Looking For the Elephant    A Philosophical way of Seeing and Looking  at, and for History    by  Russell D.

 Hartill                                Published by the  HSSTORY Foundation  Sandy, Utah  March, 2006 

Looking for the Elephant

  I    An elephant is a very tangible and real  creature, but a difficult one to capture and  transport. To bring an elephant into your  home or classroom would be a tremendous  if not impossible chore. Nevertheless, it  would be ridiculous to say that elephants  donʹt exist, just because a man lacks the  resources to successfully capture one and  bring it home. Elephants exist.    And so does history. It exists, and exists  outside of our perception because it is not a  product of manʹs thinking. History is the  reality of what happened and the reasons  behind it.    Before we go any further, Iʹd like to share  with you a poem by John Godfrey Saxe,  entitled ʺThe Blind Man and the Elephant.ʺ    It was six men of Indostan  To learning much inclined,  Who went to see the elephant  (Though all of them were blind),  That each by observation 
2

Looking for the Elephant

Might satisfy his mind.    The First approached the elephant,  And, happening to fall  Against his broad and sturdy side,  At once began to bawl:  ʺGod Bless me! but the elephant  Is nothing but a wall!ʺ    The Second, feeling of the tusk,  Cried: Ho! what have we here  So very round and smooth and sharp?  To me ʹtis very clear  This wonder of an elephant  Is very like a spear!ʺ    The Third approached the animal,  And, happening to take  The squirming trunk within his hands,  thus boldly up and spake:  ʺI see,ʺ quoth he, ʺthe elephant  Is very like a snake!ʺ    The Fourth reached out his eager hand,  And felt about the knee:  ʺWhat most this wondrous beast is like  Is very plain,ʺ qouth he;  ʺʹTis clear enough the elephant 
3

Looking for the Elephant

Is very like a tree.ʺ    The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear,  Said: ʺEʹen the blindest man  Can tell what this resembles most;  Deny the fact who can,  This marvel of an elephant  Is very like a fan.ʺ    The Sixth no sooner had begun  About the beast to grope,  Than, seizing on the swinging tail  That fell within his scope,  ʺI see,ʺ qouth he, ʺthe elephant  Is very like a rope!ʺ    Saxe teaches the historical profession some  wonderful lessons. History is not an opinion,  prejudice, or point of view. History is the  elephant. One note here: Seemingly  conflicting historical accounts may not be at  conflict with each other. History, existing  outside your perception, is not limited by it;  the way in which you see it is not exactly the  same way in which someone else will see it.    History, if successfully captured and  presented, will be able to accommodate 
4

Looking for the Elephant

individuality and bring all correct and  accurate points of view into proper  perspective and proportion, without  sacrificing truthfulness. History is an  absolute, it is the elephant and not anyoneʹs  and everyone’s perception of it unless that  perception is a correct one.    History does not require the denial of our  own perceptions, experience, or education,  but rather requires the use of them to the  fullest with acknowledgement of their  limitations.    Perfect perception is possible. If one believes  that the elephant will never be perceived  distortion‐free, and that perfection is  unreachable, why try to approximate it? Can  one claim to be closer to the unreachable  than another? Or closer to never getting  there? If no one is sure what an elephant  really looks like, any description would be  just as good as another. But history is an  elephant, not a wall or a fan or a snake.  Neither is it a combination of them all.  Elephants exist, and although it is not easy, it  is the historians job to search for it.   
5

Looking for the Elephant

Every once in awhile, someone ventures into  the jungle and, after a personal struggle and  great effort, finds his elephant. He has seen  it. But now his job is to capture it and  present it as accurately and successfully as  possible. Perhaps he writes a description of  it on paper, makes a sketch, takes a  photograph, films a movie, tapes a  videotape, makes a hologram. Or, perhaps  he captures one live and brings it home  (Taking it out of context?!?) All would be  valiant attempts at presenting the elephant  to others‐‐and all, without exception, would  fail miserably unless one key ingredient is  present‐‐the ability to take your reader there,  letting him see the elephant for himself in its  own environment. (in context) 

