!
16
...f
4!

White is now forced to clarify

his intentions concerning his

pawn-structure.

17.exf4 .ih6

It was preferable for Black to

capture the pawn with his knight,

consenting to the exchange of the

dark-squared bishops, since that

would only emphasize the vul­

nerability of the dark squares in

White's campo Nevertheless Black

maintained an edge in the game

as weIl.

Chapter 2

18)üd2 hf4 19.cJ?bl lLle5+

Magalashvili

-

Izoría,

Kocaeli

6

...

1L1h6!?

Black's position is flexible and

  • 2002. he has different possibilities for

D2) 4.1L1c3 g6

Chapter 2 18)üd2 hf4 19.cJ?bl lLle5+ Magalashvili - Izoría, Kocaeli 6 ... 1L1h6!? Black's position is

the development ofhis g8-knight,

for example to h6. This is a very

ambitious plan, and it involves

sorne risk (reasonable though ...).

In practice he ofien plays the

more solid move 6

...ttle7.

After

this Black should not have prob­

lems, but seizing the initiative be­

comes a bit more difficult. For ex­

ample: 7.ttlge2 o-o 8.0-0 (8.b3

exd4 9.ttlxd4 ttlc5 10.0-0 l:'1e8f±)

8

...exd4

9.exd4 :1'i:e8 1O.i.f4 ttlf5

11.�d2 c6 12.:1'i:ad1 ttlf6f± Kock -

Gagarin, Gyor 1990. The pawn­

D2a) 5.g3

structure is symmetrical and

D2b) 5.1L1f3

White has slightly more space,

D2c)

5 .td3

but in general the game is equal.

About 5.ttlge2 i.g7 6.g3 - see

5.g3.

D2a) 5.g3

There will always be fans of

the fianchetto of the fl-bishop, ir­

respective of the pawn-structure,

so Black must be well prepared

for this variation.

5 ....tg7 6 • .tg2
5
....tg7
6 • .tg2

7.1L1ge2 o-o 8. 0-0

Here

8.b3

f5

9.0-0

ttlf7

amounts to just a transposition of

moves.

8

...f5

9.b3

White could consider 9.dxe5

dxe5 1O.e4, in order to create

hanging pawns for Black in the

centre and then to attack them.

Still, afier 1O

1l.exf5 gxf5

12.b3, Kurtenkov - Vulevic, Plo­

vdiv 1987, 12

5!? 13.�xd8

(White cannot achieve much with

13.i.a3 �a5.) 13

14

.tg5

:1'i:e8 15.l:'1ad1 .tf8= Black should

not have serious problems in this

endgame.

9

1L1f7

Black's idea gradually be­

comes clear. He places his knight

on f7 and leaves the d8-h4 diago-

1.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.e3 tLld7 4.tLlc3 g6

nal open, allowing his queen to

use it later to go to the kingside.

Meanwhile, he plans to continue

with eS-e4 and tLlfl-gS-f3; this

manoeuvre will be particularly

strong ifhis other knight occupies

the e5-square (for example, after

the exchange on e5, or after d4-

d5).

1.d4 d6 2.c4 eS 3.e3 tLld7 4.tLlc3 g6 nal open, allowing his queen to use it

10 .dxe5

This is possibly White's best

reaction.

The following line is harm­

Azmaiparashvili - Mohr, Palma

de Mallorca 1989.

1O

.

.ia3 E!:e8 (1 have already

mentioned that in reply to dxe5,

Black wishes to capture on e5

with his pawn and follow this

with e5-e4.) 11.�d2 c6. One of

the pluses of the placement of

the knight on fl, instead of more

usual squares such as e7 or f6, be­

comes clear. Black covers the d5-

square without having to worry

about his d6-pawn. 12.l"lfd1 �g5

13.l"lac1 �h5. His queen has come

to the kingside and remains in

ambush, because it is not so sim­

ple to create any real threats yet.

Still, its position there may act on

White's nerves

...

