You are on page 1of 2

 

 
 
 Capitalization Tables Lecture Transcript 
 
Hello Jobs University Students and welcome to your lecture on Cap Tables. As this is the 
last unit in practical finance, this lecture will give you a taste of what you will experience in 
entrepreneurial finance. In entrepreneurial finance we go much more in depth on the finances of 
a company and focus more on entrepreneurial skills. 
 
A capitalization table or cap table for short, shows at a glance ownership in a company 
including common shares, preferred shares and stock options. 
 
Cap tables are often just used for startups, but they are important to understand because 
equity is where a lot of wealth is generated. Having a stake in a company can turn into a large 
investment. 
 
We are going to look at a typical startup cap table pre­financing. 
 
A cap table consists of the shareholder and the amount of stock they have. Generally, 
what you will see in a cap table pre­financing are three categories. Those being founders, 
employees and option pool.  
 
Now lets say the company raises $2 million at a pre­money valuation of $4 million. The 
total post­money valuation of the company is $2 million plus $4 million which is $6 million. The 
company also has 1 additional category in the cap table, that being Series A Investors. Series A 
Investors are usually professional investors. Now the Founders have 2 million shares which is 
47.8% of the company, employees have 350,000 shares which is 8.4% of the company, there 
are 370,000 shares in the option pool which is 8.8% of the company and Series A investors have 
1,462,000 shares or 35% of the company.  
 
Here are charts of the cap table both pre and post series A investment. The amount of the 
company that the founders, employees and option pool own decrease as the Series A investors 
now have a stake in the company. 
 
Later on in the company’s life, the company decides to raise more money. The 
company’s value has increased so the pre­money valuation is $15.2 million. The company 
raises $7.5 million for a total valuation of $22.7 million. The founders, the employees and series 
A investors own less percentage wise of the company, but the same number of shares. The 
$7.5 million that was invested by the Series B Investors go towards 1,392,520 shares or 24.5% 
of the company.  
 

 better to have a slice of watermelon than  half a grape.    This is just scratching the surface of entrepreneurial finance. We will go into more detail  about cap tables in the next course.    It is important to remember that while the founder’s shares do get diluted every time the  company raises money.    If you do have founder’s shares. not percent.  The most important factor here is value ­ not percentage.   As seen by this chart of the different stakes in the company.  . you want to keep an eye on  what is happening in the cap table. but the number of shares you own should never change. the overall value of their shares is increasing as the company’s value  increases.      It is about value. or early employee stock or options. each party’s  shares are diluted so that each party now owns a smaller portion of the  company.  You want higher price per  share more than a big piece of a small company.  Or.    Thank you and we hope you found this lecture helpful.