6

Looking for the Elephant

  II    History exists apart from our perception of  it, perhaps just slightly beyond and out of  our present day reach, but as our abilities of  perception increase so do our potentials to  close in on the elusive elephant. Even when  we have these potentials it does not mean  we will automatically stumble upon history.  We still lack a sense of direction.    In order to capture the elephant and present  it accurately to others we must be able to  take them there. To accomplish this we must  first get there ourselves. Letʹs take some time  now to examine the answers to two  questions‐‐Where does history live? and  How does one get there?    Reviewing what we know already, history  exists outside of our perception. Perception  is our ability to see something as it really is.  It involves the senses (sight, smell, touch,  taste, hearing) and our spiritual sense of  feeling. To go where the elephant is (that is,  to go outside our own perception) we must  enlarge, utilize, develop, discipline, and 
7

Looking for the Elephant

stretch our senses to the point where they no  longer limit us and we can see experience,  retain and describe the elephant as it is.    Although we know they live outside our  perception, it is hard to pinpoint exactly  where the elephants are out there. For  example, we have much evidence telling us  where theyʹve been. But usually where they  are and where theyʹve been and two  different stories. Historical records are  usually preserved miles from the  corresponding historical site. For instance,  drive to Rhyolite, NV and what will you find  there? Nothing much, as my wife says. But  Bay Area Microfilm, Knottʹs Berry Farm, and  several hundred treasure hunters all have  pieces of evidence of Rhyolite, part of the  elephant.    To head you on the right path, Iʹll begin by  mentioning what you have to go through in  order to get to the elephant.    You begin the journey as you enter a long  tunnel, the tunnel of importance. Spend  several years traveling in the tunnel, or  however long it takes. Be sure to take along 
8

Looking for the Elephant

oxygen, food, and water (but on second  thought maybe you shouldnʹt)    Donʹt ever give up, but you must thirst, and  hunger for the elephant if you ever hope to  find it.    As you emerge from this tunnel (and some  people wonʹt‐‐‐ever), you will find yourself  back where you started but some things will  appear different. You will feel different too,  as though a part of you is missing, or as  though youʹre looking for something that  you once had and desperately need, but lost.  This is good. Even if you never had an  elephant, search for it as though you did.  Your search will be much easier with these  feelings accompanying you. Also, never be  afraid of the elephant. This is basic. If you  have any fears as to what youʹll find, you  wonʹt find it. Courage, to present to the  world what you find, be it popular or  unpopular, is also required. Non‐ conformists are sometimes the worst  conformists. While attending Cal State  Sacramento, dressed in solid non‐denim  slacks and a sport shirt, I was approached by  a pretty young thing who started chewing 
9

Looking for the Elephant

me out for being “square,” as she said I  dressed like “all the rest;” and was a  conformist. Asking her what I needed to do  to please her, she answered, “Dress in levis  and a Tee shirt,” which happened to be the  official uniform worn by her and 80% of the  students on campus that semester!    How does one search for something you  once had? In two ways‐‐physically and  mentally. While looking, feeling, smelling  and listening for it, you are also trying to  remember where you lost it (if you knew  where, you could go right to it) So the search  is being carried out in two dimensions. This  is symbolic of the difference between  undiscovered evidence still on site, and the  evidence which has been misplaced and lost  in our libraries, or just plain never used and  forgotten.    By scrambling and searching frantically in  all directions and desperately trying to  remember where you misplaced your  elephant one begins to taste and perhaps  understand what is meant by going outside  oneʹs perception, by using, expanding and  exercising all of your senses. 
10

Looking for the Elephant

  This process must now begin, but  systematically, and not haphazardly.If  correctly followed you will be taken down  two paths at the same time. To the far  corners of the earth physically and to the  deepest recesses of your mind spiritually. 