14.d5 c5 15.tLlb5

l"le7 16.b4 b6 17.l"lb1 tLlf6? The

fight is developing in the spirit of

the King's Indian Defence. White

creates threats on the queenside,

while Black aUacks the enemy

king, Ostenstad - Jansa, Oslo

less for Black: 1O

.ib2 c6 11.�d2

1991. 1O.�c2 c6! This is an im­

tLlf6 12J'l:ad1 (White does not ob­

portant move, which is played

tain any advantage by occupy­

with two purposes. The first one

ing space on the queenside with

is obvious - to cover the d5-

12.dxe5 dxe5 13.�c2 �c7 14.eS

square, just in case. The second

.ie6 15J'Ud1 l"lad8 16.b4 a6 17.a3

will become clear a bit latero (In

l"lfe8? Cocchi - Schuurman,

the following game, Black played

Bratlo 2000.) 12

13.f4 e4

imprecisely and he ended up in a

14.b4 (The immediate move 14.d5

worse position: 1O

11.i.a3

is not dangerous to Black owing to

c6 12.dxe5 tLldxe5. He is forced to

the simple response 14

15.a3

capture now on e5 with his knight

b6 and his

po sitio n is very solid.)

and his d6-pawn becomes a weak­

14

He

prevents the move d4-

ness. 13.l"lad1 �f6 14.l"ld4 l"le8

d5, after which White's queenside

initiative may become threaten­

ing. 15.c5 .id7 16.a4 h6 17.l"lb1 g5?

15.h3 g5 16.E!:fdU Cvitan - Pan­

durevic, Tucepi 1996. After 11 ...

E!:e8 12.dxe5 dxe5 13.e4! White

Chapter 2

is better.) 1l.ia3 Ele8 12.dxe5

dxe5 13.e4 �a5!�. Now, you can

see the second purpose behind

Black's 10th move: his queen will

be very well placed on a5. It repels

the enemy bishop from its active

position, leaves the open file and

also protects the e5-pawn. Later,

Black will play lLlf6, with good

counter chances.

 

10

.••dxe5

11.ia3

Ele8

12.e4,

Av.Bykhovsky - Sekulic, Yugosla­

via 1993,

12

••.c6

13.exiS

For 13.�c2 '\Wa5 - see 1O.�c2.

13

••• gxf5 14.�c2 e4

After 14

White

has the

powerful riposte 15.lLla4! '\Wa5 16.

Elad1

.te6

17

.

.tb2 and Black's

pawn-centre is about to crumble.

15.tLlf4 tLlde5 16.Elad1 �a5

17.ib2 tLlg5�

Chapter 2 is better.) 1l.ia3 Ele8 12.dxe5 dxe5 13.e4 �a5!�. Now, you can see the second

veloped his knight to e7 with

a

more so lid position.

D2b) 5.tLlf3

Chapter 2 is better.) 1l.ia3 Ele8 12.dxe5 dxe5 13.e4 �a5!�. Now, you can see the second

White's plan includes quick

and simple development of the

kingside and a pawn-offensive on

the queenside.

5 •.•ig7 6.i.e2

The exchange in the centre

cannot create any real problems

for Black: 6.dxe5 dxe5 7

.

.te2 tLle7

8.Elb1 O-O 9.h4 h6 1O.e4 tLlc5

(After White has weakened the

d4-square, Black's knight qui­

etly comes closer to this outpost.)

1l.

.te3 lLle6= Koppenhoefer -

Lammers, Budapest 2009.

In answer to the flank devel­

opment of White's queen-bishop

 

- 6.b3 lLle7 7

.tb2 o-o 8:�c2,

Black's position is a bit too ex­

Black can reduce the tension in

posed, but his active knights and

the centre with the line 8

exd4

the powerful e4-pawn enable his

9.lLlxd4 lLlc5 1O

.te2 a5 1l.Eld1 tLlc6

defence to hold ..

12.lLlxc6 bxc6 13.0-0 Elb8 14

.tf3

If this situation seems to be

too risky, then I will repeat that

on move 6, Black could have de-

�e8°o with a double-edged posi­

tion, Popovics - Postny, Budapest

2004.

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.e3 lLld7 4.lLlc3 g6

l.d4 d6 2.c4 e5 3.e3 lLld7 4.lLlc3 g6 6 ••• .!lJe7 In this set-up Black does

6 ••• .!lJe7

In this set-up Black does not

have enough targets to develop

his initiative on the kingside, so

he must build up a solid defensive

line aH over the entire board.

Here it looks rather dubious to

play 6

lLlh6, beca use of 7.e4! and

the knight is not comfortable on

h6.

7. 0-0 O-O 8.b3

8.b4 a5 9.bxa5 lLlf5 1O.�b2 ge8

11.ge1 gxa5 12.d5 lLlb6f! Marti­

novsky - Fedorowicz, Lone Pine

1977.

8. WIc2 lLlf5 9.d5 a5 1O.�d2

lLlc5f! Skvortsov - Ventskevich,

Nizhnij Tagil 2005.