11

Looking for the Elephant

  III    Enlarging your perception is accomplished  along three fronts. One “eye” must be  constantly on the lookout for every scrap of  evidence the elephant has left behind. Each  one of our sensors must be looking for,  scanning, and receiving evidence. Evidence  is not history, but it can lead us to it. There is  a danger of spending too much time with  evidence. Remember, youʹre ultimately  looking for the elephant, not the evidence.  Evidence is a means to the end.    Traditionally, evidence has been examined  by one single sensor (sight). Each piece of  evidence should be examined by the other  senses as well. (Smell a book, for example).  Evidence should be cross‐examined. Our  sensors have never been fully used. Now is  the time to do so. Creativity is a prerequisite.  Think. Involve all your senses in the search,  not just your eyes. Music, food, clothing will  suddenly become other pieces of evidence to  look for. In order to find the elephant you  must try to think like he does, and you canʹt  do that until you begin to put on his clothes, 
12

Looking for the Elephant

eat what he eats, and do what he does.   Experiencing evidence in order to arrive at  the history is one of the guiding principles of  Living history.     Once you think like he does you can begin to  find even more evidence by asking yourself  Where would I go? Flood your senses with  the evidences of the elephant. Since it exists  outside of your perception, any  comprehension of the complete elephant will  come only after using your senses to the  fullest. The only way to stretch and enlarge  your senses is by overloading them.    Another “eye” is tuned into and constantly  looking for ways to augment and perfect  oneʹs perception, description, and retention  abilities of both the elephant and his  evidence. As technological advances are  introduced and barriers broken down, much  evidence should be re‐examined, in hopes of  seeing more of the elephant and less of the  spears, fans, and trees.    There are pitfalls that we must avoid in  trying to describe something from our  perspective that exists outside of it. The 
13

Looking for the Elephant

door, for example, has hinges on one side  and a knob on the other, but whether they  are on the right or left side depends upon  oneʹs perspective. Knowledge therefore, that  will teach us how to correctly, accurately  and completely perceive what our senses are  receiving must always be sought. Our senses  will expand as we begin to correctly describe  and accurately retain the signals they send  us.    The third eye deals with the most abstract,  but by far the most creative aspect of the  perception widening process. It does not  look for evidence, knowledge, or  technological advances‐‐it supplies them.  The third eye is in charge of looking for, and  creating inspiration.    (Think of it as a sense, a feeling, an intuition.  Inspiration is creativity, ideas,  brainstorming, and flashes.)    In the darkness of the tunnel your two  natural eyes werenʹt enough, and you were  forced to begin to use this third eye. The  awakening of this eye is the reason why the  same things appeared a little differently 
14

Looking for the Elephant

upon emerging from the tunnel. It is very  necessary to develop this eye and you will  enter many a tunnel precisely for this  purpose. Perhaps not many tunnels, but the  same tunnel over and over again, until you  can see what was really there all the time in  front of you. Whether you ever emerge from  the tunnel will depend on how well you  develop this eye.    It is because of this eye that you begin to  search for something youʹve never seen  before. You have no idea how youʹll  recognize what youʹve never seen, but the  light that this eye receives is telling you to go  on. One cannot quite understand nor explain  it, but it is an essential and important to  follow and develop this eye. Quite often it  will quietly tell you to do something without  explaining why, or come to you late at night,  early in the morning, or in a dream. Learn to  use it. While you have two eyes to look,  smell, touch, and listen for the elephant, you  only have one eye helping you to remember  where you misplaced it.    One will better appreciate the importance of  this eye later, suffice it for now just to 
15

Looking for the Elephant

mention that while any improvement in one  eye will affect the other two, the slightest  development in the third eye will radically  improve the others, since the third eye has  historically been the least used and the  majority of the development and the key to  stepping outside your perception is to be  found here.    Each improvement in one eye will cause a  shift in focus (in your perception) requiring a  re‐evaluation (or re‐focusing) in the other  two. We must telescope our focus deeper  and deeper into the inner recesses of the  soul. It requires concentration, meditation,  prayer. Our mind is unruly, it has the  capacity to hurdle forward or backward in  time. It has the power to transcend the  normal barriers of space. Control it. Fast if  you must.    Meditation and prayer are religious terms  but even non‐religious people practice them.  Meditation is just pondering, wondering,  daydreaming, thinking about something,  mulling over it, while prayer is talking to  yourself or your maker about these ideas,  concepts and thoughts going through your 
16

Looking for the Elephant

mind. Fasting is also a religious term,  meaning going without food. Many people  get so caught up in doing something that  time flies and before you know it itʹs  nightfall and you havenʹt eaten. If you arenʹt  that excited about something you ought to  be. try fasting.    In this manner we go down the two paths,  picking up evidence, broadening our senses,  explaining our perception physically and  descending into our minds spiritually, using  two eyes to follow the first path and one to  follow the second. The surprising thing is,  the two paths will one day meet, and where  they do, there you will find the elephant. 

17

Looking for the Elephant

  IV    We have been searching for the elephant  with faith that it exists and faith that we will  recognize it once we reach it. We have been  treating our quest as if it were a search for  something we once had but lost, treating it  as though the elephant was a missing part of  ourselves. We have been searching  spiritually within ourselves for it as well as  physically outside ourselves. These two  paths we have been following benefit from  and develop from each otherʹs discoveries.  They are simply different facets of a  common quest.    There occurs an abrupt, curious change at a  certain point in the development of the third  eye. Brought on by the evidence being  received by the other two eyes, the  experience of the tunnel, and the feelings of  growth and development of the senses, your  third eye, for an instance, catches a glimpse  of the elephant. Gone now is the need for  faith in that it exists or in recognizing it once  we see it. Our job now is to continue  developing our perception until we can 
18

Looking for the Elephant

glimpse the elephant for longer and longer  periods of time and finally have it continual  in front of us.    Looking for the Elephant is not really a  search to a distant place but a new ability to  see what was always there in front of us but  above and beyond our perception. Looking  for the Elephant is the search for eyes with  which to see things as they are.    This occurs when one begins to realize and  perceive oneʹs relationship to history. We  have been searching for the elephant as  though it were a missing part of us because  it is. We are where and what we are today  because of history.  Think of your father,  your great‐grandfather and so on. We stand  on the summit of their collective shoulders  as we reach for the stars.    When a piece of evidence is identified as or  accurately felt to be part of the reason why  we are where and what we are today (in  order words, a part of history), it becomes a  part of us, an extension of ourselves. We  deepen our perception of where and what  we are from the inside while looking for it 
19

Looking for the Elephant

on the outside as well. There comes a time  when the piece of evidence falls into place,  something clicks, and we see the elephant.     This does not mean that anything felt to be  so is history. History will never be just  whatever one feels it to be. Many traditional  rules of evidence acceptance must be  followed. What is referred to here is the  psychic, cosmic or spiritual aesthetic  identification one can have with a valid,  accurately perceived piece of evidence.    To understand ourselves we study history  and to understand history we study  ourselves. Evidence isnʹt history until we can  perceive its relationship to us, until it comes  alive for us. When this occurs we will feel  almost as if we are re‐living the event or  experience (because you did live through it  before)    The search is a physical one on the outside  and a spiritual one on the inside, involving  feelings, sentiments, personal attachment.  Every piece of valid evidence is a piece of  ourselves, and related to us in a certain  unique way, different from anyone else. The 
20

Looking for the Elephant

inside search is for an understanding of this  relationship. When we discover a piece of  evidence and can perceive it as it is, a piece  of ourselves, we will not only be able to  catch a glimpse of the elephant from the  outside, we catch a glimpse of it as being  inside us (the feeling of reliving it, having  been through it before, identifying with it,  relating to it). The outside search will lead us  back to ourselves and help us to remember a  past we really were a part of, the past that  lies dormant inside us all. It helps to think of  ourselves as having always existed,  witnessing history, and only having just  recently received at birth a physical body.  This isnʹt as wild as it sounds. Because we  are on the summit of our ancestorʹs collective  shoulders, and because we are where and  what we are today because of history, we  have, through them, vicariously witnessed  history, and for those believers of an  afterlife, would it be any harder to believe  that you were somewhere before you were  born if you hold to the idea that youʹll go  somewhere after death?    History is as much inside ourselves as it is  outside ourselves. We just lack a perception 
21

Looking for the Elephant

of it. We are searching for something we  donʹt remember (but it appears to us as  though weʹve never known it), but when we  arrive weʹll know it because weʹve been  there before. Even if we forget what  something looks like, upon seeing it again  we recognize it. You will recognize the  elephant when you see it because youʹve  seen one before, and youʹve been there  before. It is a part of you. Some things we  just know. Little children, without being  told, know that little chicks donʹt grow up to  be German Shepard watchdogs. Even if we  forget what something looks like, to the  point of denying having ever seen it because  we cannot remember it, upon seeing it again  youʹll recognize it. I cannot prove to you that  you have been there before, but neither can  you prove you havenʹt been there before just  because you canʹt remember it. The human  mind forgets. Elephants never forget.    When the outside evidence can be perceived  as an extension of yourself, you glimpse the  elephant and re‐witness history. In time with  more and more evidence, you will see more  and more of the elephant for longer and  longer periods of time. However, the fact 
22

Looking for the Elephant

that you have seen it is no guarantee that  you will be able to share your discovery with  me. 

23

Looking for the Elephant

  V    We are where and what we are today  because of history. Implying of course, that a  relationship exists between our present state  and circumstance with what has occurred in  the past. Because your parents procreated,  you are. In large measure because of their  choices, you are rich or poor, fat or thin.  Multiply this by three, four, thirty  generations, and it becomes quite clear what  a tremendous role the past has had in  shaping your present state and  circumstances.    Many books, films, and college courses claim  to be history. Anything claiming to be  history is claiming to be able to take me  there, to reveal unto me a part of myself,  claiming to let me see the elephant for  myself in its natural environment. If I am  properly prepared and have developed my  senses, my perception to the required  degree, I can be shown a piece of evidence  and immediately see the elephant behind it  and inside it. I will be able to relate to it, to 

24

Looking for the Elephant

have it come alive for me, and to have it take  me there.    Seeing the elephant is no guarantee that I  will successfully capture it or be able to find  my way back again with others with whom I  wish to share my discovery. This is so  because seeing the elephant is in great part a  personal discovery. On the use of footnotes  in taking me there‐‐There is a great deal of  support for the idea that no one can help  lead me to the elephant, that it must be a  personal search. Perhaps the third eye  (desire) gets weak if people help. Quite often  the bibliography is more useful in getting me  there than the historical work itself, because  said work is loaded with a narrow  perception  or is dull, and is guilty of failing  to utilize all the senses. If the author still  believes that history can only be seen and  read instead of read, seen, touched, smelled,  tasted and felt. Whether or not it needs to be  a completely personal search is something I  am not going to commit to. However, the  footnotes and bibliography can serve as the  escape road your reader can take if you lose  him.  Each person has his own individual;  relationship to history. He will not be related 
25

Looking for the Elephant

to it in quite the same way as you are, but he  will be related to it. Because each person is  related to history in a slightly different way(  and has his own individually developed  sensory system) the path he takes to reach it  will be slightly different from yours. Even  so, you should both arrive at the same  elephant. The difference will lie in historyʹs  unique relationship with each person. Walk  up the root of your pedigree chart to the  elephant, then walk down to someone else  and bring them back too. This is what  Looking for the elephant is all about.   (Would looking for the elephant make a  good video game?)    In order to successfully take someone there,  you must make sure the person is  adequately prepared and developed enough  perceptually to be able to start the trip  (which is something that cannot be  completely taught, as it is personally  discovered). Perhaps you will have to teach  him how to enlarge and go outside his  perception, to develop his third eye, or help  him to search for the elephant from inside as  well as outside.   
26

Looking for the Elephant

You must write for your audience. Youʹve  got to know where theyʹre at. This requires  forethought, planning, time, concern. You  cannot neglect them. Each piece of evidence,  each step must be described and presented  accurately and never at a lower, less accurate  perception level than your audience. To sell  John Brown what John Brown buys, youʹve  got to see things through John Brownʹs eyes.  Ideally it should be described at the same  perception level, bit by bit, adding and  becoming more and more precise and  specific as the perception ability of your  audience increases and approaches your  own.    After seeing the elephant you are in a  position to describe it‐‐but you must try to  see it and describe it through the eyes of  your reader. Describe it as accurately as you  can in terms of their limited perception  (without sacrificing truthfulness). Invite and  encourage them to find their own  relationship to it, and teach them how to  increase their perception until you both  arrive at the elephant.    

27

Looking for the Elephant

  ABOUT THE AUTHOR    Russ served as the first Mission Historian for  the Chile Santiago North Mission. While in  Chile, Russ contracted typhoid fever and  was bedridden for a month. While  recuperating at the mission home he wrote  this.     Upon his return to America, he enrolled at  Cal State Fullerton, graduating with a BA in  History. Russ married Susan Teresa  Rodriguez in 1979 and has two sons,  Douglas Stewart Hartill and Brannan Russell  Hartill. He lives in Sandy, Utah and practices  law. He is a popular speaker and is  Executive Director of the HSSTORY  Foundation.    Russ wishes to thank Steven Spenser for  listening while bouncing off many of the  ideas contained in Looking for the Elephant  and for his continued friendship.  

28

Looking for the Elephant

ABOUT THE HSSTORY FOUNDATION    As a result of this treatise and Russ’ deep  appreciation and respect for history, he  announces the formation of the HSSTORY  foundation, a 501(c)(3) educational and  scientific organization dedicated to using  hardware and software to sell, teach or  research yesterday, (H.S.S.T.O.R.Y)    Supported in part by the generous  contributions of Hartill and Sons (we put the  “HS” in HSSTORY) as well as contributions  of time and talents from readers like you, the  HSSTORY Foundation is dedicated to  helping you find the elephant and to  creatively and dynamically interpret  Western America history. We welcome your  inquiries into such programs as Miners of  HSSTORY, Miners using HSSTORY, the  Pacific States Library and Academy of  Pacific States History, Bancroft’s West, the  LIVING WEST and Beyond Bancroft™     The HSSTORY Foundation  140 W 9000 S Suite 1  Sandy, UT 84070   
29

Looking for the Elephant

INDEX    aesthetic history, 2, 4, 6, 9, identification, 14 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, afterlife, 15 20, 21 audience, 18 HSSTORY, 1, 20, Bay Area Microfilm, 21 6 inspiration, 10 bibliography, 17 intuition, 10 Cal State knob, 10 Sacramento, 7 knowledge, 10 collective shoulders, let me see, 17 14, 15 meditation, 11 describe, 6, 10, 19 neglect, 18 desire, 17 oxygen, 7 discovery, 16, 17 path, 7, 12, 18 door, 10 paths, 8, 12, 13 elephant, 2, 3, 4, 6, people, 7, 11, 17 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, perception, 2, 4, 6, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 21 14, 15, 17, 18, 19 Elephant, 1, 2, 13, perfect, 10 20 perfection, 4 environment, 5, 17 personal, 4, 14, 17 evidence, 6, 8, 9, 10, planning, 18 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, prayer, 11 18 relationship to eye, 9, 10, 11, 13, history, 13, 18 17, 18 remember, 8, 11, 15 fan, 3, 4 Rhyolite, 6 feel, 7, 14 rope, 3 footnotes, 17 Saxe, 2, 4 hinges, 10
30

Looking for the Elephant

see, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 seeing, 10, 15, 17, 19 smell, 6, 11 snake, 3, 4 spear, 3 take me there, 17 taste, 6, 8  

third eye, 10, 11, 13, 17, 18 tree, 3 truthfulness, 4, 19 tunnel of importance, 7 utilize all the senses, 17 video game, 18 wall, 2, 4

31